Do you…
• Want to let people share and use your photographs, but not allow
companies to sell them?
• Want to find access t...
Use the Creative Commons!
“A nonprofit organization that enables the sharing and use of creativity and
knowledge through f...
History of CC
• Founded in 2001
• Supported by the Center for the Study of the Public Domain (Duke
University)
• First lic...
Who’s using CC?
Before licensing…
•Irrevocability
•Appropriateness of the material
•Nature and adequacy of rights
•Type of license
•Additi...
Considerations for licensees
• Understand the license
• Legal code – not just human-readable deed
• Permission granted for...
The Licenses
• Three “layers”
• LegalCode
• Human-Readable – “The Common Deed”
• Machine-Readable
• Six different licenses...
Attribution
(CC BY)
• Allows others to:
• Distribute
• Remix
• Tweak
• Build upon
• Benefit commercially even
• As long as...
Attribution-NoDerivs
(CC BY-ND)
• Allows others to:
• Commercial redistribute
• Non-commercial redistribute
• As long as…
...
Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike
(CC BY-NC-SA)
• Allows others to non-commercially:
• Remix
• Tweak
• Build upon
• As ...
Attribution-ShareAlike
(CC BY-SA)
• Allows others to:
• Remix
• Tweak
• Build upon
• Benefit commercially even
• As long a...
Attribution-NonCommerical
(CC BY-NC)
• Allows others to non-commercially:
• Remix
• Tweak
• Build upon
• As long as…
• Cre...
Attribution-NonCommerical-NoDerivs
(CC BY-NC-ND)
• Allows others to:
• Download
• Share
• As long as…
• Credit the creator
Some rights reserved
Marking a Presentation
IMSLP
Questions??
Created by: Sara Nodine
snodine@fsu.edu
Licensed by: Creative Commons
Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 4.0...
Creative Commons
Creative Commons
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Creative Commons

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Basic information on Creative Commons licenses.

Published in: Education, Technology
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  • A way to give the public permission to share and use your creative works – on conditions of your choice.Allows you to change your copyright terms from “all rights reserved” to “some rights reserved”Not an alternative to copyright – works alongside it and allows you to adjust according to your needs.Protects the people who use your work, so they don’t have to worry about copyright infringement, as long as they abide by the conditions you have specified.Universal access to information via the Internet is wonderful, but our legal and social systems restrict how we can use that information to continue developing ideasMakes a person’s creative, educational, and scientific content instantly more compatible with the full potential of the Internet
  • You can search the Commons and these sites to find materials you can share and use in various ways.
  • Irrevocability – once you apply a CC license it is in effect until the material is no longer protected by copyrightAppropriateness of the material – no hardware or software & make sure you clearly mark/indicate in a notice which of the parts are covered by the license (i.e. text, images, music, etc.)Nature and adequacy of rights – CC license only operative where copyright comes into play – if it involves others be sure to get permissionType of license – how you want the work used and if you have any obligations that would affect the license (requirements from a funding source, employment agreement, etc.)Additional provisions – be sure to check if there are additional provisions set by others involved in the creation of the work
  • Understand the licenseRead the legal code, not just the human-readable deed.Make sure the license grants permission for what you want to doTake note of the particular version of the licenseScope of the licensePay attention to exactly what is being licensedConsider clearing rights of a third party if you are concernedSome uses of licensed material do not require permission under the licenseKnow your obligationsProvide attributionDo not restrict others from exercising rights under the licenseDetermine what, if anything, you can do with adaptations you make Termination is automatic with failure to comply
  • Most accommodating licenseRecommended for maximum dissemination and use of licensed materials
  • Compared to “copyleft” (a similar “some rights reserved” idea)All new works based on yours will carry the same license, so any derivatives will also allow commercial use. This is the license used by Wikipedia, and is recommended for materials that would benefit from incorporating content from Wikipedia and similarly licensed projects.
  • Though the creator must be acknowledged, the derivative work does not have to be licensed under the same terms.
  • The most restrictive license.Cannot change the work in any way or use it commercially.
  • Creative Commons

    1. 1. Do you… • Want to let people share and use your photographs, but not allow companies to sell them? • Want to find access to course materials from the world’s top universities? • Want to encourage readers to re-publish your blog posts, as long as they give you credit? • Want to find songs that you can use and remix, royalty-free? Source: creativecommons.org
    2. 2. Use the Creative Commons! “A nonprofit organization that enables the sharing and use of creativity and knowledge through free legal tools.” Mission: “Creative Commons develops, supports, and stewards legal and technical infrastructure that maximizes digital creativity, sharing, and innovation.” Vision: “Our vision is nothing less than realizing the full potential of the Internet – universal access to research and education, full participation in culture – to drive a new era of development, growth, and productivity.” Source: creativecommons.org
    3. 3. History of CC • Founded in 2001 • Supported by the Center for the Study of the Public Domain (Duke University) • First licenses released in 2002 free to the public • Dedicated projects in education launched in 2007 • 2008: the new Nine Inch Nails album was released underCC • In its first 7 years – estimated 350 million CC licensed works • October 2013 – CCWorkshop with musicians in Melanesia
    4. 4. Who’s using CC?
    5. 5. Before licensing… •Irrevocability •Appropriateness of the material •Nature and adequacy of rights •Type of license •Additional provisions
    6. 6. Considerations for licensees • Understand the license • Legal code – not just human-readable deed • Permission granted for what you want to do • Version of the license • Scope of the license • What exactly is being licensed • Clear rights with any third parties • Know your obligations • Provide attribution • Do not restrict others from exercising rights • Determine what you can do with adaptations • Termination is automatic when you fail to comply
    7. 7. The Licenses • Three “layers” • LegalCode • Human-Readable – “The Common Deed” • Machine-Readable • Six different licenses • Attribution • Attribution-NoDerivs • Attribution-ShareAlike • Attribution-NonCommerical-ShareAlike • Attribution-NonCommercial • Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivs
    8. 8. Attribution (CC BY) • Allows others to: • Distribute • Remix • Tweak • Build upon • Benefit commercially even • As long as… • Credit the creator
    9. 9. Attribution-NoDerivs (CC BY-ND) • Allows others to: • Commercial redistribute • Non-commercial redistribute • As long as… • Unchanged • Complete • Credits the creator
    10. 10. Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike (CC BY-NC-SA) • Allows others to non-commercially: • Remix • Tweak • Build upon • As long as… • Credit the creator • License the new creation under identical terms
    11. 11. Attribution-ShareAlike (CC BY-SA) • Allows others to: • Remix • Tweak • Build upon • Benefit commercially even • As long as… • Credit the creator • License the new creation under identical terms
    12. 12. Attribution-NonCommerical (CC BY-NC) • Allows others to non-commercially: • Remix • Tweak • Build upon • As long as… • Credit the creator
    13. 13. Attribution-NonCommerical-NoDerivs (CC BY-NC-ND) • Allows others to: • Download • Share • As long as… • Credit the creator
    14. 14. Some rights reserved
    15. 15. Marking a Presentation
    16. 16. IMSLP
    17. 17. Questions?? Created by: Sara Nodine snodine@fsu.edu Licensed by: Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 4.0 International
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