Using Problems to Learn  Service-oriented Computing Sandeep Purao , Ph.D. Associate Professor of IST  Enterprise Informati...
The IT Professional <ul><li>Service-orientation requires shifting the role </li></ul><ul><ul><li>From a Toolsmith (Brooks ...
Multiple Epistemologies <ul><li>The ‘traditional’ model </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Stimulus-Response (Skinner 1968), Lecture mo...
Problem-based Learning <ul><li>The simple idea that ‘problems come before answers’ (Adams et al. 1988) </li></ul><ul><li>H...
Problems as the basis of Learning Traditional Problem-based
An Example
Another Example
Problem Structure Context Questions Objective Sources Outcomes Rubric Descriptors Constructivist Socio-Cultural Learning b...
Current Challenges <ul><li>Balancing the need to learn fundamentals versus the need to learn about context (Nilsen and Pur...
Status <ul><li>Experience: Instructors, Courses, Terms </li></ul><ul><li>Being Adapted at Another Institution </li></ul><u...
Partners <ul><li>http://aesop.ist.psu.edu </li></ul><ul><li>Penn State Team </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Sandeep Purao </li></ul>...
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Using Problems to learn Service-oriented Computing

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Outlines an approach to use problem-based learning for service computing

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Using Problems to learn Service-oriented Computing

  1. 1. Using Problems to Learn Service-oriented Computing Sandeep Purao , Ph.D. Associate Professor of IST Enterprise Informatics and Integration Center Standards Interest Group, Socio-technical Systems Lab The work has been funded by National Science Foundation under award numbers 722112 and 722141.
  2. 2. The IT Professional <ul><li>Service-orientation requires shifting the role </li></ul><ul><ul><li>From a Toolsmith (Brooks 1996) </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>To a Participant in a multi-disciplinary team (Edens 2000) </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>A successful IT professional must be self-directed, participate effectively in a team, be aware of IT standards nessary for loose coupling and inter-operability (Watts 2006, CRA 2006) </li></ul></ul></ul>
  3. 3. Multiple Epistemologies <ul><li>The ‘traditional’ model </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Stimulus-Response (Skinner 1968), Lecture mode (Leidner and Jarvenpaa 1995) </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Constructivist Theories </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Learning as an active process </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Students construct their own abstract framework </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>(Piaget 1929, Bruner 1966, Yarusso 1992) </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Socio-Cultural Theories </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Knowledge is not abstract, it cannot be separated from the students’ background </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Learning is a function of activity and context in which it occurs </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>(Lave 1988, Brown et al. 1989, Argyris 1976) </li></ul></ul>
  4. 4. Problem-based Learning <ul><li>The simple idea that ‘problems come before answers’ (Adams et al. 1988) </li></ul><ul><li>Has been applied in disciplines such as medicine, management and architecture with variants including case-based learning (Bernstein et al. 1995, Schmidt et al. 1987, Garvin 2007) </li></ul>Experiential Problem-based Learning Abstraction
  5. 5. Problems as the basis of Learning Traditional Problem-based
  6. 6. An Example
  7. 7. Another Example
  8. 8. Problem Structure Context Questions Objective Sources Outcomes Rubric Descriptors Constructivist Socio-Cultural Learning by Engaging in Solving Problems
  9. 9. Current Challenges <ul><li>Balancing the need to learn fundamentals versus the need to learn about context (Nilsen and Purao 2005) </li></ul><ul><li>Devising problems that represent frames that are likely to engage the students (Albenes and Mitchell 1993) </li></ul><ul><li>Ensuring that the scope of the problem is sufficiently narrow to provide directed learning and feedback within the assigned time </li></ul><ul><li>Providing opportunities for reflecting on the feedback provided to encourage learning </li></ul>
  10. 10. Status <ul><li>Experience: Instructors, Courses, Terms </li></ul><ul><li>Being Adapted at Another Institution </li></ul><ul><li>Evaluation baselines being created </li></ul><ul><li>Repository being constructed </li></ul>
  11. 11. Partners <ul><li>http://aesop.ist.psu.edu </li></ul><ul><li>Penn State Team </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Sandeep Purao </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>John Bagby </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Brian Cameron </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Steve Sawyer </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Hoi Suen, Lisa Lenze </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Georgia State Team </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Vijay Vaishnavi </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Richard Welke </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Faye Borthick </li></ul></ul>The work reported has been funded by the National Science Foundation under award numbers 722112 and 722141. AESOP [email_address]

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