New SP coaching for induction 1 2013

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October 17, 2013

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  • Darren4:00 – 4:033mThank you for bringing your binders and signing in.
  • 4:03 – 4:052mIn the workshops we’ve focused on FACT modules, this is a complete shift toward the work of mentoring. In our experience, new SPs are often very concerned and anxious about the what of formative assessment and BTSA, Tonight’s sesssion is focused on you, the mentors. It’s the how of induction. How to work more effectively with your PTs and support their growth as teachers. Refine your understanding about the role of the mentor: offer support, create challenge, facilitate professional vision of new teachers.
  • 4:05 – 4:105mNow that we’ve set the stage for tonight’s meeting, we’re ready to begin. We’ve all been busy today doing a myriad things that have everything to do with our “day job” but little to do with our role as an SP; so, it is important to get back into our role and that thinking. Air of mystique, you like the cut of their jib, they have a certain swagger.At the signal, I want you to stand up, find a person not at your table, and talk to them about this prompt. We will give you five minutes. Please begin.
  • 4:10 – 4:122mOur agenda for tonight is two tools for growth. First on our agenda for tonight is stances for growth. We’ll be considering the various approaches to work with our PTs as we problem solve with them. Second on our agenda is language for growth. We’ll be using learning and practicing language to move toward clarity and refine thinking.
  • 4:12 – 4:2715m (thanks Gita!!!)1 min presenter, 4 m to read, 2 min per person to share x 3, 2 min whole group shareWe’re going to explore our understandings of what it means to be a mentor. This excerpt is from Laura Lipton’s, Mentoring Matters. You’ll be working in triads at your table. Choose who your are A, B & C. If you need to get up and move to another group, please do.Take several minutes to read the article. As you are read highlight key points that stand out to you. When you finish reading your two pages, share your connections and possible applications to your work as a mentor. ****As Mentors one of our roles is to support teachers. It is critical that we don’t get stuck on only providing support. It is also important to create challenge. We create challenge by helping our PT learn from experience. The third component is creating vision. For BTSA facilitating vision is helping teachers attain the CSTP. We also create challenge when we help them move from one level of the Continuum to the next. It’s important to balance all three elements in order to energize growth and learning. In absence of any one of the three, you don’t have a learning focused relationship.
  • 4:27 – 4:28
  • 4:28 – 4:302mWhen we come together with our participating teachers the conversations that we have a very specific purpose. They are learning focused interactions These are different conversations than we might have on other occasions with peers or our mentors in other situations.The continuum of learning focused interactions describes the cognitive load of the work that we do depending upon what kind of conversation what kind of conversation we’re having with our PT.This introduces four stances for learning focused mentoring arrayed on a continuum from most to least directive. It offers ideas for providing information, while developing self reliance as well as thoughts and methods for fostering collaborative and self directive learning.
  • 4:32 – 4:414m video3m pair share2m share outWe’re going to watch a … minute video clip of a Support Provider working with a PT in a growth oriented way. Please focus on what the mentor does and says to guide the conversation rather than the content of their discussion.Module 2 “Coach to Consult”We’re going to show you two different videos. One of a secondary teacher, and one with an elementary teacher. In each case, focus on the conversation, not on the subject matter they’re teaching. After the second video, you’ll have a chance to debrief your notes.We’re going to start by looking at components of Mentoring in isolation to make our understanding to them permanent; then, we will practice them by putting the in context of the work we do in FACT.SET FOR WATCHING: What are some things you notice that occur in this clip? Look at who is doing the talking, listening, etc. What type of language is being used? Focus on the way conversation pattern – not the content of the conversation.
  • 4:41 – 4:504m video3m pair share2m share outLisa’s video (3:00)Module 2  Awareness  Navigating  Multi-stanceSET FOR WATCHING: What are some things you notice that occurred in this clip? Look at who is doing the talking, listening, etc. What type of language is being used? Focus on the way conversation pattern – not the content of the conversation.AFTER VIDEO: Talk to your neighbor about some things you noticed. Compare and contrast the two approaches of the coaches.Talk to a partner: What are some things you notice that occurred in these clips? Look at who is doing the talking, listening, etc.NOTE at end if it doesn’t come up. Lisa lead the teacher to problem solve to come up with her own solution to a problem – using centers in kinder to make them academic.
  • 4:50 – 4:512 mNow that you’ve seen it modeled in the videos, you’ll have an opportunity explore the stances in more depth.
  • 1m
  • Gita4:57 – 5:003mSo now we’ve seen that the stances that Support Providers use with Participating teachers to problem solve and help grow the PT’s habits of mind. Now, we’re going to look at what specific language can be used to invite thinking in those stances.Our goal is to empower PTs to be in charge of their own learning, It is important to use language that allows the PTs brain to OPEN their thinking and ask questions in a way to help them focus their thinking. We’re going to explore some language frames that assist in opening and focusing thinking. You will notice they consist of an invitation, cognition, and a topic.
  • Gita 5:00 – 5:044mThis is an example of a sentence you might use in a casual conversation, “How do you think your students did?”In a learning focused relationship, When collaboratively looking at student work with another teacher in casual conversation, we would most likely say, “How do you think your students did on this formative assessment?”When using an intentional language frame, we might say, “What are some of your conclusions about your students’ learning on this formative assessment?” Invitation= “What are some” Cognition = conclude Topic = formative assessment
  • Gita 5:00 – 5:044mThis is an example of a sentence you might use in a casual conversation, “How do you think your students did?”In a learning focused relationship, When collaboratively looking at student work with another teacher in casual conversation, we would most likely say, “How do you think your students did on this formative assessment?”When using an intentional language frame, we might say, “What are some of your conclusions about your students’ learning on this formative assessment?” Invitation= “What are some” Cognition = conclude Topic = formative assessment
  • Gita 5:00 – 5:044mThis is an example of a sentence you might use in a casual conversation, “How do you think your students did?”In a learning focused relationship, When collaboratively looking at student work with another teacher in casual conversation, we would most likely say, “How do you think your students did on this formative assessment?”When using an intentional language frame, we might say, “What are some of your conclusions about your students’ learning on this formative assessment?” Invitation= “What are some” Cognition = conclude Topic = formative assessment
  • Gita 5:00 – 5:044mThis is an example of a sentence you might use in a casual conversation, “How do you think your students did?”In a learning focused relationship, When collaboratively looking at student work with another teacher in casual conversation, we would most likely say, “How do you think your students did on this formative assessment?”When using an intentional language frame, we might say, “What are some of your conclusions about your students’ learning on this formative assessment?” Invitation= “What are some” Cognition = conclude Topic = formative assessment
  • 5:04 – 5:073mAnother option: READ ” Invitation= “As you” Cognition = analyze, conclude Topic = student work, structure of lesson
  • 5:04 – 5:073mAnother option: READ ” Invitation= “As you” Cognition = analyze, conclude Topic = student work, structure of lesson
  • 5:04 – 5:073mAnother option: READ ” Invitation= “As you” Cognition = analyze, conclude Topic = student work, structure of lesson
  • 5:04 – 5:073mAnother option: READ ” Invitation= “As you” Cognition = analyze, conclude Topic = student work, structure of lesson
  • 5:07-5:124mYou’ve seen a video with some of this language. We’ve given you an example of breaking this apart. Now you’re going to practice this in your group.Using these language frames, first you’ll take turns building questions. In triads, take turns generating mediational questions using the Invitation, Cognition and Topic. For example, you might say, “How might you compare the pre and post-assessment results from the writing assignment?”In your triad, practice with mediational language is intentionally a drill just to get familiar with it and to become the automatic. You are going to make as many Mediational Questions as you can in 3-4 minutes. You will have 3-4 minutes to practice. Finally, we’ll check in to see what new thoughts and questions about the process you have regarding the development of questions that invite thinking.
  • 5:12 – 5:3220 mAfter the break, Kelly will lead us through some practice putting these questions into context.
  • Welcome back. Tonight’s training is intended to add some tools to your mentoring tool belt.We began with recognizing different approaches or perspectives that intended to support the growth of the PT.Then we began building our knowledge of language for growth. You’ve had an opportunity to work in your groups to craft mediational questions. Now we’re going to practice applying them to our own experience as mentors.
  • 5:32 – 5:4210Welcome back. Tonight’s training is intended to add some tools to your mentoring tool belt.We began with recognizing different approaches or perspectives that intended to support the growth of the PT.Then we began building our knowledge of language for growth. You’ve had an opportunity to work in your groups to craft mediational questions. Now we’re going to practice applying them to our own experience as mentors.In order to do that, let’s put this experience into context. First consider a critical incident that has occurred in your work with your PT. What we mean by critical incident is something that we aren’t sure how to approach and want some feedback on. Much like the work of a teacher can be isolating, the work of a mentor can be isolating that we don’t have the opportunities for problem solving with each other.One recent critical incident for me happened when the PT I was working with recently, she had two evaluations back to back. She was upset because felt that as a second year teacher there was a discrepancy between what she perceived were her strengths – specifically, implementing the DI framework and high levels of student engagement – which is what her principal told her she should be an areas of focus for her. I was struggling to support her emotionally and helping her process the information but as a mentor, I wanted to help her prioritize next steps.Now take a few minutes to write notes on the _______ describing this incident. (2m) We’ll be using this incident to provide context in practicing the mediational questions. **wait time**The purpose of this activity is three-fold. First it’s to practice crafting mediational questions within a learning focused conversation.Second, it’s to experience what it’s like being led in a learning focused conversation.Finally, it’s to observe how others use these scaffolds to create questions and open the thinking of their colleagues.Describe of a critical incidentUse Question StemsScript questionsNow that we have the critical incident we are going to take turns, by working in triads.During this protocol, only one person will speak at a time. First, Person A will spend 2 minutes describing the critical incident. Person B & C are listeningThen Person B will spend 3 minutes crafting questions – Person A listens – NOT answering questions. During this time, Person C scripts the questions.Finally, Person C will take 2 min to share and reflect aloud on the questions and their observations.After that time, we’ll repeat the protocol. When everyone has gone through all the roles, we’ll share out together. I’ll use the chime for transition cues.
  • 5:32-5:4210mUsing these language frames, first you’ll take turns building questions. Then you’ll apply this new skill in mentoring a fellow mentor, as your third partner scripts your questions. Finally, we’ll check in to see what new thoughts and questions you have regarding the development of questions that invite thinking. In your triad, practice with mediational language is intentionally a drill just to get familiar with it and to become the automatic. You will have 3-4 minutes to practice with your partner. In your group generate some mediational questions. Take turns using the Invitation, Cognition and Topic elements to practice forming mediational questions. Person A makes the questions, while persons B & C listen.You are going to make as many Mediational Questions as you can in ___ minutes. With your partner, decide who is Person A, B, & C.
  • 5:32 – 5:4210Welcome back. Tonight’s training is intended to add some tools to your mentoring tool belt.We began with recognizing different approaches or perspectives that intended to support the growth of the PT.Then we began building our knowledge of language for growth. You’ve had an opportunity to work in your groups to craft mediational questions. Now we’re going to practice applying them to our own experience as mentors.In order to do that, let’s put this experience into context. First consider a critical incident that has occurred in your work with your PT. What we mean by critical incident is something that we aren’t sure how to approach and want some feedback on. Much like the work of a teacher can be isolating, the work of a mentor can be isolating that we don’t have the opportunities for problem solving with each other.One recent critical incident for me happened when the PT I was working with recently, she had two evaluations back to back. She was upset because felt that as a second year teacher there was a discrepancy between what she perceived were her strengths – specifically, implementing the DI framework and high levels of student engagement – which is what her principal told her she should be an areas of focus for her. I was struggling to support her emotionally and helping her process the information but as a mentor, I wanted to help her prioritize next steps.Now take a few minutes to write notes on the _______ describing this incident. (2m) We’ll be using this incident to provide context in practicing the mediational questions. **wait time**The purpose of this activity is three-fold. First it’s to practice crafting mediational questions within a learning focused conversation.Second, it’s to experience what it’s like being led in a learning focused conversation.Finally, it’s to observe how others use these scaffolds to create questions and open the thinking of their colleagues.Describe of a critical incidentUse Question StemsScript questionsNow that we have the critical incident we are going to take turns, by working in triads.During this protocol, only one person will speak at a time. First, Person A will spend 2 minutes describing the critical incident. Person B & C are listeningThen Person B will spend 3 minutes crafting questions – Person A listens – NOT answering questions. During this time, Person C scripts the questions.Finally, Person C will take 2 min to share and reflect aloud on the questions and their observations.After that time, we’ll repeat the protocol. When everyone has gone through all the roles, we’ll share out together. I’ll use the chime for transition cues.
  • 5:49-5:564mUsing these language frames, first you’ll take turns building questions. Then you’ll apply this new skill in mentoring a fellow mentor, as your third partner scripts your questions. Finally, we’ll check in to see what new thoughts and questions you have regarding the development of questions that invite thinking. In your triad, practice with mediational language is intentionally a drill just to get familiar with it and to become the automatic. You will have 3-4 minutes to practice with your partner. In your group generate some mediational questions. Take turns using the Invitation, Cognition and Topic elements to practice forming mediational questions. Person A makes the questions, while persons B & C listen.You are going to make as many Mediational Questions as you can in ___ minutes. With your partner, decide who is Person A, B, & C.
  • 5:32 – 5:4210Welcome back. Tonight’s training is intended to add some tools to your mentoring tool belt.We began with recognizing different approaches or perspectives that intended to support the growth of the PT.Then we began building our knowledge of language for growth. You’ve had an opportunity to work in your groups to craft mediational questions. Now we’re going to practice applying them to our own experience as mentors.In order to do that, let’s put this experience into context. First consider a critical incident that has occurred in your work with your PT. What we mean by critical incident is something that we aren’t sure how to approach and want some feedback on. Much like the work of a teacher can be isolating, the work of a mentor can be isolating that we don’t have the opportunities for problem solving with each other.One recent critical incident for me happened when the PT I was working with recently, she had two evaluations back to back. She was upset because felt that as a second year teacher there was a discrepancy between what she perceived were her strengths – specifically, implementing the DI framework and high levels of student engagement – which is what her principal told her she should be an areas of focus for her. I was struggling to support her emotionally and helping her process the information but as a mentor, I wanted to help her prioritize next steps.Now take a few minutes to write notes on the _______ describing this incident. (2m) We’ll be using this incident to provide context in practicing the mediational questions. **wait time**The purpose of this activity is three-fold. First it’s to practice crafting mediational questions within a learning focused conversation.Second, it’s to experience what it’s like being led in a learning focused conversation.Finally, it’s to observe how others use these scaffolds to create questions and open the thinking of their colleagues.Describe of a critical incidentUse Question StemsScript questionsNow that we have the critical incident we are going to take turns, by working in triads.During this protocol, only one person will speak at a time. First, Person A will spend 2 minutes describing the critical incident. Person B & C are listeningThen Person B will spend 3 minutes crafting questions – Person A listens – NOT answering questions. During this time, Person C scripts the questions.Finally, Person C will take 2 min to share and reflect aloud on the questions and their observations.After that time, we’ll repeat the protocol. When everyone has gone through all the roles, we’ll share out together. I’ll use the chime for transition cues.
  • 5:49-5:567mUsing these language frames, first you’ll take turns building questions. Then you’ll apply this new skill in mentoring a fellow mentor, as your third partner scripts your questions. Finally, we’ll check in to see what new thoughts and questions you have regarding the development of questions that invite thinking. In your triad, practice with mediational language is intentionally a drill just to get familiar with it and to become the automatic. You will have 3-4 minutes to practice with your partner. In your group generate some mediational questions. Take turns using the Invitation, Cognition and Topic elements to practice forming mediational questions. Person A makes the questions, while persons B & C listen.You are going to make as many Mediational Questions as you can in ___ minutes. With your partner, decide who is Person A, B, & C.
  • Kelly5:56 – 6:01You’ve had an opportunity to practice all of the roles we’d like to open it up to all of the group and hear what you thought.
  • Kelly 6:01 – 6:054mWhat are some key learnings your taking tonight that you’ll be able to use to empower your PTs to grow? Think of two ways you can use the strategies from tonight to empower your Participating Teacher to grow in their craftWrite each idea on a separate sheet of paper
  • Kelly6:05 – 6:1510mWhat are some key learnings your taking tonight that you’ll be able to use to empower your PTs to grow? Stand in a circle.
  • Kelly6:15 – 6:172mAfter you fill out the evaluations and bus your table. If you have any questions, please come and talk to us.
  • 5:15-5:194mUsing these language frames, first you’ll take turns building questions. Then you’ll apply this new skill in mentoring a fellow mentor, as your third partner scripts your questions. Finally, we’ll check in to see what new thoughts and questions you have regarding the development of questions that invite thinking. In your triad, practice with mediational language is intentionally a drill just to get familiar with it and to become the automatic. You will have 3-4 minutes to practice with your partner. In your group generate some mediational questions. Take turns using the Invitation, Cognition and Topic elements to practice forming mediational questions. Person A makes the questions, while persons B & C listen.You are going to make as many Mediational Questions as you can in ___ minutes. With your partner, decide who is Person A, B, & C.
  • 4:50 – 4:512 mNow that you’ve seen it modeled in the videos, you’ll have an opportunity explore the stances in more depth.
  • New SP coaching for induction 1 2013

    1. 1. Welcome New Support Provider Coaching for Induction I October 17, 2013 SAN JOSE UNIFIED SCHOOL DISTRICT INSPIRING AND PREPARING ALL STUDENTS TO SUCCEED IN A GLOBAL SOCIETY
    2. 2. Meeting Goal Build Support Provider mentoring skills to invite thinking in order to empower Participating Teachers to grow in their craft
    3. 3. What learning do you think your PT walked away with at the end of your last session?
    4. 4. Stances for growth Language for growth
    5. 5. Learning focused relationships accelerate teacher growth Mentoring Matters In trios, all read introduction and: • A-Offering Support • B-Creating Challenge • C-Facilitating Professional Vision Triad read, share, whole group share of applications to your work as a mentor
    6. 6.  “The most important function for mentors is to embrace a growth orientation, understanding their work is to increase their colleagues effectiveness as a professional problem solver and decision maker.” - Laura Lipton, 2010 
    7. 7. The continuum of learning focused interactions describes and guides conversations. Calibrate Information & Analysis Consult Collaborate Coach
    8. 8. Video Processing Question Partner A: What are you noticing on each stance of the continuum? Partner B: Script questions that the mentor is asking.
    9. 9. Learning focused stances coach to consult Inspiring and Preparing ALL Students to Succeed in a Global Society
    10. 10. Learning Focused Stances Multi-Stance Inspiring and Preparing ALL Students to Succeed in a Global Society
    11. 11. The continuum of learning focused interactions describes and guides conversations. Calibrate Information & Analysis Consult Collaborate Coach
    12. 12. Pronoun: You COACH • Supports the beginning teacher’s underlying thinking • Increases the beginning teacher’s ability to plan • Allows the beginning teacher to reflect on practice and make instructional decisions
    13. 13. Pronouns: Us, Our, We COLLABORATE • Involves shared analysis, problemsolving, decision-making and reflection • Supports mutual learning, mutual growth and mutual respect
    14. 14. Pronoun: I CONSULT • provides the essential information and or resources to support learning for the beginning teacher
    15. 15. Pronoun: It, They CALIBRATE • Articulates standards • Uses data to identify gaps between expected standards and present results • Defines problems • Prescribing results
    16. 16. Stances for growth Language for growth
    17. 17. Use mediational language to open thinking
    18. 18. Use mediational language to open thinking “How do you think your students did?” “What are some of your conclusions about your students’ learning on this formative assessment?”
    19. 19. Use mediational language to open thinking “How do you think your students did?” “What are some of your conclusions about your students’ learning on this formative assessment?”
    20. 20. Use mediational language to open thinking “How do you think your students did?” “What are some of your conclusions about your students’ learning on this formative assessment?”
    21. 21. Use mediational language to open thinking “How do you think your students did?” “What are some of your conclusions about your students’ learning on this formative assessment?”
    22. 22. Use mediational language to open thinking “How do you think your students did?” “As you analyze your student work, what are some of your conclusions about the structure of your lesson?”
    23. 23. Use mediational language to open thinking “How do you think your students did?” “As you analyze your student work, what are some of your conclusions about the structure of your lesson?”
    24. 24. Use mediational language to open thinking “How do you think your students did?” “As you analyze your student work, what are some of your conclusions about the structure of your lesson?”
    25. 25. Use mediational language to open thinking “How do you think your students did?” “As you analyze your student work, what are some of your conclusions about the structure of your lesson?”
    26. 26. Invitation Cognition How might What would What are some In what ways How might you As you What seems What are your Predict Recall Select Describe Sequence Compare/contra st Analyze Prioritize Summarize Conclude Generalize Connect Apply Topic Student work Assessment results Performance standards Observations Concerns Student behavior Lesson Event Curriculum Materials
    27. 27. Break
    28. 28. Stances for growth Language for growth
    29. 29. Use the Continuum of Teaching Practice to promotes teacher growth Think of a recent critical incident with your PT. A. B. Describe critical incident (2 m) Craft questions using stems (3 m) C.1 Script questions C.2 Reflection (2m)
    30. 30. Invitation Cognition How might What would What are some In what ways How might you As you What seems What are your Predict Recall Select Describe Sequence Compare/contra st Analyze Prioritize Summarize Conclude Generalize Connect Apply Topic Student work Assessment results Performance standards Observations Concerns Student behavior Lesson Event Curriculum Materials
    31. 31. Use the Continuum of Teaching Practice to promotes teacher growth Think of a recent critical incident with your PT. C. A. m) B.1 B.2 Describe critical incident (2 m) Craft questions using stems (3 Script questions Reflection (2m)
    32. 32. Invitation Cognition How might What would What are some In what ways How might you As you What seems What are your Predict Recall Select Describe Sequence Compare/contra st Analyze Prioritize Summarize Conclude Generalize Connect Apply Topic Student work Assessment results Performance standards Observations Concerns Student behavior Lesson Event Curriculum Materials
    33. 33. Use the Continuum of Teaching Practice to promotes teacher growth Think of a recent critical incident with your PT. B. C. m) A.1 A.2 Describe critical incident (2 m) Craft questions using stems (3 Script questions Reflection (2m)
    34. 34. Invitation Cognition How might What would What are some In what ways How might you As you What seems What are your Predict Recall Select Describe Sequence Compare/contra st Analyze Prioritize Summarize Conclude Generalize Connect Apply Topic Student work Assessment results Performance standards Observations Concerns Student behavior Lesson Event Curriculum Materials
    35. 35. What are some things you noticed in each of the roles? How did hearing the questions shift your understanding of the critical incident?
    36. 36. How can you use these strategies to empower your PT to grow in their craft?
    37. 37. Snowball Fight! • Crumple up paper into a snow ball • On the signal, begin throwing your snowballs! • At the second signal, stop & pick up two snowballs around you • Forming a group of 2 – 3 people, take turns sharing and discussing the snowball ideas with your group
    38. 38. Closure • Evaluations • Upcoming Trainings • Year 2 PTs with SP: October 21, 22, 24 • ECO & Year 1 SP: November 7*, 12*, December 2, 3, 4
    39. 39. Invitation Cognition How might What would What are some In what ways How might you As you What seems What are your Predict Recall Select Describe Sequence Compare/contra st Analyze Prioritize Summarize Conclude Generalize Connect Apply Topic Student work Assessment results Performance standards Observations Concerns Student behavior Lesson Event Curriculum Materials
    40. 40. The continuum of learning focused interactions describes and guides conversations. Calibrate Information & Analysis Consult Collaborate Coach

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