"The Creator gathered all of creation and said,I want to hide something from the humans until they are Ready for it.      ...
Why Do People Learn a               Second/Foreign Language?•   Here are a few suggestions:•   Fulfill school/university r...
Definitions of L2• It is crucial here to mention the difference between a Second and a  Foreign language, which are both r...
Good L2 LearnersResearch has shown that the use of specific learning strategies & techniques while studying a second orfor...
Definitions of Motivation•   However simple and easy the word "motivation" might appear, it is in fact very difficult to  ...
Sources of Motivation• "Without knowing where the roots of motivation  lie, how can teachers water those roots?"• (Oxford ...
Becoming İnspired by Great Quotes"While teachers and school systems have drawn on both of the first two sources of motivat...
Motivational Flow Chart
Source of Motivational Needs (1)behavioral/external• elicited by stimulus associated/ connected to  innately connected sti...
Source of Motivational Needs (2)Biological• increase/decrease stimulation• activate senses (taste, touch, smell, etc.)• de...
Source of Motivational Needs (3)Affective• increase/decrease affective dissonance  (inconsistency)• increase feeling good•...
Source of Motivational Needs (4)Cognitive• maintain attention to something interesting or  threatening• develop meaning or...
Source of Motivational Needs (5)Conative• meet individually developed/selected goal• obtain personal dream• take control o...
Source of Motivational Needs (6)Spiritual• understand purpose of ones life• connect self to ultimate unknowns
Models of Motivation• Gardner & Lambert (1959, 1972): Socio-  Educational Model• After conducting a study that lasted more...
Models of MotivationGardner (1985):.Gardner explored four other motivational orientations:         (a) reason for learning...
Models of Motivation• Dornyei (1990): He postulated a motivational  construct consisting of:  – an Instrumental Motivation...
Implications & Strategies for L2               Learners Motivation:Teachers:•   The greatest motivational act one person c...
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Sanli com2 ,final_project

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Please fınd my attached my final project slıde

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Sanli com2 ,final_project

  1. 1. "The Creator gathered all of creation and said,I want to hide something from the humans until they are Ready for it. It is the Realization that They Create their Own Reality. The eagle said, Give it to me, I will take it to the moon. The Creator said, No. One day they will go there and find it. The salmon said, I will hide it on the bottom of the ocean. No. They will go there too. The buffalo said, I will bury it on the Great Plains. Then Grand-mother Mole, who lives in the breast of Mother Earth, and who has no physical eyes but sees with spiritual eyes, said, Put it Inside them. And the creator said, It is done. " -Sioux Legend
  2. 2. Why Do People Learn a Second/Foreign Language?• Here are a few suggestions:• Fulfill school/university requirements• Function and compete effectively in the global economy of today and the future• Increase job opportunities and salary potential• Develop intercultural sensitivity, increasing global understanding• Improve English vocabulary and language proficiency in order to communicate with members of that language community.• Improve critical and creative thinking skills• Improve ones education• Enhance travel and study abroad opportunities• Enjoy great literary and musical masterpieces and films in their original language• Improve likelihood of acceptance into university and graduate schools• Increase understanding of people in own country• Gain social power (prestige)• Have a secret code• Please ones parents• Any other reason(s)?• After all, we, as teachers, need to find the students motives so that we can accommodate them.
  3. 3. Definitions of L2• It is crucial here to mention the difference between a Second and a Foreign language, which are both referred to as L2.• People who are living in an English-speaking community/country are learning English as their SECOND language. "The learner of the second language is surrounded by stimulation, both visual and auditory, in the target language and thus has many motivational and instructional advantages." (Oxford & Shearin, 1994)• As for those who are not living in an English-speaking community/country, they are learning English as a FOREIGN language. "Foreign language learners are surrounded by their own native language and have to go out of their way to find stimulation and input in the target language. These students typically receive input in the new language only in the classroom and by artificial means, no matter how talented the teacher is." (Oxford & Shearin, 1994)
  4. 4. Good L2 LearnersResearch has shown that the use of specific learning strategies & techniques while studying a second orforeign language leads to success. "The conscious, tailored use of such strategies is related to languageachievement and proficiency. (Oxford, 1994)Some of those strategies:• Rubin (1975) suggested that good L2 learners – are willing and accurate guessers; – have a strong drive to communicate; – are often uninhibited, and if they are, they combat inhibition by using positive self-talk, by extensive use of practicing in private, and by putting themselves in situations where they have to participate communicatively. – are willing to make mistakes; – focus on form by looking for patterns and analyzing; – take advantage of all practice opportunities; – monitor their speech as well as that of others; – and pay attention to meaning.One of the factors that influence the choice of strategies used among students learning asecond/foreign language is Motivation. More motivated students tend to use more strategies than lessmotivated students, hence, they tend to be more successful. (Oxford, 1990a)
  5. 5. Definitions of Motivation• However simple and easy the word "motivation" might appear, it is in fact very difficult to define. It seems to have been impossible for theorists to reach consensus on a single definition.• Here are a few that I have found in the literature:• According to the Websters, to motivate means to provide with a motive, a need or desire that causes a person to act.• According to Gardner (1985), motivation is concerned with the question, "Why does an organism behave as it does?• Motivation involves 4 aspects: – A Goal – An Effort – A Desire to attain the goal – Favorable Attitude toward the activity in question.• Motivation is also defined as the impetus to create and sustain intentions and goal-seeking acts (Ames & Ames, 1989). It is important because it determines the extent of the learners active involvement and attitude toward learning. (Ngeow, Karen Yeok-Hwa, 1998)
  6. 6. Sources of Motivation• "Without knowing where the roots of motivation lie, how can teachers water those roots?"• (Oxford & Shearin, 1994- p.15) – Educational psychologists point to three major sources of motivation in learning (Fisher, 1990): – The learner’s natural interest: intrinsic satisfaction – The teacher/institution/employment: extrinsic reward – Success in the task: combining satisfaction and reward
  7. 7. Becoming İnspired by Great Quotes"While teachers and school systems have drawn on both of the first two sources of motivation, the third source is perhaps under-exploited in language teaching. This is the simple fact of success, and the effect that this has on our view of what we do. As human beings, we generally like what we do well, and are therefore more likely to do it again, and put in more effort . . .In the classroom, this can mean that students who develop an image of themselves as ‘no good at English’ will simply avoid situations which tell them what they already know – that they aren’t any good at English. Feelings of failure, particularly early on in a student’s school career, can therefore lead to a downward spiral of a self- perception of low ability – low motivation – low effort – low achievement – low motivation – low achievement, and so on.
  8. 8. Motivational Flow Chart
  9. 9. Source of Motivational Needs (1)behavioral/external• elicited by stimulus associated/ connected to innately connected stimulus• obtain desired, pleasant consequences (rewards) or escape/avoid undesired, unpleasant consequences• imitate positive models
  10. 10. Source of Motivational Needs (2)Biological• increase/decrease stimulation• activate senses (taste, touch, smell, etc.)• decrease hunger, thirst, discomfort, etc.• maintain homeostasis, balance
  11. 11. Source of Motivational Needs (3)Affective• increase/decrease affective dissonance (inconsistency)• increase feeling good• decrease feeling bad• increase security of or decrease threats to self-esteem• maintain levels of optimism and enthusiasm
  12. 12. Source of Motivational Needs (4)Cognitive• maintain attention to something interesting or threatening• develop meaning or understanding• increase/decrease cognitive disequilibrium; uncertainty• solve a problem or make a decision• figure something out• eliminate threat or risk
  13. 13. Source of Motivational Needs (5)Conative• meet individually developed/selected goal• obtain personal dream• take control of ones life• eliminate threats to meeting goal, obtaining dream• reduce others control of ones life
  14. 14. Source of Motivational Needs (6)Spiritual• understand purpose of ones life• connect self to ultimate unknowns
  15. 15. Models of Motivation• Gardner & Lambert (1959, 1972): Socio- Educational Model• After conducting a study that lasted more than ten years, they concluded that the learners attitude toward the target language and the culture of the target-language-speaking community play a crucial role in language learning motivation. They introduced the notions of instrumental and integrative motivation.
  16. 16. Models of MotivationGardner (1985):.Gardner explored four other motivational orientations: (a) reason for learning, (b) desire to attain the learning goal, (c) positive attitude toward the learning situation, and (d) effortful behavior.Gardner (1985) describes core second language learning motivation as a constructcomposed of three characteristics:• the attitudes towards learning a language (affect),• the desire to learn the language (want) and• motivational intensity (effort).According to Gardner, a highly motivated individual will• enjoy learning the language, and• want to learn the language,• strive to learn the language.
  17. 17. Models of Motivation• Dornyei (1990): He postulated a motivational construct consisting of: – an Instrumental Motivational Subsystem – an Integrative Motivational Subsystem – Need for Achievement – Attribution about past failures."Instrumental motivation might be moreimportant than integrative motivation forforeign language learners."
  18. 18. Implications & Strategies for L2 Learners Motivation:Teachers:• The greatest motivational act one person can do for another is to listen.--Roy E. MoodyDornyei (1994) suggests• developing students self-efficacy,• decreasing their anxiety,• promoting motivation-enhancing attributions,• encouraging students to set attainable sub-goals, and• increasing the attractiveness of course content.Dornyei (1998:131) suggests "Ten Commandments for Motivating Language Learners”• Set a personal example with your own behavior.• Create a pleasant, relaxed atmosphere in the classroom.• Present the task properly.• Develop a good relationship with the learners.• Increase the learners linguistic self-confidence.• Make the language classes interesting.• Promote learner autonomy.• Personalize the learning process.• Increase the learners goal-orientedness.• Familiarize learners with the target language culture.
  19. 19. Thank You

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