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Topic 1 Introduction Part B The majority of the slides in this course are adapted from the accompanying slides to the book...
Access networks and physical media <ul><li>Q: How to connect end systems to edge router? </li></ul><ul><li>residential acc...
Residential access: point to point access <ul><li>Dialup via modem </li></ul><ul><ul><li>up to 56Kbps direct access to rou...
Residential access: cable modems <ul><li>HFC: hybrid fiber coax </li></ul><ul><ul><li>asymmetric: up to 30Mbps downstream,...
Company access: local area networks <ul><li>company/univ  local area network  (LAN) connects end system to edge router </l...
Wireless access networks <ul><li>shared  wireless  access network connects end system to router </li></ul><ul><ul><li>via ...
Home networks <ul><li>Typical home network components:  </li></ul><ul><li>ADSL or cable modem </li></ul><ul><li>router/fir...
Physical Media <ul><li>Bit:  propagates between transmitter/rcvr pairs </li></ul><ul><li>physical link:  what lies between...
Physical Media: coax, fiber <ul><li>Coaxial cable: </li></ul><ul><li>two concentric copper conductors </li></ul><ul><li>bi...
Physical media: radio <ul><li>signal carried in electromagnetic spectrum </li></ul><ul><li>no physical “wire” </li></ul><u...
Access networks and physical media
The Network Core <ul><li>mesh of interconnected routers </li></ul><ul><li>the  fundamental question:  how is data transfer...
Network Core: Circuit Switching <ul><li>End-end resources reserved for “call” </li></ul><ul><li>link bandwidth,  switch ca...
Circuit Switching <ul><li>network resources (e.g., bandwidth)  divided into “pieces” </li></ul><ul><li>pieces allocated to...
Circuit Switching: FDM and TDM FDM frequency time TDM frequency time 4 users Example:
Back in the Old Days…
Then Came TDM… Multiplex (mux) Demultiplex (demux) <ul><li>Synchronous time division multiplexing </li></ul>
TDM Logical Network View
Numerical example <ul><li>How long does it take to send a file of 640,000 bits from host A to host B over a circuit-switch...
Packet Switching <ul><li>each end-end data stream divided into  packets </li></ul><ul><li>user A, B packets  share  networ...
Packet Switching <ul><li>Interleave packets from different sources </li></ul><ul><li>Efficient: resources used on demand <...
Characteristics of Packet Switching <ul><li>Store and forward </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Packets are self contained units </li>...
Packet Switching (Internet) Packets
Packet Switching: Statistical Multiplexing <ul><li>Sequence of A & B packets does not have fixed pattern     statistical ...
Packet switching versus circuit switching <ul><li>1 Mb/s link </li></ul><ul><li>each user:  </li></ul><ul><ul><li>100 kb/s...
Packet switching versus circuit switching <ul><li>Great for bursty data </li></ul><ul><ul><li>resource sharing </li></ul><...
Packet-switching: store-and-forward <ul><li>Takes L/R seconds to transmit (push out) packet of L bits on to link of R bps ...
Packet Switching: Message Segmenting <ul><li>Now break up the message into 5000 packets </li></ul><ul><li>Each packet 1,50...
Packet-switched networks: forwarding <ul><li>Goal:  move packets through routers from source to destination </li></ul><ul>...
Network Taxonomy Telecommunication networks <ul><li>Internet provides both connection-oriented (TCP) and  </li></ul><ul><l...
What Goes Wrong in the Network? <ul><li>Bit-level errors (electrical interference) </li></ul><ul><li>Packet-level errors (...
Performance Metrics <ul><li>Εύρος Ζώνης ( bandwidth, throughput )  </li></ul><ul><li>Καθυστέρηση  (latency or delay ) </li...
Performance Metrics explained <ul><li>Bandwidth (throughput) </li></ul><ul><ul><li>data transmitted per time unit </li></u...
Bandwidth versus Latency <ul><li>Relative importance </li></ul><ul><ul><li>1-byte: 1ms vs 100ms dominates 1Mbps vs 100Mbps...
Delay x Bandwidth Product <ul><li>Amount of data “in flight” or “in the pipe” </li></ul><ul><li>Usually relative to RTT </...
How do loss and delay occur? <ul><li>packets  queue  in router buffers   </li></ul><ul><li>packet arrival rate to link exc...
Four sources of packet delay <ul><li>1. nodal processing:   </li></ul><ul><ul><li>check bit errors </li></ul></ul><ul><ul>...
Delay in packet-switched networks <ul><li>3. Transmission delay: </li></ul><ul><li>R=link bandwidth (bps) </li></ul><ul><l...
Caravan analogy <ul><li>Cars “propagate” at  100 km/hr </li></ul><ul><li>Toll booth takes 12 sec to service a car (transmi...
Caravan analogy (more) <ul><li>Cars now “propagate” at  1000 km/hr </li></ul><ul><li>Toll booth now takes 1 min to service...
Nodal delay <ul><li>d proc  = processing delay </li></ul><ul><ul><li>typically a few microsecs or less </li></ul></ul><ul>...
Queueing delay (revisited) <ul><li>R=link bandwidth (bps) </li></ul><ul><li>L=packet length (bits) </li></ul><ul><li>a=ave...
“ Real” Internet delays and routes <ul><li>What do “real” Internet delay & loss look like?  </li></ul><ul><li>Traceroute  ...
“ Real” Internet delays and routes 1  cs-gw (128.119.240.254)  1 ms  1 ms  2 ms 2  border1-rt-fa5-1-0.gw.umass.edu (128.11...
Packet loss <ul><li>queue (aka buffer) preceding link in buffer has finite capacity </li></ul><ul><li>when packet arrives ...
Παράδειγμα   1   Δύο υπολογιστές βρίσκονται σε απόσταση 100 Km.  Πόσος χρόνος χρειάζεται για τη μετάδοση 1ΜΒ από τον ένα σ...
Παράδειγμα 2   Δύο υπολογιστές βρίσκονται σε απόσταση 100 Km.  Πόσος χρόνος χρειάζεται για τη μετάδοση 1ΚΒ από τον ένα στο...
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Chapter 1B

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  • Two simple multiple access control techniques. Each mobile’s share of the bandwidth is divided into portions for the uplink and the downlink. Also, possibly, out of band signaling. As we will see, used in AMPS, GSM, IS-54/136
  • Transcript of "Chapter 1B"

    1. 1. Topic 1 Introduction Part B The majority of the slides in this course are adapted from the accompanying slides to the books by Larry Peterson and Bruce Davie and by Jim Kurose and Keith Ross. Additional slides and/or figures from other sources and from Vasos Vassiliou are also included in this presentation.
    2. 2. Access networks and physical media <ul><li>Q: How to connect end systems to edge router? </li></ul><ul><li>residential access nets </li></ul><ul><li>institutional access networks (school, company) </li></ul><ul><li>mobile access networks </li></ul><ul><li>Keep in mind: </li></ul><ul><li>bandwidth (bits per second) of access network? </li></ul><ul><li>shared or dedicated? </li></ul>
    3. 3. Residential access: point to point access <ul><li>Dialup via modem </li></ul><ul><ul><li>up to 56Kbps direct access to router (often less) </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Can’t surf and phone at same time: can’t be “always on” </li></ul></ul><ul><li>ADSL: asymmetric digital subscriber line </li></ul><ul><ul><li>up to 1 Mbps upstream (today typically < 256 kbps) </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>up to 8 Mbps downstream (today typically < 1 Mbps) </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>FDM: 50 kHz - 1 MHz for downstream </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>4 kHz - 50 kHz for upstream </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>0 kHz - 4 kHz for ordinary telephone </li></ul></ul>
    4. 4. Residential access: cable modems <ul><li>HFC: hybrid fiber coax </li></ul><ul><ul><li>asymmetric: up to 30Mbps downstream, 2 Mbps upstream </li></ul></ul><ul><li>network of cable and fiber attaches homes to ISP router </li></ul><ul><ul><li>homes share access to router </li></ul></ul><ul><li>deployment: available via cable TV companies </li></ul>
    5. 5. Company access: local area networks <ul><li>company/univ local area network (LAN) connects end system to edge router </li></ul><ul><li>Ethernet: </li></ul><ul><ul><li>shared or dedicated link connects end system and router </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>10 Mbs, 100Mbps, Gigabit Ethernet </li></ul></ul><ul><li>LANs: chapter 5 </li></ul>
    6. 6. Wireless access networks <ul><li>shared wireless access network connects end system to router </li></ul><ul><ul><li>via base station aka “access point” </li></ul></ul><ul><li>wireless LANs: </li></ul><ul><ul><li>802.11b (WiFi): 11 Mbps </li></ul></ul><ul><li>wider-area wireless access </li></ul><ul><ul><li>provided by telco operator </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>3G ~ 384 kbps </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Will it happen?? </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>WAP/GPRS in Europe </li></ul></ul>base station mobile hosts router
    7. 7. Home networks <ul><li>Typical home network components: </li></ul><ul><li>ADSL or cable modem </li></ul><ul><li>router/firewall/NAT </li></ul><ul><li>Ethernet </li></ul><ul><li>wireless access </li></ul><ul><li>point </li></ul>wireless access point wireless laptops router/ firewall cable modem to/from cable headend Ethernet
    8. 8. Physical Media <ul><li>Bit: propagates between transmitter/rcvr pairs </li></ul><ul><li>physical link: what lies between transmitter & receiver </li></ul><ul><li>guided media: </li></ul><ul><ul><li>signals propagate in solid media: copper, fiber, coax </li></ul></ul><ul><li>unguided media: </li></ul><ul><ul><li>signals propagate freely, e.g., radio </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Twisted Pair (TP) </li></ul><ul><li>two insulated copper wires </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Category 3: traditional phone wires, 10 Mbps Ethernet </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Category 5: 100Mbps Ethernet </li></ul></ul>
    9. 9. Physical Media: coax, fiber <ul><li>Coaxial cable: </li></ul><ul><li>two concentric copper conductors </li></ul><ul><li>bidirectional </li></ul><ul><li>baseband: </li></ul><ul><ul><li>single channel on cable </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>legacy Ethernet </li></ul></ul><ul><li>broadband: </li></ul><ul><ul><li>multiple channel on cable </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>HFC </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Fiber optic cable: </li></ul><ul><li>glass fiber carrying light pulses, each pulse a bit </li></ul><ul><li>high-speed operation: </li></ul><ul><ul><li>high-speed point-to-point transmission (e.g., 5 Gps) </li></ul></ul><ul><li>low error rate: repeaters spaced far apart ; immune to electromagnetic noise </li></ul>
    10. 10. Physical media: radio <ul><li>signal carried in electromagnetic spectrum </li></ul><ul><li>no physical “wire” </li></ul><ul><li>bidirectional </li></ul><ul><li>propagation environment effects: </li></ul><ul><ul><li>reflection </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>obstruction by objects </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>interference </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Radio link types: </li></ul><ul><li>terrestrial microwave </li></ul><ul><ul><li>e.g. up to 45 Mbps channels </li></ul></ul><ul><li>LAN (e.g., Wifi) </li></ul><ul><ul><li>2Mbps, 11Mbps </li></ul></ul><ul><li>wide-area (e.g., cellular) </li></ul><ul><ul><li>e.g. 3G: hundreds of kbps </li></ul></ul><ul><li>satellite </li></ul><ul><ul><li>up to 50Mbps channel (or multiple smaller channels) </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>270 msec end-end delay </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>geosynchronous versus low altitude </li></ul></ul>
    11. 11. Access networks and physical media
    12. 12. The Network Core <ul><li>mesh of interconnected routers </li></ul><ul><li>the fundamental question: how is data transferred through net? </li></ul><ul><ul><li>circuit switching: dedicated circuit per call: telephone net </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>packet-switching: data sent thru net in discrete “chunks” </li></ul></ul>
    13. 13. Network Core: Circuit Switching <ul><li>End-end resources reserved for “call” </li></ul><ul><li>link bandwidth, switch capacity </li></ul><ul><li>dedicated resources: no sharing </li></ul><ul><li>circuit-like (guaranteed) performance </li></ul><ul><li>call setup required </li></ul>
    14. 14. Circuit Switching <ul><li>network resources (e.g., bandwidth) divided into “pieces” </li></ul><ul><li>pieces allocated to calls </li></ul><ul><li>resource piece idle if not used by owning call (no sharing) </li></ul><ul><li>dividing link bandwidth into “pieces” </li></ul><ul><ul><li>frequency division </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>time division </li></ul></ul>
    15. 15. Circuit Switching: FDM and TDM FDM frequency time TDM frequency time 4 users Example:
    16. 16. Back in the Old Days…
    17. 17. Then Came TDM… Multiplex (mux) Demultiplex (demux) <ul><li>Synchronous time division multiplexing </li></ul>
    18. 18. TDM Logical Network View
    19. 19. Numerical example <ul><li>How long does it take to send a file of 640,000 bits from host A to host B over a circuit-switched network? </li></ul><ul><ul><li>All links are 1.536 Mbps </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Each link uses TDM with 24 slots </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>500 msec to establish end-to-end circuit </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Work it out! </li></ul>
    20. 20. Packet Switching <ul><li>each end-end data stream divided into packets </li></ul><ul><li>user A, B packets share network resources </li></ul><ul><li>each packet uses full link bandwidth </li></ul><ul><li>resources used as needed </li></ul><ul><li>resource contention: </li></ul><ul><li>aggregate resource demand can exceed amount available </li></ul><ul><li>congestion: packets queue, wait for link use </li></ul><ul><li>store and forward: packets move one hop at a time </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Node receives complete packet before forwarding </li></ul></ul>Bandwidth division into “pieces” Dedicated allocation Resource reservation
    21. 21. Packet Switching <ul><li>Interleave packets from different sources </li></ul><ul><li>Efficient: resources used on demand </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Statistical multiplexing </li></ul></ul><ul><li>General </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Multiple types of applications </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Accommodates bursty traffic </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Addition of queues </li></ul></ul>
    22. 22. Characteristics of Packet Switching <ul><li>Store and forward </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Packets are self contained units </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Can use alternate paths - reordering </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Contention </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Congestion </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Delay </li></ul></ul>
    23. 23. Packet Switching (Internet) Packets
    24. 24. Packet Switching: Statistical Multiplexing <ul><li>Sequence of A & B packets does not have fixed pattern  statistical multiplexing . </li></ul><ul><li>In TDM each host gets same slot in revolving TDM frame. </li></ul>A B C 10 Mb/s Ethernet 1.5 Mb/s statistical multiplexing queue of packets waiting for output link D E
    25. 25. Packet switching versus circuit switching <ul><li>1 Mb/s link </li></ul><ul><li>each user: </li></ul><ul><ul><li>100 kb/s when “active” </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>active 10% of time </li></ul></ul><ul><li>circuit-switching: </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Supports 10 users </li></ul></ul><ul><li>packet switching: </li></ul><ul><ul><li>with 35 users, probability >= 10 active less than .002 </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Packet switching allows more users to use network! </li></ul>N users 1 Mbps link
    26. 26. Packet switching versus circuit switching <ul><li>Great for bursty data </li></ul><ul><ul><li>resource sharing </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>simpler, no call setup </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Excessive congestion: packet delay and loss </li></ul><ul><ul><li>protocols needed for reliable data transfer, congestion control </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Q: How to provide circuit-like behavior? </li></ul><ul><ul><li>bandwidth guarantees needed for audio/video apps </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>still an unsolved problem </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Is packet switching a “slam dunk winner?” </li></ul>
    27. 27. Packet-switching: store-and-forward <ul><li>Takes L/R seconds to transmit (push out) packet of L bits on to link of R bps </li></ul><ul><li>Entire packet must arrive at router before it can be transmitted on next link: store and forward </li></ul><ul><li>delay = 3L/R </li></ul><ul><li>Example: </li></ul><ul><li>L = 7.5 Mbits </li></ul><ul><li>R = 1.5 Mbps </li></ul><ul><li>delay = 15 sec </li></ul>R R R L
    28. 28. Packet Switching: Message Segmenting <ul><li>Now break up the message into 5000 packets </li></ul><ul><li>Each packet 1,500 bits </li></ul><ul><li>1 msec to transmit packet on one link </li></ul><ul><li>pipelining: each link works in parallel </li></ul><ul><li>Delay reduced from 15 sec to 5.002 sec </li></ul>
    29. 29. Packet-switched networks: forwarding <ul><li>Goal: move packets through routers from source to destination </li></ul><ul><li>datagram network: </li></ul><ul><ul><li>destination address in packet determines next hop </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>routes may change during session </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>analogy: driving, asking directions </li></ul></ul><ul><li>virtual circuit network: </li></ul><ul><ul><li>each packet carries tag (virtual circuit ID), tag determines next hop </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>fixed path determined at call setup time , remains fixed thru call </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Analogy: there is already a policeman at every crossing to direct you </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>routers maintain per-call state </li></ul></ul>
    30. 30. Network Taxonomy Telecommunication networks <ul><li>Internet provides both connection-oriented (TCP) and </li></ul><ul><li>connectionless services (UDP) to apps. </li></ul>Circuit-switched networks FDM TDM Packet-switched networks Networks with VCs Datagram Networks
    31. 31. What Goes Wrong in the Network? <ul><li>Bit-level errors (electrical interference) </li></ul><ul><li>Packet-level errors (congestion) </li></ul><ul><li>Link and node failures </li></ul><ul><li>Packets are delayed </li></ul><ul><li>Packets are deliver out-of-order </li></ul><ul><li>Third parties eavesdrop </li></ul>
    32. 32. Performance Metrics <ul><li>Εύρος Ζώνης ( bandwidth, throughput ) </li></ul><ul><li>Καθυστέρηση (latency or delay ) </li></ul><ul><li>Απώλεια πακέτων (packet loss) </li></ul><ul><li>Διακύμανση καθυστέρησης ( delay variation or jitter ) </li></ul>
    33. 33. Performance Metrics explained <ul><li>Bandwidth (throughput) </li></ul><ul><ul><li>data transmitted per time unit </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>link versus end-to-end </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>notation </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>KB = 2 10 bytes </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Mbps = 10 6 bits per second </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><li>Latency (delay) </li></ul><ul><ul><li>time to send message from point A to point B </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>one-way versus round-trip time (RTT) </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>components </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Latency = Propagation + Transmission + Queue </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Propagation = Distance / c (speed of light) </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Transmission = Size / Bandwidth </li></ul></ul></ul>
    34. 34. Bandwidth versus Latency <ul><li>Relative importance </li></ul><ul><ul><li>1-byte: 1ms vs 100ms dominates 1Mbps vs 100Mbps </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>25MB: 1Mbps vs 100Mbps dominates 1ms vs 100ms </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Infinite bandwidth </li></ul><ul><ul><li>RTT dominates </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Throughput = TransferSize / TransferTime </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>TransferTime = RTT + 1/Bandwidth x TransferSize </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>1-MB file to 1-Gbps link as 1-KB packet to 1-Mbps link </li></ul></ul>
    35. 35. Delay x Bandwidth Product <ul><li>Amount of data “in flight” or “in the pipe” </li></ul><ul><li>Usually relative to RTT </li></ul><ul><li>Example: 100ms x 45Mbps = 560KB </li></ul>
    36. 36. How do loss and delay occur? <ul><li>packets queue in router buffers </li></ul><ul><li>packet arrival rate to link exceeds output link capacity </li></ul><ul><li>packets queue, wait for turn </li></ul>A B packet being transmitted (delay) packets queueing (delay) free (available) buffers: arriving packets dropped ( loss ) if no free buffers
    37. 37. Four sources of packet delay <ul><li>1. nodal processing: </li></ul><ul><ul><li>check bit errors </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>determine output link </li></ul></ul><ul><li>2. queueing </li></ul><ul><ul><li>time waiting at output link for transmission </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>depends on congestion level of router </li></ul></ul>A B propagation transmission nodal processing queueing
    38. 38. Delay in packet-switched networks <ul><li>3. Transmission delay: </li></ul><ul><li>R=link bandwidth (bps) </li></ul><ul><li>L=packet length (bits) </li></ul><ul><li>time to send bits into link = L/R </li></ul><ul><li>4. Propagation delay: </li></ul><ul><li>d = length of physical link </li></ul><ul><li>s = propagation speed in medium (~2x10 8 m/sec) </li></ul><ul><li>propagation delay = d/s </li></ul>Note: s and R are very different quantities! A B propagation transmission nodal processing queueing
    39. 39. Caravan analogy <ul><li>Cars “propagate” at 100 km/hr </li></ul><ul><li>Toll booth takes 12 sec to service a car (transmission time) </li></ul><ul><li>car~bit; caravan ~ packet </li></ul><ul><li>Q: How long until caravan is lined up before 2nd toll booth? </li></ul><ul><li>Time to “push” entire caravan through toll booth onto highway = 12*10 = 120 sec </li></ul><ul><li>Time for last car to propagate from 1st to 2nd toll both: 100km/(100km/hr)= 1 hr </li></ul><ul><li>A: 62 minutes </li></ul>ten-car caravan 100 km 100 km toll booth toll booth
    40. 40. Caravan analogy (more) <ul><li>Cars now “propagate” at 1000 km/hr </li></ul><ul><li>Toll booth now takes 1 min to service a car </li></ul><ul><li>Q: Will cars arrive to 2nd booth before all cars serviced at 1st booth? </li></ul><ul><li>Yes! After 7 min, 1st car at 2nd booth and 3 cars still at 1st booth. </li></ul><ul><li>1st bit of packet can arrive at 2nd router before packet is fully transmitted at 1st router! </li></ul><ul><ul><li>See Ethernet applet at AWL Web site </li></ul></ul>ten-car caravan 100 km 100 km toll booth toll booth
    41. 41. Nodal delay <ul><li>d proc = processing delay </li></ul><ul><ul><li>typically a few microsecs or less </li></ul></ul><ul><li>d queue = queuing delay </li></ul><ul><ul><li>depends on congestion </li></ul></ul><ul><li>d trans = transmission delay </li></ul><ul><ul><li>= L/R, significant for low-speed links </li></ul></ul><ul><li>d prop = propagation delay </li></ul><ul><ul><li>a few microsecs to hundreds of msecs </li></ul></ul>
    42. 42. Queueing delay (revisited) <ul><li>R=link bandwidth (bps) </li></ul><ul><li>L=packet length (bits) </li></ul><ul><li>a=average packet arrival rate </li></ul>traffic intensity = La/R <ul><li>La/R ~ 0: average queueing delay small </li></ul><ul><li>La/R -> 1: delays become large </li></ul><ul><li>La/R > 1: more “work” arriving than can be serviced, average delay infinite! </li></ul>
    43. 43. “ Real” Internet delays and routes <ul><li>What do “real” Internet delay & loss look like? </li></ul><ul><li>Traceroute program: provides delay measurement from source to router along end-end Internet path towards destination. For all i: </li></ul><ul><ul><li>sends three packets that will reach router i on path towards destination </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>router i will return packets to sender </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>sender times interval between transmission and reply. </li></ul></ul>3 probes 3 probes 3 probes
    44. 44. “ Real” Internet delays and routes 1 cs-gw (128.119.240.254) 1 ms 1 ms 2 ms 2 border1-rt-fa5-1-0.gw.umass.edu (128.119.3.145) 1 ms 1 ms 2 ms 3 cht-vbns.gw.umass.edu (128.119.3.130) 6 ms 5 ms 5 ms 4 jn1-at1-0-0-19.wor.vbns.net (204.147.132.129) 16 ms 11 ms 13 ms 5 jn1-so7-0-0-0.wae.vbns.net (204.147.136.136) 21 ms 18 ms 18 ms 6 abilene-vbns.abilene.ucaid.edu (198.32.11.9) 22 ms 18 ms 22 ms 7 nycm-wash.abilene.ucaid.edu (198.32.8.46) 22 ms 22 ms 22 ms 8 62.40.103.253 (62.40.103.253) 104 ms 109 ms 106 ms 9 de2-1.de1.de.geant.net (62.40.96.129) 109 ms 102 ms 104 ms 10 de.fr1.fr.geant.net (62.40.96.50) 113 ms 121 ms 114 ms 11 renater-gw.fr1.fr.geant.net (62.40.103.54) 112 ms 114 ms 112 ms 12 nio-n2.cssi.renater.fr (193.51.206.13) 111 ms 114 ms 116 ms 13 nice.cssi.renater.fr (195.220.98.102) 123 ms 125 ms 124 ms 14 r3t2-nice.cssi.renater.fr (195.220.98.110) 126 ms 126 ms 124 ms 15 eurecom-valbonne.r3t2.ft.net (193.48.50.54) 135 ms 128 ms 133 ms 16 194.214.211.25 (194.214.211.25) 126 ms 128 ms 126 ms 17 * * * 18 * * * 19 fantasia.eurecom.fr (193.55.113.142) 132 ms 128 ms 136 ms traceroute: gaia.cs.umass.edu to www.eurecom.fr Three delay measements from gaia.cs.umass.edu to cs-gw.cs.umass.edu * means no reponse (probe lost, router not replying) trans-oceanic link
    45. 45. Packet loss <ul><li>queue (aka buffer) preceding link in buffer has finite capacity </li></ul><ul><li>when packet arrives to full queue, packet is dropped (aka lost) </li></ul><ul><li>lost packet may be retransmitted by previous node, by source end system, or not retransmitted at all </li></ul>
    46. 46. Παράδειγμα 1 Δύο υπολογιστές βρίσκονται σε απόσταση 100 Km. Πόσος χρόνος χρειάζεται για τη μετάδοση 1ΜΒ από τον ένα στον άλλο δεδομένου ότι συνδέονται με ζεύξη χωρητικότητας 1 00Mbps στην οποία ηλεκτρομαγνητικά κύματα ταξιδεύουν με ταχύτητα 3 x10 8 m/s Αίτημα A B
    47. 47. Παράδειγμα 2 Δύο υπολογιστές βρίσκονται σε απόσταση 100 Km. Πόσος χρόνος χρειάζεται για τη μετάδοση 1ΚΒ από τον ένα στον άλλο δεδομένου ότι συνδέονται με ζεύξη χωρητικότητας 1 00Mbps στην οποία ηλεκτρομαγνητικά κύματα ταξιδεύουν με ταχύτητα 3 x10 8 m/s A B Αίτημα
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