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  • Walter Viali - Process Manager At Texaco for 24+ years, including assignments with Texaco Italy and Caltex… Analyst/Programmer, Project Manager, Quality Assurance Coordinator, I.S. Manager, Process Owner, Process Manager…. Have been dealing with Process and Project Management for 15 years… I’m now on my 10th and final iteration of trying to implement Advanced Process and Project Management Practices… It appears the oil companies are allergic to this stuff……. Wonder if it will ever change…. Had some of these practices going pretty well back in 1983-84 at Texaco but lost it all eventually….
  • This is today’s program, if you wish… Now that you know this, can you tell me who you are and why you are here?
  • Sooo… Why a presentation on this topic? Aren’t we good at what we do in the Information Technology arena in the U.S.? Aren’t we world leaders in this area?
  • 80 points out of the 100 above have nothing to do with technical, software or hardware issues… Pretty amazing…... Interesting to note that a hard-working, focused staff only has 3 points in this breakdown… We’re obviously not the problem…. The problem is inherent in this quote at the bottom of the slide and we will try to answer this important question during the next hour or so….
  • It’s taken about 40 years, but these disciplines are finally catching some people’s attention…. No longer overhead which stifles a developer’s creativity??? We’ll see...
  • Gartner Group Update from last month….
  • SEI -- Software Engineering Institute established in 1984 to cope with erratic software delivered to U.S. Gov’t. agencies… Awarded to Carnegie Mellon University in Pittsburgh… Federally funded (so we might as well take advantage of it….)…. Objective was to build a model of sorts to allow Gov’t. agencies to evaluate the effectiveness of an outside software company… Watts Humphrey was named to run the SEI, after many, many years at IBM, in the software practices area, and he developed the Capability Maturity Model for Software within the next 5 years or so… Best kept secret for a while, it started bleeding over to Industry in 1993 or so… Texaco was the first company to be exposed to it in mid-1994, when I brought the model in-house to assess our own capability….
  • 5 This will become the future yardstick to determine whether an IS organization lives or dies! Plagued with poor software from its vendors, the U.S. Government commissioned Carnegie Mellon University in Pittsburgh to develop a model to assess DoD contractors… Software Engineering Institute was established in 1984… Watts Humphrey, ex-IBM, to lead... Level 2: Requirements Management, Software Project Planning, Software Project Tracking and Oversight, Software Subcontract Management, Software Quality Assurance, Software Configuration Management Level 3: Organization Process Focus, Organization Process Definition, Training Program, Integrated Software Management, Software Product Engineering, Intergroup Coordination, Peer Reviews Level 4: Software Quality Management, Quantitative Process Management Level 5: Process Change Management, Technology Change Management, Defect Prevention
  • The Key Process Areas we need to work on to achieve an acceptable level of Project Management effectiveness… Each Key Process Area (KPA) has a number of Common Features and Key Practices needed to satisfy the specific KPA (in an Assessment)...
  • Let’s look at Assessments and Certification (and what that buys us…).
  • Rather than a seal of approval, we’re looking for an effective and efficient operation, unless that seal of approval is actually required (and most external service providers feel it is required in their case)…. We start with an assessment… Done by an external assessor, it will cost approx. 50k (less for an interim profile)…. Assessments conducted from 1987 through December 1998 • 1213 assessments • 951 organizations • 252 participating companies • 221 reassessed organizations • 4984 projects
  • Strategic, Tactical and Installation Plans Software Engineering Process Group to handle… Typically 1% to 3% of the IS Organization SEI CMM + ISO 9000-3 = SPICE (Software Process Improvement Capability dEtermination)
  • All IS Organizations should become involved in SEI CMM driven improvement efforts right now… - NASA (L 5) - IBM (L 5) - United (L 2) - Motorola (L 5 in India) - Tata (L 4) - EDS - CSC - USAA (working on it)
  • Premise for an SEI CMM Level 1 organization to survive, is that its heroes stick around… There are fewer SEI CMM Level 1 organizations around these days than there were in 1991…. Outside Service Providers got the picture a few years ago, as soon as the SEI CMM was out there…. In the future, one won’t be able to do business anywhere with an SEI CMM Level 1 Organization (external or internal)………..
  • People skills are still critical…. Need to understand level of Project Management expertise and the actual role of the Project Manager in the Organization…. Project Management Certification is growing worldwide… PMI membership is growing at 40% a year… Quality Assurance goes hand in hand with Project Management… Certification from QAI is available... I.S. Managers need the same program, actually they need both to really understand how to manage the complete cycle..…
  • So, what are the benefits of doing all this???
  • 6 Other studies say the same thing! The key question is: do we have the time and the resources needed to achieve Level 2 or Level 3 effectiveness or is it too late?
  • - Same techniques - Same language - Continuity when inevitable personnel changes occur - Ability to use state-of-the-art tools effectively, I.E. use Project Management tools beyond just producing a high-level Gantt Chart (and say you know all there is to know about Project Management)...
  • So, how can we do things right and still do it fast, without taking all the usual shortcuts, which lead us to instability and many other problems?
  • Train first… Give them tools later… Current tools are more sophisticated than previous ones… Need a Project Management Office...
  • Bottom line, you can do things right, but doing it all by hand is close to insane, especially if we’re not dealing with life-critical systems (a la NASA)… We need an approach that will allow us to run things well, but also collect the needed measures to prove it (and eventually help us improve)… These were nice ideas until a couple of years ago… Evolution and the Internet have translated these ideas into effective solutions...
  • The complete loop…..
  • No more red books sitting on a shelf, collecting dust….
  • Very valuable slide… The essence of where most project plans go wrong… Tasks that last 2 hours, tasks that last 6 months… There is method to the madness of developing a Work Breakdown Structure… And a real methodology is available to build processes…..
  • Then the question becomes, how do you keep all this together and operating on a continuous basis… Who’s responsible for maintaining this entire solution and improving it over time? Who handles new software releases?
  • And actively supports projects…..
  • Support Strategic Business and IT Planning with JAD 1. Repository Model…… 2. Repository Coach Model….. 3. Repository Coach-Manager Model….
  • Conduct JAD sessions (Planning and Project Reqs.) Support Tools Build and Improve Repeatable Processes Support Project Management for all Projects Update Estimating Models Implement Risk Management Support Project Portfolio Management Reporting Cycles Support new SW releases Support Testing Conduct Quality Assurance
  • Evolutionary approach… Need to move from one model to the next over time, taking into account culture change at all levels… This is about dollars and cents, not just doing the right thing...
  • A few dos and don’ts from our own experience in Texaco and elsewhere…..
  • Walter Viali - Process Manager At Texaco for 24+ years, including assignments with Texaco Italy and Caltex… Analyst/Programmer, Project Manager, Quality Assurance Coordinator, I.S. Manager, Process Owner, Process Manager…. Have been dealing with Process and Project Management for 15 years… I’m now on my 10th and final iteration of trying to implement Advanced Process and Project Management Practices… It appears the oil companies are allergic to this stuff……. Wonder if it will ever change…. Had some of these practices going pretty well back in 1983-84 at Texaco but lost it all eventually….
  • Transcript

    • 1. Optimize Process and Project Management through the PMO Walter A. Viali, CSQA, PMP UH – April 6, 2005 Enterprise Project Management
    • 2. Agenda
      • What’s the Big Deal?
      • Process and Project Management to the Top
      • Where Do We Want to Be?
      • How Do We Get There?
      • Why the SEI CMM (and the CMMI)?
      • What About Certification?
      • Enter PMI and QAI
      • An Enterprise Project Management Maturity Model
      • Where’s the Bang for the Buck?
      • How Can We Do Things Right and Fast?
      • How Do We Manage This Whole Thing?
      • Developing a PMO Implementation Plan
      • PMO of the Future?
      • Lessons Learned and Conclusion
    • 3. What’s the Big Deal?
    • 4. From the Standish Group...
      • 17% of projects succeed
      • 31% of projects fail
      • 52% of projects are challenged
        • Cost and/or schedule performance
      • $78 billion dollars total project waste (against $250 billion in project spending)
      The Standish Group 1994 Chaos Report
    • 5. From the Standish Group...
      • 34% of projects succeed (100% improvement over 1994)
      • 15% of projects fail (down from 31% in 1994)
      • 51% of projects are challenged
      • $55 billion dollars total project waste (against $255 billion in project spending)
        • $38 billion in lost dollars for US projects in 2002
        • $17 billion in cost overruns
      The Standish Group 2003 Chaos Report
    • 6. Project Failure
      • “ The major cause of project failure is not the specifics of what went wrong, but rather the lack of procedures, methodology and standards for managing the project.”
      • Source: Info Week, 1996
    • 7. "We know why projects fail, we know how to prevent their failure -- so why do they still fail?” Martin Cobb Treasury Board of Canada Secretariat Ottawa, Canada
      • User Involvement 19
      • Executive Management Support 16
      • Clear Statement of Requirements 15
      • Proper Planning 11
      • Realistic Expectations 10
      • Smaller Project Milestones 9
      • Competent Staff 8
      • Ownership 6
      • Clear Vision & Objectives 3
      • Hard-Working, Focused Staff 3
      • TOTAL 100
      Success Criteria Points 61/100
    • 8. Process and Project Management to the Top…..
    • 9. CIO Priorities Top 10 Management Issues (1999-2003)
      • 1. Business/IT Fusion
      • 2. Demonstrating Business Value
      • 3. IT Skills (Recruit, Retain, Re-skill)
      • 4. Y2K Clean-up/Contingencies
      • 5. "Sourcing" Management
      • 6. IT Governance
      • 7. Process/Project Management
      • 8. M&A IT Integration
      • 9. Knowledge Management
      • 10. IT Organization
      Gartner Group (11/16/98)
    • 10. Where Do We Want to Be?
    • 11. Where Do We Want to Be?
      • Improved project management and process management practices based on:
        • A portfolio view of projects aligned with a strategic business plan
        • Defined processes for different types of projects
        • A uniform project management process to support the software processes
        • Integrated business and quality controls
        • Viable tools to support process, project management and project portfolios
    • 12. Managing Projects Managing Portfolios of Projects
    • 13. BUSINESS STRATEGY A BUSINESS STRATEGY B BUSINESS STRATEGY C IT PORTFOLIO B PROGRAM X PROGRAM Y PROJECT 1 PROJECT 2 PROJECT 3 PROJECT 6 PROJECT 5 PROJECT 4 TOTAL COST TOTAL BENEFITS COST BENEFITS $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ COST BENEFITS $ $ Establishing Project Portfolios
    • 14. As Of Date: ___________________ Strategic Priority: _______________ Business Project Manager: _________________________________________ I.T. Project Manager: _____________________________________________ Project Name/Business Strategy: ____________________________________ Profitability Market Share Infrastructure Cost to Compete Mandated Initiative creates profitability to organization Initiative increases market share Initiative improves organization infrastructure Initiative enables organization to compete Initiative is required Does not improve service Less than $1M in first year Greater than $2M in first year Less than $5M in first year New industry product Industry leader 0 1 2 3 4 5 __ x .4 = __ __ x .3 = __ ___ x .15 = __ ___ x .1 = __ ___ x .05 = __ Does not improve Market Share Strong potential to increase Market Share somewhat over next 2 years Strong potential to increase Market Share somewhat over first year New industry product Significant impact right away 0 1 2 3 4 Market Owner 5 Does not improve Infrastructure Reduces cost somewhat of existing infrastructure Reduces cost moderately of existing infrastructure Reduces cost significantly of existing infrastructure Provides competitive advantage Industry Leader 0 1 2 3 4 5 Does not improve competition ability Improves somewhat ability to compete Improves moderately ability to compete Improves significantly ability to compete Moderately reduces cost to compete Significantly reduces cost to compete 0 1 2 3 4 5 Initiative is not mandated State mandated within fiscal year Federally mandated within fiscal year High risk of State penalty if not implemented in fiscal year High risk of Federal penalty if not implemented in fiscal year Large Penalty to the Business if not implemented in fiscal year. 0 1 2 3 4 5 Project Portfolio Priority Matrix Company Name
    • 15. Project Portfolio Summary
    • 16. Project Portfolio Reporting
    • 17. Operating Departments CEO CIO Senior User Project Sponsor Senior IT I.T. and Project Governance I.T. Governance Project Governance* Project Manager Project Team PMO * = Level of Project Governance staffing tied to project visibility and delegation of authority QA
    • 18. Managing Projects Managing Portfolios of Projects
    • 19. Technical Tasks Stage 1 Technical Tasks Stage 2 Technical Tasks Stage 3 Technical Tasks Stage 4 Lessons Learned PM Process Discipline-Specific Template (Web Dev., CSOO, Support, etc.) Business Controls (Management) - Resources - Schedule - Cost T e c h n i q u e s T o o l s Process/Project Management Business and Quality Controls Stage 1, 2, 3, 4… (for example: Initiation, Development, Implementation, Closure) = Compulsory End-Stage Assessment Meeting = Quality Review Meetings (Scheduled as needed by Project Type, Activity Type, Deliverable Type = Compulsory Quality Review Meeting - Product Quality - Technical Standards Quality Controls (Technical)
    • 20. Operating Departments CEO CIO Senior User Project Sponsor Senior IT I.T. and Project Governance I.T. Governance Project Governance* Project Manager Project Team PMO * = Level of Project Governance staffing tied to project visibility and delegation of authority QA
    • 21. How Do We Get There?
    • 22. How Do We Get There?
      • Assessment of the current organizational software capability
      • A roadmap to improved process and project management practices based on the assessment results
      • An internal function in support of project portfolio management and of the improvement journey
    • 23. Why Do We Need to Assess?
      • Establish a baseline
      • What are our strengths?
      • What are our weaknesses?
      • What do we need to fix first?
      • Do we need a PMO?
      • Is the PMO effective?
      • Should we outsource?
    • 24. Why Do We Need to Assess?
      • Use hard data to show IT and Business Management where current processes stand
      • Provide business case for the establishment of a Project Office
      • Need information to build a thorough process improvement plan
      • Keep those outsourcers away!
    • 25. Why the SEI CMM* (and the CMMI)? *Software Engineering Institute’s Capability Maturity Model
    • 26. Capability Maturity Model (SM) Software Engineering Institute 1991 Initial - Ad hoc, Informal - Hero Driven Repeatable - Project Mgmnt. Focus Defined - Process Mgmnt. Focus Managed - Focus on QA and QC Measures Optimizing - Continuous Improvement
    • 27. SEI CMM Level 2 KPAs
      • Requirements Management
      • Software Project Planning
      • Software Project Tracking
      • Sub-contract Management
      • Quality Assurance
      • Configuration Management
    • 28. SEI CMM Level 3 KPAs
      • Organization Process Focus
      • Organization Process Definition
      • Training Program
      • Integrated Software Management
      • Software Product Engineering
      • Inter-group Coordination
      • Peer Reviews
    • 29. SEI CMM Level 4 KPAs
      • Quantitative Process Management
        • Quality Assurance (process)
      • Software Quality Management
        • Quality Control (products)
    • 30. SEI CMM Level 5 KPAs
      • Defect Prevention
      • Technology Change Management
      • Process Change Management
    • 31. CMMI Staged Representation
    • 32. CMMI Continuous Representation
    • 33. The Capability Im-Maturity Model Finkelstein, "A Software Process Immaturity Model"
    • 34. What About Certification?
    • 35. SEI CMM Assessments
      • Full Assessment
        • two weeks or longer
        • documentation intensive
        • when organization is between CMM levels
      • “Interim Profile” Assessment
        • gets the job done quickly
        • checklist based
        • quick snapshot of a CMM Level 1 organization
        • between full assessments
      Evidence Based
    • 36. Improvement Plans
      • Based on the SEI CMM Assessment
        • strengths, weaknesses, recommendations
      • Aimed at improving Project Management
        • process, techniques, tools
      • Aimed at improving Process Management
        • process, techniques, tools
      • Not a part-time effort
        • Project Management Office (PMO)
    • 37. Typical Recommendations from SEI CMM Assessments for a Level 1 Organization
      • Develop a Process Improvement Plan, based on the findings of the SEI CMM Assessment, aimed at reaching Level 2 of the SEI CMM.
      • Make the Process Improvement Plan a strategic initiative.
      • Create policies, as required by the SEI CMM, to confirm support for the Process Improvement initiative.
      • Implement a global Project Management Office (PMO) and establish a Software Process Engineering Group (SEPG) within the PMO.
    • 38. Typical Recommendations from SEI CMM Assessments for a Level 1 Organization
      • Task the SEPG with the rollout of a common Project Management Process for the organization.
      • Acquire Enterprise Project Management and Enterprise Resource Management tools to support Project Planning and Project Tracking and Oversight activities.
      • Staff a Quality Assurance function and a Software Configuration Management function.
      • Implement methods, techniques and tools to support Software Quality Assurance and Software Configuration Management.
    • 39. Typical Recommendations from SEI CMM Assessments for a Level 1 Organization
      • Implement individual certification programs for Project Managers and Quality Assurance staff.
      • Implement policies and procedures for Subcontract Management.
      • Capture and support high-value processes for the organization (such as the SAP Implementation Process).
      • Implement a Skills Assessment system to drive the training and resource allocation functions.
    • 40. Typical Recommendations from SEI CMM Assessments for a Level 1 Organization
      • Strive for certified Project Managers to lead all projects.
      • Document the new way of doing business, explain it to the customers and obtain their concurrence.
      • Benchmark internally on a periodic basis and benchmark best internal process externally.
    • 41. Application Development Practices
      • "Software Capability Evaluations (based on SEI's Capability Maturity Model) will be used to qualify all IT contractors on U.S. Federal Government projects by year end 2001 (0.8 Probability); however, widespread year 2000 damage will push regulated AD into the private sector , starting with applications that have public health and safety implications."
      Gartner Group (11/16/98)
    • 42. So What?
      • SEI CMM Level 1 Organizations will not be able to survive for very much longer
      • Heroes leave (more rapidly now)
      • Outside Service Providers are racing up the SEI CMM ladder
      • Can’t do business with the Government if not at SEI CMM Level 3
    • 43.  
    • 44. The Sarbanes-Oxley Act
      • During the past two years, a series of accounting and management scandals within major companies undermined investor confidence in corporations and others serving the capital markets. In response to the crisis, the U.S. Congress passed legislation, the Sarbanes-Oxley Act of 2002, that establishes many new requirements, including:
      • 1. Composition/Responsibilities of Audit Committees
      • 2. Adoption of Code of Ethics by Sr. Management
      • 3. Increased Financial Disclosures
      • 4. Audit Partner Rotation
    • 45. Enter PMI and QAI
    • 46. Some Background Information
      • PMI began in 1969 with 5 members and now has more than 150,000
      • Represented in over 125 countries
      • PMP Certification program established in 1984
      • Almost 100,000 PMPs as of recent count
      • PMBOK Guide now an American National Standard
      • PMI Certification Program Department is ISO 9000 approved
    • 47. The PMBOK Guide
      • Core to the PMP Certification Process
      • Current edition published in 2002
      • Focuses on 5 Process Groups
      • Process Groups govern 9 Knowledge Areas
      • Project Management a la PMI
      • New 2004 version to be officially adopted as of October 2005
    • 48. Initiating Processes - Recognizing that a project or phase should begin and committing to do so. Planning Processes - Devising and maintaining a workable scheme to accomplish the business need that the project was undertaken to address. Executing Processes - Coordinating people and other resources to carry out the plan. Controlling Processes - Ensuring that project objectives are met by monitoring and measuring progress and taking corrective action when necessary. Closing Processes - Formalizing acceptance of the project or phase and bringing it to an orderly end. PROJECT MANAGEMENT PROCESS GROUPS
    • 49. Links Among the Process Groups in a Project Phase Initiating Processes Planning Processes Controlling Processes Executing Processes Closing Processes
    • 50. Project Management Knowledge Areas
      • Project Integration Management
      • Project Scope Management
      • Project Time Management
      • Project Cost Management
      • Project Quality Management
      • Project Human Resource Management
      • Project Communication Management
      • Project Risk Management
      • Project Procurement Management
    • 51. Another Assessment Needed
      • Project Management and PMI….
        • http://www.pmi.org
      • Assess Project Managers’ Skills
        • “it’s not your daddy’s PM anymore”
      • Bring everyone to the same level
        • huge resistance to change!
        • love to hate accountability
      • PMP Certification not an option
        • Project Management is “almost” a profession
    • 52. Another Assessment Needed
      • Programs available to make it happen
        • Extensive and a bit painful...
      • Ditto for IT Managers…
        • Pioneers are a thing of the past
        • “Unconscious Incompetence”
        • Love to reinvent all known wheels
      • Ditto for Quality Assurance Specialists
        • http://www.qaiusa.com/
    • 53. The Quality Assurance Institute
      • Based in Orlando, Florida
      • Promotes quality in software development and support activities
      • Provides quality related training courses
      • Offers Certified Quality Analyst (CQA) and Certified Software Testing Engineer (CSTE) programs
      • Certification programs available through the local Society for Software Quality (SSQ)
    • 54. An Enterprise Project Management Maturity Model
    • 55. OPM3
      • PMI’s answer to the plethora of Project Management Maturity Models is OPM3
        • Organizational Project Management Maturity Model
        • Comprised of three general elements
          • Knowledge – content of the standard
          • Assessment – method for comparison with the standard
          • Improvement – setting the stage for organizational changes
    • 56. Organizational Project Management Processes – the Domains
    • 57. OPM3 Stages of Maturity
    • 58. Where’s the Bang for the Buck?
    • 59. Observed SEI CMM Benefits Estimated impact for 200,000 LOC Software Project (from Sematech publication ‘Communique”)
    • 60. Project Management Certification – Benefits
      • Consistent Project Management approach within the organization and improved interface mechanisms with all customers
      • Certification requires continuing education in the Project Management field, which leads to more effective Project Managers over time
      • Project Management Certification thoroughly supports the findings and recommendations of most benchmarking efforts
      • Combination of Project and Process Management has the potential of reducing project development costs by 30% a year (Gartner Group)
    • 61. Project Management Certification – Is It Worth It?
      • By 2004, 70% of successful projects will have certified project managers, while 90% of failed projects will not (0.7 probability).
      • By 2002, employees with Project Management Professional (PMP) certification will receive salaries 20% higher than those of project managers without PMP certification (0.7 probability).
      • By 2002, leading-edge project management outsource vendors will have at least one out of five contracted staff team members who are PMP-certified (0.7 probability).
      Gartner Group - November 16, 1999
    • 62. How Can We Do Things Right... And Fast?
    • 63. Where Do the Slick Tools Fit?
      • Depends on the outcome of the assessment of the organization
      • Depends on the outcome of the assessment of the individuals
      • No tools until the knowledge is there
        • “A fool with a tool is still a fool”
      • No tools without the right support in place
        • Training
        • Process Management Function (PMO)
    • 64. The Need For Process Management And Project Management Tools
      • Process Management too complex to implement without effective tools
      • Process Management and Project Management tools must be integrated
      • Tools must be able to produce reliable measures for Process and Project Management
      • Process Management tools are now industrial strength
    • 65. Define the Process Control the Project Plan the Project Do the Activity Improve the Process Process And Project Management
    • 66. The New Shape of Processes From This... Process Library Process Manager Developer Project Manager Workflow Model Work/Activity Model Techniques Tools Roles Deliverables / Products Metrics To This...
    • 67. A Word about Tools
      • Many to choose from!
      • Start small and grow as the organization matures
      • Master the use of MS Project for scheduling
      • Purchase Web-based team collaboration tools to support CMM Level 2 processes
      • Implement more mature tools to support CMM Level 3 processes
    • 68. A Word about Tools
    • 69. A Word about Tools
    • 70. A Word about Tools Project Information
    • 71. A Word about Tools Project Information
    • 72. A Word about Tools Project Information Project Management Template
    • 73. Project Information PMO Implementation Template A Word about Tools
    • 74. Work Breakdown Structure Step(s) Task(s)
      • Produces major end products for major end of stage assessment
      • Well-defined chunk of activity which can be planned in detail (2-3 months)
      • Development milestone where performance against plan can be assessed
      • Produces major deliverables (component parts of stage end products)
      • Lowest level of work defined (<10 days)
      • Provides basis for estimating effort, allocating resources, and controlling progress
      • Produces minor deliverables
      Stage(s)
    • 75. Work Breakdown Structure Stage Step Tasks Scope Quality Procurement Communication Human Resources Time Cost Risk Plan Manage Project Plans Project Integration Management Planning and Managing at the Task Level
    • 76. Enterprise Project Management
      • Leading EPM Software Tools:
        • Artemis ( www.artemisintl.com )
        • Changepoint ( www.changepoint.com )
        • Evolve ( www.evolve.com )
        • Kintana ( www.kintana.com )
        • Niku ( www.niku.com )
        • Pacific Edge ( www.pacificedge.com )
        • Planview ( www.planview.com )
        • Primavera ( www.primavera.com )
        • Prosight ( www.prosight.com )
        • Systemcorp ( www.systemcorp.com )
    • 77. How Do We Manage This Whole Thing?
    • 78. What’s a Project Office?
      • A Project Office is a company’s source of project management expertise and serves as the guardian of project management standards, a central point for process and project management tools, best practice reuse and process library
    • 79. Evolution of the Project Office
      • Early 30s: Empire State Building sets record for large construction using “fast tracking” and centralized project control office.
      • Late 50s: Military “System Program Offices” established to support major program/project managers. Polaris Submarine…
      • Early 60s: Advent of computerized project scheduling techniques leads to Project Offices staffed with programmers.
      • Mid 70s: User-oriented/controlled project management software leads to Project Offices staffed with systems engineers to run mainframe PM software. Artemis support...
    • 80. Evolution of the Project Office
      • Early 80s: Development of user-friendly, sophisticated scheduling software creates interest in project management and leads to the demise of the Project Office concept. “Let the technical managers do the project management.” Harvard Project Manager...
      • Early 80s thru early 90s: Proliferation of scheduling software with the expectation that technical or administrative team members would use it.
      • Early to mid 90s: Recognition that projects need professional project managers, supported by other specialists. Project management training emphasized. Awareness of the need for Project Office resurfaces.
    • 81. Evolution of the Project Office
      • Mid 90s to the present: Emergence of Enterprise Project Management, where the Project Office plays a crucial role. Realization that enterprise-wide projects require broader definition of the Project Office role and leadership. The Project Management Institute experiences exponential growth.
      • The Future: Project Offices will grow in size, reflecting increased organizational commitment to conducting work through project management. Evolution of the Project Office to equivalent functional department status. Project Management Certification will no longer be an option.
    • 82. Why Do We Need a Project Office?
      • “ Through 2004 and beyond, Information Services organizations that establish enterprise standards for project management, including a Project Office with suitable governance, will experience half the major project cost overruns, delays and cancellations of those that do not.”
      • Gartner Group, 1999
    • 83. What Does a Project Office Do?
      • Ensures executive sponsorship, leadership, and continued involvement
      • Selects the “right” project office model
      • Selects the “right” team structure, roles, and responsibilities
      • Supports training requirements and activities
      • Establishes executive-level, top-down planning techniques that align financial objectives to projects from a project portfolio perspective
    • 84. What does a Project Office really do?
      • A Project Office establishes a set of stable, predictable, repeatable, reusable, and reliable management techniques and processes
        • planning - standardize estimating techniques, prioritization techniques, and project management processes for small, medium, and large projects, etc. aligned with PMI’s PMBOK
        • controls - establish change management standards, project measurements, and metrics, etc.
        • communication - develop a library for processes, templates, project files, etc. aligned with the SEI CMM
        • tools - project planning, scheduling and management, project data repository, JAD, etc.
    • 85. What is Joint Application Development (JAD)?
      • JAD is a structured meeting, conducted by a neutral facilitator, designed to extract high-quality information from the meeting participants, using a compressed time frame and a workshop environment to enhance the process.
      • JAD strongly complements, but does not replace, analytical methodologies.
    • 86. The Power of JAD in Lifecycle Management Strategic Business Planning Business Process Reengineering Strategic I.T. Planning Project Scope Definition Process and Data Modeling Structured Walkthroughs Acceptance Testing I.T. Project Portfolios
    • 87. Lessons Learned Benefits of JAD
    • 88. Project Office Models
      • Repository Model - Model 1
        • source of information on project methodology and standards
      • Repository-Coach Model - Model 2
        • coordinates sharing of best practices across business functions
      • Repository-Coach-Manager Model - Model 3
        • direct management of projects and project managers
    • 89. Drill Down Capability Executive Management Project Portfolio Database Process Library Resource Pool Contractor Database Business Units PPM Tools Training PPM Operations Guide PROJECT OFFICE • Program Status • Program Forecasting • Schedule Performance • Project Funding • Resource Analysis and Allocation • Projects Disposition • Issues/Resolutions • Overtime Reporting • Cost Overrun • Business Function/ Program Evaluation • Contract Analysis • Program Exception Analysis • Budget Analysis • Problem Analysis Standard Reporting Requirements Policy Vision Strategy Business Trends Direction Projects Status Approvals/Adjustments/Status Budget Proposals Business Cases Project Justification Project Office Overview
    • 90. Project Office Mission
      • Processes, Standards and Methodologies
      • Process and Project Management Tools Project Support
        • Planning, Scheduling, Risk Management
      • Consulting and Mentoring
      • Facilitated Workshops
      • Training
    • 91. Project Office Mission
      • Software Quality Assurance
      • Software Configuration Management
      • Certified Project Managers
      • Subcontract Management
      • Benchmarking
      • Strategic Planning
      • Project Portfolio Management
    • 92. Staffing the Project Office
      • PMO should report to the CIO and later to the CEO
      • One to three percent of development staff
      • The right skills needed
        • Application development and support experience
        • Certified Process and Project Management professionals
        • Knowledge of Strategic Planning
        • Trained JAD facilitators
        • Knowledge of the SEI CMM and CMM assessments
        • Knowledge of Process and Project Management tools
        • QA and Configuration Management experience
    • 93. Staffing the Project Office
      • Project Office Director
      • Project Managers
      • Project Mentors
      • Project Controllers
      • Project Planners
      • Methodology Experts
      • Estimators
      • Librarian/Documentation Specialist
      • Administrative Support Coordinator
      • Communications Coordinator
      • Issue Resolution and Change Control Coordinator
      • Risk Management Coordinator
      • PM Software Guru
    • 94. Project Office CSFs
      • Unwavering Management Support
      • Motivated, Enthusiastic and Knowledgeable Project Office Staff
      • Availability of External Skills, Knowledge, Processes and Tools
      • Effective Change Management Strategy
      • Project Office Implementation Managed at least at SEI CMM Level 2
    • 95. Developing a PMO implementation plan
    • 96. An Implementation Approach
      • Project Initiation and Planning
      • Project Office Establishment
      • Project Office Infrastructure
      • Organization-Wide Standards Development
      • Rollout and Training Preparation
      • Breakthrough Stage
      • Operations Stage
      • Project Closure
    • 97. Project Initiation and Planning Stage Major Deliverables
      • Project Charter and Objectives
      • Project Organization
      • Project Scope
      • Project Plan
      • Project Standards and Control Procedures
      • Business Case
      • Project Budget
    • 98. Project Office Establishment Stage Major Deliverables
      • Project Office Communication Plan
      • Project Office Documentation Plan
      • Project Office Facilities Plan
      • Project Office Organization Structure
      • Project Office Staffing Plan
      • Project Office Budget
    • 99. Project Office Infrastructure Stage Major Deliverables
      • Project Office Guidebook:
        • Software and Hardware Procedures
        • Security and Budget Control Procedures
        • Communication and Staffing Procedures
        • Measurement and Exception Management Procedures
        • Operational Management Procedures
        • Projects Meeting and Reporting Guidelines
        • Projects Baselining Procedures
        • Standard Projects Justification Criteria
        • Projects Resource Allocation Procedures
        • Project Office Interface Structure
    • 100. Organization-Wide Standards Development Stage Major Deliverables
      • SEI CMM Level 2 Compliant Practices for:
        • Requirements Management
        • Project Planning
        • Software Project Tracking and Oversight
        • Software Subcontract Management
        • Software Quality Assurance
        • Software Configuration Management
    • 101. Technical Tasks Stage 1 Technical Tasks Stage 2 Technical Tasks Stage 3 Technical Tasks Stage 4 Post-Mortem Review PM Process Discipline-Specific Template (Web Dev., CSOO, Support, etc.) Business Controls (Management) Quality Controls (Technical) - Product Quality - Technical Standards - Resources - Schedule - Cost T e c h n i q u e s T o o l s Project Management Business and Quality Controls Stage 1, 2, 3, 4… (for example: Initiation, Development, Implementation, Closure) = Compulsory End-Stage Assessment Meeting = Quality Review Meetings (Scheduled as needed by Project Type, Activity Type, Deliverable Type = Compulsory Quality Review Meeting
    • 102. Rollout and Training Preparation Stage Major Deliverables
      • Rollout Approach:
        • Rollout Scope Document
          • Objectives
          • Risks and Constraints
          • List of Breakthrough Projects
      • Rollout Increments
        • Training Strategy
        • Change Resistance Strategy
    • 103. Breakthrough Stage Major Deliverables
      • Breakthrough Projects Managed at SEI CMM Level 2
      • Project Office Support to Breakthrough Projects
      • Project Office Reports Based on Breakthrough Projects Performance
      • Breakthrough Projects Feedback and Process Improvements
    • 104. Operations Stage Major Deliverables
      • Process for Projects Assessment and Prioritization
        • Ongoing Projects
        • New Projects
      • Project Office Reporting on Projects
        • Cost Analysis
        • Time Analysis
        • Performance Analysis
      • Assessment of Project Office Activities
    • 105. Project Closure Major Deliverables
      • Maintenance Guide for Project Office Activities
      • Action Plans for Remaining Open Items
      • Project Performance Measures
      • Lessons Learned
      • Process Improvement Report
      • Project Closure Meeting
      • Celebration of Success!
    • 106. The PMO Lifecycle Loop Project Portfolio Management Projects Project Management Office Maturity Models Strategic Business Planning Business Process Reengineering Strategic IT Planning
    • 107. PMO of the Future?
    • 108. The Need for an Advanced PMO Model (for Effective Project Portfolio Management) Traditional PMO Traditional PMO Next Generation PMO Focus mostly on tactical issues Focus on strategic and cultural issues Science of project management Art and craft of project management Emphasis on monitoring and control Emphasis on collaboration Tools as a “map” Tools as a “compass” Internal process focused Focus on end products and customers “ Heavy” methods and practices “Agile” methods and practices Based on rules Based on guiding principles Defined, repeatable, optimized practices Adaptive and innovative practices Focus on efficiency Focus on effectiveness and innovation Process leadership Thought leadership Heavy management and governance Balanced management, governance and leadership
    • 109. Lessons Learned
    • 110. Lessons Learned Management Support
      • PMO Manager needs to secure many allies in the organization
      • PMO Manager must establish credibility as a professional
      • Need Management awareness, knowledge and understanding of issues
        • Presentations on modern Project Management approaches
        • Certification at all levels of the organization, not just Project Managers
      • PMO Manager should spend 90% of his/her time soothing irritations and communicating!
      • Gain customer support for the PMO
      • Fastest growth in law suits tied to poorly constructed and delivered software
      • Strive for Project Portfolio Management
    • 111. Lessons Learned Management Support
      • The PMO must be an overhead function
        • Cannot inflict “pain” and charge for it!
      • Beware of reorganizations and loss of support
        • If we don’t get rid of accounting, why do we get rid of the PMO?
      • Don’t threaten executives with pending disaster or righteous statements
      • Use the “Control Tower” analogy to explain the mission of the PMO
      • This is still PM 101 and a management responsibility that must be addressed by senior management
    • 112. Lessons Learned Manage Expectations
      • Need overall strategic plan for implementing and growing the PMO
        • Can’t do it all in one iteration
      • Need to realize that the PMO evolution is a journey with manageable phases
        • Each phase needs to deliver specific results
      • Develop a clear Charter and Statement of Work for the PMO
      • Develop a sound Business Case and positive ROI
      • Provide clear answers to the question of “What’s in it for me?” (WIIFM) for all levels of the organization
      • The PMO is the “enabler” but senior management has to be the “driver”
    • 113. Lessons Learned Standard Process
      • Develop a common Project Management process first
      • Impossible to adequately report project information without a common process
        • Standard number of stages/phases
        • Standard terminology for all stages/phases, major Project Management deliverables
      • Management “dashboards” not very effective if different project management processes are used by different project managers
      • Do not reinvent any “wheels”
    • 114. Lessons Learned PMO Skills
      • Need the right skills immediately!
      • It takes too long to grow internal resources, if not already skilled
      • PMO Manager should have experience in establishing and managing PMOs
      • PMO Manager can hire consultants, but should manage them effectively
      • A balanced mix of new hires, internal resources and external consultants may be acceptable
      • Quick hits and credibility require experienced resources
    • 115. Lessons Learned Which Skills
      • Strategic Planning
      • Process Management (SEI CMM)
      • Project Management (PMBOK)
      • JAD Facilitation
      • Quality Assurance (QAI)
      • Configuration Management
      • Team Management
      • Software Development
      • Project/Process Management Tools
      • Certifications
      People skills and the “right” personality are of fundamental importance
    • 116. Lessons Learned PMO Quick Hits
      • Rescue visible projects that are in trouble
      • Work with those Project Managers who really care about improving the situation
      • Use JAD Facilitation techniques
        • to compress the development lifecycle
        • to standardize process and deliverables across projects
      • Help Project Managers produce time-consuming project management deliverables
    • 117. Lessons Learned Consult Effectively
      • Ineffective “consultants” will do more harm than good
        • Credibility is constantly at stake
        • Resistance to change will be rampant
      • Help Project Managers and project staff
        • Project Planning, Risk Management, etc.
      • Use JAD Facilitation techniques
        • Project Planning, Scope Definition, Risk Management, etc.
      • JAD sessions promote the use of common techniques and methods, through an impartial facilitator
    • 118. Lessons Learned Kiss Principle!!!
      • Grow with a carefully planned and phased approach
      • Start with simple processes and simple tools
        • “A fool with a tool is still a fool!”
      • Start with simple project reporting
      • Provide hands-on support to project teams and “grant” permission to fail!
      • Gradually bring projects under the PMO umbrella
        • cannot support all projects at once
      • The more complex the approach, the harder to manage its implementation and the harder to control cost
      • Far-reaching solutions will overwhelm project teams and PMO staff
    • 119. Lessons Learned Adequate PMO Resources
      • One to three percent of the organization’s project staff
      • No more than one PMO consultant for every five or six projects
      • Implement rotation process
        • Bring the experienced “believers” into the PMO
        • Send PMO staff to the trenches and avoid “ivory tower” syndrome
      • Cut back on PMO resources once processes have become institutionalized and are the natural way of doing business
    • 120. Lessons Learned Organization Change Management
      • Develop plan for managing culture change
      • Work with those opinion leaders who are respected in the organization
        • Especially if they don’t like disciplined approaches
      • Communicate, communicate, communicate!
        • Newsletters, Web site, Presentations, etc.
      • Provide feedback mechanisms
      • Modify internal reward systems
      • Find success stories from other companies
      • Get vendor assistance to drive change
    • 121. Lessons Learned PMO Project
      • Manage PMO implementation project the same way future projects will be managed
      • Capture lessons learned at every corner!
      • Use an approach based on the PMI Knowledge Areas or on the CMM Level 2 Key Practices
      • There are no “silver” bullets
      • Beware of “lip service” as the PMO implementation evolves
      • Assess the importance of Process and Project Management in your industry and organization
      • Realize when there is not enough support and it’s time to pack it in and move on...
    • 122. Optimize Process and Project Management through the PMO Walter A. Viali, CSQA, PMP viali@pmotogo.com 713-252-9722 Enterprise Project Management

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