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    • WINDOWS FOR EDUCATORS Dabney S. Lancaster Community College CEW Center, Room 504 Day Two, June 29, 2006 8:30-4:30 This workshop contributes to the following NETS*T Standards: I. TECHNOLOGY OPERATIONS AND CONCEPTS A. demonstrate introductory knowledge, skills, and understanding of concepts related to technology (as described in the ISTE National Educational Technology Standards for Students) V. PRODUCTIVITY AND PROFESSIONAL PRACTICE Teachers use technology to enhance their productivity and professional practice. A. use technology resources to engage in ongoing professional development and lifelong learning. C. apply technology to increase productivity. Software: Microsoft Windows XP Professional Equipment: Gateway Windows XP computer lab Audience: teachers (elementary, middle school, high school, various grade levels, some PE, library media, music) Objectives: Given examples and step-by-step instructions, teachers will be able to set date, time, and keyboard options from the Control Panel; create and access Favorites; customize their folders, toolbars, START menu, and taskbar; multi-task in Windows; move, copy, and back up files and folders using more than one method; identify and set up accessibility features in Windows; identify maintenance functions; access troubleshooting help and use PrintScreen to create a screenshot. The workshop is designed to help teachers: 1) Increase productivity 2) Keep up with what students know, e.g., taskbar tricks (hide the taskbar, move the taskbar), how to pretend you’re working on a report when you’re really surfing the Internet Windows for Educators Workshop Carol Almarez June 2006 1
    • 3) Make computing easier for teachers and their students: create shortcuts so you don’t have to look through a long list, students can go directly to the place you want them to go, etc. 4) Customize student computer desktops to make them not only easy to deal with but fun 5) Address the most common problems seen in schools Prior Experience: Pre-workshop survey Handouts: Advance organizer Helpful Websites Terminology Sheet w/Accessibility information Windows for Educators Workshop Carol Almarez June 2006 2
    • CONTENTS (Hyperlinked) Topic Page # NETS*T Standards..............................................................................................................1 Objectives............................................................................................................................1 Handouts..............................................................................................................................2 I. Review............................................................................................................................4 II. Loose Ends from Yesterday..........................................................................................4 A. Control Panel..............................................................................................................4 III. Windows Customizing Continued: More on Folders...................................................5 A. Folder Options............................................................................................................5 B. Create Folders for Different Media.............................................................................6 IV. Customizing Continued: The Toolbar...........................................................................7 A. Add Favorites.............................................................................................................7 B. To Add Programs/Documents/Folders Shortcuts to your Toolbar..............................8 V. Customizing Continued: The START Menu..................................................................8 VI Customizing Continued: Taskbar..................................................................................9 Using taskbar (Multitasking I).......................................................................................10 VII. Multitasking II (using windows), or Why They Call it Windows..............................10 VIII. Moving/Copying/Backing Up Documents and Folders............................................11 Copying documents & folders in Windows...................................................................11 Backing Up Your Work.................................................................................................12 Method 1: Open Two Windows.................................................................................13 Method 2: Use ‘Folders’...........................................................................................14 Windows 2000...........................................................................................................15 IX. Accessibility in Windows...........................................................................................15 A. From Control Panel..................................................................................................16 B. From Accessibility menu.........................................................................................17 C. From Taskbar............................................................................................................19 X. Maintenance & Troubleshooting..................................................................................19 A. Maintenance..............................................................................................................19 B.Troubleshooting.........................................................................................................20 Notifying tech support...............................................................................................21 Review Day Two: Windows Jeopardy Game...................................................................21 Windows for Educators Workshop Carol Almarez June 2006 3
    • Day Two: Windows Tips ‘n’ Tricks Practice Activities are in this color I. Review Questions from yesterday? Open MyDocs2 folder: We talked about Views in Folders but we didn’t discuss Tiles View. How do you think we would set the MyDocs2 folder to show Tile View? We talked about viewing folders arranged in groups. If MyDocs2 is not arranged this way, arrange it in Group view. Now take it out of Group arrangement. Practice: Set the View in MyDocs2 so that all the PowerPoints are together, all the websites are together, etc. II. Loose Ends from Yesterday A. Control Panel: Date & Time Keyboard Open the Control Panel (fastest way?) Open Date and Time, and you will see how the Date and Time Properties can be changed. If the time that usually shows in your taskbar is incorrect, this is where you can change it. Make sure you tell it to automatically change for Daylight Savings. Windows for Educators Workshop Carol Almarez June 2006 4
    • When you open Keyboard, you will see the Properties that can be changed under the Speed Tab. You can set the character repeat rate, delay time, and the cursor blink rate. III. Windows Customizing Continued: More on Folders A. Folder Options Again in MyDocs 2 folder, from the Tools menu, pull down to Folder Options. TABS: General: can choose how tasks will be shown in Task Pane View: apply this view to all folders Advanced Settings (click to check or uncheck): -remember folders view settings; -hide extensions for known file types (if you get an error suggesting that your file will not be saved if you rename it, check here to hide extensions; if 3-letter extensions such as .doc, .wmf, .jpg, etc. are shown behind each file name, they must also be included when you rename a file unless you tell Windows to hide the extension.) The File Types tab will show you what the extensions are. Windows for Educators Workshop Carol Almarez June 2006 5
    • B. Create Folders for Different Media Create a folder on the desktop: name it Class Pictures.Open Class Pictures and create a subfolder: name it Reading Program. Open and right-click in white part of Class Pictures folder, click Customize This Folder. Under What kind of folder do you want? Next to Use folder type as template, click the down arrow for a dropdown menu Choose Pictures (best for many files) Check Also apply to subfolders Look at the Task Pane. You’ll see that the tasks have changed. These are the options for all the pictures in the Class Pictures folder. Now create a music and a video folder. Windows for Educators Workshop Carol Almarez June 2006 6
    • IV. Customizing Continued: The Toolbar A. Add Favorites The toolbar of a folder usually has Standard Buttons. By right-clicking the toolbar, you can click to add an Address bar or Links. You can also lock and unlock the toolbars or Customize the toolbar. One handy icon to have on your toolbar is Favorites. ‘Favorites’ refers to your favorite places. These can be documents or programs that you use very often (offline), or websites you visit frequently (online). Offline: First, let’s add a Favorites shortcut to your folder toolbars. To customize all folder toolbars at the same time, open My Computer (what’s the fastest way to get to My Computer from where you are?) In My Computer, Right-click on your toolbar, make sure that your toolbars are unlocked, and select Customize. On the left side, select Favorites, click the Add button, and Favorites will transfer to the right side (Current toolbar buttons). In Icon Options, you can make the icons larger if you wish. Add any other toolbar buttons you would like. Close. Online Favorites: Open your Internet browser and go to one of your favorite websites. Click the Favorites shortcut you added to the toolbar, or the Favorites menu in the Menu bar. A Favorites menu will show as a drop-down or sidebar with an Add button or Add Favorite at the top. Click Add, and the website that Windows for Educators Workshop Carol Almarez June 2006 7
    • is open will be added to your Favorites menu. The next time you open the Internet, you can click on that website in your Favorites instead of typing in the address. It will also be available when you click Favorites from any folder. B. To Add Programs/Documents/Folders Shortcuts to your Toolbar: Make sure that your toolbars are unlocked and that a Links bar has been added. Drag any icon (MS Word, a website shortcut, etc.) from your desktop, your Favorites, or your START Menu to the Links bar, and it will become a shortcut on that bar. Now check Links on ANY address bar on ANY folder and the MS Word, or other shortcut, will be there. If you add the Address bar, you can go to any part of your computer from any folder, or type in a web address and go to the Internet. You can also drag the internet icon of any website from the Address bar and add it to your Links bar. V. Customizing Continued: The START Menu Right-click on the START button, click Properties to get the Taskbar and Start Menu Properties dialog box: Click Customize button for more options. Under the General tab, you can determine the size of icons, number and some of the programs that will display on the START menu. Under the Advanced tab, check “Open submenus when I pause..” if you want Windows for Educators Workshop Carol Almarez June 2006 8
    • to minimize your number of clicks when using the START menu. Highlighting newly installed programs is also useful. If you display your Control Panel, My Computer, or any of the My Document items as a link, they will open as a window; if you display them as a menu, they will show as a submenu next to your main START menu. This is also where you can choose to add Favorites to your START menu. If you made any changes, click OK, Apply, OK. “List my most recently opened documents” can come in very handy, especially when trying to quickly find documents. (If there are too many on the list, click Clear List). This is another place you can add a shortcut to a program you use quite often. Right-click the program icon and choose Pin to Start menu from the drop-down menu. (Choose a program and add it to START menu.) Now let’s see how the START menu has changed. VI Customizing Continued: Taskbar Another option for minimum clicks: right-click empty part of Taskbar to get a menu. [Go over each part. Review parts from yesterday]: 1) Click Toolbars (these are all items that can be added to your taskbar): Click Quick Launch to open a section at the left of your taskbar. Application icons shown here can be opened with a single click of the mouse. Further down the taskbar menu, click Show the Desktop to have access to everything on the desktop. If you like a very clean desktop, you could choose not to show Desktop Items, and view them this way instead. 2) Add a program from desktop, START menu, or programs folder to taskbar: click the program icon and drag it to the QuickLaunch section of taskbar. Windows for Educators Workshop Carol Almarez June 2006 9
    • Some programs add themselves to the taskbar; you can usually right-click and delete them. [Using taskbar (Multitasking I)] 3) Open 2 Word documents from MyDocs2 folder + a website, downsize them (not minimize) Cascade and Tile windows To open 2 windows side-by-side on the desktop (e.g., doing an Internet search for a picture or for some info to put into an open Word document): Click on the Word button and press CTRL at the same time, hold down CTRL while right-clicking the website. You’ll see a popup menu, choose Tile Vertically, both will show next to each other. Click Show Desktop ICON on taskbar to minimize all windows at once. And don’t forget your keyboard shortcuts: Alt + Tab lets you toggle between minimized documents on the taskbar Another way to set Taskbar options: click Properties on the taskbar menu to show the Taskbar tab from the Taskbar & Start Menu Properties dialog box VII. Multitasking II (using windows), or Why They Call it Windows Open a PowerPoint document (ways to do this): 1) Open PowerPoint application, task pane shows latest PowerPoints used 2) Search all or part of document name: .ppt 3) Open My Documents, already set to View by Type, open one of the PowerPoints Windows for Educators Workshop Carol Almarez June 2006 10
    • Open Outlook if possible (you can set Outlook to chime when a message comes in, go down to taskbar and check message, go back to what you were doing without closing and opening windows Open Windows Help (can do a search/refer to it anytime) Minimize all to taskbar and toggle back and forth between Can have multiple copies of Internet pages open: open a Word document Name 3 ways to get to the Internet from the document you have open: 1) From Internet on taskbar (can put it there if not there) 2) START menu to Internet 3) From the Search the Web icon on the Word toolbar (can put it there if not there) Also: if you have some websites listed in your Favorites: from START Menu to Favorites. If you are working in an application that’s new to you, locate and open an online tutorial (check my website: http://www.alleghany.k12.va.us/TRT_elem ) and minimize it to your taskbar for quick reference when you run into trouble. Show multiple copies open on taskbar/group/close. The downside to multitasking: Too many open windows will reduce your system’s memory. VIII. Moving/Copying/Backing Up Documents and Folders Yesterday, we talked a lot about using click-and-drag to move folders and documents from one place to another in Windows. There is another option: copy and paste. Simply right-click on the document or folder you want to move, select Cut from the drop-down menu—or Copy, if you want to keep an extra copy—go to the place you want the document/folder to move to, right-click again. This time, choose Paste. (Use keyboard shortcuts to make it even quicker: Ctrl + X, then Ctrl + V). Examples (move docs from one folder to another using Copy-Paste). Copying documents & folders in Windows Windows for Educators Workshop Carol Almarez June 2006 11
    • Discuss uses of ‘removable media’ (floppies, removable drives, CDROMs, flash/jump/thumb/pen drives*, memory cards, etc.). Hand out CDs, show how to put flash drive/CD in drive, and open My Computer to view drive letters. * Add drive as desktop shortcut so can open it quickly anytime. I suggest you put in your ‘removable media’ in as soon as you sit down at the computer so they’re available for back up any time. Backing Up Your Work Backing up is just copying files, folders, etc. from one location (your computer) to a place outside of your computer in case something goes wrong with your computer. (This will usually happen when you haven’t backed up.) This outside location is generally another drive besides the C: (hard) drive where all of your work is usually stored, i.e., removable media. Another option for many is a network drive, which is just a separate location on your school or home network. Keep in mind that your saved data can be retrieved from the network drive if your computer goes down, but not (at least temporarily) if the network goes down. You can create folders on a removable/backup drive to organize your work. Open the desktop shortcut you created for your backup drive and create and name a new folder. 1) Within Document: Let’s open a new Word document (easiest way from where you are?) Let’s say this is a document you just spent 3 hours creating. Ideally, you would have saved it as follows while you were creating it: From the File menu, choose Save As: & browse to the drive where you intend to save it. Give it a significant name, click Save, and a copy of this document is placed in that location. A few paragraphs later, you will go to the File menu again, but from now on, you will select Save (NOT Save As). There is also a SAVE icon somewhere on your Word Toolbar. Windows for Educators Workshop Carol Almarez June 2006 12
    • 2) I will show you two methods to back up (copy) documents or folders in either Win 2000 or XP. Method 1: Open Two Windows Windows XP: Open My Computer to show all drives, restore down if maximized. Open My Docs2 folder, restore down if maximized, and move both windows around so you can see the documents/folders you want to copy as well as the drive you want to back up to. Choose the best view for what you want to back up. If you’re copying only the most recent file(s) you worked on, you might want to Arrange by “Modified” date. Select the most recent document(s). Click and drag them (or copy and paste) to the drive where your backup media is. When that drive turns dark, release the mouse button. Double-click to open the drive and all your documents should be there. If you’re backing up all documents within the folder, it can be any view. From the Edit menu, choose Select All, and click and drag (or copy and paste) as above. If you want to backup a few files from a folder: put in List or Details view, select (CTRL- click) the individual files and repeat above. If you want to back up one or more folders, the process is the same as for documents (above). Windows for Educators Workshop Carol Almarez June 2006 13
    • Choose a document from MyDocs2 folder and back it up to your CD or flash drive using two windows. Method 2: Use ‘Folders’ Open My Documents (easiest way?) Click on Folders icon You see a split window (Folders pane replaces Task pane on left) The contents of whatever is darkened (selected/highlighted) on the LEFT (Folders) pane are shown in the RIGHT pane (My Documents highlighted in left, contents of My Documents in right). Notice the + signs next to many folders on the left. That means they have something in them. To see what is in a folder without opening it, click the + sign. Use the Back button to return to a previous screen. You can click and drag (or copy and paste) from and to any folder. If the document already exists, you can overwrite/replace it with the newest version—a dialog box will ask you. In order to see your backup drive, you’ll need to click the + sign next to My Computer. (If you click on My Computer instead of the + sign, you’ll have to click the Back button on the toolbar to show your Documents again). If you want to back up to a particular folder in your backup drive, click the + next to the drive to view the folders. Select one or more documents to back up (use the document window scroll bar and/or change views if necessary). Now, as above, click-and-drag, or copy-paste your selected document(s) from My Documents on the right to the backup drive (or folder) on the left, until it turns dark, and release the mouse button. Open the backup drive to check that your documents are there. Windows for Educators Workshop Carol Almarez June 2006 14
    • Select 2 documents from My Documents and back them up (copy) to the folder you created on the backup drive, using Folders. Windows 2000 Both of the above backup methods can be used in Win 2000, except that when using one window to backup, it is called Windows Explorer instead of “Folders”. There are (at least) two ways to get to it: START Menu to Programs to Accessories to Windows Explorer, or Right-click START and choose Explorer Windows will automatically open My Documents. You can click-and-drag or copy-paste as in Windows XP You can also use Windows Explorer in Windows XP: R-click START button, choose Explore, or START-All Programs- Accessories-Windows Explorer IX. Accessibility in Windows Windows for Educators Workshop Carol Almarez June 2006 15
    • Accessibility refers to options for people who are disabled in some way, or have vision, hearing, or other difficulties. It can also include people who speak different languages. There are often students who will benefit from the use of these options. You can get to these from multiple locations in Windows. A. From Control Panel: Open Control Panel, open Accessibility Options: go over tabs, settings, etc. Terminology Sheet has additional details. Open Speech in Control Panel. On the Speech Recognition tab, select the speech recognition engine you want from the Language drop-down menu. To train the speech recognition engine: Select the profile you want from the Recognition Profile group. Training is specific to an engine and profile so that training one engine/profile set has no effect on any other engine/profile set. Click Train Profile. The Voice Training Wizard will appear; follow the directions in the wizard. Not all engines support training. If your engine does not, Train Profile will be unavailable. It is recommended that you spend at least 15 minutes training the computer. The more training you do, the higher your recognition accuracy will be. Click Text To Speech (TTS) tab. Windows for Educators Workshop Carol Almarez June 2006 16
    • Go over options. For multilingual capabilities Open Control Panel: Regional & Language Options Go over tabs, options B. From Accessibility menu: The Accessibility Wizard guides you through the process of customizing your computer with tools designed to help meet your vision, hearing, or mobility needs. Accessibility options help users with disabilities to make full use of the Windows for Educators Workshop Carol Almarez June 2006 17
    • computer. Some of the options may be of interest to all users. Once the Accessibility tools are set up, they can be accessed through Control Panel and the Accessibility menu. The Magnifier can be used to make the information on the desktop, any document page, or website larger. When it is clicked on in the menu, a magnified window opens at the top of the screen. In this example, it magnified the area around the cursor. The Settings box opens to allow changes. It can be pinned to the START menu or created as a desktop shortcut. The Narrator is a text-to-speech utility for users who are blind or have impaired vision. Narrator reads what is displayed on your screen: the contents of the active window, menu options, or the text you have typed. It is designed to work with Notepad, Wordpad, Control Panel programs, Internet Explorer, the Windows desktop, and Windows setup. Narrator may not read words aloud correctly in other programs. The Onscreen Keyboard helps those who have difficulty typing on a regular keyboard. Windows for Educators Workshop Carol Almarez June 2006 18
    • C. From Taskbar: Right-clicking the taskbar and choosing Language Bar (from Toolbars) will add Speech tools to the taskbar. Right-click the Language bar and select Settings to see the Text Services that are available. Add 1-2 accessibility options for your students with Accessibility Wizard X. Maintenance & Troubleshooting A. Maintenance: You may need administrative rights at school to use many of the maintenance and troubleshooting options; however, they can be useful at home as well. From the START menu, click Accessories, then System Tools: Disk Cleanup: Disk Cleanup helps free up space on your hard drive. Disk Cleanup searches your drive, and then shows you temporary files, Internet cache files, and unnecessary program files that you can safely delete. You can direct Disk Cleanup to delete some or all of those files. Windows for Educators Workshop Carol Almarez June 2006 19
    • Disk Defragmenter: Disk Defragmenter consolidates fragmented files and folders on your computer's hard disk, so that each occupies a single, contiguous space on the volume. As a result, your system can gain access to your files and folders and save new ones more efficiently. By consolidating your files and folders, Disk Defragmenter also consolidates the volume's free space, making it less likely that new files will be fragmented. You can also defragment disks from a command line using the defrag command. For more information, click Related Topics. Files and Settings Transfer gives options for transferring to another computer Security Center relates to security settings and Windows Firewall System Information gives you information about your computer and basic software, components, and settings System Restore allows you to return your computer to previous settings if a new program or virus (for example) has caused problems with your computer Scheduled Tasks: schedule the above tasks, backup etc. (admin) B.Troubleshooting Clearing the print queue When you begin printing, a printer icon appears on the taskbar. When you first log on to your computer—if you see a printer icon there, something is waiting to be printed. It may start printing as soon as the system is up; if not, or if you try to print and nothing happens, you should check the print queue. 1) Double-click the printer icon in the taskbar 2) If no icon, how do you get to the printer? a. START-Printers & Faxes-double-click the printer that is connected to your computer (may have to follow the cable)—on 2000, START – Settings – Printers b. Double-click the printer icon in Printers folder—this shows the list of documents waiting to print (the printer queue) It’s best to delete any documents from the queue to clear out the printer. Windows for Educators Workshop Carol Almarez June 2006 20
    • 3) Click Cancel all documents from the Printer Menu. 4) If your printer is working fine and you just want to clear out a document you had already started printing and then cancelled: select the document, go to Document menu and click Cancel to remove it. For additional troubleshooting help: Support Knowledge Base on microsoft: http://search.support.microsoft.com/search/?adv=1 What other troubleshooting questions did you have? Notifying tech support (ETC): One more keyboard shortcut: Print Screen When you have trouble on your computer, rather than trying to describe or write down the error message, Print Screen, and email to me, or print out and attach it to ETC/trouble form: 1. Open MS Word (blank document) and minimize. 2. With the error or problem showing on the screen (maximized), press PrtScrn key (use a dialog box to represent error). 3. If you think the error message will go away quickly, reverse 1 and 2 4. Maximize Word and click on the page 5. Either CTRL-V or Edit-Paste: the screen will show on your Word page. 6. Save the Word document. Let’s try one. Review Day Two: Windows Jeopardy Game Windows for Educators Workshop Carol Almarez June 2006 21