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2012 - IR - CSR

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IR Thematic Seminar on Corporate Social Responsibility 2012

IR Thematic Seminar on Corporate Social Responsibility 2012


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  • 1. IR Thematic Seminaron Corporate Social Responsibility December 17, 2012
  • 2. Forward Looking Statement This presentation contains forward-looking statements as defined in the Private Securities Litigation Reform Act of 1995, as amended. Forward-looking statements are statements that are not historical facts. These statements include projections and estimates and their underlying assumptions, statements regarding plans, objectives, intentions and expectations with respect to future financial results, events, operations, services, product development and potential, and statements regarding future performance. Forward-looking statements are generally identified by the words "expects", "anticipates", "believes", "intends", "estimates", "plans" and similar expressions. Although Sanofis management believes that the expectations reflected in such forward-looking statements are reasonable, investors are cautioned that forward-looking information and statements are subject to various risks and uncertainties, many of which are difficult to predict and generally beyond the control of Sanofi, that could cause actual results and developments to differ materially from those expressed in, or implied or projected by, the forward-looking information and statements. These risks and uncertainties include among other things, the uncertainties inherent in research and development, future clinical data and analysis, including post marketing, decisions by regulatory authorities, such as the FDA or the EMA, regarding whether and when to approve any drug, device or biological application that may be filed for any such product candidates as well as their decisions regarding labeling and other matters that could affect the availability or commercial potential of such product candidates, the absence of guarantee that the product candidates if approved will be commercially successful, the future approval and commercial success of therapeutic alternatives, the Groups ability to benefit from external growth opportunities, trends in exchange rates and prevailing interest rates, the impact of cost containment policies and subsequent changes thereto, the average number of shares outstanding as well as those discussed or identified in the public filings with the SEC and the AMF made by Sanofi, including those listed under "Risk Factors" and "Cautionary Statement Regarding Forward-Looking Statements" in Sanofis annual report on Form 20-F for the year ended December 31, 2011. Other than as required by applicable law, Sanofi does not undertake any obligation to update or revise any forward-looking information or statements. 2
  • 3. Sanofi: a Global and Diversified Healthcare LeaderFocused on Patients’ NeedsMultiple Large BalancedGrowth Platforms Global Workforce Geographic Presence65% of net sales in 2011 2011 sales split by region OtherEmerging Markets Countries(2)Vaccines 12.5% U.S. ~110,000 29.8%Diabetes Solutions employees(3) €33.4bnConsumer Health Care 30.3% Net Sales in 100 in 2011 countriesAnimal Health Emerging 27.3%New Genzyme Markets(1) Western EuropeInnovative Products Important social, economic and environmental impacts (1) World less North America (USA, Canada), Western Europe (France, Germany, UK, Italy, Spain, Greece, Cyprus, Malta, Belgium, Luxembourg, Portugal, Holland, Austria, Switzerland, Sweden, Ireland, Finland, Norway, Iceland, Denmark), Japan, Australia and New Zealand (2) Japan, Canada, Australia and New Zealand (3) 2011 data 3
  • 4. CSR at SanofiGilles LhernouldSenior Vice President, Corporate Social Responsibility 4
  • 5. CSR, a driver of innovationto serve the patient and a source of inspiration for Sanofi Christopher A. Viehbacher Chief Executive Officer, Sanofi 5
  • 6. Agenda CSR at Sanofi Gilles Lhernould, Senior Vice President, Corporate Social Responsibility Access to Healthcare Robert Sebbag, Vice President, Access to Medicines Ethics in R&D Claire Castaings, R&D Corporate Social ResponsibilityBREAK Anti-Counterfeiting Interactive Expo Caroline Atlani, Corporate Anti-Counterfeit Coordination Workforce Development Laurence Labbé-Schmitt, Head Group Learning & Leadership Development Environmental Challenges Thomas Sénac, Corporate Health Safety Environment 6
  • 7. CSR: a Key Asset to Sanofi’s StrategyLicense to operateImage, reputation & transparencyGovernance SustainableRisk control growthComplianceHuman capital 7
  • 8. An Organization to Drive the CSR Approachacross all Sanofi EntitiesCSR MANAGEMENT  Reports to the CEO  Networks across all activities and all geographic areas  Coordinates risk control via its Risk CommitteeMissions ● Define CSR strategy at Group level, monitor its implementation across all entities ● Pilot all Group entities in addressing major CSR topics ● Support cross-functional projects ● Ensure optimal reporting to internal and external stakeholders 8
  • 9. Our CSR Strategy Includes Priorities Selected as a Result of Robust AnalysisMateriality testEXTERNAL CONCERNS 12 priorities Material among  to Sanofi 50 issues Materiality to Group’s stakeholders and Society INTERNAL CONCERNS Materiality of potential impact on the Group strategy 9
  • 10. Our Global CSR Strategy:4 Pillars — 12 Priorities • Access to Healthcare PATIENT • Patient Safety • Innovation for the Patient • Ethics in R&D ETHICS • Business Ethics • Human Rights • Health & Safety PEOPLE • Diversity • Workforce Development • Water PLANET • Pharmaceuticals in the Environment • Energy & Carbon Footprint 10
  • 11. Focus of the Presentation:Four Global CSR Priorities • Access to Healthcare PATIENT • Patient Safety • Innovation for the Patient • Ethics in R&D ETHICS • Business Ethics • Human Rights • Health & Safety PEOPLE • Diversity • Workforce Development • Water PLANET • Pharmaceuticals in the Environment • Energy & Carbon Footprint 11
  • 12. Access to HealthcareRobert SebbagVice President, Access to Medicines 12
  • 13. Sanofi: Anticipating Patient’s Needsacross the Globe Most affluent patients Middle income patients Base of the pyramid An integrated and comprehensive approach to address patient needs and pursue growth opportunities 13
  • 14. Sanofi’s Diversification Helps to Respond to the Needs of the Greatest Number of PatientsSanofiAntibiotics, Diabetes, Cardiovasculardrugs, Oncology, Antifungals…Sanofi PasteurVaccinesGenzymeRare diseasesSanofi Access to MedicinesNeglected Tropical Diseases(1), Malaria,Mental disorders, Epilepsy, TuberculosisSanofi Espoir FondationDevelopment aid projectsHumanitarian emergencies (1) Sleeping sickness, Leishmaniasis, Chagas disease, Buruli ulcer, Lymphatic filariasis 14
  • 15. Improving Access to Healthcareis a Complex Challenge 1/3 of the global population does not have access to essential medicines and vaccines  Drugs alone are not enoughDevelopment Availability Distribution Affordability UsageDo effective Are Are Do patients Is there medicines medicines medicines have access adequate exist? available getting to to medicines? access in a country? pharmacies to Information, & clinics? Education, Communication? Adjusting the business model Partnering with relevant stakeholders 15
  • 16. Improving Access to Healthcareis a Shared Responsibility Suppliers Endemic countries’ Ministries of Health Foundations Patients Regulatory authorities and agencies WHO/PAHO 16
  • 17. Sanofi’s Approaches Are Multi-faceted:Some ExamplesSanofi Global OperationsSanofi PasteurGenzymeSanofi Access to MedicinesSanofi Espoir Fondation 17
  • 18. Contributing to Better Access to Healthcare Creates Value for SanofiControls R&D cost, Ensures penetration Improves our licenserisk & complexity of new markets to operate• Tailored product • Local manufacturing • Training of healthcare offering to meet local and supply chain professionals to foster market conditions to the highest quality delivery of products standards and services• R&D that fulfills unmet medical needs • Locally adapted • Advocacy towards sales and distribution health authorities• Partnership in R&D for better disease to foster innovation management internally 18
  • 19. SanofiAccess to MedicinesCase Study: Malaria 19
  • 20. Malaria: a Global Public Health Challenge ● 50% of the world’s population is exposed ● More than 650,000 deaths worldwide. In 2010, 91% of victims were in Africa(1) ● 86% of victims are children under 5 years(1)MALARIA: COUNTRIES AND REGIONS WITH RISK OF INFECTIONSource: World Health Organization (WHO), 2011(1) Countries and regions Countries and regions ● A child dies every minute(2) where infection occurs with limited risk of infection (1) WHO, WHO Global Malaria Program, World Malaria report 2011 (2) WHO, Malaria media center, fact sheet no94, December 2011 20
  • 21. Our Fight Against Malaria TIERED PRICES INFORMATION AND to ensure medicine EDUCATION PROGRAMS is affordable designed for all actors in the health chain R&D PROJECTS INDUSTRIAL CAPABILITIES to meet future needs for low-cost and high-quality medicines 21
  • 22. Tiered Prices to Ensure Affordability PRIVATE MARKETS Coarsucam® ● $2-3 wholesale price ● 1 blister pack / box PUBLIC MARKETS Artesunate-Amodiaquine Winthrop® ● Preferential price until the “no loss-no profit” price is reached: approx $1 for adults, <$0.50 for children ● 25 blister packs / box en attente visuelsTreatments to fight over 200 million malaria attacks distributed since October 2008 22
  • 23. Education Programs to Improve AwarenessSCHOOL CHILDREN AGAINST MALARIATeaching 200,000 children about Malaria(2008-2010)(1)In 2012● 4th session in Ivory Coast and Burkina Faso● 1st sessions in Madagascar, Burundi, the Democratic Republic of Congo (DRC), Nigeria, Malawi and CongoTRAINING THE TRAINERS● 34 trainers trained(1)● 5,000 community health workers(1) trained (in the DRC in 2010) (1) Internal data 23
  • 24. Industrial Know-How to Ensure Program SustainabilityMAPHAR PLANT, a Sanofi Company(Casablanca, Morocco) for the productionof ASAQ Winthrop● GMP certified● Prequalified by the WHO● Over 100 million treatments/year production capacity, i.e. 30% of the plant’s activity Maphar is part of a network of 46 manufacturing sites in Emerging Markets GMP – Good Manufacturing Practices 24
  • 25. Ethics in R&DClaire CastaingsR&D Corporate Social Responsibility 25
  • 26. Sanofi R&D: Committed to Accelerate Innovationat the Service of Patients€4.8bn invested 17 assets in late-stagein R&D in 2011 development(1) Short-term Opportunities(2) ® ®Multiple partnershipswith external groups ®to accelerate innovation TM QIV IM (1) As updated in October 2012 (2) See regulatory status in relevant press releases Zaltrap® is developed in collaboration with Regeneron, Kynamro™ with Isis Pharmaceuticals and Lyxumia® is in-licensed from Zealand Pharma Genzyme is developing Lemtrada™ in MS in collaboration with Bayer HealthCare 26
  • 27. The New Challenges for R&D in Pharma New New New therapeutic target populations public health targets challenges Ethical challenges Creation of a Bioethics Committee 27
  • 28. Committed to Ethics in Sanofi R&D Risks Nanotechnology Stem cells Innovation Genetic material in R&D Internal Externalcommunication Ethics in Patient communication Sanofi clinical trials Benefit Risk Patient community Sanofi Pasteur Health authorities Genzyme Rating agencies Merial Animal Biodiversity Investors Fovea Welfare Partnerships NGO Outsourcing Opportunities 28
  • 29. Promoting Best Practices for Clinical Studies An ethical approach to clinical studies in Emerging/Developing MarketsObjectives Company-wide InitiativesProvide solid and reliable ● Address cultural differencesdata focusing on the right safety and vulnerable patients:and welfare of clinical trial participants ● Patient informed consent ● Country standard of care ● Study protocol ethical reviewApply the most stringent ethical and post study commitmentsand quality standards everywhere ● Develop innovative internal standards ● Conduct audits in Emerging/Rebuild trust and confidence Developing countriesin the pharmaceutical industry ● Protect and preserve Sanofi’s reputation 29
  • 30. Committed to Ethics in Sanofi R&D Risks Nanotechnology Stem cells Innovation Genetic material in R&D Internal Externalcommunication Ethics in Patient communication Sanofi clinical trials Benefit Risk Patient community Sanofi Pasteur Health authorities Genzyme Rating agencies Merial Animal Biodiversity Investors Fovea Welfare Partnerships NGO Outsourcing Opportunities 30
  • 31. Define Principles in Stem Cells Research A clear strategy approved by the Sanofi Bioethics CommitteeObjectives Company-wide InitiativesAccomplish progress in medical ● Focus research on the understandingand biological sciences that will benefit of biological models onlyhuman health or patients’ quality of life ● Allows understanding of cells self-renewal ● Offers great potential in pharmaceutical testingProtect dignity and privacy of donors platforms and hope for future therapeutic approaches ● Ensure traceability of samplesComply with international and comply with applicable data protection guidance& local principles and regulations 31
  • 32. Committed to Ethics in Sanofi R&D Risks Nanotechnology Stem cells Innovation Genetic material in R&D Internal Externalcommunication Ethics in Patient communication Sanofi clinical trials Benefit Risk Patient community Sanofi Pasteur Health authorities Genzyme Rating agencies Merial Animal Biodiversity Investors Fovea Welfare Partnerships NGO Outsourcing Opportunities 32
  • 33. Promoting Best Practicesfor the Use of Laboratory Animals Sanofi maintains a global “Culture of Care” for all animalsObjectives Company-wide InitiativesLimit the number of animals ● Chief Veterinary Officer appointedand when possible develop ● Sanofi standards in placesubstitute methods ● Charter on the Human Care and Use of Animals ● Internal ethics committeesOptimize animal welfare and health ● 3R principles implementedduring all phase of testing (KPI on progresses made) ● Progress on AAALAC accreditation planned in 2013Comply with animal welfarelaws and regulations 3R – Replacement, Reduction and Refinement AAALAC – Association for Assessment and Accreditation of Laboratory Animal Care KPI – Key Performance Indicator 33
  • 34. Sanofi Has Created a Committee Dedicated Exclusively to Addressing Ethical Issues Sanofi Bioethics Committee addressing R&D ethics issues and supporting transparency for stakeholders Risks Nanotechnology Stem cells Innovation Genetic material in R&D Internal Bioethics Externalcommunication Ethics in committee Patient communication Sanofi clinical trials Benefit Risk Patient community Sanofi Pasteur Health authorities Genzyme Rating agencies Merial Animal Biodiversity Investors Fovea Welfare Partnerships NGO Outsourcing Opportunities 34
  • 35. The Sanofi Bioethics Committee Establishes Rulesof Conduct and New Approaches to BiomedicineChairman ProposeChief Medical Officer internal standardsSecretary Foster awarenessR&D CSR Correspondent of ethical issues15 Members(1) Follow progresses of scienceRepresentatives of R&D operations and regulationsand support functionsExternal experts (1) Permanent members as of November 2012 35
  • 36. Sanofi Workforce DevelopmentLaurence Labbé-SchmittHead Group Learning & Leadership Development 36
  • 37. By 2015, our Growth Platforms Are Expectedto Represent Over 80% of Sales Emerging Markets Consumer Health Care Vaccines Animal Health Diabetes Solutions Innovative Products New Genzyme 37
  • 38. Five Strategic Priorities in Human Resources to Reach our Goal 1 2 3 4 5 Build Build Maximize Strengthen EmbedNext Generation Critical Organization Performance Sanofi Culture of Leaders Capabilities Efficiency Driven throughout Organization the Company Build HR Capabilities (Operating model, systems, processes) 38
  • 39. Three Workforce Development Priorities1. Diversity 1. Diversity Reflect the Sanofi of today and of tomorrow Reflect the Sanofi of today and of tomorrow2. Adaptation 2. Adaptation The right competencies at the right place The right competencies at the right place3. Sustainability 3. Sustainability Invest in mid and long term programs in the long run Develop our people and retain talent 39
  • 40. Workforce Development Priorities1. Diversity 1. Diversity Reflect the Sanofi of today and of tomorrow Reflect the Sanofi of today and of tomorrow2. Adaptation 2. Adaptation The right competencies at the right place The right competencies at the right place3. Sustainability 3. Sustainability Invest in mid and long term programs in the long run Develop our people and retain talents 40
  • 41. Workforce Global Footprint: Major Evolutions(1) 16% Total Headcount 2011 2008 VS 113,860 98,213 9% Europe 14% 6%North America 58,275 Japan 53,515 19,956 3,121 3,311 17,429 55% Middle East / Central 708 1,102 39% Asia Pacific 12,659 17,621 43% Latin America Africa 6,958 9,959 3,823 3,636 5% (1) Source: International Social Reports 2008 & 2011 41
  • 42. Gender Balance: Ongoing Progress 11% Top Management 18% Senior Leadership INITIATIVES TO IMPROVE 39% Key Positions GENDER BALANCE ON THE WAY 37% People Managers 46% Workforce Source: Executives Report September 2012 and International Social Report SR 2011 42
  • 43. Gender Balance: More Initiatives1 2 3 4 Identification Development Promotion Increase of female talent of next generation of Work Life awareness of women leaders Balance SHARING Women talent  Mentorship  Launch  KPI in Group pools: Top 50 list programs of Flex-work dashboard Actively seek  Speed networking in North America  Expansion of regional female candidates  Pilot Leadership  Telework in France and international for open positions Program networks short-list for Women  Gender Balance events (Women’s Forum, GLT, conferences) KPI – Key Performance Indicators GLT – Global Leadership Team 43
  • 44. Workforce Development Priorities1. Diversity 1. Diversity Reflect the Sanofi of today and of tomorrow Reflect the Sanofi of today and of tomorrow2. Adaptation 2. Adaptation The right competencies at the right place The right competencies at the right place3. Sustainability 3. Sustainability Invest in mid and long term programs in the long run Develop our people and retain talents 44
  • 45. Development: Training Is Not the Only Solution! Individual training External coaching Collective training Developing Internal competencies On the job coaching implementation and behaviors Co-development Job rotation Mentoring 45
  • 46. Reinforcing Technical Competencies for Today and Tomorrow TRANSVERSAL 1 PROGRAM Business Partnering HSE LEGAL 4 PROGRAMS 4 PROGRAMS PROCUREMENT COMMUNICATIONS 3 PROGRAMS 4 PROGRAMS2012: North America and France FINANCE2013: Latin America 3 PROGRAMS HSE – Health, Safety and Environment 46
  • 47. Offering Visibility and Clarity on Development: Corporate Programs Leadership Individual Business Technical & Management Development Acumen Skills LEADERSHIP IMPACTFULExecutives Program (soon) COMMUNICATING DISCOVERSeniors BUSINESS Partnering INNOVATE DISCOVER Sanofi AcademiesLeaders MENTORINGManager EXPLORE BUSINESS Partnering Sanofi Academiesof Managers PILOT COACHING ONE HRFirst Line EVOLVE EXPLORE Sanofi AcademiesManagers Rotation programsIndividual EVOLVE Sanofi AcademiesContributors Rotation programs 47
  • 48. Offering Self Development Opportunities (USA) Sanofi offers online coursesOnline / Self-Directed courses via the Learning GatewayStepping up to Managementand Harvard Manage Mentor 48
  • 49. Workforce Development Priorities1. Diversity 1. Diversity Reflect the Sanofi of today and of tomorrow Reflect the Sanofi of today and of tomorrow2. Adaptation 2. Adaptation The right competencies at the right place The right competencies at the right place3. Sustainability 3. Sustainability Invest in mid and long term programs in the long run Develop our people and retain talent 49
  • 50. Ensuring Sustainable People DevelopmentPerformance Review and Individual Development Plan A thorough process enabling employees to have a discussion with their manager on performance, areas of strengths and development as well as next step opportunities Workforce Planning Initiatives Anticipate evolution Talent Development Processes in skills required, enhance cross countries and cross activities mobility, allow each Talent reviews enable HR and Managers individual to take active part to identify critical skills and positions, to his/her own “R&D” gaps in succession planning and to optimize career development for our best people 50
  • 51. Focus on International Rotation Programs SWAP Dedicated programs according Short-term to population profileWork Assignment Program SWAP: Junior employees, identified as early potential SEED: High potentials, with a majority of candidates coming from Emerging Markets A minimum of 6 to 18 months international SEED assignments, swapping from Mature Sanofi Early to Emerging Markets Executive Development Program 51
  • 52. Focus on “Actor of your Employability” Workforce Planning Initiative in EuropeVisibility ● Describe job evolutions by 2015 at Region LevelAnticipation ● Identify trends that impact jobs & skills (quantitative and qualitative impact) in relation to market environment & Sanofi strategyTransparency ● Develop staff employability ● Develop attractiveness towards external talent 52
  • 53. Environmental ChallengesProducts in Pharmaceutical EnvironmentThomas SénacCorporate Health Safety Environment 53
  • 54. HSE Contribution to Sanofi’s CSR Performance Healthcare Environmental leader impact HSE and CSR 54
  • 55. HSE Team and Policy Reflecting Commitmentto Environmental IssuesHSE Policy: Top Management commitment towards stakeholders  Policy and tools designed to meet regulatory requirements and go beyond when possible  Policy endorsed by our CEO Strong HSE Organization Multiple Tools● 800 experts devoted ● Annual HSE ● Training to HSE, with involvement action plan ● Audits at each company’s site ● Integration ● Rules, standards of new entities & guides ● HSE risk analysis ● Learning at site level from experience 55
  • 56. Water Pharmaceuticals in the Environment Planet 2012: 3 CSR prioritiesEnergy & CarbonFootprint 56
  • 57. Environment Reflecting Human Activities Phthalates PAHs Disinfectants PCB Alkylphenols Bromide-based flame retardants Organochlorinated pesticides Perfluorinated substances Cosmetics Hormones … 57
  • 58. Presence of Pharmaceuticals in the Environment Pharmaceuticals in the Environment (PiE) is not a new issue ● First published works: end of 70s Raising awareness since 2000 ● Evolution of analysis technologies ● Public, media and health authorities awareness Concerns both human and animal medicinesRELEVANT FIGURES ● 200 substances identified in the environment  15% of marketed products ● 3,000 human and animal medicines 58
  • 59. Sources for Human Medicines in the Environment 2% from productionSanofiplant Waste water treatment 90% patients Public ? Drinking water waste treatment treatment center 8% unused medicines Incineration ? 59
  • 60. Health and Environmental Impact of PiE Pharmaceuticals in the Environment  May be found in very low concentrations and are measured in nanograms (10-9g/l) or micrograms (10-6g/l) per liter  Specific concerns for some pharmaceutical products classes (hormonal substances, cytotoxic drugs and antibiotics) Health impact Environmental impact Negligible Existing data suggest unlikelytaking into account existing data short term effects Developing scientific knowledge on long term effects Assessing possible impact on aquatic species Collaborating with public and private stakeholders 60
  • 61. Sanofi ActionsEvaluatingGroup products● Regulatory ERAs (EMA/FDA) Supporting collection programs● Voluntary ERAs for unused medicines● ERA of 30 major ● Public information (e.g. website) Group’s products ● Actively support local programs completed to collect and destroy unused medicinesAssessing impactof activities● Screening for API Acting as a stakeholder and degradation products ● Relations with health and quantification in sites’ and environment authorities effluents ● Public communication● Risk based evaluation of environmental impacts due to API present in effluents ERA – Environmental Risk Assessment API – Active Pharmaceutical Ingredient EMA – Evaluation Medicines Agency (EU) FDA – Food and Drug Administration (U.S.) 61
  • 62. Case Study: Peres Center for Peace RESEARCH PROJECT IN A HIGH WATER SCARCITY REGION Sanofi supports a joint Israeli-Palestinian project addressing the removal of pharmaceutical materials Two-year sponsorship from treated waste water by Sanofi HSE departmentSeptember 2012: first series of research resultsIdentification of promising methods to improve the water quality aftertreatment (irrigation water, etc.)Research scope: stability studies and removal methods such as biologicaltreatment, advance membrane filtration and absorption technologies 62
  • 63. Water Pharmaceuticals in the Environment Planet 2012: 3 CSR prioritiesEnergy & CarbonFootprint 63
  • 64. Continued Reduction in Water Consumption In m3 -20% since 2005 Objective 2020: 25% reduction in water usage vs. 201060,000,00060 000 00050,000,00050 000 00040,000,00040 000 000  City water30 000 00030,000,000  Well water  Surface water20 000 00020,000,00010 000 00010,000,000 00 2009 variation 2010 variation 2011(1) Total water 58,682,317 -2.94% 56,958,242 -5.03% 54,090,658consumption (1) Genzyme not included 64
  • 65. Water Pharmaceuticals in the Environment Planet 2012: 3 CSR prioritiesEnergy & CarbonFootprint 65
  • 66. Encouraging Reduction in CO2 Emissions In tons Objective 2020: 20% reduction in CO2 emissions target vs. 2010 (on a comparable perimeter)1,400,000 1400000  Medical sales1,200,000 1200000  fleet vehicles  (estimated)1,000,000 1000000  Production 800000 of electricity 800,000 and steam 600000 (indirect CO2) 600,000  Fossil Fuel 400000 400,000 (direct CO2) 200000 200,000 0 0 2009 2010 2011(1) (1) Genzyme not included 66
  • 67. CO2 Emission Indicators Show Progressin Various Sources of Energy Consumption 2005-2011 variation in CO2 emissions per unit produced: ● -9.5% for direct CO2 emissions ● -15.6% for indirect CO2 emissions 2005-2011 variation in CO2 emissions per km traveled (emissions generated by medical sales vehicles): -20% Green Supply Chain / product logistic: 23,000 tons CO2 saved (2006-2011) ● Sea transportation increase (switch from air) ● Better long range trucks utilization ● Low CO2 emitting "last kilometer " ● Natural gas or electric vehicles ● Tricycle for town-center deliveries ● Rail and barge transportation ● From distribution centers to seaport: rail for intra-european shipments 67
  • 68. ConclusionGilles LhernouldSenior Vice President, Corporate Social Responsibility 68
  • 69. Recognition of Sanofi CSR Performance ● Sanofi has moved up to 3rd position in 2012 (among 20 pharma companies assessed)● Sanofi included in the DJSI ● Based on significant improvements for the 6th consecutive in access to healthcare and year (one of 7 pharma a leading position in public policy companies selected in 2012 out of 60 evaluated)● Sanofi evaluated as Best in Class on ● Sanofi score increased to 93/100 ● Corporate Governance from 58/100 (in 2011) (90/100) ● Marketing Practices ● Disclosure level “B” achieved in 2012 (97/100) (from “D” beginners level in 2011) ● Climate Strategy ● #3 ranking in terms of disclosure, (100/100) #4 for performance among ● Bioethics (100/100) 38 global healthcare companies assessed ● Strategy to Improve ● New comer in the Carbon Disclosure Access to Drugs Leadership Index (CDLI) SBF 250 or Products (100/100) 69
  • 70. CSR Internal Tools CSR Blog CSR Intranet siteCSR e-awareness Awards 70
  • 71. CSR External Tools2011–2012 Brochure 2010 on-line CSR Report: http://csrreporting.sanofi.com 71
  • 72. CSR Enhances Sanofi’s Strategy and Sustainability Innovation Competitiveness CSR, a driver forPerformance License to Operate Talent Risk Control Management Our focus on CSR is key for all the investment community and not solely SRI Funds 72