Balanced Scorecard and  Project Management Processes
Session I:  Balanced Scorecard
Session I Agenda: Developing and using a Balanced Scorecard  <ul><li>Description of a Balanced Scorecard (BSC)  </li></ul>...
An organization achieves success in its goals and excellence in its operations not by good fortune or hard work, but by  f...
Aligned Management Systems <ul><li>Strategic Planning- Balanced Scorecard </li></ul><ul><li>Project Management/Plan Manage...
What is a Balanced Scorecard? <ul><li>An approach to strategic management  developed in the early 1990's by Drs. Robert Ka...
<ul><li>The balanced scorecard is a  management system  (not only a measurement system) that enables organizations to clar...
The Scorecard Is Balanced Across Four Perspectives Mission What resources are necessary and can we manage them properly? F...
It All Starts With the  Vision and Mission <ul><li>Mission :   </li></ul><ul><li>North Carolina's public schools will crea...
The Management Systems work together to create a cohesive whole Results Appraisal System DPI Budget Projects and Initiativ...
A Balanced Scorecard Contains These Elements <ul><li>Mission and Vision –  Why you exist  as an organization and what you ...
Department of Public Instruction Balanced Scorecard Project List Balanced Scorecard Categories: Customer/Stakeholder Budge...
Example – from goal to strategy to objective to project (initiative) <ul><li>Goal:  Student Achievement </li></ul><ul><li>...
Example – from goal to strategy to objective to project (initiative) <ul><li>Goal:  Equity </li></ul><ul><li>Strategy:  Es...
Break-out Session <ul><li>Develop another example for Goal, Strategy and Strategic Objective  </li></ul><ul><li>Goal:    <...
Strategy Map <ul><li>A strategy map is a method of viewing the  key  strategies and objectives for moving an organization ...
1.1 Improve curriculum 1.8 Support schools & LEAs having well  trained/prepared administrators. 1.7 Support  students havi...
What Is A Good Measure? <ul><li>Is the performance measure resistant to manipulation? </li></ul>Credible <ul><li>Can actio...
What Is A Good Measure? <ul><li>Is the measure an indicator of how well things are working within the process? </li></ul>I...
What is a Good Target? <ul><li>Targets should provide direction for action, represent continuous improvement and motivate ...
What is a Good Baseline? <ul><li>Existing available data reflecting current level of performance for related measures.  Se...
Steps to develop a BSC <ul><li>Step 1  – self assessment, short and long term goals, identify champion and BSC team </li><...
Balanced Scorecard Categories: Customer/Stakeholder Budget/Financial HR Learning and Growth Internal Business Process Stra...
Break-out Session <ul><li>Complete the earlier example by adding a Measure, Target and Project  </li></ul><ul><li>Goal:  <...
Darden/Curry School/District Turnaround Process  <ul><li>Our Goal: To create a school/district turnaround process that mer...
Instructions: Replace each TBD with specific targets before the start of the school year.  Involve the school leadership t...
Questions?
Session II:  Project Management and Plan Management Oversight Committee (PMOC)
Session II Agenda: Project Management Process  <ul><li>Characteristics and roles of a Project Management Process and Proje...
An organization achieves success in its goals and excellence in its operations not by good fortune or hard work, but by  f...
Management Systems to Align with the Balanced Scorecard <ul><li>Strategic Planning </li></ul><ul><li>Project Management/Pl...
It’s About Execution  (Work Tracking and Monitoring)… ABC Strategic Priorities #1 High Student Performance #2 Healthy Stud...
Why have a  Project Management Process? <ul><li>Project management tools ensure  clarity of scope  and expectations for th...
Project Management Work Environment Stakeholders Project Management Oversight Committee Project Manager Primary Customers ...
The Project Management Process The following diagram represents the Wachovia project management process which has been ada...
<ul><li>Purpose: </li></ul><ul><li>Describe project’s purpose and requirements. </li></ul><ul><li>Confirm the project’s im...
Project Framework Phase <ul><li>Purpose: </li></ul><ul><li>Finalize project scope. </li></ul><ul><li>Document assumptions....
 
Project Planning Phase <ul><li>Purpose: </li></ul><ul><li>Schedule work.  </li></ul><ul><li>Assign responsibilities. </li>...
Project Implementation Phase <ul><li>Purpose: </li></ul><ul><li>Deliver the value of the project.  </li></ul><ul><li>Produ...
Communications Approach Issue Resolution  & Change Control Communications, Issue Resolution, and Change Control Stakeholde...
<ul><li>Purpose: </li></ul><ul><li>Understand project costs. </li></ul><ul><li>Monitor actual expenses. </li></ul><ul><li>...
Project Definition Phase Project Framework Phase Sponsor reviews plan & task   assignmen ts Yes Project team performs task...
The Purpose of the  Plan Management Oversight Committee <ul><li>To identify, approve, and oversee the progress on the proj...
Plan Management  Oversight Committee <ul><li>Issue identification, assignment, tracking and status checks:  An issues data...
PMOC Best Practices <ul><li>Plan is not in addition to the work - it should define the work. </li></ul><ul><li>Deliverable...
PMOC Face-to-Face <ul><li>Keep presentation material understandable - use color coding and simple charts that make the mat...
PMOC Face-to-Face <ul><li>Stay within the allotted time (20 minutes) for your PMOC agenda item - be short to allow time fo...
Plan Management Oversight Committee Set Priorities Provide Resources Remove Barriers Oversee Scope Resolve Issues Evaluate...
Questions?
Balanced Scorecard and  Project Management Processes
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Rick Rozelle - Balanced Scorecard and Project Management Process

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  • Success – to me – is achieving your vision, your strategic objectives. Success is achieved, first by having a clarity of understanding for these strategic objectives in terms of strategies for achieving them, how to measure progress toward and eventual achievement of these strategic objectives, and what projects to initiate -- and in what sequence. This is what a BSC is all about. Clearly defining the “right things” and then focusing efforts (through a project management process) on these things.
  • The Balanced Scorecard doesn’t stand alone as a management process – and the BSC is a process, not a thing that gets created and placed on the bookshelf. The BSC is downstream from and supports and helps to clarify, focus and operationalize an organization’s long range strategic plan. The BSC defines the key projects for an organization – which feed into the project management process. This is critical process for an organization – one that has been used in the private sector for years. Other downstream processes of the BSC include the budget and appraisal processes.
  • You each have a copy of the BSC – let’s look at the components. First you have the strategic objectives – to clarify and further define strategic intent for the Department. These each are linked to the strategic priority they support – and are color coded to show the BSC category for which they apply. Each objective is given a sponsor – the person most responsible for tracking the measures and progress of the objective. Each objective is given a set of measures – to monitor progress and ultimate achievement. Note that there are both process measures (to monitor progress along the way – i.e. leading indicators) and outcome measures (to measure ultimate achievement – i.e. lagging indicators). Each measure is to be given a baseline (where it is now) and a target (where it is to be in the future). We don’t want to go over the entire document – but I would like to highlight a few key items in the BSC. Look at items 1.1 – note how the process and outcome measures work together to provide leading and lagging indicators. Note that there are a lot of customer satisfaction measures – this is intended to get the department more customer focused. Note the measures for teacher and administrators – 1.8 and 1.9 Also 2.0 is an important effort to begin to identify things to stop doing.
  • The primary strategy for DPI is to provide a proper balance of education related services and leadership for North Carolina so that all students achieve at a high level and graduate . There is another strategy – more implicit but very important and the reason for this balanced scorecard - and that is to increase the level of accountability within DPI for providing service and leadership. A primary reason for the department’s balanced scorecard is to measure and hold DPI accountable for those things that the department’s staff can more directly affect (DPI processes and outcomes) – while also tracking those things that DPI indirectly affects through the efforts of the department (such as most of the measures in the ABCs Plus plan). While the balanced scorecard doesn’t directly measure the ABCs Plus strategic plan, it is closely aligned with it and is intended to measure and monitor how well DPI carries out its functions that support the achievement of the ABCs. Service to districts is the most important strategy and function of DPI. The key strategies for services are to: continuously improve the curriculum; provide high-quality assistance to schools that are struggling to meet academic goals; provide programs to help districts address health and safety issues; provide guidance and programs to promote family support for schools; ensure that students have well trained and prepared teachers and their schools have well trained and prepared administrators. Leadership is a very important role that DPI must perform for the State, but it must be balanced with services. The key strategies for leadership are to: work to increase customer satisfaction and stakeholder (School Board, Legislature, etc.) confidence; partner with important external groups to establish directions and provide support services to schools and districts; obtain and properly align the necessary resources (funds, staffing, etc.) for ensuring all students achieve at a high level; implement a plan to grow the professional capabilities and employee satisfaction of DPI employees; continuously improve the ABCs program; and implement a robust technical infrastructure for education across the State. Accountability is being addressed with two key strategies: Implement a system for setting key strategies and targets and measuring the departments degree of success at implementing these strategies (i.e. a balanced scorecard); and improving the department’s management of data to provide better information for decision making and monitoring progress.
  • Talking Points: A strategic map is a method of viewing the key strategies and objectives and how they align with and support each other. The primary strategy for DPI is to provide leadership and service to LEAs. There is another strategy – implicit but very important and the reason for this balanced scorecard - and it is to increase the level of accountability within DPI for providing this service and leadership. A primary reason for the Department’s balanced scorecard is to measure those things that the DPI staff can more directly affect (process measures) – while also tracking those things that DPI only indirectly affects (outcome measures such as test scores for example). You can see how the strategic objectives align with each other and some are more support to others than direct support to the LEAs. You can also see how the four quadrants of the Balanced Scorecard come into play across each of the three areas.
  • Objectives, measures and targets are important – but not enough. A common mistake that a lot of organizations make is once they get to this point they stop. The plan becomes book-shelf material and good conversation for group meetings – but nothing more. A good plan should drive the work of an organization – from top to bottom. That’s why it’s important to break a plan down into projects – while keeping the big-picture alignment to the plan’s objectives in mind. What you see in this document (which is in your packet) is the BSC broken into 24 projects. The BSC category and the strategic priority that the project supports is shown, as is the quarter in which each project should begin. Also, the sponsor and the project manager are identified – this defines the key roles for success of the project.
  • Success – to me – is achieving your vision, your strategic objectives. Success is achieved, first by having a clarity of understanding for these strategic objectives in terms of strategies for achieving them, how to measure progress toward and eventual achievement of these strategic objectives, and what projects to initiate -- and in what sequence. This is what a BSC is all about. Clearly defining the “right things” and then focusing efforts (through a project management process) on these things.
  • Let’s talk about Project Management and the Plan Management Oversight Committee (PMOC). Both of these are taken from private sector best practices. They are management systems or processes – ways of conducting work and overseeing work.
  • Once a scorecard is developed and the projects are identified – the next important thing is execution – using a proven project management process to scope, sequence, assign and track the work. It’s also important to build the budget to support the projects – so there is continuity from strategic planning to budgeting. Ultimately, individual performance appraisals (and compensation) could and should be driven by the BSC.
  • Talk from slide
  • The process we’re using is adapted from First Union (Wachovia) and Duke Energy. It has four phases – all of which are monitored by the PMOC in a very structured manner. There are a number of tools that accompany the process, to include: Project Charter – to define the scope, team members, cost and project milestones Detailed Project Schedule Project status report template Issues tracking tool Communications planning tool Change control form The PMOC has been trained on the process – the project managers for the BSC projects are being trained next week.
  • You have a sample charter for one of the BSC projects in your packet. This is one of the most complicated and most important projects. The Project Management process – with the project charter tool – has helped to get clarity around how to go about conducting this work. But just as important, our association with the DSAC and the CCSSO has helped us to see how other states are tackling this effort – like Missouri and Georgia. Briefly, you see the components of the charter – introduction, organization, scope, milestone schedule, budget. The charter, once established, becomes the foundation for tracking the work and ensuring the project manager stay on scope and on schedule and completes the work. The process fosters accountability, status tracking and focus for our efforts. What this whole exercise (the BSC and accompanying project management) is about – is taking the lofty strategic priorities and breaking them down into objectives, projects, deliverables and tasks – while keeping the alignment to the strategic priorities. This is how an organization achieves success.
  • The PMOC is the key component to this overall process – of BSC and project management. It approves the scope, schedule and costs of the projects. They routinely monitor the status of the projects (with monthly status reports and regular – every 6 weeks - face-to-face meetings with the project managers). They actively seek out issues that might keep a project from being successful – not for punitive purposes but to take corrective action to ensure success. They track the measures in the BSC – and adjust the plan to keep the measures on track – that’s how the BSC is a process and not just a “thing”. To conclude, we want your comments on the BSC – help us to see any gaps – and we want your support for the process. The Department is to be commended for taking this step. This has the potential to usher in culture change that brings about clearer strategy and increased focus, improved status tracking and individual accountability. It’s a bold move – potentially ground-breaking for DPI. Nationally, other states are seeing the importance of such management processes – such as Georgia, Tennessee, New Mexico have embraced or are embracing this through the CCSSO.
  • Rick Rozelle - Balanced Scorecard and Project Management Process

    1. 1. Balanced Scorecard and Project Management Processes
    2. 2. Session I: Balanced Scorecard
    3. 3. Session I Agenda: Developing and using a Balanced Scorecard <ul><li>Description of a Balanced Scorecard (BSC) </li></ul><ul><li>Components of the BSC </li></ul><ul><li>Break-out session to discuss examples of strategies </li></ul><ul><li>Reports/discussion from break-out groups </li></ul><ul><li>Steps to develop a BSC </li></ul><ul><li>Break-out session to discuss examples of measures </li></ul><ul><li>Reports/discussion from break-out groups </li></ul><ul><li>Alignment from SEA to LEA to School – the Virginia School Turnaround Program </li></ul>
    4. 4. An organization achieves success in its goals and excellence in its operations not by good fortune or hard work, but by focused effort on the right things .
    5. 5. Aligned Management Systems <ul><li>Strategic Planning- Balanced Scorecard </li></ul><ul><li>Project Management/Plan Management Oversight Committee </li></ul><ul><li>Senior Management Appraisal System </li></ul><ul><li>Budget Alignment </li></ul>
    6. 6. What is a Balanced Scorecard? <ul><li>An approach to strategic management developed in the early 1990's by Drs. Robert Kaplan (Harvard Business School) and David Norton. </li></ul><ul><li>Recognizing some of the weaknesses and vagueness of previous management approaches, the balanced scorecard approach provides a clear prescription as to what companies should measure in order to “balance” the financial perspective. </li></ul>Taken from the Balanced Scorecard Institute Website
    7. 7. <ul><li>The balanced scorecard is a management system (not only a measurement system) that enables organizations to clarify their vision and strategy and translate them into action. </li></ul><ul><li>It provides feedback around both the internal business processes and external outcomes in order to continuously improve strategic performance and results. </li></ul><ul><li>When fully deployed, the balanced scorecard transforms strategic planning from an academic exercise into the nerve center of an enterprise. </li></ul>What is a Balanced Scorecard? Taken from the Balanced Scorecard Institute Website
    8. 8. The Scorecard Is Balanced Across Four Perspectives Mission What resources are necessary and can we manage them properly? FINANCIAL PERSPECTIVE Goals Objectives How do we look to our customers and stakeholders? CUSTOMERS AND STAKEHOLDERS Goals Objectives Are we able to sustain innovation, change, and improvement? EMPLOYEES AND ORG CAPACITY Goals Objectives How cost-effective are our practices and procedures? INTERNAL BUSINESS PROCESSES Goals Objectives Strategy
    9. 9. It All Starts With the Vision and Mission <ul><li>Mission : </li></ul><ul><li>North Carolina's public schools will create a system that will be customer driven with local flexibility to achieve mastery of core skills with high levels of accountability in areas of student achievement. </li></ul>
    10. 10. The Management Systems work together to create a cohesive whole Results Appraisal System DPI Budget Projects and Initiatives Department Strategies for Meeting the Plan State ABCs Strategic Plan Methods, Tools, Teams, Continual Improvement Clear Direction - Values, Vision, Mission, Goals Alignment of Instruction and Management Functions Aligned and Continuously Improved DPI Products & Services Balanced Set of Department Measures and Targets
    11. 11. A Balanced Scorecard Contains These Elements <ul><li>Mission and Vision – Why you exist as an organization and what you want to become. </li></ul><ul><li>Goals - What end results you want to achieve. </li></ul><ul><li>Strategies and Strategic Objectives – How the results will be achieved. </li></ul><ul><li>Measure - What it looks like when you have successfully implemented the strategic objectives. These are key performance indicators that show achievement of goals and objectives. </li></ul><ul><li>Target - An objective-specific goal (linked to baseline data), which represents outstanding achievement for related measures. </li></ul><ul><li>Initiative – or project – clearly scoped work effort that has discernable beginning and end, ensures the objectives are met and is a key budget driver. </li></ul>
    12. 12. Department of Public Instruction Balanced Scorecard Project List Balanced Scorecard Categories: Customer/Stakeholder Budget/Financial HR Learning and Growth Internal Business Process Strategic Priorities: High Student Performance Healthy Children in Safe, Orderly & Caring Schools Quality Teachers, Administrators, and Staff Strong Family, Community, and Business Support Effective and Efficient Operations Core Business – primary strategy: Provide leadership and services in curriculum, instruction (including school reform) and other support areas to local education agencies (LEAs) to ensure that each student achieves at a high level and graduates. TBD TBD TBD TBD TBD in 2004-05 (Rick Klein data provider) TBD in 2004-05 (Priscilla Maynor data provider) TBD in 2004-05 (Charlotte Hughes data provider) Available for 2003-04 from Gongshu Zang Same as above for #2 <ul><li>Process Measures: </li></ul><ul><li>Quality of participation in developing new curriculum – percent of external participation with advanced degrees, national board certification, University tenure, more than 5 years of teaching experience (not to exclude new teachers) and corporate executive/officer status. </li></ul><ul><li>Percent favorable responses from teachers and parents regarding the curriculum (by content area as it is released). </li></ul><ul><li>Percentage of curriculum objectives that are deemed relevant and are tested - source Dr. Bill Daggett. </li></ul><ul><li>Outcome Measures: </li></ul><ul><li>Average annual percent improvement in EOC/EOG results by content area. </li></ul><ul><li>NAEP results where appropriate by grade/content. </li></ul>Elsie Leak 1 1.1 Continuously improve the state’s comprehensive, standards-based curriculum, involving cross-divisional representatives and key customers and stakeholders. 1.0 Customer/ Stakeholder 2004-05 Target Baseline Measures Sponsor Strategic Priority Strategic Objective
    13. 13. Example – from goal to strategy to objective to project (initiative) <ul><li>Goal: Student Achievement </li></ul><ul><li>Strategy: Strong central support for defining curriculum, A+ program, quarterly assessments and providing rapid support teams </li></ul><ul><li>Strategic Objective: Provide a strong, centrally driven curriculum and instructional process </li></ul><ul><li>Measure: Student assessment results – percent at grade level or above </li></ul><ul><li>Target: 95% by 2010 </li></ul><ul><li>Project: Academic Excellence Project for Elementary, Middle and High Schools </li></ul>
    14. 14. Example – from goal to strategy to objective to project (initiative) <ul><li>Goal: Equity </li></ul><ul><li>Strategy: Establish standards, measure schools against standards, allocate resources by formula </li></ul><ul><li>Strategic Objective: Each school has equitable inventory of resources </li></ul><ul><li>Measure: % of schools at standard for technology </li></ul><ul><li>Target: 100% by 2005 </li></ul><ul><li>Project: Instructional Computers and Professional Development Project </li></ul>
    15. 15. Break-out Session <ul><li>Develop another example for Goal, Strategy and Strategic Objective </li></ul><ul><li>Goal: </li></ul><ul><li>Strategy: </li></ul><ul><li>Strategic Objective </li></ul>
    16. 16. Strategy Map <ul><li>A strategy map is a method of viewing the key strategies and objectives for moving an organization toward a new vision for the future. </li></ul><ul><li>It does not capture all of the strategies – only the critical few. </li></ul><ul><li>A strategy map also shows how the strategies align with and support each other. </li></ul>
    17. 17. 1.1 Improve curriculum 1.8 Support schools & LEAs having well trained/prepared administrators. 1.7 Support students having well trained /prepared teacher 1.6 Promote family support 1.5 Partner with external groups 1.4 Develop programs to promote health and safety 1.2 Provide assistance to schools and LEAs Service Accountability Leadership 2.1 Obtain & align resources 4.1 Improve & align ABCs program 3.1 Implement a plan for professional growth for DPI 3.2 Promote DPI employee satisfaction 4.2 Implement & refine a technology infrastructure 4.3 Implement a system of accountability for improving & measuring DPI 4.4 Improve data management Strategy Map Balanced Scorecard Categories: Customer/Stakeholder Budget/Financial HR Learning and Growth Internal Business Process 1.3 Increase customer sat. & stakeholder confidence HIGH STUDENT ACHIEVEMENT
    18. 18. What Is A Good Measure? <ul><li>Is the performance measure resistant to manipulation? </li></ul>Credible <ul><li>Can action be taken to improve performance? </li></ul>Actionable <ul><li>Can the results be controlled or significantly influenced under a designated span of control? </li></ul>Controllable <ul><li>Can the performance measure be easily and clearly communicated? </li></ul>Understandable Main Concern Measure Characteristic
    19. 19. What Is A Good Measure? <ul><li>Is the measure an indicator of how well things are working within the process? </li></ul>Internal Process <ul><li>Is the measure an indicator of the end result of the process? </li></ul>End Result Process <ul><li>Can the data to support the measure be assessed cost-effectively? </li></ul>Cost-Effective to Assess <ul><li>Can the performance measure be quantified? </li></ul>Measurable Main Concern Measure Characteristic
    20. 20. What is a Good Target? <ul><li>Targets should provide direction for action, represent continuous improvement and motivate employees toward a stretch objective. </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Determine near-term targets and long-term targets and review them each year. </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Ask “would I be proud of results?” </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Ask “would I bet on the end result?” </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Ask “will I be able to sell my manager on this target? </li></ul></ul>
    21. 21. What is a Good Baseline? <ul><li>Existing available data reflecting current level of performance for related measures. Serves as a starting point for reaching target levels of performance. </li></ul><ul><li>Caution: A baseline is not always at “standard”. </li></ul><ul><ul><li>A baseline may be below standard. </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Make sure your data has integrity. </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Consider where you should aggregate or disaggregate particular information. </li></ul></ul>
    22. 22. Steps to develop a BSC <ul><li>Step 1 – self assessment, short and long term goals, identify champion and BSC team </li></ul><ul><li>Step 2 – identify strategies </li></ul><ul><li>Step 3 – develop strategic map </li></ul><ul><li>Step 4 – finalize strategic objectives </li></ul><ul><li>Step 5 – develop measures </li></ul><ul><li>Step 6 – identify projects (initiatives) </li></ul>
    23. 23. Balanced Scorecard Categories: Customer/Stakeholder Budget/Financial HR Learning and Growth Internal Business Process Strategic Priorities: High Student Performance Healthy Children in Safe, Orderly & Caring Schools Quality Teachers, Administrators, and Staff Strong Family, Community, and Business Support Effective and Efficient Operations Department of Public Instruction Balanced Scorecard Project List Core Business – primary strategy: Provide leadership and services in curriculum, instruction (including school reform) and other support areas to local education agencies (LEAs) to ensure that each student achieves at a high level and graduates.
    24. 24. Break-out Session <ul><li>Complete the earlier example by adding a Measure, Target and Project </li></ul><ul><li>Goal: </li></ul><ul><li>Strategy: </li></ul><ul><li>Strategic Objective: </li></ul><ul><li>Measure: </li></ul><ul><li>Target: </li></ul><ul><li>Project: </li></ul>
    25. 25. Darden/Curry School/District Turnaround Process <ul><li>Our Goal: To create a school/district turnaround process that merges two sets of time-tested and research-based strategies: </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Research based strategies from the education community that improve student achievement. </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Strategies from the private sector business community related to leadership, management, planning and measurement (balanced scorecard), corporate turnaround and project management. </li></ul></ul>
    26. 26. Instructions: Replace each TBD with specific targets before the start of the school year. Involve the school leadership team in this process. Where an N/A is shown, there is no target to be set. At the end of each quarter, fill in the Actual spaces with the results obtained. <ul><li>School Turnaround - Balanced Scorecard </li></ul><ul><li>Goal: Meet AYP targets alanced Scorecard Categories: </li></ul><ul><li>Student Performance </li></ul><ul><li>School/Community Perspective </li></ul><ul><li>Learning and Growth </li></ul><ul><li>School Process </li></ul>N/A N/A Target=100% Actual=___ Target=53% Actual=___ Target=TBD Actual=___ Target=81% Actual=___ Target=80% Actual=___ Target=100% Actual=___ N/A N/A Target=100% Actual=___ Target=52% Actual=___ Target=TBD Actual=___ Target=80% Actual=___ Target=80% Actual=___ Target=TBD Actual=___ N/A N/A Target=100% Actual=___ Target=51% Actual=___ Target=TBD Actual=___ Target=79% Actual=___ Target=80% Actual=___ Target=TBD Actual=___ Target=End of 1 st qtr Actual=___ Target = End of 1 st qtr Actual=___ Target=100% Actual=___ Target=50% Actual=___ Target=TBD Actual=___ Target=78% Actual=___ Target=80% Actual=___ Target=TBD Actual=___ N/A N/A N/A 49.2% N/A 77.0% N/A TBD <ul><li>Process Measures: </li></ul><ul><li>Date when 100 % of teachers are fully trained on the reading model and curriculum material </li></ul><ul><li>Date when a fully complete scope and sequence for each grade level and content area is available to all teachers. </li></ul><ul><li>% of teachers on scope and sequence for reading (as documented from teacher scope and sequence documents and observations every two weeks). </li></ul><ul><li>% showing mastery on formative assessment tool and SOL at each grade: </li></ul><ul><li>3 rd grade </li></ul><ul><li>4 th grade </li></ul><ul><li>5 th grade </li></ul><ul><li>Correlation between grades and formative assessment results at each quarter. </li></ul><ul><li>% of NCLB subgroups at target in reading </li></ul>1.1 Utilize a comprehensive Reading Model, complete with curriculum material, scope, sequence and schedule. 1.0 Student Performance 4 th Qtr (target and actual) 3 rd Qtr (target and actual) 2 nd Qtr (target and actual) 1 st Qtr (target and actual) 2004-05 Baseline Measures Lead Person Strategic Objectives
    27. 27. Questions?
    28. 28. Session II: Project Management and Plan Management Oversight Committee (PMOC)
    29. 29. Session II Agenda: Project Management Process <ul><li>Characteristics and roles of a Project Management Process and Project Management Oversight Committee (PMOC) </li></ul><ul><li>Definitions and overview of the process and tools for phase I and II </li></ul><ul><li>Example of a project charter </li></ul><ul><li>Break-out session to develop a project charter </li></ul><ul><li>Definitions and overview of the process and tools for phase III and IV </li></ul><ul><li>Break-out session to develop a project schedule </li></ul><ul><li>Role of the PMOC </li></ul>
    30. 30. An organization achieves success in its goals and excellence in its operations not by good fortune or hard work, but by focused effort on the right things .
    31. 31. Management Systems to Align with the Balanced Scorecard <ul><li>Strategic Planning </li></ul><ul><li>Project Management/Plan Management Oversight Committee </li></ul><ul><li>Senior Management and Principal Appraisal </li></ul><ul><li>Budget Alignment </li></ul><ul><li>Continuous Improvement Process </li></ul>
    32. 32. It’s About Execution (Work Tracking and Monitoring)… ABC Strategic Priorities #1 High Student Performance #2 Healthy Students in Safe, Orderly & Caring Schools #3 Quality Teachers, Administrators & Staff #4 Strong Family, Business & Community Support #5 Effective & Efficient Operations Balanced Scorecard (Operational Plan) WHY? WHAT? Processes Outcomes Action Plans (Project Plans, Initiatives, Department Work Plans) HOW? Budget Process & Allocation Performance Management Process Project Management Process Monitoring
    33. 33. Why have a Project Management Process? <ul><li>Project management tools ensure clarity of scope and expectations for the project team. </li></ul><ul><li>Delivery on schedule, on budget with 100% accuracy for every project requires structure and tools. </li></ul><ul><li>Common terminology and formats will help the PMOC to oversee the many projects required by The BSC. </li></ul>
    34. 34. Project Management Work Environment Stakeholders Project Management Oversight Committee Project Manager Primary Customers (Districts & Schools) Sponsor Managers Controlling Resources Colleagues Project Team
    35. 35. The Project Management Process The following diagram represents the Wachovia project management process which has been adapted for use in education. Each phase is critical to the success of the project. Project Definition Project Framework Project Planning Project Implementation Communications, Issue Resolution, and Change Control Project Finance Estimation and Tracking *This process has been adapted from Wachovia’s project management process.
    36. 36. <ul><li>Purpose: </li></ul><ul><li>Describe project’s purpose and requirements. </li></ul><ul><li>Confirm the project’s importance. </li></ul>Project Definition Project Plan Project Approval Matrix 1. Describe the project in terms of business need or problem to be addressed. 2. Identify project sponsor and project manager. 3. Identify the preliminary scope in terms of desired results and specific deliverables. 4. Review the importance of the project with the PMOC. 5. Obtain approval of the purpose and scope from the PMOC. A clear path is evident when you begin with the end in mind. - Stephen Covey Project Definition Phase Project Description and Scope Project Objectives Project Activities Project Resources Tools Steps Priority 3 Priority 4 Priority 2 Priority 1 Project Plan
    37. 37. Project Framework Phase <ul><li>Purpose: </li></ul><ul><li>Finalize project scope. </li></ul><ul><li>Document assumptions. </li></ul><ul><li>Identify key milestone dates. </li></ul><ul><li>Identify resources required. </li></ul><ul><li>Assess project risks. </li></ul><ul><li>Obtain approval to proceed. </li></ul>Project Plan 1. Finalize project scope (desired results and specific deliverables) 2. Identify projects or initiatives that may impact or be impacted by the success of this project. 3. Document the assumptions that are used in defining the project and laying out the milestone schedule. 4. Identify key milestones and the associated dates. 5. Identify the costs of the project (as appropriate). 6. Identify resources (ie., staffing, funding) required and the amount of time needed. 7. Review Plan with project sponsor for approval. 8. Review Plan with Project Management Oversight Committee (PMOC) and assess the project risks. 9. Obtain approval from the PMOC to proceed. Project Approval Matrix Identify subprojects Determine Effective Framework Develop Reporting Structure Project Framework Tools Steps Priority 3 Priority 4 Priority 2 Priority 1 Project Plan
    38. 39. Project Planning Phase <ul><li>Purpose: </li></ul><ul><li>Schedule work. </li></ul><ul><li>Assign responsibilities. </li></ul><ul><li>Avoid future problems. </li></ul>Project Scheduling Tool Note: Tools used in this phase may vary. 1. Determine all project tasks and the optimum sequence of their completion. 2. Finalize resource assignment by assigning a person to each task. 3. Assign a start/finish date for each task. 4. Develop contingency plans. 5. Review Project Schedule with the sponsor. Planning is the process of outguessing and outsmarting failure. - Robert D. Gilbreath Map Account- abilities & Responsibilities Develop Critical Path Finalize Assignments Contingency Plan Project Planning Tools Steps
    39. 40. Project Implementation Phase <ul><li>Purpose: </li></ul><ul><li>Deliver the value of the project. </li></ul><ul><li>Produce deliverables to meet the project’s desired results. </li></ul>Project Scheduling Tool Issues Log 1. Begin the project’s activities. 2. Manage the project according to the plan. 4. Identify, track and resolve all issues. 5. Ensure all desired results were met and share experiences. Monthly Project Management Report Project Closeout & Lessons Learned Document Project Implementation Execute Plan Progress Tracking Revise Plan Mobilization Completion & Final Assessment 3. Provide brief, succinct status reports on a regular basis. The pessimist complains about the wind; the optimist expects the wind; the realist adjusts the sails. - Anonymous Tools Steps
    40. 41. Communications Approach Issue Resolution & Change Control Communications, Issue Resolution, and Change Control Stakeholder Analysis <ul><li>Purpose: </li></ul><ul><li>Identify, plan, and begin project communications. </li></ul><ul><li>Establish approach and mechanisms to identify and manage issues and change requests. </li></ul>Communications Strategy 1. Determine stakeholder / sponsor’s needs. 2. Establish a communications plan. 3. Perform issue resolution and change control. Issue Log and Change Control Introduction and Scope section of Project Plan Communication, Issue Resolution, and Change Control Phase Tools Steps Project Plan
    41. 42. <ul><li>Purpose: </li></ul><ul><li>Understand project costs. </li></ul><ul><li>Monitor actual expenses. </li></ul><ul><li>Track actual expenses compared to budget. </li></ul>Tools Steps Financial Spreadsheets 1. Calculate resource costs.. 2. Calculate equipment and materials. 3. Calculate training costs. 4. Calculate project administration / operation costs. 5. Prepare project budget. 6. Track monthly expenditures. Project Finance Estimation and Tracking Phase Project Finance Estimation and Tracking
    42. 43. Project Definition Phase Project Framework Phase Sponsor reviews plan & task assignmen ts Yes Project team performs tasks PMOC reviews project purpose Assign sponsor and project manager C omplete project Plan Take Plan to PMOC and assess risk Develop detailed project schedule Identify need for project. No No Project Complete Project Mgmt. Report is Positive Project Implementation Phase No Supports district goals? Stop project PMOC approval? PMOC gives sponsor the approval to begin Sponsor approves Plan? Yes No Yes Yes Project Management Process Project Planning Phase Proj. Mgt. Oversight Committee Project Sponsor Project Manager PMOC ensures project issues are resolved
    43. 44. The Purpose of the Plan Management Oversight Committee <ul><li>To identify, approve, and oversee the progress on the projects necessary to carry out the Balanced Scorecard . </li></ul><ul><li>The PMOC also monitors measures related to the Balanced Scorecard to keep the measures on target. </li></ul>
    44. 45. Plan Management Oversight Committee <ul><li>Issue identification, assignment, tracking and status checks: An issues database will be used to track and review the issues. </li></ul><ul><li>Balanced Scorecard measures should be tracked on a quarterly basis . </li></ul><ul><li>Group norms should be established for the work of the PMOC. </li></ul>
    45. 46. PMOC Best Practices <ul><li>Plan is not in addition to the work - it should define the work. </li></ul><ul><li>Deliverables are nouns. </li></ul><ul><li>Spread deliverables/milestones throughout the year, don’t bunch them around June 30. </li></ul><ul><li>Try to have some milestones due each month. </li></ul><ul><li>Use the change control process. </li></ul>
    46. 47. PMOC Face-to-Face <ul><li>Keep presentation material understandable - use color coding and simple charts that make the material understandable at a glance. </li></ul><ul><li>Use the following format for the face-to-face: </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Deliverables completed (to date over the past period) </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Upcoming deliverables </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Issues that require PMOC assistance </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Build in the “So What” questions during your presentation </li></ul></ul>
    47. 48. PMOC Face-to-Face <ul><li>Stay within the allotted time (20 minutes) for your PMOC agenda item - be short to allow time for questions. </li></ul><ul><li>Rehearse your PMOC presentation. </li></ul><ul><li>Know who does each part of the presentation and be sure they stay within their allotted time. </li></ul><ul><li>Stay on subject - do not stray in your conversation from the designated agenda item. </li></ul><ul><li>Bring handouts for each PMOC member and your team. </li></ul>
    48. 49. Plan Management Oversight Committee Set Priorities Provide Resources Remove Barriers Oversee Scope Resolve Issues Evaluate Results Board of Education Superintendent and Deputy Superintendent Project A Sponsor Project Manager Process Manager Member Member Member Member Project B Sponsor Project Manager Process Manager Member Member Member Member Project C Sponsor Project Manager Process Manager Member Member Member Member Active Projects
    49. 50. Questions?
    50. 51. Balanced Scorecard and Project Management Processes

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