Where The Action Is In Psychology

1,933 views
1,708 views

Published on

A presentation on "Where The Action Is" Foundations of Embodiment by Paul Dourish with some reflection and current media.

Published in: Education, Technology, Spiritual
0 Comments
0 Likes
Statistics
Notes
  • Be the first to comment

  • Be the first to like this

No Downloads
Views
Total views
1,933
On SlideShare
0
From Embeds
0
Number of Embeds
9
Actions
Shares
0
Downloads
38
Comments
0
Likes
0
Embeds 0
No embeds

No notes for slide

Where The Action Is In Psychology

  1. 1. Where The Action Is On Embodied Interaction & Psychology Jan Smeddinck (#1976868) jan83 # tzi.de Psychological Foundations of Embodiment, Marion Wittstock Uni Bremen, Germany (2009) http://synthese.files.wordpress.com/2009/04/intelligent-agent.jpg
  2. 2. The Book • Where The Action Is: The Foundations of Embodied Interaction – 2001, Cambridge, MIT Press • Paul Dourish: – Prof. of Informatics @ Univ. of California – Glasgow > Uni. Edinburgh > Cambridge (EuroPARC) > London (UCL, PhD) > Palo Alto (Xerox) > Cupertino (Apple) > Los Angeles (UCI) (http://www.dourish.com/) • Underline the big picture! 10/6/2009 Where The Action Is 2 http://www.flickr.com/photos/pdourish/3103575261/sizes/o/ http://mitpress.mit.edu/images/products/books/0262041960-f30.jpg
  3. 3. Presentation Content Background Framework Embodiment Towards Design Reflections 10/6/2009 Where The Action Is 3
  4. 4. Approaching Embodiment • TED Talk: – Michael Merzenich: Exploring the rewiring of the brain – Neuroscience (@ 11:02 – 14:07) – http://www.ted.com/index.ph p/talks/michael_merzenich_o n_the_elastic_brain.html 10/6/2009 Where The Action Is 4
  5. 5. Dourish‘s Foundations of Embodiment • Observations in: – Tangible computing • physical, distributed interaction • augmented reality (vs. VR) • computation in the physical world (ref. ubiq. comp.), non-sequencial – Social Computing • human interaction has social factors • observe real social behavior to create beneficial designs 10/6/2009 Where The Action Is 5
  6. 6. Tangible Computing • Dourish gives many examples from the 80s and 90s – Wellner’s Digital Desk – Jeremijenko’s Live Wire – Bishop’s Marble Answering Machine • Great concept, everybody loved it, but it never kicked off … why? 10/6/2009 Where The Action Is 6 http://www.ijdesign.org/ojs/public/journals/1/214/web/Figure2.jpg
  7. 7. HCI History • HCI and interaction paradigms electronic symbolic textual graphical • More symbolic … less physical • Flexibility vs. Affordance / Usability • Information appliances (later) 10/6/2009 Where The Action Is 7
  8. 8. Tangible Computing Today • TED Talk: – David Merrill: Siftables: The Toy Blocks That Think – http://www.ted.com/talks/david_merrill_demos_siftables _the_smart_blocks.html 10/6/2009 Where The Action Is 8 http://profissaoempreendedor.files.wordpress.com/2009/03/siftables.jpg
  9. 9. Social Computing social behavior ethnography computer systems • != James Surowiecki's “The Wisdom of Crowds” • Examples: Air Traffic Control, Printshop • Cultural, social, organizational context • Focus on setting & practices • Accountability 10/6/2009 Where The Action Is 9
  10. 10. Drawn Together • Focus on human skills & activities • Participation in the world (physical and social reality) • Spread in space & time (not system time) • -> Context (actions <-> settings) 10/6/2009 Where The Action Is 10
  11. 11. Embodiment • Theory of interaction • Presence & Practice – About engaged participation – Pre-ontological • Relation to Phenomenology (Philosophy) – Study of phenomena of experience & perception 10/6/2009 Where The Action Is 11
  12. 12. Biologically Inspired Robotics Auke Ijspeert, EPFL Lausanne, Switzerland • Extensive experiments with segmented, amphibian robots • Animal locomotion: – Movement is fundamental to animals – They coordinate motion towards and end-point trajectory – Rhythms for locomotion are due to central pattern generators – General Model: – CPGs (central pattern generators) can also produce fictive locomotion • In segmented amphibian robots, multiple oscillator networks (one per segment, all identical) generate complex motion patterns • Animals can run / walk / fly with most of their brains Cerebal Cerebellum Brain Stem Spinal Cord Cortex removed (via electrical •timing, •selection of •CPGs and spinal chord stimulation) •define motor coordination, motor program reflexes plan learning • CPGs can be activated / entrained by sensory signals 10/6/2009 IK 2009 Report 12
  13. 13. Phenomenology • Away from Cartesian dualism Maurice Merleau- Ludwig Edmund Husserl Martin Heidegger Alfred Schutz Ponty Wittgenstein •Founder of •Ending •The •The •Semiotician Phenomenology Cartesianism Phenomenology Phenomenology •„The meaning of •From abstract (separation of of the Social of Perception a word is how Galilean science inner mental life World •Body + phisical we use it.“ to things that and outside •Life-world & & social skills •There is no matter world) intersubjectivity •Embodiment truth •Questions of •Dasein (being- •language games experience, in-the-world) memory, mind, •No theory prior cognition to praxis 10/6/2009 Where The Action Is 13
  14. 14. Embodiment & Meaning • Because interaction is about conveying meaning… • Three aspects of meaning: – Ontology (entities, concepts, objects) – Intersubjectivity (how to share meaning) – Intentionality (directedness -> semiotics) 10/6/2009 Where The Action Is 14 http://www.sciencedaily.com/images/2007/11/071106123725-large.jpg
  15. 15. Embodied Interaction in Practice • Media Space – Awareness & hybrid spaces • Document Management – The HOW of structures is important • Today we have much more: – Social networks – Agile management – Embodied agents – Touch / Multitouch 10/6/2009 Where The Action Is 15 http://www.billbuxton.com/BG_FGfig2.gif
  16. 16. Design Principles 1. Computation is a medium (communication) 2. Meaning arises on multiple levels (objects, signs, metaphors) 3. Users, not designers, create and communicate meaning – Now: User generated context (UGX) 10/6/2009 Where The Action Is 16
  17. 17. Design Principles 4. Users, not designers, manage coupling – relating entities for the purpose of action 5. Embodied technologies participate in the world they represent – artifacts-in-use vs. separation of object and representation 6. Embodied interaction turns action into meaning – no meaning in the system itself, but in the way it is used 10/6/2009 Where The Action Is 17
  18. 18. Conclusions & Directions After Dourish • Information appliances vs. convergence – No conflict, really… • Invisible interfaces – Not a good idea in terms of embodiment – Maybe just a bad term… • System design – psychology – HCI – CSCW – social sciences • Persistence of symbolic interaction… 10/6/2009 Where The Action Is 18
  19. 19. Reflections • Missing reference to emotions and emphasis on learning… • Won’t embodiment limit the power of software? – Well, we can increase the bandwidth of embodied interfaces… (6th sense) • Embodiment is popular and many more pieces are added to the big puzzle… • Huge impact on modern Psychology (Biopsychology) – Richard David Precht 10/6/2009 Where The Action Is 19 http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/thumb/9/9b/Mad_scientist_transparent_background.svg/641px-Mad_scientist_transparent_background.svg.png
  20. 20. Pushing the Boundaries of Embodiment • TED Talk: – Pattie Maes: Sixth Sense (@ 02:10 - …) – http://www.ted.com/index.php/talks/pattie_maes_demos _the_sixth_sense.html 10/6/2009 Where The Action Is 20 http://www.geek.com/wp-content/uploads/2009/02/wuw.jpg
  21. 21. That’s it! ? 10/6/2009 Where The Action Is 21
  22. 22. Sources & References • Paul Dourish @ ICS • http://www.ics.uci.edu/~jpd/embodie d/ • Please also refer to the links on the slides… 10/6/2009 Where The Action Is 22

×