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Case Study of Sara Rad's Master's of Design, 2012
 

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    Case Study of Sara Rad's Master's of Design, 2012 Case Study of Sara Rad's Master's of Design, 2012 Document Transcript

    • CASE STUDY: SARA RAD, MASTER OF DESIGN (DISTINCTION), AUT, 2012.Email sara.rad@me.com | moblie 021 655 013Disrupting Aged Care. The Analysis and Development of a Design Manifestoas Potent Change Agencies to Drive Social Innovation in Aged Care.BackgroundCurrent technocratic and business models have failed to satisfy a new generation of elderly people, their extend family and friends.Over the decades to come, there will be a significant increase in elderly populations due to the advancement of medical technology,high birth rates, increased life expectancy and the baby boomers shifting into retirement. This will exert a tremendous amount ofpressure on the economy and society. Residential care industries will need to meet the demands however at present they lack theadequate sociocultural models of care. There is a need for a new holistic model care to satisfy the socio cultural needs, wants anddesires of the 21st century’s ageing population.Research Question How can a manifesto be framed as a potent change agency for social innovation to transform societal beliefs of aged care?Project aimThe purpose of the design manifesto is to universally influenced the heuristic design phases through an iterativecommunicate shared responsibility and ownership across process to produce the proposed outcome.disciplines surrounding the issues of aged care as a potentchange agent to influencing social innovation using strategic Discussiondesign thinking and a compelling narrative that captivates theaudience. It will attempt to outline an innovative blue ocean This design project applied elements of strategic design thinkingapproach that suggests a way for policy makers to develop to produce a tangible outcome using an interdisciplinarypolicies that cater for the ageing population. approach. Due to the time frame of nine months and the scope of the project, primary and secondary research was conductedVision during the immersion stage. In-depth research using semi-The project aims to transform societal beliefs of the delivery of structure interviews with key informants and additionallyaged care using an innovative, humanistic model of care that family and friends of elderly people with experiences relating tocelebrates life and wellbeing. Additionally the vision empowers residential care in the aged care sector were carried out. Givenand cherishes elderly people so that they can have a longer time frame, and consent from AUT’s Ethics Board ameaningful lives. transdisciplinary approach would have been used to collaborate with elderly research participants. That would have allowed theTarget Audience practical use of human-centred design and an inclusive designFor revolutionary change to be successful there needs to thinking methodology to discover tangible insights from elderlybe collective buy-in, shared responsibility and ownership. to shape an innovative humanistic future for aged care. TheTherefore, the target audience is multidisciplinary ranging actionable insights would have influenced the content of thefrom healthcare, social services, city planners, localgovernments, designers, architects, interior designers, design manifesto providing a viewpoint from the user instead ofdevelopers, social entrepreneurs, elderly, families, caregivers, a top down approach.resident nurses, and retirement industry service providers. ConclusionMethodology and Methods It has been concluded through study and research that over theAn interdisciplinary approach was taken combining design last few decades there have been some positive and incrementaltheory and action research methodologies. Empirical and changes in the aged care sector. However to have real disruptiveheuristic qualitative methods were used which included innovation as a driver for change in the delivery of aged care,literature reviews, precedent analysis, site visits, expert it is essential to shift societal thinking, and depart from ageisminterviews, case studies and netnography. The areas reviewed and institutional technocratic models of care. Alternatively, towere residential care, ageing in place, and inequalities of humanrights in the aged care sector, inspirational leadership, and captivate stakeholders through a well-told narrative that affectshuman-centred design. I visited two Auckland based retirement the emotions and intellect, educates, gives ownership, andvillages. Additionally three expert interviews were conducted engenders social responsibility through commitment and socialwith key informants. The insights analysis and reflection media, a design manifesto can be an extremely powerful tool.
    • Design Manifesto InTroduCTIon To put the world in order, we must first put the nation in order; to put the nation in order, we DISRUPTING must put the family in order; to put the family Humanity has travelled through many gruelling surrounding the delivery of aged care. The multifaceted AGED in order, we must cultivate our personal life; challenges over the past few centuries, yet it is a part of human nature to never give up no matter how problems are complex and systemic, They originate from failed government policies, and include difficult the trials may seem. Currently, global sirens economics, retirement lifestyle providers, society, and to cultivate our personal life, we must are blasting, but no one seems to be listening to the environment, domestic relationships, elderly, human warning signals for the grey tsunami that swiftly ! rights inequality, district health boards, and healthcare first set our hearts right. approaches. This tsunami is representative of the and the delivery of medicine. CARE Confucius (BC 551-BC 479) Chinese philosopher. ageing population, which is rapidly increasing on a global scale. A report written by the New Zealand Human Rights Commission expressed that some elderly (as well as This quote suggests that in order to be a potent change expressed the opinion that to inspire action we have Over the next few decades, the elderly will outnumber their caregivers) living in residential care facilities feel agency we need to lead from the inside out, for these to initiate the communication of our beliefs from within. young people due to advancements in medical undervalued, discarded, discriminated against changes to take place. It is vital that we re-educate This inspires others with a vision they can identify with technologies, increased longevity and lower fertility (Caring counts, 2012). In other words, victims of ageism. societal thinking and beliefs for growth. Of course, and allows them to make it their own. The followers rates. Baby boomers will age with a higher complexity Change this will not be an easy road to take. There will be will spread the word and attract like-minded people. of medical illnesses (Pool, 2007). There are numerous Also, the retirement industry has an unfavourable FESTO DESIGN MANI chaos, confusion and crisis, followed by sadness As more people join the cause, systemic transformation issues at hand. Society must address these issues and reputation that is connected to historical events. A and acceptance. Simon Sinek, a leadership expert, will take place (Sinek, 2009). acknowledge the failure to manage existing pressures Originally, retirement villages in New Zealand for 5 6 Change! SARA RAD in soiled pants. Of course, you can imagine the loved ones have the right skillsets. outrage and pain this caused her and family, but also leT’s foCus These are only a selection of issues that affect our he must have felt devalued and despair. This level of elderly and their carers. I do not want to dwell on care inexcusable, however I imagine that this is due to problems. We know there are many, to which we can the limited time allocations in which caregivers must relate through our own experiences or indirect complete their daily tasks. It is unbelievable to think experiences/stories of rest homes and nursing homes. on that some residents may receive just one hour of care The main message that I want to express is that if we per day. continue to go about business as usual and keep our Recently, there has been some hype in the media with heads buried in the sand unprepared for the dramatic regard to the inequality of wages and pay parity increase of the ageing population, there will be a between caregivers from private and public sectors. strong backlash from the community, family and elderly. Caregivers who work for the DHBs earn higher wages than the caregivers that work for the service providers despite providing exactly the same services. I praise leT’s the people who want to work in this industry and help make a difference for our elderly. Surely they choose Talk this line of work because of their passion for caring? Why else would they choose it? As I alluded to earlier, the hours are long and tedious with limited support, and carers are expected to work unpaid shifts when abouT solutions. someone calls in sick. However, these positions need to be filled – because, if they aren’t, who will take care of our elderly? Someone needs to do it, if not him or her, then who? Should it be the unskilled workforce that society seems to automatically presume cares for our elderly? Perhaps that is the reason why it is the lowest paid profession in New Zealand? I have to believe that the people who take care of our cherished 9 10 LOVE EMPOWERING Life is a celebration, the fun doesn’t need to stop just because you’re Without it, we are nothing. Only love is required in fostering life experiences and growth. wiser than the rest. It makes the world go round; a universal language that needs no translation. YOUTH 33 34 AND ELDERLY Let the kids of today teach the elderly of tomorrow how to use technology.Design Project’s final submission - prototype. 35 36Exegesis 5. reseArCH AnD DesIGn – ACtIonAbLe InsIGHts 5.5. Inspiring Change language classes (targeted toward the occupancy in 6. ConCept to DeveLopMent 6.2. Research Question residential care or home care), nutrition workshops that How can a manifesto be framed as a potent change agency for social innovation to transform societal beliefs of aged care? According to Deepak Chopra, to be a successful visionary, educate staff on how to maximise nutrient consumption, 6.1. Design Project Brief 5.1. A Profile of the Baby Boomer fundraisers to build social cohesion. The third phase of the we need to lead from our soul and listen to our inner guide 6.3. Research design patient care management for diverse cultures, and the Generation campaign uses education such as public presentations (Chopra, 2010). I believe this to be true, however I also project aim developmental ofproficiency strategies for staff with The diagram below displays the design project’s process that uses an action research cycle. This project went through three The baby boom generation (born between 1946–1964), and co-design workshops with elderly to shape their future. think that to lead change, humanity requires a shift in The purpose of this design manifesto is to universally communicate shared responsibility and ownership across disciplines recognised programme accreditation. rounds of action and reflection before the project concept was finalised. Over the course of the design project a reflective have a young, active and vibrant self-image and do not consciousness. When I look back on my childhood, I surrounding the issues of aged care as a potent change agent to influencing social innovation using strategic design 5.4. Key Informant Insights 5.6.2. Community programmes for elderly journal was kept to capture ideas, reflections from interviews and mind mapping, which all influenced the outcome. foresee ‘retirement’ anytime soon. They are technologically remember my parents teaching me the golden rule, to care for thinking and a compelling narrative that captivates the audience. The use of language will be formatted for a ubiquitous others, as we would want to be cared for. That proverb is a Community programmes can educate participants on the perceptive and maintain their knowledge of innovative During the data collection, I thought it would be appropriate audience. It will communicate touchpoints that could enhance social-cultural, technological and business value, use socio- part of my mantra. We live in a human centred world where positive sides of ageing. Their main goal is to decrease technologies (Coleman, Hladikova, & Savelyeva, 2006). to approach experts from diverse backgrounds that would technical optimisation and harness social networking through web 2.0 technology. It will attempt to outline an innovative influence a humanist approach. I interviewed a spiritual humanity supports the larger ecosystem. Collective and the isolation of frail and sick elderly and to provide them blue ocean approach that suggests a way for policy makers to develop policies that cater for the ageing population. project concept Additionally, they like professional growth and self-improvement, individual decisions can have long-term consequences. In the with a supportive social network. Currently patients want to make a difference through community service and healer, a home care service provider, and an architect residing in long-term care facilities suffer from isolation as vision advocate for environmental awareness and change who specialised in residential care. Four key insights emerged first degree, this might not be apparent as it does require a research question there is limited interaction with the outside world. The project aims to transform societal beliefs of the delivery of aged care using an innovative, humanistic model of care that (Coleman et al., 2006). from the interview process: conscious effort to consider the long-term effects. At present However, through a transdisciplinary approach designers, celebrates life and wellbeing. Additionally the vision empowers and cherishes elderly people so that they can have meaningful lives. government, policy makers, DHBs, and the retirement industry reflection Literature review 1. Residential care business models are not human 5.2. The Neighbourhood, An centred, alternatively the foci is monetarily driven are trying to come up with solutions to band-aide issues in the city councils, and senior members of society could use background Innovative Model Of Care design to foster interaction with sociocultural relevant business models, which focus on capital gain for aged care sector. However, I believe that society needs to find Over the next few decades, there will be an increased elderly population due to the advancement of medical technology, Action (n=3) revised concept Data Collection developers and shareholders. solutions that will truly make a difference. To make selfless programmes. These programmes could have the ability to The Neighbourhood is a new model of care that advocates a high birth rates, increased life expectancy and the baby boomers shifting into retirement. This will exert a tremendous amount choices can be hard, which is why many people would increase social cohesion through engendering wisdom future where communities cherish and celebrate the elderly 2. It is acknowledge that western society is an of pressure on the economy and society (Pool, 2007). The residential care industry will try to meet the desires of the baby Analysis Key insights synthesis prefer the easy alternative. Perhaps designers are more in sharing relationships and meaningful experiences. with a fresh attitude that discourages ageism. Additionally, it individualistic society, however while technology boomer generation however this will not be achievable if society as a collective does not take responsibility and ownership of Initial concept advances people have become more self- touch with this inner guide because they use heuristic 5.6.3. support services for Communities supports ‘ageing in place’ through small group lifestyle in the current issues in the aged care sector. The issues are complex and multifaceted and originate from government policies, indulgent, society is starting to forget important methodologies during the ideation and design development. If In order to foster community based care the government proposed outcomes homes situated in mixed generational neighbourhoods. which ultimately effect the delivery of care. life values such as spending time with family, this is the case, then designers are in a strong position to be Figure 6. Research design process diagram The Neighbourhood facilitates access to services for the could introduce free social services to educate people and patience and compassion for others. change agents and trendsetters. Social infrastructures that target Audience elderly from lower socioeconomic groups, fosters meaningful provide accreditation for training. There are numerous 3. There is an issue of who will take care of the support a compassionate future (not only elderly but also the For revolutionary change to be successful there needs to be collective buy-in, shared responsibility and ownership. Therefore, relationships, provides care with dignity and respect, educates touchpoints that designer could use to innovate for ageing in new ageing population Care whole of humanity) are of vital importance. the target audience is multidisciplinary ranging from healthcare, social services, city planners, local governments, designers, precedent analysis place for instance, in each community’s locality, there could Disrupting Aged ent of a Design Manifesto society on how to care for elderly persons and transforms 4. The government has yet to develop a sustainable architects, interior designers, developers, social entrepreneurs, elderly, families, caregivers, resident nurses, and retirement misconceptions about the ageing process. The programme be a social service hub for elderly welfare. This hub would research question strategy to support the ageing population’s 5.6. Social and Cultural Lifestyles industry service providers. literature review will empower elderly persons to enhance their wellbeing and have partnerships with service providers that include future. 5.6.1 social cultural relevance Developm enjoy a healthier, more meaningful life. tradesmen, landscaping, financial advice, transport, personal project Deliverables The Analysis and Innovation ideation After reflecting on these themes, I decided to change my At present, the majority of residential care caters to Europeans assistants, grocery shopping, companionship, housekeeping Agents of Social The final submission of the design portfolio will be made up of 70% theory and 30% practice based design (manifesto). 5.3. Communicating the perspective and look at the bigger picture. Questions of how as Potent Change and other ethnicities have been expected to fit into a and volunteer programmes. Additionally services such as Manifesto to the Public we implement compassion into a clinical setting and how we doctor house calls mobile dental trucks and non-sectarian Challenges and unknowns euro-centric service model. People want to feel valued; concept development design thinking in Aged Care. educate society around caring (without communicating from spirituality spaces could be grown and developed. • The challenges are universal stakeholder acceptance, buy-in and the sharing of responsibility. The manifesto suggests a way for governance and policy consequently, social technical optimisation combining social the ego) emerged. Research shows that over the past 23 cultural relevance is one solution for individualism. • Harnessing new future technologies to convey a potent universal communication to establish public awareness. key insights makers to approach the ageing population with dignity. It is co-design workshop expert interviews years scholars and medical professionals have been calling Acknowledgement, respect and celebration of ethnicities necessary to have a communications strategy to support and • Economic, social and multicultural changes. for a humanistic revolution in the delivery of aged care, diverse religions, as well as language support and education develop public awareness on an alternative future for the however society has not changed or adopted humanism. design development synthesis ageing population. Communications could be delivered by are key to overcoming these barriers. Offering empathetic information in a three phased advertising campaign including solutions to patients and caregivers will undoubtedly enhance test iterate social networking using web 2.0 technology, print a greater position in the value chain of aged care in New prototype publications and outdoor mediums. The second phase would Zealand. Some solutions to be considered for caregivers to use PR in the areas of creative events, and community develop their sociocultural competence are foreign Figure 7. Design process diagram 12 13 10 11 7.2. Define Meaningful After I completed the secondary research I concluded that designing prestigious nursing homes for affluent seniors was not the solution. I discovered the issues in the aged care sector exceed far beyond the environment and originate from multiple disciplines. experiences Additionally I started to reflect on the fates of elderly from low socioeconomic cohorts and realised these people are beings of neglected and receive the lowest quality of care. Furthermore, internal questions emerged of how could I shape a positive future for my parents where they will be cherished and celebrated? What happens to the people who cannot afford retirement care? (AK1248) Master of Design Moreover, as a change agent how can I communicate the collective responsibility and ownership that is required to transform | Programme: ID: 1259573 Name: Sara Rad Paper: Design Project (119202 ) Yap | Date: 1 November 2012 DREAM aged care? These questions led me to explore manifestos as an outcome for the project. | Supervisor: Leong Assessment: Exegesis The actionable insights clarified there was a need to transform the delivery of aged care. Figure 12 displays the users’ needs and the target audiences of the manifesto, which included baby boomers and the multidisciplinary stakeholders. The project’s unique design vision is to create a future where elderly can celebrate life (figure 13). PHYSIO PSYCHO target Audience EXPERIENCE PLEASURE The primary target audience is the ageing population. The secondary target audience (stakeholders) includes community SOCIO User Needs and family members, policy-makers, retirement service and healthcare providers, social services, city planners, designers, IDEO Identity Independence Personal care Subsistence services Leisure resident nurses, and developers. Understanding Companionship Security Affordability Stakeholder Needs Affection Long-term care Legal servicesPages from the exegesis Figure 10. Application of design thinking for meaningful experiences Creation Social support Credibility Research based Commitment practice Activities of daily Health care Trust Respect Participation living Respect Elderly Designers Families Characteristics: Baby Boomers (1946 –1964)displaying the design Service Community Adventurous Energetic New opportunities providers Leisure Cultures Innovation Aged Care Vibrant Wants to make Technology a difference Young High expectations Hobbies Independence Self-improvement Green Excitementdevelopment of the Professional growth Policy-makers Travel Healthcare Social Government services Council Figure 12. Image defining the target audiencemanifesto. Examples ofdesign thinking, design (Figure 10) is an example of design thinking applied to experience design, four pleasures framework and futurist dream society to create meaningful Figure 16. Co-design workshop at AUT, baby boomer profile Figure 17. Design thinkingresearch and analysis. Figure 11. Initial concept experiences. Figure 13. Tagline developed in the branding paper to support the manifesto 20 21 16 17
    • CASE STUDY: SARA RAD, MASTER OF DESIGN (DISTINCTION), AUT, 2012.Email sara.rad@me.com | moblie 021 655 013Disrupting aged care.brand strategy for the neighbourhood.BackgroundCurrent technocratic and business models have failed to satisfy a new generation of elderly people, their extend family and friends.Over the decades to come, there will be a significant increase in elderly populations due to the advancement of medical technology,high birth rates, increased life expectancy and the baby boomers shifting into retirement. This will exert a tremendous amount ofpressure on the economy and society. Residential care industries will need to meet the demands however at present they lack theadequate sociocultural models of care. There is a need for a new holistic model care to satisfy the socio cultural needs, wants anddesires of the 21st century’s ageing population.Brand MessageThe Neighbourhood is a visionary programme that evolves and adapts to the needs of the community. The Neighbourhood is acollective that advocates a new holistic model for the delivery of care to an ageing population.It promotes a future where communities cherish and celebrate the elderly with a fresh attitude that departs from ageism.Additionally, it supports ‘ageing in place’: small group lifestyles in homes situated with in mixed generational neighbourhoodsthat remain immersed with in local communities.The Neighbourhood also facilitates access to services for the elderly from lower socioeconomic cohorts; fosters meaningfulrelationships; provides care with dignity and respect; re-educates society on how to care for elderly persons and changes theirmisconceptions about the ageing process. The programme will empower elderly persons to enhance their wellbeing and enjoya healthier more meaningful life.Brand StrategyVision Brand PositionTo bring about social change through the delivery of elder care so The brand position for The Neighbourhood is the retirementthat the elderly can maintain a substantive, and meaningful life. industry with a focus to support low income elderly.Mission Target Audience • To develop a path for the care of an aging population The primary target audience is the ageing population. The • To raise the standards of retirement options and secondary target audience (stakeholders) includes community expectations of care and family members, policy-makers, retirement service and • To support partnerships and collaborate with peer healthcare providers, social services, city planners, designers, organisations to lead change. resident nurses, and developers.Objective Brand ExperienceShare responsibilities and ownership across disciplines for a To be a part of a collective, leading social change for a futurenew model of aged care. Focus on a humanistic approach that where the elderly are celebrated. To support a new model inengenders a supportive environment for elderly persons of low the delivery of aged care.socioeconomic cohorts. • Love, support and respect •  ompanionship, making time available for elderly persons CCore Values to let them know they are cared forLove, creativity, community, family, education, stimulating, • Empowerment by encouraging autonomynurturing, empowerment, supportive, fun. • Enhancing wellbeingBrand Values • Making a difference by helping others.Holistic, empowering, “celebrate life”. Who is the Brand?Brand Essence You are the brand if you are committed to a brighter future forCelebrate life the elderly – celebrating their years during retirement.
    • brand strategy and Communication plan NeigBranduSrtrhaood Target Audience the hbo tegy The primary target audience is the ageing population. The secondary target audience (stakeholders) includes community User Needs and family members, policy-makers, retirement service and Identity Independence Personal care healthcare providers, social services, city planners, designers, services Leisure Subsistence resident nurses, and developers. Companionship Security Understanding Stakeholder Needs 12 Affordability 24 October 20 Affection Long-term care Legal services Credibility Research based Commitment Creation Social support practice Health care Trust Respect Participation Activities of daily living Respect Elderly Designers Families Characteristics: Baby Boomers (1946 –1964) Service providers Community Adventurous Energetic New opportunities Leisure Cultures Innovation Aged Care Vibrant Wants to make Technology a difference Young High expectations eta Karmokar Hobbies | Supervisor: Sange Independence Self-improvement ing (119205) 48) Paper: Brand Green Programme (AK12 Master of Design Excitement | Programme: ID: 1259573 Professional growth Name: Sara Rad Policy-makers Travel Healthcare Social Government services Council (Coleman, Hladikova, & Savelyeva, 2006; Pool, 2007) Brand Personality Brand Point of Difference Current users of the retirement industry are from the greatest As stated in the problem many areas need addressed. However Provides access to affordable care for the low income generation (born between 1914 -1924). However the baby the most essential is the need for change, thus allowing the elderly who want to celebrate life. boomer generations (born between1946 -1964) becoming brand personality to evolve into a blue ocean brand instead of the new customers. The characteristics of the baby boomer traditional, dull and dated brand personalities. generation are quite different from that of their parents. They A lively, dynamic and innovative personality is far more attractive are dissimilar to the elderly of today and do not wish to move to the boomer generation, but The Neighbourhood is more than a into rest homes or village lifestyles. They would prefer to ‘age community. It is a collective that adapts to meet the strongest needs in place,’ keep their independence and stay part of their local of the ageing population. Right now it is an advocate for change. communities. These characteristics provide businesses need to meet these future market trends. Therefore, The Neighbourhood has to be attractive to the needs of each generation. Through uniting these generations, there is an opportunity to innovate. Brand Symbol Brand Image The brand prism is a key element in the design process to create The logo has been incorporated into the symbol but can be used as a the brand symbol. It illustrates the brand message, using a warm, standalone. The font choice for the logo design was derived from the bright, fun colour pallet. The symbol illustrates a neighbourly core values. The look and feel needed to display a friendly, fluid, soft, community that embraces the brand essence of celebration. calming and modern presence. Neighbourhood thePages from the brand and strategy final submission, Communication Mechanismsdisplays the rational behind The Neighbourhood as The following communication mechanisms have been identified to promote/establish brand awareness and launch the manifesto to the public.a segment of my Masters. Mechanism/Deliverable Audience Phase 1- Advertising campaign shifting negative perceptions Frequency Purpose Press – newspaper and magazine General Public Local community papers quarterly • To create brand awareness Elderly focused magazines quarterly Outdoor – Billboards, eyelites, signage General public Make connections with media buyers to suggest frequency • To create brand awareness around New Zealand Online – Microsite General Public Design and update when new information becomes available • Provide information to general public about the manifesto Blog/newsletter weekly • Initiate community discussions around aged care • Positive facts around ageing • Education • Provide direction for public to get involved • Capture and measure traffic, building database Social Media - Facebook General Public Daily • Brand recognition • Competition to get traffic to website Social Media -Twitter Global Public Every other day • Advocating positive change, join the movement • Brand recognition • Get people talking about positive futures for elderly Phase 2 - PR campaign product launch of Disrupting aged care a design manifesto for change! Creative event – flash mob New Zealand public One event • To celebrate elderly • Raise public awareness • Gain interest • Drive traffic to microsite • Face to face emotional connection Community fundraisers Partnering with community Quarterly • Brand awareness of the neighbourhood organisations centred on elderly Local fairs • Promote manifesto • Advocating positive future for elderly • Building relationships • Encouraging people to sign up for co-design workshops Press release to local media General public Once Manifesto launch Phase 3- Education Co-design workshops Elderly from different economic Trial first workshop to see how popular it is and then decide • Gain insights from elderly to see how they want their future care shaped classes frequency at later date • Gather human centred research to influence later campaigns targeting government, healthcare, retirement sectors Presentations - TED General public and additional Any opportunity that arises • Provoke thinking for the future stakeholders • Advocate change and the cause • Attract followers to join the movement