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    • NEW DEGREE PROGRAM REQUEST (UA Regulation 10.04.02) Doctor of Program Management (DPM) Submitted to the University of Alaska Board of Regents by the Faculty of the UAA Engineering, Science and Project Management Department UAA School of Engineering February 23, 2009
    • NEW DEGREE PROGRAM REQUEST Table of Contents I. Cover Memorandum.....................................................................................................................1 A. Name of Persons Preparing Request.......................................................................................1 B. Brief Program Description......................................................................................................1 C. Research Areas for Students...................................................................................................2 D. Program’s Founding Philosophy............................................................................................4 E. Background of Program’s Support..........................................................................................5 F. Approval Signatures................................................................................................................7 II. Identification of program............................................................................................................8 A. Description of the Program.....................................................................................................8 1. Program Title.......................................................................................................................8 2. Credential Level of Program...............................................................................................8 3. Admission Requirements and Prerequisites........................................................................8 4. Dissertation Committee and Research Supervision.............................................................9 5. Course Descriptions (for required core courses)...............................................................10 6. Degree Requirements.........................................................................................................12 B. Program Goals.......................................................................................................................16 1. Brief identification of objectives and subsequent means for their evaluation...................16 2. Relationship of program objectives to “Purpose of the University”.................................18 3. Occupational/other competencies to be achieved..............................................................19 4. Relationship of courses to the program objectives............................................................19 III. Personnel Directly Involved with Program.............................................................................23 A. List of faculty involved in the program................................................................................23 B. Timeline and contribution of faculty to be hired..................................................................23 C. Administrative and coordinating personnel..........................................................................24 D. Classified personnel..............................................................................................................24 IV. Enrollment Information...........................................................................................................25 A. Projected enrollment/present enrollment..............................................................................25 B. How determined/who surveyed/how surveyed.....................................................................25 C. Minimum enrollments to maintain program for years 1 to 5................................................28 D. Maximum enrollment which program can accommodate....................................................28 E. Special restrictions on enrollment.........................................................................................29 V. Need for Program......................................................................................................................30 A. Requirement for Other Programs..........................................................................................30 B. Employment Market Needs..................................................................................................30 C. Similar and Competing Programs.........................................................................................31 VI. Resource Impact......................................................................................................................33 A. Budget...................................................................................................................................33 B. Facilities/space needs............................................................................................................33 C. Credit hour production..........................................................................................................33 D. Faculty..................................................................................................................................33 E. Library/media materials, equipment, and services................................................................34 VII. Relation of Program to other Programs within the System....................................................35 A. Effects on enrollments elsewhere in the system...................................................................35 i
    • Doctor of Program Management (DPM) Proposal B. Does it duplicate/approximate programs anywhere in the system........................................35 C. How does the program relate to research or service activities?............................................35 1. Contributions to research or service..................................................................................35 2. Benefits from research or service activities.......................................................................35 D. Current department research and funding (descending ordered in year 2009-2004)...........36 VIII. Implementation/Termination................................................................................................43 A. Date of implementation........................................................................................................43 B. Plans for recruiting students..................................................................................................43 C. Termination date (if any)......................................................................................................43 D. Plans for phasing out program if it proves unsuccessful......................................................43 E. Assessment of the program...................................................................................................44 IX. Regents Guidelines..................................................................................................................47 Board of Regents Summary Form............................................................................................48 X. Program Catalog Copy..............................................................................................................55 XI. New Course Descriptions........................................................................................................59 A. New Course: PM 650 - Program and Portfolio Management...............................................59 B. New Course: PM 652 - Enterprise Program Management Information Systems.................59 C. New Course: PM 654 - Portfolio Finance.............................................................................59 D. New Course: PM 656 - Global Program Leadership and Innovation...................................59 E. New Course: PM 658 - Program Governance and Group Decision Making........................60 F. New Course: PM 660 - Program Management Coaching.....................................................60 G. New Course: PM 695 - Research Methods in Program Management..................................60 H. New Course: PM 699 - Program Management Dissertation................................................60 XII. New Course Syllabi................................................................................................................61 A. New Course: Program and Portfolio Management...............................................................61 B. New Course: Enterprise Program Management Information Systems.................................66 C. New Course: Portfolio Finance.............................................................................................70 D. New Course: Global Program Leadership and Innovation...................................................74 E. New Course: Program Governance and Group Decision Making........................................78 F. New Course: Program Management Coaching.....................................................................82 G. New Course: Research Methods in Program Management..................................................85 H. New Course: Program Management Dissertation................................................................88 XIII. External Review....................................................................................................................91 XIV. Industry Support Letters.......................................................................................................93 XV. Prospective Student Commitment Letters...........................................................................104 XVI. Alumni Survey....................................................................................................................112 XVII. Resumes of Key Faculty Members...................................................................................118 A. Full-time Faculty Position to Be Filled...............................................................................119 B. Full-time Faculty Position Being Proposed........................................................................120 ii
    • Doctor of Program Management (DPM) Proposal Table of Exhibits Exhibit 1. Sample Course of Study, Four-Year Duration..............................................................14 Exhibit 2. Program Objectives and Evaluation Measures.............................................................17 Exhibit 3. Mapping of Objectives Addressed by Courses.............................................................20 Exhibit 4. Survey Respondents’ Interest in DPM Enrollment by Cohort and Residency.............26 Exhibit 5. Survey Respondents’ Topic Areas of Interest..............................................................27 Exhibit 6. Survey Respondents' Research Topics of Interest........................................................28 Exhibit 7. Summary of Project Management Related Degree Programs by Delivery Type.........30 Exhibit 8. Growth in PMI GAC Accredited Project Management Programs................................31 Exhibit 9. Other Doctoral Programs Related to Project and Program Management.....................32 Exhibit 10. Assessment of Academic Outcomes...........................................................................45 Exhibit 11. Projected Enrollment in DPM Program......................................................................51 iii
    • I. COVER MEMORANDUM A. Name of Persons Preparing Request Dr. Jang Ra, PhD, PMP Department Chair and Professor Engineering, Science and Project Management (ESPM) Department School of Engineering (907) 786-1862, afjwr@uaa.alaska.edu Mike Fisher, MSPM, MBA, PMP MSPM Alumni and ESPM Instructor Project Consultant, Northern Economics, Inc. (907) 274-5600, afmhf@uaa.alaska.edu B. Brief Program Description “Program Management is the centralized coordinated management of a program to achieve the program’s benefits and objectives. It involves aligning multiple projects to achieve the program goals [allowing] for optimized or integrated cost, schedule and effort” (PMI’s Standard for Program Management, 2008). It is the research field concerned with solving project, program, and portfolio management problems using qualitative and quantitative methods. Program management is the tool organizations use to implement their strategic plans. It is also focused on how projects, programs, and portfolios may be used to achieve organizational goals. Program management is grounded in theories and concepts of program management, including the three themes of benefits management, stakeholder management, and program governance. The methods have their origins in various scientific traditions including those in engineering and technology. According to our research, there is no program like our proposed DPM program in the United States and one of only two in the world that explicitly focuses on programs. Only two universities, located in Australia and France, offer doctoral-level study specifically in project and/or program management. The United States currently does not have a program of this nature; a number of doctoral programs offer project or program management as an area of research for their students, the DPM is the only program in the United States that focuses all of its coursework and research on program management. Doctoral level education in program management is currently underserved because of the need for organizations to reach a certain level of project management maturity before advancing to the next level. With project management becoming a globally recognized and highly valuable field, it is now time to train the next generation of program managers to leverage the benefits of programs of projects. UAA’s ESPM Department has demonstrated its ability and need to offer the DPM program, based on the past five years of performance by the Master of Science in Project Management (MSPM) program, including its accreditation by the Project Management Institute’s (PMI) Global Accreditation Center in 2007 and hosting of the 4th International Project Management Conference (ProMAC) in 2008. With program management gaining visibility and acceptance as a professional field, Alaska, in particular, is in need of skilled program management 1
    • Doctor of Program Management (DPM) Proposal practitioners due to the multiple large programs of projects envisioned and underway in the state. Advanced academic study and applied research is needed for the advancement of the profession and contribution to the program management body of knowledge. UAA has a unique and timely opportunity to become a global leader in this educational area. The DPM program may be characterized by the following attributes: • The program builds on students’ past experience and education, allowing for individual plans of study to address personal and professional development goals. • The program provides professional credibility through advanced coursework, and focused research, and practical application. • The program has a primary train-the-trainer focus and will help students to maximize their effectiveness as an educator, trainer, or mentor. • Graduates of the program will also be well suited to work in senior executive positions of organizations, in academic settings, and in consulting roles. • The coursework and dissertation process will enhance students’ ability to carry out meaningful and relevant research. The DPM program can be taken remotely with the use of tele-video and other Internet tools, which have been proven to be capable for this application by their use as part of the MSPM program. These technologies allow students outside the Anchorage area to attend classes and complete the program without requiring that they relocate to Anchorage. During student research, these technologies can be used for regularly scheduled process meetings, while these and other technologies can be used for one-on-one collaboration and discussion of research progress. Further, offering distance education in this manner allows the program to work through Homeland Security issues that block many potential international students from studying in the United States. International students have the option to stay in their home country while studying program management at UAA. C. Research Areas for Students The Doctor of Program Management program prepares students for positions involving the planning, supervision, and management of large projects, programs, and portfolios, as well as for participation in team investigations and solutions of major interdisciplinary problems. The program’s dissertation consists of an investigation and solution of a program management project or problem that specifically addresses the students’ ability to function in a program environment. In considering the issues facing organizations today, a number of program management research areas are available for study. A selection of potential student research topics are shown in the following list, which is based on feedback from MSPM alumni who are interested in or considering the proposed DPM program. These topics represent industry professionals’ best judgment about the project and program management issues that need to be addressed through advanced education and research in Alaska and at UAA today. The research topics include: • Program risk management, organizational risk maturity, and quantitative risk analysis tools 2
    • Doctor of Program Management (DPM) Proposal • Information technology program management • Communication, virtual teams, and multicultural issues in program management • Program management for international oil and gas companies • Systems engineering, process modeling, and strategic planning As an example of the types of advanced study being done in project, program, and portfolio management, the following lists summarize some of the research completed in recent years by various organizations and universities: • The Project Management Institute’s current research projects1 focus on a variety of topics that could be areas for future study by DPM students with respect to programs. Selected research topics for study in the DPM program, based on current PMI research, includes: o Program Management in Non-Profit Organizations o Implementation of Research to Practical Program Management Applications o Using Complexity as a Framework for Studying Programs and Program Management Practice o Program Managers as Senior Executives o Understanding Decision-making within Distributed Program Teams o Program Management in China o Understanding the Value of Program Management o The Value Mindset of Program Managers and Its Influence on Program Success o Understanding the Antecedents of Program Management Best Practices o Identifying the Forces Driving the Frequent Changes in Project Management Offices • Students might further research or seek new ways to apply research presented at the 2005 Conference of the Center for Program/Project Management Research (CPMR)2, which featured several presentations related to program and project management (P/PM). In the following list, the titles for CPMR research and the rationales for abstract selection are shown: o Modeling: Analyzing and Engineering NASA’s Safety Culture (Reflects in-depth understanding of NASA P/PM culture and decision-making.) o Innovative Management of Student Run Space Research Projects (Directly addresses NASA need to find ways to attract and recruit future P/PM personnel. Innovate P/PM process to enable students to carry out serious space-related projects while maintaining an acceptable level of risk. Leverages experience from existing SMEX P/PM practices.) 1 See http://www.pmi.org/Resources/Pages/Current-Research.aspx. 2 See http://cpmr.usra.edu/conference.html and http://cpmr.usra.edu/cpmr-abst-8-04.doc. 3
    • Doctor of Program Management (DPM) Proposal o Projects in Space (Directly responds to NASA’s challenge in attracting and developing P/PM professionals, and utilizes new generation of web-based training tools.) o Building a Strategic System Approach to NASA’s Project and Program Management (Strategic framework to distinguish among NASA projects - to tailor P/PM practices to each type. The P/PM framework would foster development of P/PM personnel and their ability to serve a customer.) o Project Management Research: Lessons Learned Life Cycle Processes and Aerospace Workforce Development o Learning-Based Project Reviews (Proposes improving learning and knowledge transfer on P/PM reviews at KSC -- a significant contribution.) o NASA Strategic Multi-Project Resource Management ‘CC-Lite’ (Potential avenue to introduce a tool for P/PM not in current NASA use, but with potential for significant paradigm change.) o Risk and Safety/Security Assessment at NASA (Study could provide a valuable resource for implementing P/PM culture change.) • Additional research topics for DPM students might include: o Improving Knowledge Management for Project, Program, and Portfolio-Based Organizations o The Effect of Organizational Learning Strategies on Program Management and Administration o Contribution of Earned Value Management to Project, Program, and Portfolio Success o Benchmarking of Program Management Practices o Improvement of Program Management Practices and the Effect on Stakeholder Satisfaction o Using Transformational Leadership to Enhance Program Success o Team Motivation and Cooperation in Geographically Diversified Programs o Measurement of Decision-Making Skills of Program Managers D. Program’s Founding Philosophy The Doctor of Program Management (DPM) program is a unique, pioneering program that builds on the demonstrated successes of the Engineering, Science and Project Management (ESPM) Department at the University of Alaska Anchorage (UAA). The DPM is a professional, practice- oriented doctorate degree focused on coursework and research focused on practical solutions to real-world program management issues. Program management is a practitioners’ field facing growth and the need for a higher level of education to shape the future of the field. 4
    • Doctor of Program Management (DPM) Proposal The ESPM Department and UAA are well-positioned to serve the global needs for well- educated, highly-skilled practitioners of program management in academic institutions, government, and industry. The Department’s success in identifying trends and addressing professional and academic needs has been demonstrated by the creation and subsequent success of the Master of Science in Project Management (MSPM) program and other endeavors. It is important for DPM program to become available soon to benefit from the successes of the MSPM program to fill the demand for program management education and establish UAA as a recognized leader in the field. The role of the DPM program is to advance the standard of practice and contribute to the program management body of knowledge. This role is intended to address today’s project, program, and portfolio management challenges and provide benefits to government and industry. Program management focuses on how organizations implement their strategic plans and realize competitive advantages through the execution of coordinated programs of projects. The program’s founding philosophy is based on the Project Management Institute’s Standard for Program Management and is centered on the three themes of benefits management, stakeholder management, and program governance. E. Background of Program’s Support On December 4, 2007, a proposal for a Doctor of Program Management was presented to President Mark Hamilton and Chancellor Fran Ulmer by the UAA School of Engineering and Engineering, Science, and Project Management (ESPM) Department team including Dean Rob Lang, LuAnn Piccard, Dr. Steve Wang, and Dr. Jang Ra. Both President Hamilton and Chancellor Ulmer were very supportive of the proposal. In particular, President Hamilton encouraged the creation of a professional doctoral program that would not be perceived in competition with UAF’s fundamental research-oriented Ph D programs. President Hamilton offered a clarification to others' views on his position regarding doctorial programs at UAA vs. UAF. He indicated that he was not opposed to these programs at UAA as long as they were well differentiated from UAF, were consistent with each institution's academic and programmatic focus, and utilized UA resources wisely. He expressed concern that it might be difficult for UAA to obtain institutional accreditation for fundamental, research-oriented PhD programs given the expectations for research facilities, library resources, infrastructure, and the like. However, at UAA, he was willing to consider putting in place professional doctoral programs (e.g., project management, education, and nursing) that required program-level vs. institutional accreditation and encouraged us to seek out the specific requirements for project management. A total of five PhD faculty will support the program. Given two full-time doctoral faculty members and a third under recruitment, two additional faculty will be added. The ESPM Department has made this request to the University of Alaska Anchorage administration who, in response, promised to provide necessary faculty positions for DPM at the meeting of Provost Mike Driscoll, Vice Chancellor Bill Spindle, Engineering Dean Rob Lang, and Dr. Jang Ra on August 14, 2008 at 2:30 p.m., in ADM 201. Support has been expressed from various groups. Section XIV presents supporting letters from corporate and governmental entities. Section XV presents commitment letters from perspective 5
    • Doctor of Program Management (DPM) Proposal students. The program has been reviewed by Dr. Cleland, who is regarded as the Father of Project Management. Dr. Cleland’s review letter is found in Section XIII. 6
    • Doctor of Program Management (DPM) Proposal F. Approval Signatures Patricia Sandberg Date Bob White Date Chair, UAA Graduate Academic Board Dean, UAA Graduate School Michael Driscoll Date Fran Ulmer Date Provost, UAA Chancellor, UAA Mark Hamilton Date Cynthia Henry Date President, University of Alaska Chair, UA Board of Regents Note: Although they are not included in the signature lines, there is support for this program from industry and government organizations, as well as letters from students committed to begin the program when it is offered. Please see the appendix for letters of support. 7
    • II. IDENTIFICATION OF PROGRAM A. Description of the Program 1. Program Title Doctor of Program Management 2. Credential Level of Program Professional Doctor Degree in Program Management, DPM 3. Admission Requirements and Prerequisites Students with a variety of backgrounds will be admitted to the program. The program seeks outstanding students from engineering, science, and technology-oriented disciplines. However, this program will also be beneficial to non-technology people who are working in a technology- oriented environment. The program is designed for working professionals. Potential students will complete an application to enter the program and submit it to the Engineering, Science and Project Management Department at the University of Alaska Anchorage. Application requirements will include: • A Master of Science in Project Management degree, a masters degree in project management accredited by PMI’s Global Accreditation Center, a BA/BS degree for students applying to complete both the MSPM and DPM degrees, or another masters degree and admissions committee approval. • Five years of work experience, preferably in the fields of project, program, and/or portfolio management • Three letters of recommendation • Statement of purpose • Graduate Management Admission Test (GMAT) scores or Graduate Record Examination (GRE) scores, or department approval • Application fee (two times the current UAA application fee) • For international students, TOEFL (required for students whose first language is not English unless they received an undergraduate degree from an English speaking country) An admissions committee will review all applications. The target class size for the first year will be 12, growing to approximately 20 per year steady state (depending on the availability of highly-qualified applicants and financial resources). The admissions committee will consist of faculty only (5 from UAA) and will be charged with identifying outstanding students that have the potential to be future leaders in program management. The committee will consist of Dr. Jang Ra (Chair), two faculty (comprised of Dr. Rob Lang, Dr. Steve Wang, and new faculty to be hired), and two industry professionals holding doctoral degrees. The committee will give extensive consideration to qualifications of applicants, areas in which they express interest, and faculty who have openings to advise students. It will assign an initial research advisor to each 8
    • Doctor of Program Management (DPM) Proposal accepted student (subject to agreement by the advisor), and the student will receive an offer letter from the University. The offer letter will clearly indicate that the offer is to participate in the professional doctor program. Incoming DPM students are expected to have taken appropriate courses or gained experience using quantitative techniques. Students are expected to have knowledge equivalent to at least one semester each of graduate-level statistics and either cost management or finance. Students are also expected to be competent with technology, including basic office applications and project management software (such as Microsoft Project). Students without the expected level of experience with statistics, cost management, finance, and technology may use courses offered by the ESPM Department to satisfy these requirements prior to entering the DPM program or in the first semester of study. The department offers graduate-level statistics, project cost management, cost estimating, and other courses. The department also offers Microsoft Project training. Completion of the DPM program will generally require students to have earned their Master of Science in Project Management (MSPM) from the ESPM Department. The admissions committee will review and give serious consideration to students who have not completed the MSPM degree or who hold a masters degree in another discipline. If the prospective student demonstrates a sufficient educational background and potential for the DPM program, admission may be granted without requiring the MSPM degree to be completed. Otherwise, the student will be required to complete the MSPM degree prior to beginning study in the DPM program, in which case the admissions committee may, at its discretion, grant a conditional acceptance into the DPM program, contingent on successful completion of the MSPM program. The admissions process is intended to be flexible, and primarily is focused on admitting students into the program who have the educational background and experience to be successful in the DPM program. Graduates of the DPM program will be sufficiently qualified to work as academic faculty as well as professional practitioners in government and industry, including in senior executive and consultancy roles. 4. Dissertation Committee and Research Supervision The Doctor of Program Management dissertation consists of an investigation and solution of, or a critical study of, a program management project or problem. The principal criteria of achievement in the dissertation are originality and creativity in the application of program management tools to solve a significant and specifically defined problem. The student must demonstrate the ability to carry out a program of advanced research and to report the results in accordance with standards observed in recognized scientific journals. The dissertation must be approved by the dissertation committee. The Doctor of Program Management dissertation committee will consist of at least three faculty members from UAA. When appropriate, it is suggested that one or two members from the professional community be added to the committee to allow for practice-oriented feedback and guidance. Research will be supervised by a chief advisor selected by the student and approved by the dissertation committee. The chief advisor chosen by the student should be well versed in program management and possess advanced education and experience relevant to the student’s research. 9
    • Doctor of Program Management (DPM) Proposal A program of research supervision will be developed to meet the student’s needs. Regular progress meetings will be held during the dissertation process, during which time the student will provide a progress report of work completed. The progress meetings will take place to ensure the student’s dissertation project is completed on schedule and meets the scope requirements. 5. Course Descriptions (for required core courses) The required core course work for the DPM program is described below. The core courses are 6 credit courses, which includes 3 hours of classroom time, group work and meeting time, individual work time, and other student/instructor interaction. PM 650 (TBD) (6 credits) Fall: Program and Portfolio Management New Course, Format Syllabus is attached (see Section A) Introductory foundational course for the DPM program. Covers program and portfolio management as techniques for the governance of multiple projects in an organization with systems thinking approach. Includes a discussion of project management and capability maturity models and maturity assessment tools, such as OPM3. Looks at organizational structures, cross-functional coordination, strategic alignment, and the role of the Program Management Office. Provides a broad review of global project and program management standards, including global standards such as PMI (U.S.), IPMA/ICB (Swiss), OGC/PRINCE2 (UK), PMAJ/P2M Revised (Japan), BSi/BS6079-1.2.3.(4): 2002, 2000 (UK), APM/APMBOK (UK), and ISO 21500 (initiated in November 2007). Students explore emerging program and portfolio management issues in Alaska, the United States, and globally. Students are expected to draw on their work experience and internet research to bring issues for study to the class. Prerequisite: MSPM degree or Department Approval PM 652 (TBD) (6 credits) Spring: Enterprise Program Management Information Systems New Course, Format Syllabus is attached (see Section B) Covers the management of enterprise-wide programs and portfolios, including the theoretical basis and practical applications and solutions for tracking and managing projects and project information. Features instruction in the use of the Primavera P6 application for the development and utilization of enterprise project management information systems. Covers how organizations can capture, analyze, and use historical information for successful projects in the future. Includes the capture and application of information within projects as well as inter-project knowledge management and wisdom management through lessons learned. Prerequisite: PM 650 or Department Approval PM 654 (TBD) (6 credits) Summer: Portfolio Finance New Course, Format Syllabus is attached (see Section C) Provides a broad and in-depth coverage of portfolio finance and related topics, including resources, cost, schedule, and financial management. The curriculum includes project- level finance, organizational financial management, and global economic aspects of 10
    • Doctor of Program Management (DPM) Proposal managing projects. Project-level and organizational finance includes funding constraints and phases, legal aspects, unions, resource availability and requirements, workforce requirements, projects and programs with multiple sponsors, and the risk implications of financing decisions. Also considers project and resource scheduling and project phasing. International topics include the effect of macroeconomic and political influences of projects, including interest rates, economic trends, logistics and supply chain management procurement aspects, and currency exchange rates. Prerequisite: PM 650 or Department Approval PM 656 (TBD) (6 credits) Fall: Global Program Leadership and Innovation New Course, Format Syllabus is attached (see Section D) This course covers the global context of projects, programs, and portfolios, focusing on environmental factors other than financial aspects. Topics include human resources, communication, virtual project teams, change management, geography and temporal challenges, global program management standards, cultural awareness and differences, legal issues, and techniques for addressing global challenges within a program. Overseas travel is required as part of this course, either to co-present a paper at an international project management conference (PMI Global Congress, SPM International Project Management Conference, or similar) and/or to co-author a report based on an international project site visit. A portion of travel costs, up to 50% of the tuition amount, are included in the cost of tuition to cover the cost of airfare, hotel stays, and miscellaneous expenses. Prerequisite: PM 650 or Department Approval PM 658 (TBD) (6 credits) Spring: Program Governance and Group Decision Making New Course, Format Syllabus is attached (see Section E) Covers the development, communication, implementation, and monitoring of organizational decision-making policies, procedures, and strategic plans for program and portfolio management. These factors form a framework for efficient and effective decision making and program delivery. Through proper program governance, an organization can control program investment and monitor the delivery of program benefits. Topics related to group interactions and decision making include roles and responsibilities, professional ethics, organizational and program risk management, organizational behavior, stakeholder management techniques, quantitative judgment and decision methods (such as the Analytic Hierarchy Process), risk tolerance, group dynamics, conflict resolution, transparency, and the importance of timely decisions. Prerequisite: PM 650 or Department Approval PM 660 (TBD) (3 credits) Summer: Program Management Coaching New Course, Format Syllabus is attached (see Section F) This course covers adult education, learning styles, and presentation techniques for graduate-level coaching and training through direct instructor roles, assisting faculty 11
    • Doctor of Program Management (DPM) Proposal members through a teaching assistantship, or providing mentoring on-line for students studying in the MSPM program. In this applied “train the trainers” course, activities include preparing new teaching materials and improving existing materials to enhance the quality and consistency of delivery. Students will teach a professional short course or undergraduate course, or serve as a mentor for multiple students in a graduate course; students will be paid for their teaching assignment. While teaching, the student teaching feedback and evaluations will be monitored by faculty. After completing this course, students should be prepared for teaching, mentoring, and training their team members. Prerequisite: PM 650, PM 652, PM 654, PM 656, PM 658, and Department Approval PM 695 (TBD) (3 credits) Summer: Research Methods in Program Management New Course, Format Syllabus is attached (see Section G) Introduction to the research methods used in project, program, and portfolio management. The course will provide students with an understanding of the difference between theory and practice, the connection of theory and research, the scientific inquiry process through surveys and interviews, research approaches and methods, and presentation of research results. Students are expected to provide a list of contemporary Program Management- related research topics, including their own DPM research. Students will study the dissertation research process in depth, including the design of research questions and hypotheses, data collection and analysis, valid statistical sampling, statistical analysis of research data, development of keywords, how to conduct a thorough literature review, effective internet searches, and intellectual property issues. Prerequisite: PM 650, PM652, PM 654, PM 656, and PM 658 or Department Approval PM 699 (TBD) (6 credits) Fall/Spring/Summer: Program Management Dissertation New Course, Format Syllabus is attached (see Section H) This is the dissertation course. Students working on their dissertation are required to maintain continuous enrollment in this course through the completion and successful defense of their dissertation. Prerequisite: PM 695 or Department Approval 6. Degree Requirements 1. Complete the general university requirements listed in the UAA catalog 2. Complete the graduate requirements listed in the UAA catalog 3. Complete coursework as determined by the advisory committee 4. Required elements of the Plan of Study a. Coursework (36 credits): Students must complete the core course requirements of: PM 650, PM 652, PM 654, PM 656, PM 658, PM 660, and PM 695. b. Outreach activity of one annual public presentation c. Advancement to Candidacy occurs when the student demonstrates mastery in understanding of the problems and theories of program management and in-depth knowledge of the student’s dissertation topic area. Requirements for Advancement to Candidacy are determined by the student’s academic committee and shall be consistent with the candidacy requirements for graduate studies at 12
    • Doctor of Program Management (DPM) Proposal UAA. Requirements include passing the comprehensive qualification exam, developing a dissertation topic, and showing teaching potential (based on student feedback). d. Pass the Comprehensive Qualification Exam, which will consist of multiple papers and a written exam. Students will be required to receive a satisfactory grade on a minimum number of papers and receive a satisfactory grade on the written exam to pass this requirement. The papers and written exam will focus on material covered in the coursework and developed through individual study while in the program. e. Submit a successful Dissertation Proposal f. Doctoral Dissertation (30 research credits) • Four-Year Cycle of Course Offerings This proposal provides a four-year course cycle envisioned to demonstrate the feasibility of completing the degree. All students are required to enroll in PM 650 Program and Portfolio Management course in the Fall semester of their first year. Students have the option of completing the program in three years if desired. 13
    • Doctor of Program Management (DPM) Proposal • Sample Course of Study Exhibit 1 shows a four-year course offering for the Doctor in Program Management. Students wishing to complete the program on an accelerated, three-year schedule would follow the schedule as shown through the second year and then take 12 credits of PM 699 for two of the three semesters in the third year. Exhibit 1. Sample Course of Study, Four-Year Duration Tuition Estimate (subject to increase) **** PM 650 (6) Fall Year 1 $4,000 PM 652 (6) Spring Year 1 $4,000 30 credits of lecture PM 654 (6) Summer Year 1 $4,000 courses Student PM 656 (6)* Fall Year 2 $4,000 PM 658 (6) Spring Year 2 $4,000 66 Credits 3 credits teaching** PM 660 (3) Summer Year 2 $2,000 3 credits of proposal PM 695 (3) Summer Year 2 $2,000 Qualification exam Summer Year 2 $4,000 PM 699 (6) Fall Year 3 $4,000 Candidate*** PM 699 (6) Spring Year 3 $4,000 30 credits of PM 699 (6) Summer Year 3 $4,000 research courses PM 699 (6) Fall Year 4 $4,000 PM 699 (6) Spring Year 4 $4,000 Fees (admission, graduation, miscellaneous university fees) $2,000 Total (approx.) $50,000 * * Basic costs will be supported by the ESPM Department, including up to $800 for Basic costs will be supported by the ESPM Department, including registration, $1,000 for airfare, and $1,000for airfare, room$1,000 for a $2,000 of up to $800 for registration, $1,000 for a hotel and and per diem. hotel room and per diem. registration, airfare, hotel and per diem. ** **Teaching compensation will be paid. be paid. Teaching compensation will *** Candidate will have a Teaching Fellowship (to be determined) position. *** Candidate will have a Teaching Fellowship (to be determined) position. **** Subject to UA BOR decisions. **** Subject to UA BOR decisions. The authors of the proposal recognize that many students will wish to work through the program at a different pace from what is shown in the sample course of study. The sample course of study is presented simply as an example. The program will work to accommodate different student study and research schedules and will evaluate the feasibility of options to make coursework available during alternative semesters as the need arises. 14
    • Doctor of Program Management (DPM) Proposal • Preliminary Catalog Sample Course of Study Doctor of Program Management School of Engineering DPM Degree Minimum requirement for Degree: 30 thesis credits The Doctor of Program Management program prepares future leaders as academic faculty and professional practitioners in government and industry, including in senior executive and consultancy roles, for careers at the frontiers of project, program, and portfolio management. Those who seek to study and further the project, program, and portfolio management bodies of knowledge need well-defined skill sets and an understanding of issues faced in today’s globally linked and fast paced environment. The DPM program at UAA builds on the academic knowledge, industry experience, and in-depth research of ESPM faculty members to educate students in program management, while training them to be acquainted with the full spectrum of issues, tools, and advances in project, program, and portfolio management. Program management is centered on the three themes of benefits management, stakeholder management, and program governance. The Doctor of Program Management program focuses on these three thematic areas of study and explores the relationships of project, program, and portfolio management. Overall, program management is a tool organizations can use to implement their strategic plans and realize competitive advantage. In the proposed DPM program, each student follows a common set of core courses and, with his or her graduate committee, develops a research plan for the in-depth study of a unique issue facing program management. The purpose of this research is both to produce an intellectual contribution to the project, program, and portfolio management bodies of knowledge and to develop a core area of expertise for future application and research in issues facing project-driven organizations in the future. Graduate Program—DPM Complete the admission process including the following: 1. Complete the general university requirements listed in the UAA catalog 2. Complete the graduate requirements listed in the UAA catalog 3. Complete coursework as determined by the advisory committee 4. Required elements of the Plan of Study a. Coursework (36 credits): Students must complete the core course requirements of: PM 650 (6), PM 652 (6), PM 654 (6), PM 656 (6), PM 658 (6), PM 660 (3), and PM 695 (3). b. Outreach activity of one annual public presentation c. Advancement to Candidacy occurs when the student demonstrates mastery in understanding of the problems and theories of program management and in-depth knowledge of the student’s dissertation topic area. Requirements for Advancement to Candidacy are determined by the student’s academic committee and shall be consistent with the candidacy requirements for graduate studies at UAA. Requirements include developing a dissertation topic, showing teaching 15
    • Doctor of Program Management (DPM) Proposal potential (based on student feedback), and passing the comprehensive qualification exam. d. Doctoral Dissertation (30 research credits) B. Program Goals The goal is to provide intensive education to enable outstanding students to become leaders in identifying and solving tomorrow’s problems in program management. This program will: • Represent a new, unique academic discipline and provide an innovative curriculum • Draw upon the joint resources and strengths of University of Alaska, governments, and industries in Alaska • Be complementary to existing Ph.D. programs in Alaska, attracting a new pool of global outstanding students • Be balanced between theoretical and empirical research skills DPM graduates will be sufficiently qualified to work as academic faculty as well as professional practitioners in government and industry, including in senior executive and consultancy roles. 1. Brief identification of objectives and subsequent means for their evaluation The proposed Doctor of Program Management at the University of Alaska Anchorage would prepare future leaders as academic faculty and professional practitioners in industry and government, including in senior executive and consultancy roles, for careers at the frontiers of project, program, and portfolio management. Specific focus would be given to the organizations and industries that exist in Alaska, the Pacific Rim, and the circumpolar North. The primary program objectives are to: 1. Educate and train scholars at the doctoral level with in-depth and integrated knowledge in research and application of program management. 2. Develop leaders who will apply the principles of program management in the organizations and industries in Alaska, the Pacific Rim, and the circumpolar North. 3. Create a globally recognized and respected program in program management that will contribute to science and inform public and organizational decision. 4. Contribute to the development of Alaska’s project, program, and portfolio management maturity and application. 16
    • Doctor of Program Management (DPM) Proposal Exhibit 2. Program Objectives and Evaluation Measures Objective Measurement Educate and train scholars at the doctoral level • Number of applicants admitted with in-depth and integrated knowledge in • Number of graduates research and application of program management • Student retention • Duration of study • Exit interviews with students • Course-specific surveys • Port coursework surveys • Follow-up surveys of graduates Develop leaders who will apply the principles • Employment of graduates of program management in the organizations • Number of graduates in senior leadership and industries in Alaska, the Pacific Rim, and positions in Alaska, the Pacific Rim, and the circumpolar North the circumpolar North • Follow-up surveys of graduates Create a globally recognized and respected • Publications by students program in program management that will • Presentations by students contribute to science and inform public and organizational decision • External funding received Contribute to the development of Alaska’s • Citations of student research project, program, and portfolio management • Stakeholder survey for impact assessment maturity and application • Number of public presentations and other outreach efforts The DPM program’s contribution to the objectives shown above will be measured and tracked annually. The measurements will be used to judge the program’s success, with success characterized by high demand for entrance into the program, high retention and graduation rates, improving course evaluations through continuous improvement, high alumni satisfaction, high hiring rates of alumni, and the volume of alumni publications and citations. 17
    • Doctor of Program Management (DPM) Proposal 2. Relationship of program objectives to “Purpose of the University” The mission of UAA is stated as the following: The mission of the University of Alaska Anchorage is to discover and disseminate knowledge through teaching, research, engagement, and creative expression. Located in Anchorage and on community campuses in Southcentral Alaska, UAA is committed to serving the higher education needs of the state, its communities, and its diverse peoples. The University of Alaska Anchorage is an open access university with academic programs leading to occupational endorsements; undergraduate and graduate certificates; and associate, baccalaureate, and graduate degrees in a rich, diverse, and inclusive environment. The Doctor of Program Management will serve this mission by contributing to the following key areas defined by the UAA Strategic Plan 2017: • Excellence in teaching, learning, research, and creative expression (Vision): The DPM program will expand the teaching, learning, and research activities at UAA through its coursework, “train the trainer” approach, and dissertation process. • Innovative undergraduate and graduate education centered on professional and craft practice, academic research, or creative performance (Vision): The DPM program has been developed to meet the professional and practice-oriented needs of Alaskan organizations and government agencies. • High quality research that includes special attention to Alaska, the Pacific Rim, and the circumpolar North; (Vision): The DPM program focuses on improving the program management maturity of organizations based in or operating in Alaska. It seeks to draw students from around Alaska and the Pacific Rim. • Innovation and Creativity (Core Values): The DPM program is a unique and innovative program that will address emerging needs for advanced, practice-oriented education. • Collaborate closely with public and private sector partners to maintain and develop our programs supporting workforce development and high-demand careers (Strategic Priorities): The DPM program has been developed through close collaboration with industry professionals and organizations with the intent of meeting the need for advanced education in project, program, and portfolio management. • Continue to design and implement new, mission-appropriate academic programs with special attention to advanced graduate study (Strategic Priorities): The DPM program is a unique and innovative program that expands upon UAA’s advanced graduate programs. • Develop selected programs of distinction, designed to attract the best students and faculty from Alaska and beyond (Strategic Priorities): Program management is a globally recognized field that is growing in visibility and importance as projects and programs of projects become larger, faster, and more comprehensive. • Organize and expand our internationalization and inter-cultural programs to prepare our students to think, work, and serve in a world being transformed by integration and 18
    • Doctor of Program Management (DPM) Proposal globalization (Strategic Priorities): A core aspect of the DPM program is the application of education and experience in a global environment. The program incorporates global issues in its coursework and requires students to present at an international project management conference held outside Alaska and/or the United States, such as a PMI Global Congress or SPM International Project Management Conference. For international students, it has them come to Alaska or the United States for their presentation. • Increase the active participation of our students, both undergraduate and graduate, in professional or craft practice, academic research, creative expression, and service learning to enrich their learning experience, increase their opportunities for academic distinction, and sustain the growth of engagement with our communities (Strategic Priorities): The DPM program offers advanced, practice-oriented graduate education in a collaborative environment designed to enhance learning, provide students with a network of professional peers, and produce research that benefits Alaskan organizations and government agencies. • Build selected research-centered graduate programs of distinction by recruiting critical masses of the most highly qualified faculty and graduate students (Strategic Priorities): The DPM program, which being a professional, practice-oriented degree, also features a substantial focus on research through its dissertation process. DPM student research will position UAA as a global leader in project and program management education. 3. Occupational/other competencies to be achieved Organizations competing in fast-paced, competitive, and globally-oriented project environment need qualified professionals with competency in the tools and techniques of project, program, and portfolio management, along with in-depth knowledge and expertise in specific application areas. The DPM program strives to meet this need by training professionals with qualitative and quantitative analytical skills for understanding program management issues. The specific skill set of the graduate will depend on his or her research objectives, but may include risk analysis, quantitative modeling, enterprise project management, decision-making, and portfolio and program knowledge management. The broad conceptual frameworks for understanding systems of projects, portfolios, and programs are covered in the DPM program core courses, described below. 4. Relationship of courses to the program objectives • Core courses: All courses in the DPM program are required of all students. The goal of these courses is to focus on the concepts, frameworks, and analytical tools and techniques for understanding issues of program management in an integrated approach. Topics covered in the core courses form an overarch ideas directly related to and integrated with program management tools and techniques. In addition to forming a solid foundation for the application of program management, these courses also provide an opportunity for students to identify areas of study for their research. • Research courses: A professional doctorate program is focused on the acquisition and development of both academic and practical knowledge. The research component of this degree focuses on the development of practical knowledge through applied research into a real-world problem. 19
    • Doctor of Program Management (DPM) Proposal Exhibit 3 shows the contribution of each course type to the four specific objectives of the program. Exhibit 3. Mapping of Objectives Addressed by Courses 20
    • Doctor of Program Management (DPM) Proposal Objective management in the organizations and industries in Alaska, program management that will contribute to science and Educate and train scholars at the doctoral level with in-depth Contribute to the development of Alaska’s project, program, Develop leaders who will apply the principles of program Create a globally recognized and respected program in and integrated knowledge in research and application of and portfolio management maturity and application inform public and organizational decision the Pacific Rim, and the circumpolar North program management Course PM 650: Program and Portfolio Management – Explores the models and methods of program and portfolio × management. PM 652: Enterprise Program Management Information Systems – Examines the theory and application of enterprise management tools for the × × × management of programs and portfolios. PM 654: Portfolio Finance – Provides training in the tools available for management of project, program, and × × × portfolio resources. PM 656: Global Program Leadership and Innovation – Provides students with a global context for program management and promotes cultural × × awareness and collaboration. PM 658: Program Governance and Group Decision Making – Explores the models and methods for supporting × × effective group decision-making. 21
    • Doctor of Program Management (DPM) Proposal PM 660: Program Management Coaching – Prepares students for effective sharing of knowledge through × teaching. Dissertation Courses (PM 695, PM 699) × × × × 22
    • III.PERSONNEL DIRECTLY INVOLVED WITH PROGRAM A. List of faculty involved in the program SOE and Adjunct Faculty Jang Ra, Ph.D.: Professor and Department Chair, ESPM Department. Specializations: Project Management, Multi-criteria Decision Making, Operations Research and Statistics. Teaching Responsibilities: PM601 – Project Management Fundamentals, PM612 – Project Time Management, PM624 – Project Risk Management, PM685 – PM Case Studies and Research, and many professional and customized short courses Steve Wang, Ph.D.: Assistant Professor, ESPM Department. Specializations: TQM, Management Sciences, Energy Management, Systems Management. Teaching Responsibilities: ESM601 – Engineering and Science Management, PM614 – Project Cost Management, PM616 – Project Quality Management Paula Donson, Ph.D.: Adjunct Professor, ESPM Department. Specializations: Corporate Leadership Management, Human Resource Management. Teaching Responsibilities: PM620 – Project HR Management. David Rechenthin, DBA: Adjunct Professor, ESPM Department. Specializations: Project Controls, Project EPC Management. Teaching Responsibilities: PM610 – Project Scope Management, PM622 – Project Communications Management, PM694d – Advanced Project Controls William Spindle, EdD: Adjunct Professor, ESPM Department. Specializations: Project Procurement Management. Teaching Responsibilities: PM 626 – Project Procurement Management New Full-Time Faculty (to be hired 2009-2010; approved position under recruitment) – Planned Teaching Responsibilities: Portfolio Finance, Program Management Coaching, Program Management Dissertation New Full-Time Faculty (to be hired 2010-2011) – Planned Teaching Responsibilities: Global Program Leadership and Innovation, Research Methods in Program Management, Program Management Dissertation New Full-Time Faculty (to be hired 2010-2011) – Planned Teaching Responsibilities: Program Governance and Group Decision Making, Research Methods in Program Management, Program Management Dissertation Resumes for each of the key faculty members are provided in Section XVII. B. Timeline and contribution of faculty to be hired This proposal includes plans for the hire of three additional faculty members to support the program. One faculty member is expected to be hired in the 2009-2010 fiscal year, with a focus on portfolio finance, program management coaching, and the program management dissertation. These topics will be covered in the summer semesters of the first and second years of the 23
    • Doctor of Program Management (DPM) Proposal program. Two additional faculty members are expected to be hired in the 2010-2011 fiscal year. The first of these hires will focus on global program leadership and innovation, research methods in program management, and the program management dissertation. The second of these hires will focus on program governance and group decision making, research methods in program management, and the program management dissertation. Other teaching responsibilities will depend on the program’s need as well as general needs within the ESPM Department. These topics will be covered in the fall, spring, and summer semesters, respectively, of students’ second year in the program. All faculty members will serve as student advisors and dissertation committee members to support student dissertation research. C. Administrative and coordinating personnel The DPM program will rely on existing personnel for administrative and coordinating support. The current administrative and coordinating staff is financially supported almost entirely form the Self-Supporting funds from the MSPM program. The DPM in its initial year will also function as a self supporting program until enrollment grows. When the DPM enrollment increases additional professional personnel will be hired accordingly. D. Classified personnel The DPM program will rely on existing classified personnel for delivery with the addition of three new full-time faculty members. The first new member will be hired in 2009-2010 and two additional positions will be added in the 2010-2011 fiscal year. 24
    • IV.ENROLLMENT INFORMATION A. Projected enrollment/present enrollment We anticipate 6 new students per year, following an initial group of 12 students once the program begins. B. How determined/who surveyed/how surveyed The projected enrollment for the proposed DPM program is based on letters of support from government and industry (see Section XIII) and prospective students (see Section XV), the ESPM Department’s experience and track record with developing and growing the MSPM program, and additional research about the demand for advanced and doctoral-level program management education. In addition to letters of support included with this proposal, numerous individuals from Asia have contacted the ESPM Department to express interest in the program. The ESPM Department conducted an online survey of MSPM alumni in late 2008. The purpose of the survey was to determine the level of interest in the program. The following section describes the results of the survey. Student Survey Methods The enrollment projections were derived based on data received from an online survey of alumni of the Masters of Science in Project Management program and prospective student commitment letters. The survey was sent via e-mail in early December 2008 to 43 alumni from both the Anchorage-based (UAA, 34 alumni) and Alaska Air Group Cohort (AAG, 9 alumni) programs. Alumni received an e-mail with a link to a survey page on the ESPM Department website. Multiple reminders were sent and the survey received a fairly high response rate (79 percent, based on 34 responses). The response rate was 67 percent (6 responses) for AAG alumni and 82 percent (28 responses) for UAA alumni. Survey respondents were asked about their awareness of and interest in the DPM. Interested was gauged by asking when the respondent would want to start the program and what factors would influence their decision. The survey also asked a number of questions to gauge alumni opinion about the ESPM Department. A copy of the survey is contained in Section XVI. Discussion Survey responses were received from 34 alumni. Of the respondents, 23 of them (68 percent) were residing in Alaska, 9 (26 percent) were residing elsewhere in Alaska, and 2 (6 percent) were residing outside the United States. When asked about their tenure and work experience, most (48 percent) alumni had been with their current employer for “up to five years,” followed by 21 percent who answered “more than 15 years.” The remainder had been with their employer for between five and fifteen years. Most of the respondents had a significant amount of work experience, with 65 percent reporting “more than 15 years” and 26 percent reporting “8 to 15 years.” 25
    • Doctor of Program Management (DPM) Proposal Respondents thought favorably of the ESPM Department and the MSPM program. All of the AAG alumni rated the ESPM Department’s effectiveness as “strong.” Seventy-five percent of UAA alumni rated the department’s effectiveness as “strong” and twenty-five percent rated it as “neutral.” All respondents indicated that they had recommended the ESPM Department’s programs to someone. Of those surveyed, 21 percent answered “yes” to being interested in enrolling in the DPM program, which 47 percent indicated “not sure.” A detailed breakdown of the responses to this question is shown in Exhibit 4 by current residency and cohort. Exhibit 4. Survey Respondents’ Interest in DPM Enrollment by Cohort and Residency DPM enrollment Cohort Residency No Not Sure Yes Total AAG Other US 4 2 6 UAA Alaska 6 13 4 23 Other US 1 2 3 International 1 1 2 Total 11 16 7 34 Of those who answered “yes” to being interested in enrolling in the DPM program, four people indicated an interest in being one of the funding students, with the other three wanted to know more about the program before they would consider enrolling. Of those who answered “not sure” to enrolling in the program, seven people wanted to know more about the program and the other person wanted to wait until the program is established. When asked about when they would be interested in starting the DPM program, eight people indicated an interest in starting in the next two years (2009 or 2010). Five people wanted to start in the next three to four years, while three people wanted to start in five to six years. When asked why they would not be interested in enrolling in the DPM program, a majority of the responses indicated a lack of time, lack of money, concerns about location, and misalignment with career goals for not wanting to enroll in the program. Respondents were asked to suggest topics of interest to be covered in the DPM program based on their professional experience. The purpose of the question was to gauge industry need for certain topics to be covered, based on the alumni’s perceptions. Exhibit 5 shows the responses based on interest in the program. 26
    • Doctor of Program Management (DPM) Proposal Exhibit 5. Survey Respondents’ Topic Areas of Interest Interes t Topic Areas of Interest Yes • Dealing with innovation: impacts, adjustments to portfolio and program • Engineering Project Management, Advanced Risks Management • How projects, programs, and portfolios come together; managing risk in programs and portfolios; time, cost, and resource management for programs • Program and portfolio management, business process modeling, strategic planning, contract management, research tools/methodologies. • Risk Management, Construction / Development Processes, Budgeting / Financing for projects. • WBS development with budget and scheduling relationships. Team Administration management, effective cost control techniques and accurate forecasting, Project option analysis and feasibility studies. Not • Advanced Project Controls and Leadership Communications Sure • Risk Management, Control, Oil and gas, Time management • Communication management during the design of a building. • Earned Value Management Leadership for Project Managers • Focused areas of study related to the oil and gas industry • Include classes that speak to how programs are integrated to the companies’ financial systems. The use of enterprise program/ project management software tools as a platform for corporate accounting. • Initial review of the courses proposed for the DPM program looked on track. • More in-depth scheduling and project control, risk management. Need to give a great deal of thought on the requirements of a dissertation • Program Management as it relates to relationship/interaction with regulatory agencies; especially state of AK. Also Program management and third party "interested parties" - Environmental groups, tribes, public. • Program Management. Leadership skills and development. Cost Management. No • Anything that focuses on change and communication are extremely helpful. • Change Management, specifically, organizational acceptance of project management methodologies. • I think there should be courses that are project and industry specific. Perhaps have an entire semester or year initiating, planning, executing, controlling, and closing an oil industry project. • Portfolio Management Project Selection, Program Management, Finance & Accounting • Program/Portfolio Management processes, tools and techniques. Managing the "Value Path" from conceptualization through post project realization. Leveraging project collaborations to enhance virtual team performance. Implementing Project measures / metrics to serve as leading indicators beyond tradition triple constraint focuses. Managing “sociotechnology change." Alumni who indicated some level of interest in the DPM program were asked what research areas they would like to pursue for their dissertation. Exhibit 6 shows the responses based on 27
    • Doctor of Program Management (DPM) Proposal interest in the program. Top categories evident in the responses include risk management, other quantitative topics, and a focus on the oil and gas industry. Exhibit 6. Survey Respondents' Research Topics of Interest Interest Research Topics of Interest Yes • Communication. Teams (virtual). Technology. Foreign culture. Oil and Gas (international companies). • Information technology, systems engineering/process modeling, strategic planning/portfolio management. • Information technology, risk management, portfolio management • Oil and Gas Engineering Management Practices • Project management for Oil & Gas Construction Projects. • Project risk management, organizational risk maturity, quantitative risk analysis tools • Risk Management, Construction Management, Finance. Not Sure • Constructability and Risk Management • Information Technology • Integration and Strategic Management with an emphasis on Business Intelligence • Oil and Gas - Brownfield (older field) program management. • Organizational Behavior, Corporate/Program Governance, Practice Implementation, Systems Approach, Workflow Analysis • Project cost control, scheduling. Management of project data. Why do projects fail so often, assuming success is being on time and budget? • Project Development Process • Risk and Earned Value Management • Risk Management, Control, Oil and gas, Time management • The various procurement methods used in Alaska construction and the future trends in procurement methods • Virtual project teams C. Minimum enrollments to maintain program for years 1 to 5 At least four new students per year. D. Maximum enrollment which program can accommodate Given current resources, the maximum enrollment the program can accommodate is approximately 20 students at any given time. The main limiting factor will be available faculty workloads for advising students, course instruction, and serving on students’ committees. The program will be a self-supporting program, so funding from UA/A will not be a constraint on the number of students the program can support. 28
    • Doctor of Program Management (DPM) Proposal E. Special restrictions on enrollment The admissions criteria lay out educational and work experience requirements for entry into the program. Other than meeting admissions criteria and limiting the current student body to a size manageable by the program faculty, the program will have no special restrictions on enrollment. 29
    • V. NEED FOR PROGRAM A. Requirement for Other Programs Not applicable. The DPM program is a unique academic discipline. B. Employment Market Needs In Alaska’s industries, as well as nationally and globally, employers need highly educated and skilled professionals with backgrounds and advanced degrees in project and program management. The need for these employees will only grow in the future as the changing global situation creates the demand for more mature organizations. Employees with an interest in continuing education and professional growth will also take advantage of the program. Section XIII contains letters for local organizations supporting the proposed DPM program and demonstrating the demand for its graduates. While there is demand for skilled program management professionals in government and industry positions, there is perhaps an even larger demand for graduates in academic positions. Globally, growth in the demand for project, program, and portfolio management education has resulted in an increase in the demand for qualified professors to teach in these programs. A substantial number of traditional and online universities offer project management degrees and certificates, and the number continues to grow. A November 2008 search at GradSchools.com3 resulted in the following number of programs offering a certificate, Master’s, or Doctorate degree: Exhibit 7. Summary of Project Management Related Degree Programs by Delivery Type Type of University Degree/Certificate Offered Traditional Campus Online Total Certificate 56 33 89 Master’s 105 49 154 Doctorate 12 5 17 Total 167 73 240 Source: GradSchools.com Note: Totals do not add due to some universities offering multiple degree and location options. Of the many project management programs that exist worldwide, a small subset are accredited by the Project Management Institute’s Global Accreditation Center4. PMI’s GAC has accredited 22 university degree programs through November 2008. Fifteen of those programs are in North 3 From the main website, “Business Programs” was chosen as the Field of Study, “Project Management” was chosen as the Subject, and “Worldwide” was chosen as the location. The results presented in Exhibit 7 come from the result of the website search as filtered for Campus/Online programs and each of the degree types. The website does not have a category for Bachelor’s degrees. 4 http://www.pmi.org/CareerDevelopment/Pages/Degree-Directory.aspx 30
    • Doctor of Program Management (DPM) Proposal America, including UAA’s MSPM program, while EMEA (Europe, the Middle East, and Africa) has four and Asia Pacific has three. As of January 2009, another eleven universities have programs that are candidates for accreditation5. These eleven universities are located throughout the world: five in North America, one in Latin America, four in EMEA, and one in Asia Pacific. As the number of PMI GAC accredited university programs increases, the demand for academic positions in project, program, and portfolio management will likewise increase as the programs increase faculty to handle additional curriculum development and increased student enrollments. Exhibit 8. Growth in PMI GAC Accredited Project Management Programs 24 Total 21 North America EMEA Number of GAC Accredited Schools 18 Asia Pacific 15 12 9 6 3 0 12/2003 3/2004 6/2004 9/2004 12/2004 6/2005 9/2005 12/2005 3/2006 6/2006 9/2006 3/2007 6/2007 12/2007 3/2008 6/2008 3/2005 12/2006 9/2007 9/2008 Month Source: Project Management Institute’s Global Accreditation Center C. Similar and Competing Programs According to our research, there are only two university programs offering doctoral-level study specifically focused on project and program management. Those programs, located in Australia and France, have produced graduates with the education and experience needed to serve effectively in senior executive, academic, and consultancy roles. The authors of the proposal contacted the two programs–RMIT in Australia6 and ESC Lille in France7–to obtain relevant information about their programs. The courses, research topics, and program objectives from those two programs were considered in the development of this proposal. 5 http://www.pmi.org/CareerDevelopment/Pages/Candidate-Degree-Programs.aspx 6 http://dhtw.tce.rmit.edu.au/pmgt/dpm.htm 7 http://www.esc-lille.com/en/programmes/phd 31
    • Doctor of Program Management (DPM) Proposal Other doctoral programs include some coursework or the option for student research in program management. These programs include those shown in Exhibit 9. However, these programs do not focus entirely on program management. For this reason, the proposed DPM program at UAA is the only program in the United States that focuses all of its coursework and research exclusively on program management. Exhibit 9. Other Doctoral Programs Related to Project and Program Management University Program Title and Notes Stevens Institute of Technology Ph.D. in Technology Management Coursework is not listed on the program website. Project management is one of the research areas listed on the program website. The George Washington Ph.D. in Business Administration University Candidate for accreditation by PMI GAC. No project or program management related courses are shown on the program website, though it is believed that students may take part in independent study and dissertation research in these topics. University of Alaska Fairbanks Ph.D. in Engineering with Concentration in Engineering Management Doctoral study is offered in engineering management, in which students could pursue research in program management or related topics. However, the program website only shows one course offered in project management and no courses in program management. University of Calgary Doctor of Philosophy, Project Management Specialization Program website lists current courses and research areas in project management. University of Management and Doctor of Philosophy in Management Technology Accredited by PMI GAC in July 2006. No project or program management related courses are shown on program website, though it is believed that students may take part in independent study and dissertation research in these topics. University of Maryland Doctor of Philosophy Accredited by PMI GAC in December 2005. Program website lists several project management related courses. 32
    • VI.RESOURCE IMPACT A. Budget The DPM program will be a self-sufficient program and will charge super tuition (equal to two times the current UAA tuition) to cover program costs. At present tuition rates, courses would be offered for approximately $2,000 per 3-credit course and $4,000 per 6-credit course, with total program revenues of $50,000 per student according to the sample plan of study. Training and contracted research provided by the ESPM Department will also provide financial support. This approach to funding and its success is demonstrated by the existing MSPM program. In addition to the funding methods described above, the ESPM Department may pursue the creation of an endowment fund to provide sustainable support for the program. Endowments could be general in nature or could be formed for a specific purpose, such as to support a faculty position, support technology needs, offset other operating costs, or provide financial support for students. The possibility and nature of any endowments will be determined in the future. A variety of grants and scholarships are available for students engaging in advanced engineering and program management studies. The ESPM Department will pursue these opportunities and provide information to prospective and current students. One example of student support is the Sloan Foundation for Graduate Fellowships. The School of Engineering’s application to the Sloan Foundation was accepted in the spring of 2008. This fellowship provides Native students in PhD programs with $38,000 of support, with no limit on the number of fellowships supported. B. Facilities/space needs The ESPM Department would like the University of Alaska to support the program’s start-up costs, including office and classroom space, equipment, advertisements and marketing, and faculty and staff hires. Once the program is established, the ESPM Department will operate the program in a self-financing manner through the use of super tuition, research grants, and other sources of income. In case of the MSPM program’s creation, the UA President provided $50,000 as a jump start fund in 2004. The current self-supporting MSPM program generates over $1.2M revenue during this fiscal year. C. Credit hour production A maximum of 120 credit hours per semester given the approximately 20 students enrolled (minimum 6 credit hours per semester). Some students may pursue a full-time course load (12 credit hours per semester), which would result in an increase in the credit hour production over a shorter period. D. Faculty There will be a program director (part time) who will be an existing faculty. Other faculty will participate in course instruction and on student committees. A total of five PhD faculty will 33
    • Doctor of Program Management (DPM) Proposal support the program, requiring two additional faculty to be added. The ESPM Department has made this request to the University of Alaska Anchorage administration who, in response, promised to provide necessary faculty positions for DPM at the meeting of Provost Mike Driscoll, Vice Chancellor Bill Spindle, Engineering Dean Rob Lang, and Dr. Jang Ra on August 14th, 2008 at 2:30 p.m., in ADM 201. In addition to UAA faculty, the program will rely on industry professionals with doctoral degrees to teach specific topics as adjuncts. E. Library/media materials, equipment, and services Existing resources meet program needs. Students will make extensive use of Internet resources and will have minimal requirements for physical resources except as noted above. 34
    • VII.RELATION OF PROGRAM TO OTHER PROGRAMS WITHIN THE SYSTEM A. Effects on enrollments elsewhere in the system The DPM program would be a unique offering in the University of Alaska system and is not anticipated to have an effect on enrollments elsewhere in the system. B. Does it duplicate/approximate programs anywhere in the system No, the program is a unique offering. C. How does the program relate to research or service activities? 1. Contributions to research or service Like most other professional doctoral programs, the DPM program is focused on providing students with both academic and practical knowledge of program management issues. The DPM program will distinguish itself through its strong ties to governments and industries and its contribution to timely, necessary, and critical research and application. It will do so within Alaska, along the Pacific Rim, and in countries of the circumpolar North. The DPM program’s contributions will contribute directly to the mission of the University of Alaska Anchorage, particularly in respect to the following elements of the UAA Strategic Plan 2017: • High quality research that includes special attention to Alaska, the Pacific Rim, and the circumpolar North; (Vision). • Collaborate closely with public and private sector partners to maintain and develop our programs supporting workforce development and high-demand careers (Strategic Priorities). • Organize and expand our internationalization and inter-cultural programs to prepare our students to think, work, and serve in a world being transformed by integration and globalization (Strategic Priorities). 2. Benefits from research or service activities The ESPM Department has been involved in a number of studies for public and private organizations in the fields of project management, risk management, and project risk management. The Department hosted the ProMAC 2008 International Project Management Conference in September 2008. Individuals affiliated with the Department have also published academic articles and contribution to a project management textbook in recent years. These activities directly benefit the University of Alaska Anchorage by establishing the ESPM Department as a globally-recognized source of expertise in project management fields. The DPM program would support this research and service activities and enable the ESPM Department to take a larger role in them in the future. 35
    • Doctor of Program Management (DPM) Proposal D. Current department research and funding (descending ordered in year 2009-2004) Topics addressed by recent ESPM Department affiliated research include the following: • “Project Risk Management: Systematic and Strategic Approach,” a textbook from UAA. Ra and Fisher. (In development process for publication in 2009) • “Changing Mindset: A Professional Learning Challenge for Senior Management.” Donson, Paula M. (Currently in development and will be targeted at multiple Managerial publications.) • “Counseling Models for Productive Workplaces.” Donson, Paula M. (In process for possible publication in The Journal of Training and Development) • “Project Portfolio Management.” Wang. (In process for possible publication in Journal of Project Management.) 2009 • “The Future of Project Management Education and Training Circa 2025” Ra. 2009. To be published as a chapter of “PM Circa 2025” by PMI (Cleland and Bidanda) • “EQUATOR AQUARIAN CLINIC – Pediatric Health Care Center, Rwanda, East Africa,” Project Engineer for Design for Children Competition, January 15, 2009 http://designforthechildren.org/index.php. Wang. 2008 • “Project Management Leading Managerial Revolutions,” Ra, Proceedings of ProMAC2008, Anchorage, Alaska, ISBN978-4-902378-10-8 • “Agile at Alaska Airlines: Communication Tools.” Strahm, L. (Alaska Air Cohort) for ProMAC 2008. • “Alaska Airlines Flight Operation Project Communication.” Lowy, R. (Alaska Air Cohort) for ProMAC 2008. • “Alaska’s Election Security: A Systems Approach” (Piccard, Ayers, Hoanca, Hoffman, Martin and Mock) ProMAC 2008 • “Alaska Section - The Design/Build Process: A Guide to Licensing and Procurement Requirements in the 50 States and Canada”, Publications Planning & Marketing, American Bar Association, Chicago, 2008. Davison, Bruce E. • “Breaking through the Clutter: Using Marketing Tools & Techniques to Enhance Project Communications.” Weishaar, K. (Alaska Air Cohort) for ProMAC 2008. • “A Case Study in communication Challenges in a Large Scale Information Technology Project” Elkins, M. (Alaska Air Cohort) for ProMAC 2008. • “Change Communication Challenges-A Case Study of Structural Change in a Service Division.” Dussell, K. (Alaska Air Cohort) for ProMAC 2008. • “Communication Tools and Techniques that Distinguish High Performance Teams.” Mohn, C. (Alaska Air Cohort) for ProMAC 2008. 36
    • Doctor of Program Management (DPM) Proposal • “The Future of Project Risk Management” Ra, Fisher and Kretchik, research completed with funding from ConocoPhillips Alaska, Inc., Feb. 2008. (110 pages) • “IT Procurement Decision using Risk based AHP with Chainwise Comparisons Technique” Douglas and Ra, published at PMI Global Congress NA 2008 • ”Measures of Project Risk”, ProMAC 2008, Anchorage, Alaska, 2008. Kretchik, Ra, and Fisher. • “Organizational Project Risk Management Maturity Assessment and Improvement” Fisher, Kretchik, and Ra, published at ProMAC 2008 • “Program Management- Recent Research on Program Management of Alaska Pipelines”, National Project Management Association (NPMA), Taiwan, June, 24, 2008. Wang. • “Project Accountability - Using Metrics as a Means for Project Communication”. Baysa, M. (Alaska Air Cohort) for ProMAC 2008. • “Project Communication: A View from the Trenches.” Davey, B. (Alaska Air Cohort) for ProMAC 2008. • “Project Communications in Times of Conflict.” Rice, M. (Alaska Air Cohort) for ProMAC 2008. • “Glovirtualiztion – Managing a Glovirtual Project Team in Global Economy” Kim, K.P. for ProMAC 2008. • “Project Steering Committees in a Matrix Organization.” Pykkonen, R. (Alaska Air Cohort) for ProMAC 2008. • “Project Tools – Increasing Effective Communication through Technology.” Mullinax, S. (Alaska Air Cohort) for ProMAC 2008. • “Promoting Project Communication Using Wikis.” Petroske, J. (Alaska Air Cohort) for ProMAC 2008. • “Replacement Analysis of the LED Lighting Systems” Wang, H.M.S. for ProMAC 2008. • "Simulation Of A Cold Heavy Oil Production With Sand (Chops) Separation System". Dr. David Hoffman. Written and presented for BPXA to publish this paper and in CHOPS (Dec 2008). • “A Simulation for Learning Project Management as a System.” Hoffman and Piccard. ProMAC 2008. • State of Alaska Election Security Project: Phase 1 and Phase 2 Project Summary Reports. Piccard. 2007 and 2008. • “A Study on Fuzzy Synthetic Judgment Method for Ecommerce” Kwon, Y.J., Yang, C., Kwon, D., Ra, J. for ProMAC 2008. • “A Survey of Project Risk Quantification Models” Kretchik, Fisher, and Ra, for ProMAC 2008 37
    • Doctor of Program Management (DPM) Proposal • “Tools and Methodologies for Communication Project Lessons Learned Within an Organization.” Gillis, K. (Alaska Air Cohort) for ProMAC 2008. • “Using the Harbor Economic Impact Model for Regional Economic Development Analysis.” Presented at the Annual Meeting of the Alaska Association of Harbormasters and Port Administrators, Haines, Alaska. October 9, 2008. Fisher, M. • “What Can We do to Create the Leaders We Will Need for the Future?” for PROMAC 2008. Donson, Paula. 2007 • “Project Risk Management for Alaska Oil and Gas Capital Projects” Ra and Fisher, chapter in Project Managers Handbook, Applying Best Practices Across Global Industries, edited by Drs. Cleland and Ireland, 2007. • “A State Government Department Navigation in Project Risk Management, the Unexpected, and Novel Projects.” Douglas and Ra, published and presented at PMI Global Congress NA 2007 • “A Systems Dynamic Approach to Model a Multimodal Energy System in Rural Arctic Communities” Hemsath and Hoffman, for the Arctic Energy Summit, Anchorage AK, October 2007. 2006 • “IT Project Management Graduate Course Design” Ra, Proceedings of Pan Pacific Conference XXIII, Busan, May 28-31, 2006 • Report of “A Systematic Evaluation of the ConocoPhillips Capital Projects,” Ra, submitted to ConocoPhillips, December 2006 (200 pages) • State of Alaska Department of Labor Case Study in Project Team building, ‘Constraints, Competencies, Conflicts, and the People Side of Change” Douglas and Ra, presented at PMI Global Congress NA 2006 2004 • “Consolidated Multiple Project Performance Graphics and Indices,” Ra, in Proceedings of ProMAC 2004, Japan, Oct 12-14, 2004 • “International Business and Global Project Management; Proceedings of Pan Pacific Conference XXI,” Sang Lee and Jang Ra ISBN 1-931649-18-11, 2004 • Report of “Providence Alaska Medical Center Facilities Department Management Review,” Ra, Nov, 2004 (45 pages) • "Assessment of the Project Management Training Needs in the Russian Far East", in Proceedings of Pan Pacific Business Conference, Anchorage, AK, May 26-28, 2004. Korobov, Alexander and Ra, Jang. • "One Page Graphical Presentation of Multiple Project Performance", in Proceedings of Pan Pacific Business Conference, Anchorage, AK, May 26-28, 2004. Korobov, Alexander and Ra, Jang. 38
    • Doctor of Program Management (DPM) Proposal • "Project Management: A "Hands-On" Approach", in Proceedings of Pan Pacific Business Conference, Anchorage, AK, May 26-28, 2004. McFarland, Pamela and Ra, Jang. Completed project management research projects done by MSPM graduates include the following titles: 2008 Fall • Build versus Buy - Establishing Objective Trade Criteria for IT Software Applications at AAG (Elkins). Fall 2008. • Cancelling Projects - Diagnostics, Decision Making and the Termination Process (Petroske). Fall 2008. • Communicating IT Project Cost Transparency (Mullinax). Fall 2008. • Concept and Design Considerations for a Project Management Information System (Davey). Fall 2008. • Defining and Managing Small Projects at Alaska Air Group (Lowy). Fall 2008. • How to Successfully Implement High Performing Teams in IT at AAG (Mohn). Fall 2008. • Improving Project Outcomes Through Project Accountability: A Study in Best Practices and Practical Applications for Alaska Air Group (Baysa). Fall 2008. • Improving AAG Enterprise System Implementation (ESI) Project Outcomes: An ESI Project Assessment and Framework for Incorporating Best Practices at Alaska Airlines and Horizon (Weishaar). Fall 2008. • Improving Project Quality by Embedding Cross Project Learning and Effective Knowledge Management into the Alaska Air Group Culture (Gillis). Fall 2008. • Integrating a Systems Approach to Change Management at AAG (Rice). Fall 2008. • Projects in Peril: A Proactive Approach (Strahm). Fall 2008. • Using Program Management at AAG to Deliver Quality Projects (Pykkonen). Fall 2008. Spring • Analysis of Engineering, Procurement, Construction, Management (EPCM) – North Slope Alaska Oil and Gas Industry (Polito). Spring 2008. • Course Development and Lesson Planning for PM-694A PM in Construction (Schipper). Spring 2008 • Evaluating Maturity and Mapping Project Portfolio Management (PPM) at AAG (Dussell). Fall 2008. • Integrated PM Framework - A Case Study of Organization Change at the MWH Alaska Regional Office (Zidek). Spring 2008. 39
    • Doctor of Program Management (DPM) Proposal • IT Procurement Decision using Risk based AHP with Chainwise Comparisons Technique (Douglas). Spring 2008. • Project Control: An Assessment of Uses and Needs in Alaska within the Oil and Gas Industry (Medak). Spring 2008. • Projectruptcy! Using Project Risk Management Processes in Construction Underwriting (Renshaw). Spring 2008. • A Study and Implementation of PM Processes, Tools and Methods for Use on Projects with Federal Agencies (Lasher). Spring 2008. 2007 Fall • Development of Lean Six Sigma Black Belt Certification Program at ESPM Department (Bukhari). Fall 2007. • Optimizing the Value from Software Development Projects Through the Application of a Systems Approach and Business First Philosophy (Ah-You). Fall 2007. • A Project Management Handbook for Homeland Defense and Homeland Security Exercise Projects (Wood). Fall 2007. • Refining the Air Force Communications and Information Management Palace Acquire Internship Training Program Using Project Management Skills and Techniques as the Backbone (Bordley). Fall 2007. • Source Selection: Selecting the Best Value Proposal Using the Trade Off Selection Process (Schreiner). Fall 2007. Summer • Glovirtualization: Managing a Glovirtual Project Team in a Global Economy (Kim). Summer 2007. • A Project Mgt. Analysis of Habitat for Humanity Anchorage (Grekowicz). Summer 2007. Spring • Anatomy of a Successful North Slope Project in Alaska (Gleason). Spring 2007. • Applied PM Techniques to Avoid Project and Operations Failures (Gross). Spring 2007. • Implementing a Project Knowledge Mgt. Tool within N. Slope Projects (Grekowicz). Spring 2007. • Information Technology Project Management: A Course in Practical Application of Tools and Techniques (Ramirez). Spring 2007. • NANA Development Corporation Project Management Office Project Plan (Jew).Spring 2007. 2006 Fall 40
    • Doctor of Program Management (DPM) Proposal • Additional Project Risk Management Tools and Techniques (Kaufman). Fall 2006. • Applying Project Management Methodologies to the Flight Ops Quality Assurance (Schoenberg). Fall 2006. • Developing A Project Template For the Electronic Flight Bag (EFB) Project (Fuson). Fall 2006. • Enhancing A Project Culture To Embrace Cost Management Process (Tabrum). Fall 2006. • Improving Organization Project Management Maturity (Willingham). Fall 2006. • Improving Project Performance at Alaska Air Group (Thynes). Fall 2006. • PM Challenges of International Development Projects (Okoola). Fall 2006. • Project Management Discipline for the Implementing Of Preferential Bidding (Link). Fall 2006. • A Project Management Guide For Human Resource Related Projects (Keller). Fall 2006. • Project Prioritization in an E-Commerce Organization (Shaw). Fall 2006. • Using Project Process Mentoring and Customer Satisfaction Feedback (Kelley). Fall 2006. • Utilizing Project Management Methodologies in Superior Diversity (Gillespie). Fall 2006. Summer • An Analysis Of The Implementation And Use Of Online Collaboration Tools (Briggs). Summer 2006. • Project Risk Management for Alaska Oil and Gas and Digital Projects (Fisher). Summer 2006. Spring • Project Communication Management (2 Volumes) (Anker). Spring 2006. • Project Management Support for Strategic Innovation (Jensen). Spring 2006. • Project Plan for Acquiring Land In The Retail Fuel Industry (Chenger). Spring 2006. • A Study Of BP Exploration's North American Project (Susich). Spring 2006. 2005 Fall • Implementing Emerging PM Technology - Managing Project Office and Stakeholder Culture and Organization Change to Assure Project Success (Buck). Fall 2005. • Improving Project Success Within Occupied And Operation Facilities (Howie). Fall 2005 • IT Project Management - A Study In Preventing Project Failure (Yelverton). Fall 2005. 41
    • Doctor of Program Management (DPM) Proposal • Quality Management Program for the Anchorage Fire Department (Drozdowski). Fall 2005. Spring • The Development of a Process for Project Control (Rechenthin). Spring 2005. • Managing Complex Communications for Remote Engineering & Construction Projects (Henson). Spring 2005. • Professional Responsibility for the Project Manager (Sheffrey). Spring 2005. 42
    • VIII.IMPLEMENTATION/TERMINATION A. Date of implementation The DPM program is targeted to be available Spring 2010. B. Plans for recruiting students There has been a significant increase in M.S. degrees awarded nationwide in project management and/or engineering. According to the annual survey of the Engineering, Science and Project Management masters programs at UAA, there were more than 60% interested in advanced study in project, program, and portfolio management and a Professional Doctorate in Program Management. Since this is the first program offering a Doctorate degree in Program Management, this program will attract students not only from Alaska and the United States, but globally as well. Recruiting for doctoral-level students usually occurs through faculty contacts. Recruitment for the DPM program will benefit from demand by MSPM students and alumni for additional advanced training in program management. Adjunct faculty in the ESPM Department have also expressed an interest in the DPM program. Global recruiting for the DPM program will be passive and organic, primarily through the department’s website, publications, and involvement with project management organizations. It will benefit from UAA’s MSPM program through its exposure as one of the few programs accredited by the Project Management Institute’s Global Accreditation Center. Additional recruitment tools to be developed include the following: • Program brochures to be distributed at ESPM Department open houses and in ESPM classes and training sessions • Professional meetings, including Project Management Institute Alaska Chapter events and the Project Management Institute’s annual Global Congress meetings C. Termination date (if any) There is no termination date for the DPM program. D. Plans for phasing out program if it proves unsuccessful In the event of termination, students are guaranteed degree completion. Students without a Master of Science in Project Management will be guaranteed completion of their MSPM degree. Students with a Master of Science in Project Management and working on their Doctor of Program Management will be guaranteed completion of their DPM degree. These will require no additional resources. In the event that economic conditions have a material, adverse effect on the DPM program and its students, the program chair will evaluate how to proceed. In the event of short-term economic challenges, the program will continue to serve existing students but may slow admissions of new 43
    • Doctor of Program Management (DPM) Proposal students. In the event of region-specific economic challenges, the program will maintain and improve upon its geographic distribution of students. In the event of long-term economic challenges that threaten the program and the markets it serves, the program chair will make a decision to either place the program on hold or terminate it. Given the large demand for skilled program management practitioners and the fact that program management seeks to maximize the efficiency of projects and programs enacted around the world, the authors of the proposal anticipate that short-term or region-specific challenges may affect the program occasionally, but it is unlikely that a long-term economic challenge would make the program infeasible. E. Assessment of the program The program is being reviewed by external scholars and authorities in the project management community. A formal review by a professor of project management has been completed by the following individual: Dr. David I Cleland Professor University of Pittsburgh David I. Cleland, Ph.D., is professor emeritus in the School of Engineering at the University of Pittsburgh, USA. Dr. Cleland is the author or editor of 36 books on project management and engineering management and is the most published author of PM textbooks in the world. He has served as a consultant for both national and foreign companies, and is co-founder of the University of Pittsburgh’s Manufacturing Assistance Center (MAC), whose mission is to provide manufacturing systems technology assistance to small and mid-sized manufacturers in Western Pennsylvania. A long time member of the Project Management Institute (PMI®), David was named a Fellow of PMI in 1987and has received PMI’s Distinguished Contribution to Project Management Award three times. PMI established the annual David I. Cleland Excellence in Project Management Literature Award in 1997 in his honor. Dr. Cleland has a Ph.D. from Ohio State University, and MBA and MA degrees from the University of Pittsburgh in the USA. He is very well known in the global PM professional community. Published in PM World Today - November 2006 (Vol. VIII, Issue 11) "Connecting the World of Project Management" PM from http://www.pmforum.org/viewpoints/2006/PDFs/11-06-Cleland-Manager_Ethics_Another_Look.pdf Dr. Cleland’s review letter is shown in Section XIII. An assessment of the academic outcomes of the Doctor of Program Management is shown in Exhibit 10. 44
    • Doctor of Program Management (DPM) Proposal Exhibit 10. Assessment of Academic Outcomes Statement of Intended Outcomes Assessment Criteria Implementation Institutional Purpose and Objectives and Procedures Educate and train Graduates will have Establish measures of Require a scholars at the the knowledge and advanced level of comprehensive doctoral level with in- skills to carry out knowledge about qualification depth and integrated world-class research project, program, and examination to be knowledge in research in project, program, portfolio management conducted following and application of and portfolio research completion of the core program management and to participate courses. The exam responsibly in the will consist of decision making multiple papers and a process for the written exam. allocation of resources Students will be in programs of required to receive projects. passing grades on a minimum number of the papers. A satisfactory score on the written exam will also be required. Questions will address knowledge of project and program management and other fields covered in the coursework. Evaluate dissertations for content and quality commensurate with doctoral-level study. Administer exit interviews when students have completed or otherwise left the program. 45
    • Doctor of Program Management (DPM) Proposal Statement of Intended Outcomes Assessment Criteria Implementation Institutional Purpose and Objectives and Procedures Develop leaders who Graduates are Measure employment Track employment will apply the prepared to move into success in high-level record of graduates principles of program high-level industry positions in industry through regularly management in the and government and government, as administered alumni organizations and management positions well as in academic and employer surveys industries in Alaska, and into academic positions the Pacific Rim, and positions in which the circumpolar North program management decision-making, analytical, and research skills are needed. Create a globally Graduates are capable Provide a measure of Track numbers of recognized and of high-level students’ ability to be publications in high- respected program in contributions to the productive researchers level peer-reviewed program management knowledge and and to be good journals and amounts that will contribute to practice of project, teachers and trainers. of external funding science and inform program, and received by graduates. public and portfolio management Track number of organizational and apply that publications designed decision knowledge to inform to inform the public the public. and presentations at public meetings. Contribute to the Graduates are Provide a measure of Track citations of development of prepared not only to knowledge in project, students’ research. Alaska’s project, make effective program, and Administer regular program, and decisions and portfolio management surveys of portfolio management influence decisions and students’ ability stakeholders to assess maturity and about project, to work with industry, students’ and the application program, and government, program’s impact. portfolio academia, and the management, but to public to help make Track the number of identify ways in wise decisions. public presentations which the tools may and other outreach be used or improved efforts. to contribute to their body of knowledge. 46
    • IX.REGENTS GUIDELINES The Board of Regents requires the completion of the following Summary Form. Please see the next several pages. 47
    • Doctor of Program Management (DPM) Proposal State Needs Students University of Alaska New Program Approval Academic Board of Regents Summary Form Programs Research Technology Faculty & MAU: University of Alaska Anchorage & Facilities Staff Title and brief description: Doctor of Program Management Program UAA Engineering & Science Management (ESM) Department, School of Engineering will offer a Doctor of Program Management at UAA. This proposal comes from a documented need for local, advanced course offerings and professional trainings in Program Management and local organization demands (see Sections XIII and XV for industry surpport and prospective student commitment letters). The Doctor of Program Management program has been developed to be a professional doctoral-level academic program. Program Management has become essential in virtually every technology-based organization that manages their businesses using technical people and technological projects and operates under a strategic plan that calls for change in response to market conditions. Potential students would be comprised of individuals from engineering, construction, oil & gas, mining, communications, health care, information technology, utilities, international business, military, government, transportation, retail, and other sectors. The program will adhere to the provisions of A Guide to the Project Management Body of Knowledge (PMBOK® Guide), and The Standard for Project Management, each of which is a globally recognized standard for managing projects and programs in today’s marketplace. The PMBOK® Guide is approved as an American National Standard (ANS) by the American National Standards Institute (ANSI) and International Standard Organization (ISO). Students completing the program will have an appropriate understanding of program management that will allow them to efficiently and effectively run programs of projects of any size and in all industry areas. Target Admission date: Spring 2010 *********************** How does the program relate to the Academic Mission of the University of Alaska? The University of Alaska’s mission is: “The University of Alaska inspires learning, and advances and disseminates knowledge through teaching, research, and public service, emphasizing the North and its diverse peoples.” 48
    • Doctor of Program Management (DPM) Proposal • The program inspires learning of program management processes among its students and faculty through its team-based and individual studies of current real-world project, program, and portfolio management problems. • The research and publications on program management issues by faculty, and more importantly by students, will advance the body of knowledge in program management. • One result of requiring an experienced student population is that the knowledge learned is directly applied to specific Alaska concerns. Applying program management knowledge, skills, tools, and techniques to the unique Alaskan environment is a key driving force behind the Doctor of Program Management program. • Program Management is a global effort. It is anticipated, as demonstrated by interest from students in Alaska, the rest of the United States, and around the world, that this program will reach to students coming from the northern and Pacific Rim countries. Describe the State Needs being met by this program. The Doctor of Program Management will meet the needs of the Alaskan community in general. The economic viability of Alaska is dependent on how efficient and how effective projects and programs of projects can be executed. Research and education in program management will provide the leverage that is required for the state to meet its goals in the coming century through partnering with the Pacific Rim countries. Over the next decade, a number of major programs and mega-projects will shape the face of the Alaskan economy. They include: • National Missile Defense • Alaska North Slope Natural Gas Line • Denali Commission Rural Sanitation Improvements • Statewide Transportation Infrastructure Improvements • Statewide Aviation Infrastructure Improvements • Intelligent Transportation System Initiation There will be a significant demand for trained program managers to staff these initiatives and execute the individual projects to achieve organizational objectives. The Doctor of Program Management will provide for that training. “Program Management is the centralized coordinated management of a program to achieve the program’s benefits and objectives. It involves aligning multiple projects to achieve the program goals [allowing] for optimized or integrated cost, schedule and effort” (PMI’s Standard for Program Management, 2008). The Standard for Project Management was developed by the Project Management Institute (PMI), which has more than 250,000 members globally. 49
    • Doctor of Program Management (DPM) Proposal Program Management is a useful technique for all fields and is based on those universal principles required for successful project, program, and portfolio management. Program Management has become essential in virtually every organization due to its use to implement organizational strategic plans, realize competitive advantage. Today’s program managers are employed in all areas of business and industry, including engineering, construction, oil & gas, mining, communications, health care, information technology, utilities, international business, military, government, transportation, retail, and other sectors. The establishment of a Doctor of Program Management degree will provide future benefits to the Anchorage community, the State of Alaska, and will ultimately provide a knowledge-based export product to the rest of the nation and the international community. What are the Student opportunities and outcomes? The enrollment projections? The Doctor of Program Management (DPM) program has been developed to be a professional-oriented advanced academic program. On completion of the DPM degree, students will have an appropriate understanding of program management that will allow them to efficiently and effectively run programs of projects of any size and in all industry areas. In addition, students will be provided the knowledge, skills, tools, and techniques to: • Ensure individual integrity in the Program Management Profession • Interact with project, program, and stakeholder personnel in a way to produce a fair, cooperative, and ethical program environment • Contribute lessons learned to advance the knowledge areas of Program Management In order to provide a common language both nationally and internationally in program management, the program has been structured around the three themes of benefits management, stakeholder management, and program governance. Upon successful completion of the DPM program, the student will understand and be able to apply their knowledge, skills, tools, and techniques to those three themes for the successful management and execution of programs of projects. Estimates for enrollments were based on six credits per semester for a 66-credit program. This projection is based upon interest and support from various area organizations and businesses. Enrollment projections for the initial years of the program are 12 founding students and 5 or 6 new students each year, with half of the 50
    • Doctor of Program Management (DPM) Proposal students graduating in 3 years and half graduating in 4 years. Based on these projects, Exhibit 11 demonstrates the number of enrolled students and graduates each year. Exhibit 11. Projected Enrollment in DPM Program New Continuing Year Enrollments Enrollments Total Graduates FY 10 12 0 12 0 FY 11 6 12 18 0 FY 12 6 18 24 6 FY 13 6 18 24 9 FY 14 6 15 21 6 FY 15 6 15 21 6 Describe the Research opportunities, if applicable. A wide variety of potential research topics are available in project, program, and portfolio management, including the following examples: • Research areas identified as being of interested for industry professionals in Alaska include: • Program risk management, organizational risk maturity, and quantitative risk analysis tools • Information technology program management • Communication, virtual teams, and multicultural issues in program management • Program management for international oil and gas companies • Systems engineering, process modeling, and strategic planning • The Project Management Institute supports research projects around the world8. Several of the current research topics could be areas for future study by DPM students with respect to programs. Selected topics related to project management include: • Project Management in Non-Profit Organizations • Literature Review on the Implementation of Research to Practical Project Management Applications • Mapping the Field of Complexity Theory, and Using One Concept of Complexity as an Interpretive Framework in Studying Projects and Project Management Practice • Project Managers as Senior Executives? • Understanding Decision-making within Distributed Project Teams • Project Management in China: Establishing a National Baseline • Understanding the Value of Project Management 8 See http://www.pmi.org/Resources/Pages/Current-Research.aspx. 51
    • Doctor of Program Management (DPM) Proposal • The Value Mindset of Project Managers and It’s Influence on Project Success • Understanding the Antecedents of Project Management Best Practices; Lessons to be Learned from Aid Relief Projects • Identifying the Forces Driving the Frequent Changes in PMOs • Coping with Stress in Organizational Roles Through Team Learning • Students might further research or seek new ways to apply research presented at the 2005 Conference of the Center for Program/Project Management Research (CPMR)9, which featured several presentations related to program and project management (P/PM). In the following list, the titles for CPMR research and the rationales for abstract selection are shown: • Modeling: Analyzing and Engineering NASA’s Safety Culture (Reflects in-depth understanding of NASA P/PM culture and decision-making.) • Innovative Management of Student Run Space Research Projects (Directly addresses NASA need to find ways to attract and recruit future P/PM personnel. Innovate P/PM process to enable students to carry out serious space-related projects while maintaining an acceptable level of risk. Leverages experience from existing SMEX P/PM practices.) • Projects in Space (Directly responds to NASA’s challenge in attracting and developing P/PM professionals, and utilizes new generation of web-based training tools.) • Building a Strategic System Approach to NASA’s Project and Program Management (Strategic framework to distinguish among NASA projects - to tailor P/PM practices to each type. The P/PM framework would foster development of P/PM personnel and their ability to serve a customer.) • Project Management Research: Lessons Learned Life Cycle Processes and Aerospace Workforce Development • Learning-Based Project Reviews (Proposes improving learning and knowledge transfer on P/PM reviews at KSC -- a significant contribution.) • NASA Strategic Multi-Project Resource Management ‘CC-Lite’ (Potential avenue to introduce a tool for P/PM not in current NASA use, but with potential for significant paradigm change.) • Risk and Safety/Security Assessment at NASA (Study could provide a valuable resource for implementing P/PM culture change.) • Additional research topics for DPM students might include: • Improving Knowledge Management for Project, Program, and Portfolio-Based Organizations • The Effect of Organizational Learning Strategies on Program Management and Administration • Contribution of Earned Value Management to Project, Program, and Portfolio Success • Benchmarking of Program Management Practices 9 See http://cpmr.usra.edu/conference.html and http://cpmr.usra.edu/cpmr-abst-8-04.doc. 52
    • Doctor of Program Management (DPM) Proposal • Improvement of Program Management Practices and the Effect on Stakeholder Satisfaction • Using Transformational Leadership to Enhance Program Success • Team Motivation and Cooperation in Geographically Diversified Programs • Measurement of Decision-Making Skills of Program Managers Identify any additional Faculty and Staff requirements as well as any existing expertise and resources that will be applied. New faculty and staff needed to offer the program are as follows: • Two (2) FTE Faculty positions Resources: • Numerous Existing Expertise from the ESPM Advisory Board: o Jon Ah You Alyeska Pipeline Service Company o Terry Bailey CH2M Hill o Ervin Barnes, Jr. Alyeska Pipeline Service Company o Steven Borell, PMP Alaska Miners Assoc (AMA). o Gary Boubel BP o Tom Coolidge Indian Health Service o Jeff Doyle ASRC Energy Services o Wilson Duffles, PMP NANA Development Corp. o Jay Farmwald, PMP Dowl Engineers o Verne Geidl, PE, Ph. D State of Alaska, Knik Arm Bridge and Toll Auth. o Dora Gropp, PMP Chugach Electric Association, Inc. o David Haugen, PMP Northwest Development Company o Julian Jensen, PMP Booz Allen Hamilton o Dr. Ken Jones StrateGen Inc. o Earl Korynta, PE USKH o Mike Lasher, PMP Doyon Emerald o Craig Morrison, PMP NANA/Colt Engineering, Inc o Ken Moss, PMP Kellogg Brown and Root (Canada) Company o Roger Nagarkar Meridian Management Inc. o Mark Nelson, PMP ASRC Energy Services o Thomas W. Nelson, Ed. D State of Alaska, Dept. of Labor & Workforce Dlvp o David K.F. Otto, D.Min. Municipality of Anchorage o Burt Rosenbluth, PE, PMP Conoco Phillips Alaska, Inc. o Maynard Tapp Hawk Consultants o Aves Thompson Alaska Trucking Association o Anand Vadapalli Alaska Communications Systems o Paul Varady, PMP Coastal Villages Region Fund o Frank Weiss Alaska Anvil Corporation o Kay Witt, PMP AT&T Alascom 53
    • Doctor of Program Management (DPM) Proposal o Michael Wortham, PE ConocoPhillips • Dr. Bill Spindle, UAA • Dr. Paula Donson, Alaska Railroad Corporation • Dr. David Rechenthin, ASRC Identify the impacts on existing Technology & Facilities as well as projected needs. The existing UAA School of Engineering has inadequate classroom and office space to accommodate the new program. The following facilities will be required: Faculty & administrative staff offices: 2 Research meeting conference room: 1 Classroom: 1 54
    • X. PROGRAM CATALOG COPY DOCTOR OF PROGRAM MANAGEMENT University Center, UC 155 (907) 786-1924 www.uaa.alaska.edu/espm The Doctor of Program Management program prepares future leaders as academic faculty and professional practitioners in government and industry, including in senior executive and consultancy roles, for careers at the frontiers of project, program, and portfolio management. DOCTOR OF PROGRAM MANAGEMENT ADMISSION REQUIREMENTS Students with a variety of backgrounds will be admitted to the program. The program seeks outstanding students from engineering, science, and technology-oriented disciplines. However, this program will also be beneficial to non-technology people who are working in a technology- oriented environment. The program is designed for working professionals. Potential students will complete an application to enter the program and submit it to the Engineering, Science and Project Management Department at the University of Alaska Anchorage. Application requirements will include: 5. Complete the general university requirements listed in the UAA catalog 6. Complete the graduate requirements listed in the UAA catalog 7. Complete the Departmental requirements as listed below: • A Master of Science in Project Management degree, a masters degree in project management accredited by PMI’s Global Accreditation Center, a BA/BS degree for students applying to complete both the MSPM and DPM degrees, or another masters degree and admissions committee approval. • Five years of work experience, preferably in the fields of project, program, and/or portfolio management • Three letters of recommendation • Statement of purpose • Graduate Management Admission Test (GMAT) scores or Graduate Record Examination (GRE) scores, or department approval • Application fee (two times the current UAA application fee) • For international students, TOEFL (required for students whose first language is not English unless they received an undergraduate degree from an English speaking country) 55
    • Doctor of Program Management (DPM) Proposal An admissions committee will review all applications. The target class size for the first year will be 12, growing to approximately 20 per year steady state (depending on the availability of highly-qualified applicants and financial resources). The admissions committee will consist of faculty only (5 from UAA) and will be charged with identifying outstanding students that have the potential to be future leaders in program management. The committee will consist of Dr. Jang Ra (Chair), two faculty (comprised of Dr. Rob Lang, Dr. Steve Wang, and new faculty to be hired), and two industry professionals holding doctoral degrees. The committee will give extensive consideration to qualifications of applicants, areas in which they express interest, and faculty who have openings to advise students. It will assign an initial research advisor to each accepted student (subject to agreement by the advisor), and the student will receive an offer letter from the University. The offer letter will clearly indicate that the offer is to participate in the professional doctor program. Incoming DPM students are expected to have taken appropriate courses or gained experience using quantitative techniques. Students are expected to have knowledge equivalent to at least one semester each of graduate-level statistics and either cost management or finance. Students are also expected to be competent with technology, including basic office applications and project management software (such as Microsoft Project). Students without the expected level of experience with statistics, cost management, finance, and technology may use courses offered by the ESPM Department to satisfy these requirements prior to entering the DPM program or in the first semester of study. The department offers graduate-level statistics, project cost management, cost estimating, and other courses. The department also offers Microsoft Project training. Completion of the DPM program will generally require students to have earned their Master of Science in Project Management (MSPM) from the ESPM Department. The admissions committee will review and give serious consideration to students who have not completed the MSPM degree or who hold a masters degree in another discipline. If the prospective student demonstrates a sufficient educational background and potential for the DPM program, admission may be granted without requiring the MSPM degree to be completed. Otherwise, the student will be required to complete the MSPM degree prior to beginning study in the DPM program, in which case the admissions committee may, at its discretion, grant a conditional acceptance into the DPM program, contingent on successful completion of the MSPM program. The admissions process is intended to be flexible, and primarily is focused on admitting students into the program who have the educational background and experience to be successful in the DPM program. Graduates of the DPM program will be sufficiently qualified to work as academic faculty as well as professional practitioners in government and industry, including in senior executive and consultancy roles. GRADUATION REQUIREMENTS Complete the requirements process including the following: 8. Complete the general university requirements listed in the UAA catalog 9. Complete the graduate requirements listed in the UAA catalog 10. Complete coursework as determined by the advisory committee 56
    • Doctor of Program Management (DPM) Proposal 11. Required elements of the Plan of Study a. Coursework (36 credits): Students must complete the core course requirements of: PM 650, PM 652, PM 654, PM 656, and PM 658, PM 660, and PM 695. b. Outreach activity of one annual public presentation c. Advancement to Candidacy occurs when the student demonstrates mastery in understanding of the problems and theories of program management and in-depth knowledge of the student’s dissertation topic area. Requirements for Advancement to Candidacy are determined by the student’s academic committee and shall be consistent with the candidacy requirements for graduate studies at UAA. Requirements include developing a dissertation topic, showing teaching potential (based on student feedback), and passing the comprehensive qualification exam. d. Doctoral Dissertation (30 research credits) e. Minimum requirement for Degree: 30 thesis credits PROGRAM REQUIREMENTS Substitutions of courses will not be allowed into the DPM program without written departmental approval. Students with a previous PhD may be considered for a credit load reduction upon the committee’s approval. 12. Complete the following requirements: PM A650 Program and Portfolio Management 6 PM A652 Enterprise Program Management Information Systems 6 PM A654 Portfolio Finance 6 PM A656 Global Program Leadership and Innovation 6 PM A658 Program Governance and Group Decision Making 6 PM A660 Program Management Coaching 3 PM A695 Research Methods in Program Management 3 PM A699 Program Management Dissertation 6 13. Required elements of the Plan of Study a. Coursework (36 credits): Students must complete the core course requirements of: PM 650, PM 652, PM 654, PM 656, PM 658, PM 660, and PM 695. b. Outreach activity of one annual public presentation c. Advancement to Candidacy occurs when the student demonstrates mastery in understanding of the problems and theories of program management and in-depth knowledge of the student’s dissertation topic area. Requirements for Advancement to Candidacy are determined by the student’s academic committee and shall be consistent with the candidacy requirements for graduate studies at UAA. Requirements include developing a dissertation topic, showing teaching potential (based on student feedback), and passing the comprehensive qualification exam. 14. Doctoral Dissertation (30 research credits) 15. A total of 66 credits. 36 to be completed as a student and 30 as a Doctoral Candidate with a 3.0 GPA total. 57
    • Doctor of Program Management (DPM) Proposal Questions: Jang W. Ra, PhD (Professor and Chair) School of Engineering Engineering, Science & Project Management (ESPM) Department afjwr@uaa.alaska.edu Mailing Address University of Alaska Anchorage 3211 Providence Drive Anchorage, AK 99508-4614 (907) 786-1924 (907) 786-1935 fax FACULTY Jang Ra, Ph.D., PMP, Professor and Department Chair Steve Wang, Ph.D, Assistant Professor and ESM Coordinator LuAnn Piccard, Lecturer, MSME, PMP Paula Donson, Ph.D., Adjunct Professor David Rechenthin, DBA., PMP, Adjunct Professor William Spindle, EdD., Adjunct Professor 58
    • XI.NEW COURSE DESCRIPTIONS A. New Course: PM 650 - Program and Portfolio Management Introductory foundational course for the DPM program. Covers program and portfolio management as techniques for the governance of multiple projects in an organization with systems thinking approach. Includes a discussion of project management and capability maturity models and maturity assessment tools, such as OPM3. Looks at organizational structures, cross- functional coordination, strategic alignment, and the role of the Program Management Office. Provides a broad review of global project and program management standards, including global standards such as PMI (U.S.), IPMA/ICB (Swiss), OGC/PRINCE2 (UK), PMAJ/P2M Revised (Japan), BSi/BS6079-1.2.3.(4): 2002, 2000 (UK), APM/APMBOK (UK), and ISO 21500 (initiated in November 2007). Students explore emerging program and portfolio management issues in Alaska, the United States, and globally. Students are expected to draw on their work experience and internet research to bring issues for study to the class. B. New Course: PM 652 - Enterprise Program Management Information Systems Covers the management of enterprise-wide programs and portfolios, including the theoretical basis and practical applications and solutions for tracking and managing projects and project information. Features instruction in the use of the Primavera P6 application for the development and utilization of enterprise project management information systems. Covers how organizations can capture, analyze, and use historical information for successful projects in the future. Includes the capture and application of information within projects as well as inter-project knowledge management and wisdom management through lessons learned. C. New Course: PM 654 - Portfolio Finance Provides a broad and in-depth coverage of portfolio finance and related topics, including resources, cost, schedule, and financial management. The curriculum includes project-level finance, organizational financial management, and global economic aspects of managing projects. Project-level and organizational finance includes funding constraints and phases, legal aspects, unions, resource availability and requirements, workforce requirements, projects and programs with multiple sponsors, and the risk implications of financing decisions. Also considers project and resource scheduling and project phasing. International topics include the effect of macroeconomic and political influences of projects, including interest rates, economic trends, logistics and supply chain management procurement aspects, and currency exchange rates. D. New Course: PM 656 - Global Program Leadership and Innovation This course covers the global context of projects, programs, and portfolios, focusing on environmental factors other than financial aspects. Topics include human resources, communication, virtual project teams, change management, geography and temporal challenges, global program management standards, cultural awareness and differences, legal issues, and techniques for addressing global challenges within a program. Overseas travel is required as part 59
    • Doctor of Program Management (DPM) Proposal of this course, either to co-present a paper at an international project management conference (PMI Global Congress, SPM International Project Management Conference, or similar) and/or to co-author a report based on an international project site visit. A portion of travel costs, up to 50% of the tuition amount, are included in the cost of tuition to cover the cost of airfare, hotel stays, and miscellaneous expenses. E. New Course: PM 658 - Program Governance and Group Decision Making Covers the development, communication, implementation, and monitoring of organizational decision-making policies, procedures, and strategic plans for program and portfolio management. These factors form a framework for efficient and effective decision making and program delivery. Through proper program governance, an organization can control program investment and monitor the delivery of program benefits. Topics related to group interactions and decision making include roles and responsibilities, professional ethics, organizational and program risk management, organizational behavior, stakeholder management techniques, quantitative judgment and decision methods (such as the Analytic Hierarchy Process), risk tolerance, group dynamics, conflict resolution, transparency, and the importance of timely decisions. F. New Course: PM 660 - Program Management Coaching This course covers adult education, learning styles, and presentation techniques for graduate- level coaching and training through direct instructor roles, assisting faculty members through a teaching assistantship, or providing mentoring on-line for students studying in the MSPM program. In this applied “train the trainers” course, activities include preparing new teaching materials and improving existing materials to enhance the quality and consistency of delivery. Students will teach a professional short course or undergraduate course, or serve as a mentor for multiple students in a graduate course; students will be paid for their teaching assignment. While teaching, the student teaching feedback and evaluations will be monitored by faculty. After completing this course, students should be prepared for teaching, mentoring, and training their team members. G. New Course: PM 695 - Research Methods in Program Management Introduction to the research methods used in project, program, and portfolio management. The course will provide students with an understanding of the difference between theory and practice, the connection of theory and research, the scientific inquiry process through surveys and interviews, research approaches and methods, and presentation of research results. Students are expected to provide a list of contemporary Program Management-related research topics, including their own DPM research. Students will study the dissertation research process in depth, including the design of research questions and hypotheses, data collection and analysis, valid statistical sampling, statistical analysis of research data, development of keywords, how to conduct a thorough literature review, effective internet searches, and intellectual property issues. H. New Course: PM 699 - Program Management Dissertation This is the dissertation course. Students working on their dissertation are required to maintain continuous enrollment in this course through the completion and successful defense of their dissertation. 60
    • XII.NEW COURSE SYLLABI A. New Course: Program and Portfolio Management PM650 – Program and Portfolio Management Implementation Date – Spring 2010 I. Course Information A. College or School: School of Engineering B. Course Subject: Program Management C. Course Number: A650 D. Number of Credits: Six (6) E. Course or Program: Course F. Title: Program and Portfolio Management G. Grading Basis: A-F H. Implementation Date: Spring 2010 I. Course Description: Introductory foundational course for the DPM program. Covers program and portfolio management as techniques for the governance of multiple projects in an organization with systems thinking approach. Includes a discussion of project management and capability maturity models and maturity assessment tools, such as OPM3. Looks at organizational structures, cross-functional coordination, strategic alignment, and the role of the Program Management Office. Provides a broad review of global project and program management standards, including global standards such as PMI (U.S.), IPMA/ICB (Swiss), OGC/PRINCE2 (UK), PMAJ/P2M Revised (Japan), BSi/BS6079-1.2.3.(4): 2002, 2000 (UK), APM/APMBOK (UK), and ISO 21500 (initiated in November 2007). Students explore emerging program and portfolio management issues in Alaska, the United States, and globally. Students are expected to draw on their work experience and internet research to bring issues for study to the class. J. Course Prerequisites/Registration Restrictions: MSPM Degree or Departmental Approval K. Course Fee: Yes, PM Fee at double current graduate tuition a credit hour II. Other Course Information A. Course Schedule: Standard semester timeframe (Weekend classes) B. Lecture hours/week: Six (6) hours/week C. Laboratory hours/week: None (0) D. Total time of work expected outside of class: Twelve (12) hours/week E. Program that require this course: Doctor of Program Management (DPM) F. Justification for action: Core requirement for DPM Program 61
    • Doctor of Program Management (DPM) Proposal III. Instructional Goals and Student Outcomes 1. Instructional Goals: The instructor will 1.1 Provide students with a detailed understanding of Program and Portfolio management processes and Program and Portfolio environments 1.2 Enable students to define a System, and understand Systems, Approach, Analysis, Alignments, and Management. 1.3 Enable students to define Systems Cycles and what constitutes each. 1.4 Provide students with knowledge, skills, tools and techniques to plan, organize, lead, and control the Program and Portfolio. 1.5 Enable students to determine what organization structure a Program and Portfolio utilizes and why. 1.6 Enable students to understand the Program and Portfolio manager’s role, responsibilities, and type of leadership style utilized for a Program and Portfolio. 1.7 Provide students with tools and techniques to define Program and Portfolio failure, Program and Portfolio success, and lessons learned during the life of a Program and Portfolio. 2. Course Structure: The course will be conducted as a series of weekly lectures that will include class participation, presentations, and case studies, plus small team research and term project activities outside classes. 3. Student Outcomes: The student will 3.1 Define Program and Portfolio, Program and Portfolio management, and what comprises each. 3.2 Define a System, and understand Systems, Approach, Analysis, Alignments and Management, and how they are related to each other. 3.3 Define Systems Cycles and their makeup. 3.4 To plan, organize, schedule, and control the Program and Portfolio. 3.5 Examine an organization structure and determine which structure a Program and Portfolio utilizes and why. 3.6 Describe the Program and Portfolio manager’s role, responsibilities, and type of leadership style utilized for a Program and Portfolio. 3.7 Analyze, and determine solutions for Program and Portfolio failures and successes, and define lessons learned. IV. Guidelines for Evaluation or Assessment Methods Students are evaluated on successful completion of (a) a comprehensive set of weekly assignments understanding, (b) term-project report writings and oral presentations and discussion, and/or (c) final examination. V. Course Level Justification A. Address Level Descriptors from Catalog: Graduate B. Specify Registration Restrictions: MSPM Degree or Departmental Approval 62
    • Doctor of Program Management (DPM) Proposal C. State the Disciplinary Background: Project Management/Program Management D. Specify Prerequisites, e.g., “Graduate Status.”: MSPM Degree or Departmental Approval E. Course Intent: The understanding, integration and application of Program and Portfolio Management Fundamentals occur at a doctoral level. Advanced conceptual, analytical, evaluation and communication skills are needed to understand and apply the knowledge, processes, tools and techniques relating to each of the essential foundation areas presented. VI. Topical Course Outline 1. Program Management & Portfolio management 1.1 What are Program Management and Portfolio Management? 1.2 Evolution of Program & Portfolio Management 1.3 Forms of Program Management 1.4 Program Environments 2. Systems Organizations 2.1 Definition of a Complex System 2.2 Systems Concepts and Principles 2.3 Human Organizations 2.4 Systems Approach, Analysis, Alignments and Management 2.5 User’s Requirements and Control Factors 3. Systems Development Cycles 3.1 Systems Development Life Cycles 3.2 Constraints in Systems Development 3.3 Program and Portfolio Proposal 3.4 Design/Programming Stage 3.5 Production/Build Stage 4. Program and Portfolio Life Cycles vs Project and Product Life Cycles 4.1 Program and Portfolio Scope vs Project and Product Scope 4.2 Roles and Responsibilities 5. Program and Portfolio Management Body of Knowledge 5.1 Integration Management 5.2 Scope Management 5.3 Time Management 5.4 Cost Management 5.5 Quality Management 5.6 Human Resource Management 5.7 Communications Management 5.8 Risk Management 5.9 Procurement Management 5.10Financial Management 5.11Stakeholder management 5.12Program Governance 6 Program Life Cycle Phases 6.1 Pre-Program Preparations 6.2 Program Initiation 63
    • Doctor of Program Management (DPM) Proposal 6.3 Program Setup 6.4 Delivery of Program Benefits 6.5 Program Closure 7 Planning Fundamentals 7.1 Program and Portfolio Master Plan 7.2 Scope and Work Definition 7.3 Organization Structure and Representation 7.4 Program and Portfolio Management System 7.5 Resource Allocations 7.6 Scheduling, Planning, and Scheduling Charts 7.7 Change Management 8 Program and Portfolio Organization Structure and Integration 8.1 Formal Organization Structure 8.2 Requirements of Program and Portfolio Organizations 8.3 Matrix Organizations 8.4 Program and Portfolio Office (PMO) 9 Program and Portfolio Roles, Responsibility, and Authority 9.1 The Program and Portfolio Manager 9.2 Selecting the Program and Portfolio Manager 9.3 Internal/External Roles in the Program and Portfolio Team 9.4 Relationships Among Project, Program, Portfolio and Functional 9.5 Roles 10 Program and Portfolio Failure, Success, and Lessons Learned 10.1Failures and Causes of Program and Portfolio Failure 10.2Successes and Causes of Program and Portfolio Successes 10.3Model and Procedure for Analyzing Program and Portfolio Performance 10.4Lessons Learned from the Program and Portfolio 11 Trends and Issues in Program and Portfolio Management 11.1 Program and Portfolio Office 11.2 Software 11.3 Global Program and Portfolio Management 11.4 Web-based Program and Portfolio Management 12 Program and Portfolio Management in Pacific Rim Countries VII. Suggested Texts • The Standard for Program Management, Second Edition (PMI, 2008) • The Standard for Portfolio Management, Second Edition (PMI, 2008) • The Program Management Office: Establishing, Managing And Growing the Value of a PMO (Craig J. Letavec, 2006) • The Handbook of Program Management: How to Facilitate Project Success with Optimal Program Management (James T Brown, 2007) • Program Management for Improved Business Results (Milosevic, Martinelli, and Waddell, 2007) 64
    • Doctor of Program Management (DPM) Proposal VIII. Bibliography and Resources • Creating the Project Office: A Manager's Guide to Leading Organizational Change (Jossey Bass Business and Management Series) (Englund, Graham, and Dinsmore, 2003) • Fundamentals of Effective Program Management: A Process Approach Based on the Global Standard (Paul Sanghera, 2008) • A Management Framework for Project, Program and Portfolio Integration (Wideman, 2006) • Strategic Program Management (Prieto, 2008) • Project Portfolio Management: A Practical Guide to Selecting Projects, Managing Portfolios, and Maximizing Benefits (Jossey-Bass Business & Management) (Levine, 2005) • Project & Program Risk Management: A Guide to Managing Project Risks and Opportunities (R. Max Wideman, 1992) • Practices, Roles, and Responsibilities of Middle Managers in Program and Portfolio Management (Journal article: Blomquist and Müller, PMI, March 2006) • Selected journal articles: o Tying the pieces together: A normative framework for integrating sales and project operations, Industrial Marketing Management (Cooper and Budd, 2007) o The marketing strategy of a project-based firm: The Four Portfolios Framework, Industrial Marketing Management (Tikkanen, Kujala, and Artto, 2007) o Project marketing in multi-project organizations: A comparison of IS/IT and engineering firms, Industrial Marketing Management (Blomquist and Wilson, 2007) 65
    • Doctor of Program Management (DPM) Proposal B. New Course: Enterprise Program Management Information Systems PM652 – Enterprise Program Management Information Systems Implementation Date – Spring 2010 I. Course Information A. College or School: School of Engineering B. Course Subject: Program Management C. Course Number: A652 D. Number of Credits: Six (6) E. Course or Program: Course F. Title: Enterprise Program Management Information Systems G. Grading Basis: A-F H. Implementation Date: Spring 2010 I. Course Description: Covers the management of enterprise-wide programs and portfolios, including the theoretical basis and practical applications and solutions for tracking and managing projects and project information. Features instruction in the use of the Primavera P6 application for the development and utilization of enterprise project management information systems. Covers how organizations can capture, analyze, and use historical information for successful projects in the future. Includes the capture and application of information within projects as well as inter-project knowledge management and wisdom management through lessons learned. J. Course Prerequisites/Registration Restrictions: PM650 or Departmental Approval K. Course Fee: Yes, PM Fee at double current graduate tuition a credit hour II. Other Course Information A. Course Schedule: Standard semester timeframe (Weekend classes) B. Lecture hours/week: Six (6) hours/week C. Laboratory hours/week: None (0) D. Total time of work expected outside of class: Twelve (12) hours/week E. Program that require this course: Doctor of Program Management (DPM) F. Justification for action: Core requirement for DPM Program III. Instructional Goals and Student Outcomes 1. Instructional Goals: The instructor will 1.1 Provide students with an overview and principles of development of Program Management Information Systems (PMIS). 1.2 Enable students to architecture a System and understand its Approach for Development, Coordination with Other Systems and Management. 1.3 Enable students to use Advanced and Complex PMIS such as Primavera. 1.4 Provide students with skills and techniques to structure and schedule projects and programs. 1.5 Enable students to determine which PMIS option is appropriate to different situations and according to maturity levels. 66
    • Doctor of Program Management (DPM) Proposal 1.6 Enable students to understand the Program and Portfolio Manager’s role, responsibilities, and type of leadership style to adopt a new PMIS. 1.7 Encourage students to conduct search and benchmark a better PMIS and to do comparative analysis. 2. Course Structure: The course will be conducted as a series of weekly lectures and hand-on exercises through simulating two case studies – one for IT program and another for Capital Development program. 3. Student Outcomes: The student will 3.1 Define PMIS components, stakeholders, requirements, and infrastructure. 3.2 Learn how to architect, select development approach, communicate with IT professionals and stakeholders, and how they are related to each other. 3.3 Define PMIS Cycles and their makeup. 3.4 Plan, organize, schedule, and control Programs and Portfolios within PMIS. 3.5 Have full conceptual understanding and sufficient proficiency in using advanced software like Primavera. 3.6 Identify critical factors and issues in using and improving PMIS. 3.7 Be able to consult for PMIS related topics. IV. Guidelines for Evaluation or Assessment Methods Students are evaluated on successful completion of (a) a comprehensive set of weekly assignments to demonstrate understanding, (b) term-project report writings and oral presentations and discussion, and/or (c) final examination. V. Course Level Justification A. Address Level Descriptors from Catalog: Graduate B. Specify Registration Restrictions: MSPM Degree or Departmental Approval C. State the Disciplinary Background: Project Management/Program Management D. Specify Prerequisites, e.g., “Graduate Status.”: MSPM Degree or Departmental Approval E. Course Intent: The understanding, development, operation, and improvement of Enterprise Program Management Information Systems at a doctoral level. Advanced communication and computer skills are needed to apply an advanced and sophisticated software tool(s) such as Primavera to manage projects, programs, and portfolios in alignments of enterprise strategic goals. VI. Topical Course Outline 1. Enterprise Project and Program Management Structure and Systems 1.1 Organization and Stakeholder Structures 1.2 User Requirements and Communications 1.3 Infrastructure and Coordination with Other Functional Operations 2. PMIS and Primavera Architecture 2.1 Enterprise Project System (EPS) 2.2 Organization Breakdown Structure (OBS) 67
    • Doctor of Program Management (DPM) Proposal 2.3 Resource Breakdown Structure (RBS) 2.4 Cost Breakdown Structure (CBS) 3. Program Integration Management using Primavera I 3.1 Initiate Program 3.2 Develop Program Management Plan 3.3 Develop Program Infrastructure 4. Program Integration Management using Primavera II 4.1 Direct and manage Program Execution 4.2 Manage Program Resources 4.3 Monitor and Control Program Performance 4.4 Manage Program Issues 4.5 Close Program 5. Program Scope Management using Primavera I 5.1 Plan Program Scope 5.2 Define Program goals and objectives 5.3 Develop Program Requirements 5.4 Develop Program Architecture 5.5 Develop Program Work Breakdown Structure (WBS) 6. Program Scope Management using Primavera II 6.1 Manage Program Architecture 6.2 Manage Component Interfaces 6.3 Monitor and Control Program Scope 7. Program Time Management 7.1 Develop Program Schedule 7.2 Monitor and Control Program Schedule 8. Program Communication Management 8.1 Plan Communications 8.2 Distribute Information 8.3 Report Program Performance 9. Roles, Responsibility, and Authority 9.1 Users 9.2 Project, Program and Portfolio Managers 9.3 Contractors 9.4 Schedulers 9.5 IT Professionals 10. Documents and Files Controls and Management 10.1Various Reports 10.2Causes of Program and Portfolio Failures and Successes 10.3Program and Portfolio Performance Reports 10.4Methodology management 11. Administration and Security Issues 11.1 Program and Portfolio Office 11.2 Coordination with Other Software 11.3 Virtual Team Work Environment 11.4 Web-based Program and Portfolio Management 12. Trends and Issues in Information Technology Development 68
    • Doctor of Program Management (DPM) Proposal VII. Suggested Texts • Project Management for Information Systems, Fifth Edition (Cadle and Yeates, 2007) • Integrated Cost and Schedule Control in Project Management (Kuehn, 2006) • The Standard for Program Management, Second Edition (PMI, 2008) • The Standard for Portfolio Management, Second Edition (PMI, 2008) VIII. Bibliography and Resources • Integrated Cost and Schedule Control in Project Management (Kuehn, 2006) • Selected journal articles: • Primavera P6 Enterprise Project Portfolio Management software • Microsoft Office Project Server 2007 software • Enterprise Project Management Using Microsoft Office Project Server 2007: Best Practices for Implementing an EPM Solution (Landman, 2008) • Selected journal articles: o Effectively utilizing project, product and process knowledge, Information and Software Technology, 50 (2008) (Ebert and De Man, 2008) o Building knowledge in projects: A practical application of social constructivism to information systems development, International Journal of Project Management (Jackson and Klobas) o Evaluating Benefits and Challenges of Knowledge Transfer Across Projects, Engineering Management Journal (Landaeta, 2008) o Project Scheduling-Theory and Practice, Production and Operations Management (Herroelen, 2005) o Enterprise programme management: Connecting strategic planning to project delivery, Journal of Facilities Management (Gaddie, 2003) 69
    • Doctor of Program Management (DPM) Proposal C. New Course: Portfolio Finance PM654 – Portfolio Finance Implementation Date – Spring 2010 I. Course Information A. College or School: School of Engineering B. Course Subject: Program Management C. Course Number: A654 D. Number of Credits: Six (6) E. Course or Program: Course F. Title: Enterprise Program Management Information Systems G. Grading Basis: A-F H. Implementation Date: Spring 2010 I. Course Description: Provides a broad and in-depth coverage of portfolio finance and related topics, including resources, cost, schedule, and financial management. The curriculum includes project-level finance, organizational financial management, and global economic aspects of managing projects. Project-level and organizational finance includes funding constraints and phases, legal aspects, unions, resource availability and requirements, workforce requirements, projects and programs with multiple sponsors, and the risk implications of financing decisions. Also considers project and resource scheduling and project phasing. International topics include the effect of macroeconomic and political influences of projects, including interest rates, economic trends, logistics and supply chain management procurement aspects, and currency exchange rates. J. Course Prerequisites/Registration Restrictions: PM650 or Departmental Approval K. Course Fee: Yes, PM Fee at double current graduate tuition a credit hour II. Other Course Information A. Course Schedule: Standard semester timeframe (Weekend classes) B. Lecture hours/week: Six (6) hours/week C. Laboratory hours/week: None (0) D. Total time of work expected outside of class: Twelve (12) hours/week E. Program that require this course: Doctor of Program Management (DPM) F. Justification for action: Core requirement for DPM Program III. Instructional Goals and Student Outcomes 1. Instructional Goals: The instructor will 1.1 Provide students with Program Financial Management processes to ensure the program is completed within budget. 1.2 Introduce financial framework, financial plan, cost estimating, budgeting, and controlling tools and techniques. 1.3 Evaluate case studies for under-cost, and over-cost programs and provide concerns of and solutions for each. 1.4 Provide criteria, tools, and techniques for making balanced portfolios. 70
    • Doctor of Program Management (DPM) Proposal 2. Course Structure: The course will be conducted as a series of weekly lectures that will include: class participation, presentations, and case studies. 3. Student Outcomes: The student will 3.1 Utilize effective program financial management processes to ensure the program is completed within budget. 3.2 Determine what resources, in terms of people, materials, equipment, etc., are needed to perform the program. 3.3 Develop an estimate of the approximate costs required to complete the program. 3.4 Establish a cost baseline to measuring program performance. 3.5 Determine if the cost baseline has changed and manage the changes needed to control program cost. 3.6 Learn important factors to consider in balancing a portfolio. IV. Guidelines for Evaluation or Assessment Methods Students are evaluated on successful completion of (a) a comprehensive set of weekly assignments to demonstrate understanding, (b) term-project report writings and oral presentations and discussion, and/or (c) final examination. V. Course Level Justification A. Address Level Descriptors from Catalog: Graduate B. Specify Registration Restrictions: MSPM Degree or Departmental Approval C. State the Disciplinary Background: Project Management/Program Management D. Specify Prerequisites, e.g., “Graduate Status.”: MSPM Degree or Departmental Approval E. Course Intent: This course builds on the program and portfolio financial management definitions presented in PM A650 – Program and Portfolio Management. The student will possess advanced analytical, investigative, and interpretation skills needed to examine program related advanced financial management processes and procedures – including resource planning, estimation, budgeting and cost control – used to accomplish the program within budget and maximize the rate of return through optimal portfolio management. VI. Topical Course Outline 1. Program Financial Management 1.1 Identifying the Program’s Financial Sources and Resources 1.2 Integrating the Budgets of the Individual Program Components 1.3 Developing the Overall Budget for the Program 1.4 Controlling Costs throughout the Life Cycle of the Component and Program 2. Establish Program Financial Framework 2.1 Program Financial Analysis 2.2 Payment Schedules 2.3 Funding Methods 2.4 Program WBS 71
    • Doctor of Program Management (DPM) Proposal 3. Develop Program Financial Plan 3.1 Financial Analysis 3.2 Contract Management 3.3 Analysis of Program Operational Costs 4. Estimate Program Costs I 4.1 Value Engineering 4.2 Architecture/Cost Tradeoff Analysis 4.3 Contingency and Management Reserve 4.4 Estimating Publications 4.5 Leasing vs. Buying 4.6 Economic Factors 4.7 Financing 4.8 Profit & Loss 4.9 Tools & Techniques for Estimating 5. Estimate Program Costs II 5.1 Estimating Methods 5.2 Analogous Estimating 5.3 Parametric Estimating 5.4 Bottom-up Estimating 5.5 Cost of Quality 5.6 Learning and Productivity Curves 6. Estimate Program Costs III 6.1 Procurement Analysis 6.2 Computer Cost Estimating Tools 6.3 Expert Judgment 7. Budget Program Costs 7.1 Schedule and Constraints 7.2 Program-associated overhead 7.3 Program Budget Baseline 8. Monitor and Control Program Financials 8.1 Cost Forecasting Techniques 8.2 Earned Value Management 8.3 Cost Change Management 9. Portfolio Management 9.1 Strategic Alignment 9.2 Product Advantage 9.3 Market Attractiveness 9.4 Technical Feasibility 9.5 Risk 9.6 Return 9.7 Regulatory 10. Portfolio Risk Management 10.1 Unbalanced Portfolio 10.2 Bubble Charts 11. Portfolio Governance Management 12. Program and Portfolio Cost Information System 72
    • Doctor of Program Management (DPM) Proposal VII. Suggested Texts • Project Finance in Theory and Practice: Designing, Structuring, and Financing Private and Public Projects (Academic Press Advanced Finance Series) (Gatti, 2007) • Project Financing: Asset-Based Financial Engineering (Wiley Finance) (Finnerty, 2007) VIII. Bibliography and Resources • The Standard for Program Management, Second Edition (PMI, 2008) • The Standard for Portfolio Management, Second Edition (PMI, 2008) • Practice Standard for Earned Value Management (PMI, 2005) • Financing Infrastructure Projects (Merna and Njiru, 2002) • Principles of Project Finance (Yescombe, 2002) • The Law and Business of International Project Finance: A Resource for Governments, Sponsors, Lawyers, and Project Participants (Hoffman, 2001) • World Bank and/or International Monetary Fund publications • Selected journal articles: o Which Interest Rate for Evaluating Projects?, Engineering Management Journal (Eschenbach and Cohen, 2006) o Multiple project management: a modern competitive necessity, Journal of Manufacturing Technology Management (Dooley, Lupton, O'Sullivan, 2005) o Project selection based on intellectual capital scorecards, Intelligent Systems in Accounting, Finance and Management (Daniels and Noordhuis, 2005) o Characterizing Project Performance with Quantified Indices, AACE International Transactions (Rad and Levin, 2004) o Predicting the future of project finance: A risky business, International Financial Law Review (Fletcher, 2001) 73
    • Doctor of Program Management (DPM) Proposal D. New Course: Global Program Leadership and Innovation PM656 – Global Program Leadership and Innovation Implementation Date – Spring 2010 I. Course Information A. College or School: School of Engineering B. Course Subject: Program Management C. Course Number: A656 D. Number of Credits: Six (6) E. Course or Program: Course F. Title: Global Program Leadership and Innovation G. Grading Basis: A-F H. Implementation Date: Spring 2010 I. Course Description: This course covers the global context of projects, programs, and portfolios, focusing on environmental factors other than financial aspects. Topics include human resources, communication, virtual project teams, change management, geography and temporal challenges, global program management standards, cultural awareness and differences, legal issues, and techniques for addressing global challenges within a program. Overseas travel is required as part of this course, either to co-present a paper at an international project management conference (PMI Global Congress, SPM International Project Management Conference, or similar) and/or to co-author a report with faculty based on an international project site visit. A portion of travel costs, up to 50% of the tuition amount, are included in the cost of tuition to cover the cost of airfare, hotel stays, and miscellaneous expenses. J. Course Prerequisites/Registration Restrictions: PM650 or Departmental Approval K. Course Fee: Yes, PM Fee at double current graduate tuition a credit hour II. Other Course Information A. Course Schedule: Standard semester timeframe (Weekend classes) B. Lecture hours/week: Six (6) hours/week C. Laboratory hours/week: None (0) D. Total time of work expected outside of class: Twelve (12) hours/week E. Program that require this course: Doctor of Program Management (DPM) F. Justification for action: Core requirement for DPM Program III. Instructional Goals and Student Outcomes 1. Instructional Goals: The instructor will 1.1 Provide students with a well-rounded, balanced approach to management of the technical professional. 1.2 Provide an understanding of organizational, staffing and team development. 2. Course Structure: The course will be conducted as a series of weekly lectures that will include, class participation, presentations, and case studies. 74
    • Doctor of Program Management (DPM) Proposal 3. Student Outcomes: The student will 3.1 Identify the appropriate organization for a specific Program 3.2 Select, organize and lead a team. 3.3 Set up performance measurement requirements and perform performance appraisals. 3.4 Understand the different types of personality traits and how to motivate a team under different conditions. 3.5 Apply differing leadership styles. 3.6 Know how to influence those around them. IV. Guidelines for Evaluation or Assessment Methods Students are evaluated on successful completion of (a) a comprehensive set of weekly assignments to demonstrate understanding, (b) term-Program report writings and oral presentations and discussion, and/or (c) final examination. V. Course Level Justification A. Address Level Descriptors from Catalog: Graduate B. Specify Registration Restrictions: MSPM Degree or Departmental Approval C. State the Disciplinary Background: Project Management/Program Management D. Specify Prerequisites, e.g., “Graduate Status.”: MSPM Degree or Departmental Approval E. Course Intent: This course utilizes and builds on the student’s professional background presenting a variety of topics that are applicable to leading and managing stakeholders on Programs, and managing the project management professionals. Broad areas of study will include organizational planning, staff allocations, and team development as they relate to managing the human resources required to develop and implement a Program. VI. Topical Course Outline 1. Program Leadership 1.1 Organizational Planning 1.2 Staff Allocations 1.3 Team Development 2. Introduction to Organizational Development 2.1. Organization Types 2.2. Matrix vs. Program Organizations 2.3. Organizational Theory 2.4. Coordination and Integration 3. Management and Global Leadership 3.1. Styles - Traditional, Participative, Shared 3.2. Skills and Competencies 3.3. Benevolent Dictatorship 3.4. Conflict Resolution and Negotiation 3.5. Labor Relations including Union Issues 4. Program Stakeholder Management 4.1. Plan Program Stakeholder Management 4.2. Identify Program Stakeholders 75
    • Doctor of Program Management (DPM) Proposal 4.3. Engage Program Stakeholders Management 4.4. Manage Program Stakeholder Expectation 5. Ethics 5.1. Professional Responsibility 6. Change Management 6.1. How Change Affects People 6.2. How to Manage Change in a Program 7. Global and Virtual Teams 7.1. Time Zones 7.2. Culture and Diversity 7.3. Local Labors 8. Program Communications Management 8.1. Plan Communications 8.2. Distribute Information 8.3. Report Program Performance 9. Rewards Management 9.1. Performance Measurement 9.2. Performance System Model 9.3. Performance Appraisal 10. Competency 10.1.Measurement 10.2.Competency Levels 10.3.Requirements for a Program Team 10.4.Competency Framework 10.5.Developing Individual and Group Competencies 11. Networking and Influencing 11.1.What They Are and How They Work 11.2.Formal vs. Informal 11.3.Working With and Through People 11.4.Program Manager’s Dilemma 11.5.Using Influence 11.6.Influence without Authority 12. Decision Making and Problem Solving 12.1.Tools and Techniques 12.2.Styles 12.3.How It Relates to Teamwork 12.4.Innovation and Creativity 12.5.Brainstorming 13. Management Systems 13.1.Safety and Integrity Systems 13.2.Environmental Management Systems – ISO 14001 13.3.Quality Management Systems – ISO 9001 13.4.Program Management Systems – PMBOK, ISO 10006 VII. Suggested Texts 76
    • Doctor of Program Management (DPM) Proposal • Reinventing Project Management: The Diamond Approach to Successful Growth & Innovation (Shenhar, 2007) • Cases and Projects in International Management: Cross-Cultural Dimensions (Journal article: Owusu and Welch, 2007) VIII. Bibliography and Resources • The Standard for Program Management, Second Edition (PMI, 2008) • The Standard for Portfolio Management, Second Edition (PMI, 2008) • Beyond Project Management: New Perspectives on the temporary - permanent dilemma (Sahlin-Andersson and Söderholm, 2003) • Project Leadership (Lewis, 2002) • Achieving Project Management Success Using Virtual Teams (Rad and Levin, 2003) • Mastering Virtual Teams: Strategies, Tools, and Techniques That Succeed (Jossey Bass Business and Management Series) (Duarte and Snyder, 2006) • Implementing the Virtual Project Management Office (Goncalves, 2006) • Change Management (Hiatt and Creasey, 2003) • The Theory and Practice of Change Management, Second Edition (Hayes, 2007) • Journal articles: o The buying network in international project business: A comparative case study of development projects, Industrial Marketing Management (Owusu and Welch, 2007) o Tying the pieces together: A normative framework for integrating sales and project operations, Industrial Marketing Management (Cooper and Budd, 2007) o The marketing strategy of a project-based firm: The Four Portfolios Framework, Industrial Marketing Management (Tikkanen, Kujala, and Artto, 2007) o Utilizing Knowledge Management for Effective Virtual Teams, The Business Review, Cambridge (Karayaz, 2008) o SUPERPERFORMANCE IN A REMOTE GLOBAL TEAM, Performance Improvement (Westerlund, 2008) o Group Style Differences Between Virtual and F2F Teams, American Journal of Business (Branson, Clausen, and Sung, 2008) o A study of out-sourcing versus in-sourcing tasks within a project value chain, International Journal of Managing Projects in Business (McKenna and Walker, 2008) o The Role of Technology in the Project Manager Performance Model, Project Management Journal (Anantatmula, 2008) o Nature of virtual teams: a summary of their advantages and disadvantages, Management Research News (Bergiel, Bergiel, and Balsmeier, 2008) o Does Mutual Knowledge Affect Virtual Team Performance? Theoretical Analysis and Anecdotal Evidence, American Journal of Business (Davis and Khazanchi, 2007) o Managing Global Virtual Teams, The British Journal of Administrative Management (McLean, 2007) 77
    • Doctor of Program Management (DPM) Proposal E. New Course: Program Governance and Group Decision Making PM A658 – Program Governance and Group Decision Making Implementation Date – Spring 2010 I. Course Information A. College or School: School of Engineering B. Course Subject: Program Management C. Course Number: A658 D. Number of Credits: Six (6) E. Course or Program: Course F. Title: Program Governance and Group Decision Making G. Grading Basis: A-F H. Implementation Date: Spring 2010 I. Course Description: Covers the development, communication, implementation, and monitoring of organizational decision-making policies, procedures, and strategic plans for program and portfolio management. These factors form a framework for efficient and effective decision making and program delivery. Through proper program governance, an organization can control program investment and monitor the delivery of program benefits. Topics related to group interactions and decision making include roles and responsibilities, professional ethics, organizational and program risk management, organizational behavior, stakeholder management techniques, quantitative judgment and decision methods (such as the Analytic Hierarchy Process), risk tolerance, group dynamics, conflict resolution, transparency, and the importance of timely decisions. J. Course Prerequisites/Registration Restrictions: PM650 or Departmental Approval K. Course Fee: Yes, PM Fee at double current graduate tuition a credit hour II. Other Course Information A. Course Schedule: Standard semester timeframe (Weekend classes) B. Lecture hours/week: Six (6) hours/week C. Laboratory hours/week: None (0) D. Total time of work expected outside of class: Twelve (12) hours/week E. Program that require this course: Doctor of Program Management (DPM) F. Justification for action: Core requirement for DPM Program III. Instructional Goals and Student Outcomes 1. Instructional Goals: The instructor will 1.1 Teach the purpose of Program Governance and how it fits within the program management framework. 1.2 Ensure decision-making and delivery management activities are focused on achieving program goals in a consistent manner, addressing appropriate risks, and fulfilling stakeholder requirements. 1.3 Present descriptions of the nature of risk and risk attitude. 1.4 Introduce group decision making tools and techniques. 78
    • Doctor of Program Management (DPM) Proposal 1.5 Describe group dynamics in case studies. 1.6 Enable students to utilized learned techniques for controlling and monitoring risk throughout the life of the project and the program. 2. Course Structure: The course will be conducted as a series of weekly lectures that will include class participation, presentations, and case studies. 3. Student Outcomes: The student will 3.1 Learn the importance of Program Governance Management Processes 3.2 Forecast possible project risk, its severity, and develop contingency plans to reduce this risk using Risk Register. 3.3 Monitor and control identified risks using Risk Register. 3.4 Be able to analyze multi-stakeholders, multi-criteria, multi-level complex decision problems such as Program selections and Portfolio compositions and structure them using Analytic Hierarchy Process. 3.5 Be proficient in using state of the art software. IV. Guidelines for Evaluation or Assessment Methods Students are evaluated on successful completion of (a) a comprehensive set of weekly assignments to demonstrate understanding, (b) term-Program report writings and oral presentations and discussion, and/or (c) final examination. V. Course Level Justification A. Address Level Descriptors from Catalog: Graduate B. Specify Registration Restrictions: MSPM Degree or Departmental Approval C. State the Disciplinary Background: Project Management/Program Management D. Specify Prerequisites, e.g., “Graduate Status.”: MSPM Degree or Departmental Approval E. Course Intent: The student will possess advanced analytical, behavioral, investigative, diagnostic and interpretation skills needed to explore advanced group decision making techniques – including quantitative and qualitative risk analysis, risk measurement and to develop and plan effective solutions to minimize risks on programs. VI. Topical Course Outline 1. Program Governance Structure 1.1. Program Management Information System 1.2. Organizational Planning 1.3. PMO 1.4. Issue Management 1.5. Best Practice Library 2. Audits and Program Quality 2.1. Audit Planning 2.2. Written Deviations 2.3. Program Document Repository 2.4. Benefit/Cost Analysis 2.5. Benchmarking 79
    • Doctor of Program Management (DPM) Proposal 2.6. Checklists 2.7. Cost of Quality 3. Component Initiation 3.1. Go/no-go Decision 3.2. Change Requests 4. Program Changes and Governance Oversight 4.1. Reviews 4.2. Terminations 4.3. Lessons Learned 4.4. Pre-Mortem Review 4.5. Program Phases 5. Program Benefits Management 5.1. Delivering and Managing Benefits 5.2. Organizational Differences 5.3. Benefits Sustainment 5.4. Impact Analysis 6. Program Risk Management 6.1. Plan Program Risk Management 6.2. Identify Program Risks 6.3. Analyze Program Risks 6.4. Plan Program Risk Responses 6.5. Monitor and Control Program Risks 7. Organization’s Risk Management Policies 7.1. Roles and Responsibilities 7.2. Budget 7.3. Time 7.4. Thresholds 8. Risk and Decision Analysis 8.1 Uncertainty 8.2 Maturity 8.3 Disagreement 8.4 Decision Matrix 9. Bayesian Revisions 9.1 Conditional Probability 9.2 Sensitivity and Specificity 9.3 Value of Information 9.4 Value of Influence 10. Multi-Attribute Utility Theory 10.1 Attitudes Toward Risk 10.2 Risk Triggers 11. Multi-Criteria, Multi-Level Group Decision Making 11.1.Pairwise Comparisons 11.2.Chainwise Comparisons 11.3.Measure of Judgment Inconsistency 11.4.Sensitivity Analysis 12. Program Meetings Management 80
    • Doctor of Program Management (DPM) Proposal VII. Suggested Texts • Project Governance: Integrating Corporate, Program and Project Governance (Routledge Contemporary Corporate Governance S) (Crawford, 2009) • Strategic Decision Making: Applying the Analytic Hierarchy Process (Decision Engineering) (Bhushan and Rai, 2004) • Group Decision Making: Drawing Out and Reconciling Differences (Saaty and Peniwati, 2007) VIII. Bibliography and Resources • The Standard for Program Management, Second Edition (PMI, 2008) • The Standard for Portfolio Management, Second Edition (PMI, 2008) • Project Decisions: The Art and Science (Virine and Trumper, 2007) • The Project Meeting Facilitator: Facilitation Skills to Make the Most of Project Meetings (Adams, Means, and Spivey, 2007) • Effective Communications for Project Management (Kliem, 2007) • Journal articles: o Learning investments and organizational capabilities; Case studies on the development of project portfolio management capabilities, International Journal of Managing Projects in Business (Killen, Hunt, and Kleinschmidt, 2008) o Project portfolio management for product innovation, The International Journal of Quality & Reliability Management (Killen, Hunt, and Kleinschmidt, 2008) o Implement Business Strategy via Project Portfolio Management: A Model and Case Study, Journal of American Academy of Business, Cambridge (Lan-ying and Yong-dong, 2007) o The Role of Information Feedback in the Management Group Decision-Making Process Applying System Dynamics Models, Group Decision and Negotiation (Skraba, Kljajic, and Borstnar, 2007) o Can a project champion bias project selection and, if so, how can we avoid it?, Management Research News (Lefley, 2006) o A combined AHP-GP model to allocate internal auditing time to projects, ORiON (Krüger and Hattingh, 2006) o Applying project histories and project learning through knowledge management in an Australian construction company, The Learning Organization (Maqsood, Finegan, and Walker, 2006) o CROSS: A multicriteria group-decision-making model for evaluating and prioritizing advanced-technology projects at NASA, Interfaces (Tavana, 2003) 81
    • Doctor of Program Management (DPM) Proposal F. New Course: Program Management Coaching PM A660 – Program Management Coaching Implementation Date – Spring 2010 I. Course Information A. College or School: School of Engineering B. Course Subject: Program Management C. Course Number: A660 D. Number of Credits: Three (3) E. Course or Program: Course F. Title: Program Management Coaching G. Grading Basis: A-F H. Implementation Date: Spring 2010 I. Course Description: This course covers adult education, learning styles, and presentation techniques for graduate-level coaching and training through direct instructor roles, assisting faculty members through a teaching assistantship, or providing mentoring on-line for students studying in the MSPM program. In this applied “train the trainers” course, activities include preparing new teaching materials and improving existing materials to enhance the quality and consistency of delivery. Students will teach a professional short course or undergraduate course, or serve as a mentor for multiple students in a graduate course; students will be paid for their teaching assignment. While teaching, the student teaching feedback and evaluations will be monitored by faculty. After completing this course, students should be prepared for teaching, mentoring, and training their team members. J. Course Prerequisites/Registration Restrictions: PM650 and all Prior Courses K. Course Fee: Yes, PM Fee at double current graduate tuition a credit hour II. Other Course Information A. Course Schedule: Standard semester timeframe (Weekend classes) B. Lecture hours/week: Three (3) hours/week C. Laboratory hours/week: None (0) D. Total time of work expected outside of class: Six (6) hours/week E. Program that require this course: Doctor of Program Management (DPM) F. Justification for action: Core requirement for DPM Program III. Instructional Goals and Student Outcomes 1. Instructional Goals: The instructor will 1.1 Guide the development of mentoring, training, and teaching plans, process and reviews. 1.2 Provide necessary and sufficient materials, environments, and technologies for effective mentoring. 1.3 Ensure the relationships between the student as a trainer and the trainees. 82
    • Doctor of Program Management (DPM) Proposal 2. Course Structure: The course will be conducted as a series of weekly lectures that will include class participation, presentations, and case studies. 3. Student Outcomes: The student will 3.1 Develop course contents and continuous improvement processes for coaching, mentoring, teaching activities. 3.2 Design efficient and effective leaning and teaching styles according to situational leadership. 3.3 Learn best and most by teaching. IV. Guidelines for Evaluation or Assessment Methods Students are evaluated on successful completion of (a) mentoring, training and teaching activities, (b) a comprehensive set of bi-weekly self reviews through recorded classes, (c) course evaluations by trainees and the faculty committee. V. Course Level Justification A. Address Level Descriptors from Catalog: Graduate B. Specify Registration Restrictions: MSPM Degree or Departmental Approval C. State the Disciplinary Background: Project Management/Program Management D. Specify Prerequisites, e.g., “Graduate Status.”: MSPM Degree or Departmental Approval E. Course Intent: The student will become a trainer of their project and program team members so that project and programs will produce planned goals in a consistent manner. Through this course, actual training and teaching will be exercised in a controlled structure under the faculty committee. This course will balance the student capability between research and teaching. VI. Topical Course Outline 1. Program Management Training and Teaching Plans 1.1. Project Charter 1.2. Teaching Project Schedule 1.3. Supporting Details 2. Lecture Materials Development 2.1. User’s Requirements 2.2. Benefit/Cost Analysis 2.3. Means and Methods 3. Presentation Skills 3.1. Oral Presentations 3.2. Writings 3.3. Teaching Technologies 4. 360 Degree Evaluations 4.1. Critical Success Factors 4.2. Performance Measures 4.3. Group Decisions 83
    • Doctor of Program Management (DPM) Proposal 5. Adult Learning 5.1. Generational Differences 5.2. Cultural Differences 5.3. Language Differences 6. Personal Change Management 6.1. Organizational Change 6.2. Project Change 6.3. Employee Change 7. Advising VII. Suggested Texts • Coaching and Mentoring: How to Develop Top Talent and Achieve Stronger Performance (Harvard Business Essentials) (Harvard Business School Press, 2004) • The Profession and Practice of Adult Education: An Introduction (Sharan B. Merriam and Ralph G. Brockett, 2007) VIII. Bibliography and Resources • Planning Programs for Adult Learners: A Practical Guide for Educators, Trainers, and Staff Developers, 2nd Edition (Rosemary S. Caffarella, 2001) • Learning in Adulthood: A Comprehensive Guide (Jossey-Bass Higher & Adult Education) (Merriam, Caffarella, and Baumgartner, 2006) • Adult Learning Methods: A Guide for Effective Instruction (Galbraith, 2003) • Creating a Mentoring Culture: The Organization's Guide (Zachary, 2005) • Journal articles: o Learning at Work: How to Support Individual and Organizational Learning, Journal of Education for Business (Feather-Gannon and McAliney, 2008) o The Influence of Maslow's Humanistic Views on an Employee's Motivation to Learn, Journal of Applied Management and Entrepreneurship (Wilson and Madsen, 2008) o Leadership development training transfer: a case study of post-training determinants, The Journal of Management Development (Gilpin-Jackson and Bushe, 2007) o Learning and Development for Managers: Perspectives from Research and Practice, Management Learning (Monaghan, 2007) o The contribution of experiential learning to in-house education and training, Training & Management Development Methods (Valkanos, 2007) o Action learning and action reflection learning: are they different?, Industrial and Commercial Training (Rimanoczy, 2007) o Factors that Contribute to the Effectiveness of Business Coaching: The Coachees Perspective, The Business Review, Cambridge (Blackman, 2006) 84
    • Doctor of Program Management (DPM) Proposal G. New Course: Research Methods in Program Management PM A695 – Research Methods in Program Management Implementation Date – Spring 2010 I. Course Information A. College or School: School of Engineering B. Course Subject: Program Management C. Course Number: A695 D. Number of Credits: Three (3) E. Course or Program: Course F. Title: Research Methods in Program Management G. Grading Basis: A-F H. Implementation Date: Spring 2010 I. Course Description: Introduction to the research methods used in project, program, and portfolio management. The course will provide students with an understanding of the difference between theory and practice, the connection of theory and research, the scientific inquiry process through surveys and interviews, research approaches and methods, and presentation of research results. Students are expected to provide a list of contemporary Program Management-related research topics, including their own DPM research. Students will study the dissertation research process in depth, including the design of research questions and hypotheses, data collection and analysis, valid statistical sampling, statistical analysis of research data, development of keywords, how to conduct a thorough literature review, effective internet searches, and intellectual property issues. J. Course Prerequisites/Registration Restrictions: PM650, PM652, PM654, PM656 and PM658 or Departmental Approval K. Course Fee: Yes, PM Fee at double current graduate tuition a credit hour II. Other Course Information A. Course Schedule: Standard semester timeframe (Weekend classes) B. Lecture hours/week: Three (3) hours/week C. Laboratory hours/week: None (0) D. Total time of work expected outside of class: Six (6) hours/week E. Program that require this course: Doctor of Program Management (DPM) F. Justification for action: Core requirement for DPM Program III. Instructional Goals and Student Outcomes 1. Instructional Goals: The instructor will 1.1 Guide the development of pilot research topics, scope, and scheduling processes. 1.2 Provide necessary and sufficient materials, environments, and technologies for effective research. 1.3 Ensure the research to be practical and professional to be turned out to be profitable in managing programs and portfolios. 85
    • Doctor of Program Management (DPM) Proposal 2. Course Structure: The course will be conducted through brain storming sessions, literature searches, surveys, interviews, and/or discussions with stakeholders in the topic area. Cause and effect analysis will be greatly required for identifying practical, professional, and profitable research topics. 3. Student Outcomes: The student will 3.1 Learn the importance of Program and Portfolio Management Research in Practice 3.2 Apply systems thinking (finding root causes) and approach to find Optimal (not sub- optimal) Solution 3.3 Identify and communicate with Critical Stakeholders 3.4 Improve their writing and oral presentations skills IV. Guidelines for Evaluation or Assessment Methods Students are evaluated on successful completion of (a) writing research report, (b) presenting the findings, (c) incorporating feedback for improvement, and (d) submitting a paper to an outlet by following format and guidelines. V. Course Level Justification A. Address Level Descriptors from Catalog: Graduate B. Specify Registration Restrictions: MSPM Degree or Departmental Approval C. State the Disciplinary Background: Project Management/Program Management D. Specify Prerequisites, e.g., “Graduate Status.”: PM650, PM652, PM654, PM656 and PM658 or Departmental Approval E. Course Intent: The students should be able to demonstrate the capability of conducting doctoral level research and understanding peer review process in producing publications. VI. Topical Course Outline 1. Identify Program and Portfolio Management related topics 1.1. Problem Analysis 1.2. Resource Identification 1.3. Expert Judgment 1.4. Research Goal 1.5. Background 1.6. Scope Development using WBS 1.7. Schedule Development using MS Project 2. Conduct Literature Search as a Pilot Study 2.1. Keywords Development 2.2. Scope and Schedule Development 2.3. Communications with Stakeholders 2.4. Search Engine Utilization 2.5. Resource Identification 2.6. Ability to Summarize Historical Development on Topics 3. Hypothesis Development 3.1. Null Hypothesis 86
    • Doctor of Program Management (DPM) Proposal 3.2. Alternative Hypothesis 4. Data Identification 4.1. Root Cause Analysis 4.2. Data Mining 5. Data Collection 5.1. Unbiased and Representative Sample 5.2. Observations 5.3. Surveys 5.4. Interviews 6. Data Analysis and Presentation 7. Report Structure and Writing 8. Oral Presentation Skills VII. Suggested Texts • A Manual for Writers of Research Papers, Theses, and Dissertations, Seventh Edition: Chicago Style for Students and Researchers (Chicago Guides to Writing, Editing, and Publishing) (Turabian, Booth, Colomb, and Williams, 2007) • Conducting Research Literature Reviews: From the Internet to Paper (Fink, 2009) VIII. Bibliography and Resources • Writing Science through Critical Thinking (Jones and Bartlett Series in Logic, Critical Thinking, and Scientific Method) (Moriarty, 1996) • Towards Improved Project Management Practice: Uncovering the Evidence for Effective Practices Through Empirical Research (Cooke-Davies, 2001) • The Clockwork Muse: A Practical Guide to Writing Theses, Dissertations, and Books (Zerubavel, 1999) • Theses and Dissertations: A Guide to Planning, Research, and Writing (Thomas and Brubaker, 2007) • Authoring a PhD Thesis: How to Plan, Draft, Write and Finish a Doctoral Dissertation (Dunleavy, 2003) 87
    • Doctor of Program Management (DPM) Proposal H. New Course: Program Management Dissertation PM A699 – Program Management Dissertation Implementation Date – Spring 2010 I. Course Information A. College or School: School of Engineering B. Course Subject: Program Management C. Course Number: A699 D. Number of Credits: Six (6) E. Course or Program: Course F. Title: Program Management Dissertation G. Grading Basis: A-F H. Implementation Date: Spring 2010 I. Course Description: This is the dissertation course. Students working on their dissertation are required to maintain continuous enrollment in this course through the completion and successful defense of their dissertation. J. Course Prerequisites/Registration Restrictions: PM695 or Departmental Approval K. Course Fee: Yes, PM Fee at double current graduate tuition a credit hour II. Other Course Information A. Course Schedule: Standard semester timeframe (Weekend classes) B. Lecture hours/week: Six (6) hours/week C. Laboratory hours/week: None (0) D. Total time of work expected outside of class: Twelve (12) hours/week E. Program that require this course: Doctor of Program Management (DPM) F. Justification for action: Core requirement for DPM Program III. Instructional Goals and Student Outcomes 1. Instructional Goals: The instructor will 1.1 Guide the development of research topics, scope, and scheduling processes. 1.2 Provide necessary and sufficient materials, environments and technologies for effective research. 1.3 Ensure the research to be practical and professional to be turned out to be profitable in managing programs and portfolios. 2. Course Structure: The course will be conducted through literature searches, surveys, interviews and/or discussions with stakeholders in the topic area. Marketing skills will be greatly required for selling the research topics and outcomes. 3. Student Outcomes: The student will 3.1 Learn the importance of Program and Portfolio Management Research. 3.2 Apply systems thinking and approach to the research. 88
    • Doctor of Program Management (DPM) Proposal 3.3 Apply the knowledge and skills learned throughout the program to their research topics. 3.4 Recognize that their topic is shared globally. 3.5 Improve their writing and oral presentations skills. IV. Guidelines for Evaluation or Assessment Methods Students are evaluated on successful completion of (a) writing dissertation, (b) publishing in professional outlets, (c) presenting the findings, (d) implementing research outcomes in practice to get necessary feedback. V. Course Level Justification A. Address Level Descriptors from Catalog: Graduate B. Specify Registration Restrictions: MSPM Degree or Departmental Approval C. State the Disciplinary Background: Project Management/Program Management D. Specify Prerequisites, e.g., “Graduate Status.”: PM695 or Departmental Approval E. Course Intent: The students should be able to obtain the corporate sponsor’s acceptance letter for their recommendations from the dissertation while demonstrating their academic research outcomes to be published through the peer- review process. VI. Topical Course Outline 1. Identify Program and Portfolio Management related topics 1.1. Research Goal 1.2. Background 1.3. Scope and Schedule 2. Conduct Literature Search 2.1. Keywords Development 2.2. Search Engine Utilization 2.3. Resource Identification 2.4. Ability to Summarize Historical Development on Topics 3. Hypothesis Analysis 4. Data Collection 4.1. Surveys 4.2. Questionnaire Development 4.3. Oral Presentations 4.4. Writings 4.5. Teaching Technologies 5. Data Analyses 5.1. Statistical Analyses (Descriptive and Inferential) 5.2. Graphical Presentations 6. Report Writing 6.1. Professional Writing Skills 6.2. Exhibits Development 7. Report Structure 7.1. Introduction 7.2. Literature Summary 89
    • Doctor of Program Management (DPM) Proposal 7.3. Approach 7.4. Analyses 7.5. Conclusions and Recommendations 7.6. Future Study 7.7. Appendix 7.8. Personal Change Management 8. Oral Presentation 8.1. Power Point Presentation Slides 8.2. Q&A Skills 9. 90% Communications 10. Tracking Project Progress using MS Project VII. Suggested Texts, Bibliography and Resources • Conducting Research Literature Reviews: From the Internet to Paper (Fink, 2009) • Writing Science through Critical Thinking (Jones and Bartlett Series in Logic, Critical Thinking, and Scientific Method) (Moriarty, 1996) • Towards Improved Project Management Practice: Uncovering the Evidence for Effective Practices Through Empirical Research (Cooke-Davies, 2001) • A Manual for Writers of Research Papers, Theses, and Dissertations, Seventh Edition: Chicago Style for Students and Researchers (Chicago Guides to Writing, Editing, and Publishing) (Turabian, Booth, Colomb, and Williams, 2007) • The Clockwork Muse: A Practical Guide to Writing Theses, Dissertations, and Books (Zerubavel, 1999) • Theses and Dissertations: A Guide to Planning, Research, and Writing (Thomas and Brubaker, 2007) • Authoring a PhD Thesis: How to Plan, Draft, Write and Finish a Doctoral Dissertation (Dunleavy, 2003) • The Literature Review: Six Steps to Success (Machi and McEvoy, 2008) • Making the Implicit Explicit: Creating Performance Expectations for the Dissertation (Lovitts, 2007) 90
    • XIII.EXTERNAL REVIEW From: Cleland, David I Sent: 12-10-2008 To: JANG RA Subject: FW: Evaluation of UAA DPM Proposal Dr. Jang Ra: I am pleased to evaluate this proposal. My evaluation follows: The proposal reflects that it has been prepared by those people who have a most thorough knowledge of program and project management. Since there is no other known comparable academic program in the world, UAA has the opportunity to be an innovator and set the trend for such other programs that will likely come about in the future. The program proposal states that research will be an integral part of the curriculum. Ph.D. students will have ample opportunity to select a topic for their dissertation because of the current research opportunities available from the Project Management Institute (PMI) and other organizations who support research in the field. In the Admission Requirements and Prerequisites section the eligibility of prospective students are stated. What could be further clarified is the mathematical competencies of the incoming students. If a student who is otherwise qualified needs to do remedial work in quantitative capabilities, guidelines should be established how such remedial studies can be taken. PM 660 which establishes the policy for summer Program Management Teaching and Training opportunities is a valuable course. What will be the form and content of the comprehensive qualification exam? The section for the brief identification of objectives and subsequent means for their evaluation is an important part of the program description, which also states the broad and international focus of the market for graduates of the program. What criteria will be used to judge whether or not the DPM has been a success or not. How long will this be required, and what are the specific, measurable criteria such as publications, curriculum, enhancements, and advancement of the theory and practice of project management? Having the principal industry companies buy into the program through letters of support is an important part of the marketing of the program. Also the inclusion of the need for program/project management because of the number of major programs and mega-projects that will shape the future face of the Alaska economy adds to the strategic reasoning of both the MBA and DPM educational support. Considering the outstanding support for the DPM program among the principal stakeholders in the market place, would there be any likelihood that one of these stakeholders, or a consortium of such stakeholders, be willing to provide an endowment to support the program? Alaska has 91
    • Doctor of Program Management (DPM) Proposal extraordinary resources available for development and production, thus the issue of State resources is probably not an issue. If the quality of the implementation of the DPM program is equal to the thoroughness of the New Degree Program Request proposal, then the DPM will be a resounding success! I wish you the best of success with this innovative, new doctoral program! Regards, dic Dr. David I. Cleland Professor Emeritus School of Engineering University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, PA 15261 92
    • XIV.INDUSTRY SUPPORT LETTERS The following pages provide industry support letters from the following individuals and companies. Industry Support Letters: • Mark Begich, United States Senator and Former Mayor of the Municipality of Anchorage • Tom Nelson, State of Alaska Department of Labor & Workforce Development • Michael Felix, AT&T • John Lewis, ASRC Energy Services • Roger Nagarkar, Meridian • Craig Morrison, NANAColt Engineering LLC (now NANA WorleyParsons) • Mark Nelson, ASRC Energy Services • Michael Lasher, Doyon Emerald • Ken Jones, StrateGen, Inc. 93
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    • XV.PROSPECTIVE STUDENT COMMITMENT LETTERS The following pages provide prospective student commitment letters from the following individuals, presented in the order of their date. Prospective Student Letters: • Mike Fisher, MSPM graduate (Anchorage, Alaska) • Chris Briggs, MSPM graduate (Vancouver, Washington) • Joyce Douglas, MSPM graduate (Juneau, Alaska) • Kristin Anderson, MSSM graduate (Anchorage, Alaska) • Chris Gabriel, PMP (Oklahoma) • Franklin Amechi Okwose (Nigeria) 103
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    • Dear Dr. Ra, I am thrilled to hear that UAA is proposing a Doctor in Program Management (DPM). With the ESPM Master's program being as strong as it is, it's great to see UAA leverage that strength in the form of a Program Management Doctoral program. I have been interested in a Project Management-oriented doctoral degree ever since I finished my Master's in 2003. In 2004 I even went so far as to try to piece together a program through UAF, and to research programs outside of the State that would allow me to remain in Alaska. Neither pursuit led to success, but now it looks like the ideal situation may come into fruition right here in Anchorage. Kudos to you and the University for making things happen. Unless any unanticipated factors alter my path in the months to come, I will look forward to enrolling in the program next fall. Kind regards, Kristin Anderson, PMP 109
    • Doctor of Program Management (DPM) Proposal October 4, 2008 Dr. Jang Ra Department Chair and Professor Engineering, Science and Project Management (ESPM) Department University of Alaska Anchorage 3211 Providence Drive Anchorage, Alaska USA 99508 Dr Ra, I am pleased to submit my expression of interest in the Doctor of Program Management (DPM) degree being proposed at the University of Alaska Anchorage. It is my firm belief that this program will add value not only to UAA, but to the organizations and institutions that employ the graduates of this program. The recent success of ProMac 2008 in Anchorage this past September leaves little doubt that the ESPM department at UAA is now globally recognized as a leader in project management education and the DPM will only enhance that recognition. I urge you and the University to implement this program and would consider it a prestigious honor to be included in the first cohort in the fall of 2009. Sincerely, Chris Gabriel, PMP Automation Supply Lead, Global Procurement Services Project Development / OEM ConocoPhillips Company* 110
    • Doctor of Program Management (DPM) Proposal February 11, 2008 Dr. Jang Ra Department Chair and Professor Engineering, Science and Project Management (ESPM) Department University of Alaska Anchorage 3211 Providence Drive Anchorage Alaska USA 99508 Dear Dr. Jang I have been searching for a school that runs a Doctorate program in Program and Project Management for a long time now and you cannot imaging my joy when I ran into the proposal for the Doctor of Program Management (DPM) program at the University of Alaska Anchorage. I have a total of 14 years work experience both in Nigerian Breweries Plc (A subsidiary of Heineken International) as a maintenance/production engineer and Mobil Oil Nigeria plc (A subsidiary of ExxonMobil) in the downstream sector of the Oil and Gas industry in Nigeria as sales engineer and lubrication engineer (field engineering support). I hold a Master of Engineering degree in Power Engineering and a Bachelor of Engineering degree in Mechanical Engineering both from University of Benin, Benin City in Nigeria. I have always wanted to develop my skills in project management to help in the numerous project management challenges in my country Nigeria. This interest led me to obtaining the Project Management Professional (PMP) certification in 2008, however, I still feels the need to develop my project management skills more because I intend to end my career as a sufficiently qualified academic where I hope to help in developing future project managers to tackle these numerous project management challenges in my country. I intend to concentrate my doctorate research effort in project risk management. I am pleased to write in support of this LAUDABLE program and to indicate my interest because I believe that this program will advance the course of Program and Project Management worldwide and would also provide the high level manpower to manage the numerous projects in the developing countries like Nigeria. I hope the ESPM will approve the commencement of this program so that I can apply for consideration Yours truly, Franklin Amechi Okwose, M.Eng. PMP faokwose@yahoo.com, faokwose@gmail.com 111
    • XVI.ALUMNI SURVEY Survey for DPM proposal The ESPM Department at UAA is developing a new Doctor of Program Management (DPM) program, which is planned to start in fall 2009. The program builds on the success of the Master of Science in Project Management program and will advance the standard of practice and contribute to the program management body of knowledge. The DPM program is intended to address today’s project, program, and portfolio management challenges and provide benefits to industry and government. The DPM program will be open to students with an accredited masters degree in project management (such as the MSPM degree), though students with related masters degrees are encouraged to apply and will be given serious consideration. The program may be completed in four years, with the possibility of completion in three with an accelerated schedule. Students may attend via distance learning, offering the flexibility of attending courses and completing the program without having to relocate to Anchorage. The ESPM Department is soliciting feedback, interest, and comments on the proposal for the new DPM program. To help with the proposal process, please take a few moments to complete the survey. All responses will be held strictly confidential and used solely for the purpose of assessing the market demand for a new DPM program proposal. If you have any questions about the collection and use of this information, please contact Michelle Webb, the administrator at (+1) 907 786 1924 or anmlw1@uaa.alaska.edu. If you are unsure about any of the questions, simply advance to the next question. Thank you for participating in this important process. 1. Personal Contact Information First Name Last Name City State Country Phone Email 2. As an alumnus or current student in the ESPM Department, when did you earn your ESPM degree or when do you anticipate completing your degree? Year degree earned (or 112
    • Doctor of Program Management (DPM) Proposal anticipated to be complete) 3. To what extent has your salary increased due to your study and/or degree from ESPM? 0% to 9% 10% to 25% 26% to 50% 51% to 100% Over 100% 4. What was/is your field of study at the ESPM Department? Project Management Engineering Management Science Management 5. If you were to attend graduate school again, would you choose the same institution? Yes No Not sure 6. If you were to attend graduate school again, would you choose the same major field of study? Yes No Not sure 7. Prior to receiving this survey, were you aware that the ESPM Department is developing a Doctor of Program Management (DPM) program? Yes No Not sure 113
    • Doctor of Program Management (DPM) Proposal 8. Are you interested in enrolling in the DPM program at UAA? Yes No Not sure 9. If yes, how enthusiastic are you about enrolling in the DPM program? I want to be one of the program’s founding students I will be interested once the program has been established and been around for a while I will need to know more about the program before I would consider enrolling 10. If you are interested in enrolling in the DPM program, when would want to start the program? (Note that the program would start in the fall for all new students.) In the next two years (2009 or 2010) In three to four years (2011 or 2012) In five to six years (2013 or 2014) In more than six years (2015 or later) 11. If you are interested in the DPM program, what are your specific areas of interest for research while in the program (e.g., risk management, information technology, oil and gas, etc.)? Areas of interest 12. If you are not interested in the program, please provide feedback on why you are not interested. Reasons for not being interested 13. Based on your professional experience, what topics or courses do you think should be offered in the DPM program. Please be as specific as possible. DPM topics or courses 114
    • Doctor of Program Management (DPM) Proposal 14. Are you interested in receiving more information about the DPM program? Yes No 15. What is the best method of contacting you with more information? (Please be sure you filled out the necessary contact information at the start of the survey.) Phone E-mail The following questions are intended to get some feedback about the relevance and value of the ESPM Department’s existing Masters degrees and course offerings. 16. How would you describe the effectiveness of ESPM Department, University of Alaska Anchorage to prepare you for your present job? Strong Neutral Weak 17. Have you recommended others to apply to the ESPM Department, University of Alaska Anchorage program? Yes No 18. Please indicate the value of the courses below in terms of their contribution to your PM profession and your competency enhancement. Highly Somewhat Not valuable to Valuable to valuable to valuable to my my my my Course profession profession profession profession Did not take PM 601: Project Management Fundamentals PM 610: Project Scope Management PM 612: Project Time Management 115
    • Doctor of Program Management (DPM) Proposal PM 614: Project Cost Management PM 616: Project Quality Management PM 620: Project Human Resource Management PM 622: Project Communications Management PM 624: Project Risk Management PM 626: Project Procurement Management PM 685: Project Management Case Study & Research PM 694a: Construction Project Management PM 694c: IT Project Management 19. Based on your professional experience, what other topics or courses do you think should be offered in the MSPM program. Please be as specific as possible. MSPM topics or courses The following questions are for classification purposes. Please answer them to the best of your ability. 20. I am currently: Working full-time Working part-time Enrolled in school full-time Seeking employment/in transition 116
    • Doctor of Program Management (DPM) Proposal 21. If you are currently employed, how many years have been with this employer? Up to 5 years 5 to 8 years 8 to 15 years More than 15 years Not currently employed 22. How many years of work experience do you have overall? Up to 5 years 5 to 8 years 8 to 15 years More than 15 years Thank you for completing the survey. Do you have any additional comments related to the proposed DPM program? If so, please enter them here. Thank you for completing the survey. Your responses will provide valuable feedback for future development of ESPM programs. 117
    • XVII.RESUMES OF KEY FACULTY MEMBERS The following pages provide resumes for the key faculty members of the DPM program*: A. Jang Ra, Ph.D., PMP (Full-time) B. Steve Wang, Ph.D. (Full-time) C. LuAnn Piccard, PMP (Full-time) D. Paula Donson, Ph.D. (Adjunct) E. Full-time Faculty Position (to be filled) F. Full-time Faculty Position (being proposed) *Resumes are omitted for Online Review. 118
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