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BA FS session 2
 

BA FS session 2

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  • This is the 2nd session - 3 more sessions to comeRecap of last weeks session:Looked at all the different types of resources, e.g. books, computers, hats! PLUS the services available, help desks & LibrairansLibrary Subject Guides – Business & Management – has anyone looked at it?Reading lists – how to recognise and find books, journals, chapters in books, on the library catalogue.TodayThinking about different types of information – what it is good for? What it is not good for?How to evaluate information
  • Referencing and Plagiarism libguide includes information on how to reference material correctly.Referencing tutorials available on request.EIS LibGuide bring together all the resources for your subject area.
  • Good for: broad/general overview of subjectEdited for quality and accuracyNot so good for:May not be specific enoughCan be out of date
  • Good for:Easy to use/searchAll subjects coveredCan be very up-to-dateMobileNot so good for:No editorial controlUnreliable sourcesCan be created by anyoneMaterial can lack provenanceCan be out-of-dateNot everyone has access
  • Good for:Up-to-dateEditedReadily available (latest copies especially)Not so good for:Can be biasCan be unbalancedCan be sensationalistHard to get hold of/access (back issues)
  • Good for:Up-to-dateSpecialist/focussedPresent latest researchEdited for accuracy/quality (peer reviewed)Lots of referencesNot so good for:Can be hard to locate/accessExpensiveMay be too specificMay be at wrong level
  • Good for:Latest informationCurrent eventsConcise infoProduct newsOften available online with RSS/Twitter etcNot so good for:DetailObjective information ie. can be bias, adverts, preferential products etcOften hard to find old issuesBack issues/archive
  • It is very easy to use information – especially from the Internet, without thinking about how good that information actually is.Don’t be tempted to use just any old information. Your teacher will be looking at the quality of the information you use in your work, because this shows how well you understand the topic.

BA FS session 2 BA FS session 2 Presentation Transcript

  • BA FS Session 2Types of resources / information, Evaluating information and Referencing & citationhttp:// unihub.mdx.ac.uk / study / library
  • In the previous session...• What the Library provides• Using the Library Catalogue and finding resources on your reading lists• What Library support is available to you
  • Today we will look at...• Plagiarism and referencing & citation• The different types of resources and information• The importance of evaluating the resources that you use
  • Library Subject Guides myUniHub > My Study > My Library > Library Subject Guideshttp://libguides.mdx.ac.uk
  • PLAGIARISM,REFERENCING & CITATION
  • What is Plagiarism?Copying, paraphrasing or presentingsomebody else’s words and / or ideaswithout acknowledging the original source.Whether intentionally or unintentionally!
  • Exercise 1 - Where do you draw the line?
  • Where do you draw the line?
  • What is Plagiarism?• Using someone else’s exact words without indicating that it is a quote (“...”) and without referencing?• Using other people’s ideas or theories or “facts” or “knowledge” without referencing?• Paraphrasing / summarising what you have read without referencing / stating the source?
  • What is Plagiarism?• Buying an essay from an essay-writing service?• Copying from someone’s essay?• Writing an assignment in close collaboration with a friend?• Copying from a book / journal but changing some of the words?
  • Referencing & Citation• All academic research / writing needs to consider the work and ideas of others• Each time you use someone else’s ideas or words, it is essential that you acknowledge this in your work
  • Referencing & CitationCorrect referencing involves including both:• In-text citations Importantly, Endacott et al. (2008) argue that this new approach to the delivery of critical care will aim to address Safar’s long-held concerns from as far back as 1974 that critical care is no more than an increasingly unnecessary and expensive form of terminal care in a lot of cases (Safar, 1974). Similarly, Rosenberg et al. (2001) suggest that mortality rates and lengths of stay are also enhanced through a more effective and coordinated approach to the discharge and follow-up of patients from the critical care unit. (McGloin and McLeod, 2010)• Reference list / bibliography
  • Library Subject GuidemyUniHub > My Study > My Library > Library Subject Guides http://libguides.mdx.ac.uk/
  • Business School Referencing Guide
  • Referencing exercise Exercise 2: • Working in groups, use the Harvard referencing guide provided to create a reference for this book… Source: https://encrypted- tbn0.google.com/images?q=tbn:ANd9GcTNOltX5rVbjE1VbHuGojhvsfa9YJ XHkkpTxXDHINAaMbSwX2kv
  • Edited BookDurrant, A., Rhodes, G. and Young, D.(Eds.) (2009). Getting started with University-LevelWork Based Learning. London: Sage.
  • TYPES OR RESOURCES / INFORMATION
  • Types of resources / informationExercise 3:• Each group will be given a pack of cards• The cards contain the names of 5 different resources• Match together the correct:Resource Type + Definition + “Good for” + “Not so goodfor”Time: 10mins
  • BooksWhat are they: A written or printed work of fiction or fact. May be electronic.Good for: Clear overviewNot so good for: Up to date information
  • Web pageWhat are they: An information resource which can be easily created by anyone on any topic. Electronic.Good for: Very up to date informationNot so good for: Accurate and reliable information
  • NewspaperWhat are they: A regular publication containing current events, informative articles, diverse features and advertising. May be electronic.Good for: Daily informationNot so good for: Balanced and well researched information
  • JournalWhat are they: A regular publication containing articles on a particular academic subject. Presents new research.Good for: Latest research, critically reviewed by expertsNot so good for: Broad overview of a subject
  • Popular (trade) journalWhat are they: A regular publication containing new products plus information for a business sector.Good for: Latest product newsNot so good for: Detailed and objective reports
  • EVALUATING INFORMATION
  • Evaluating information• It is very important to think about the quality of the information before you use it!• This is called evaluating information• Here are some criteria that you can help you when evaluating information…
  • Evaluating information: Authority• Can you tell who wrote the information (author/organisation name)?• What are their qualifications/credentials?• Is the source reputable? e.g. is the article published in a scholarly / peer reviewed journal?
  • Evaluating information: Relevance:• The importance of the information in relation to your topic?• Will it answer my question?• Is the information at the right level - who is the intended audience?• Depth of coverage – does the information go into enough detail or does it just touch on your topic?
  • Evaluating information: Objectivity• What is the purpose of information, e.g. is it to Sell? Entertain? Teach, Propaganda, etc.• Is the information biased (only represents one view) or balanced (represents all opposing views)• Does it links to supporting information?
  • Evaluating information: Accuracy• Is the information reliable, truthful, correct?• Where does the information come from. Are the sources listed?• Are the sources reputable?• Can you verify the information with other sources?
  • Evaluating information: Currency• How old is this information?• When was it last updated?• Can you use older sources in your work, e.g. historical research, or do you need up-to-date information?
  • Summary• Different types of resources have different types of information• The quality of information can vary for different resource types• Evaluating information – what to consider: Authority - Relevance – Objectivity – Accuracy - Currency
  • Coming next week…• Finding resources for assignments (journal articles etc)• Using the Library’s financial databases (FAME & BankScope)• Using the Library’s marketing databases (Business Source Complete. Keynote & Passport GMID)Source: http://www.flickr.com/photos/steven-young/4176704759/
  • Need more help?Please contact us for further help / to book an appointmentLibrary Subject Guides http://libguides.mdx.ac.ukAsk a Librarian http://askalibrarian.mdx.ac.uk/
  • Evaluating information:-Exercise 4• Image you are researching the topic Small Businesses and International Entrepreneurship• You have been given 4 items of information that might be useful for your research• In your groups, look at each item and answer the questions on your worksheet.• You have 15mins
  • Item 1 - Wikipedia article:• Is this information relevant to your research? The information is relevant & has in-depth coverage• Is this information reliable? Don’t know if the information in the article is reliable or accurate because we don’t know who the authors are, also the information can be edited.• Does the author have any academic authority? ?????????????
  • Item 1 - Wikipedia article:• Is the information biased or balanced? The information seems to be balanced. The purpose of the information is to inform – not sell or sway opinion.• Is this information up to date? ???????????????• Would you use this information in your research? No, but maybe use the references at the end of the article? (you must evaluate these too)
  • Item 2 - Newspaper article:• Is this information relevant to your research? The information is not relevant & too simplistic• Is this information reliable? No. The article does not state where the facts have come from.• Does the author have any academic authority? The author is a journalist for The Sun (tabloid newspaper). No academic authority.
  • Item 2 - Newspaper article:• Is the information biased or balanced? No, the author continually pays tribute to the Sun, a Conservation paper. It does not present alternative views.• Is this information up to date? Maybe?• Would you use this information in your research? No way! Not relevant, not accurate, not objective and no authority.
  • Item 3 – Academic journal:• Is this information relevant to your research? Very relevant to the topic & has in-depth coverage• Is this information reliable? Yes, The information is balanced and the author uses references to verify his work. Academic journal – good quality information.• Does the author have any academic authority? Yes (Florida State University)
  • Item 3 – Academic journal:• Is the information biased or balanced? The information is balanced. The purpose of the information is to inform and is written for the academic community.• Is this information up to date? No (2001!)• Would you use this information in your research? No, the information is too old. Need to look for more recent articles.
  • Item 4 – Trade journal:• Is this information relevant to your research? The information is not relevant & is too simplistic• Is this information reliable? Not reliable. Not very well written, No other references used in the work. Does not state where the facts have come from.• Does the author have any academic authority? No. He is President of ISSPA but not an academic and does not have expert knowledge of SMA or Entrepreneurship.
  • Item 4 – Trade journal:• Is the information biased or balanced? Very biased. Based only on his own opinion.• Is this information up to date? Yes (2009)• Would you use this information in your research? No way! Not relevant, not accurate, not objective and no authority.