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Project Management Trevor Smith What is a Project?
 

Project Management Trevor Smith What is a Project?

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  • Key Learning Objectives (KLO’s) Hints & Tips Cautions
  • Key Learning Objectives (KLO’s) Hints & Tips Cautions
  • Key Learning Objectives (KLO’s) Hints & Tips Cautions
  • Key Learning Objectives (KLO’s) Hints & Tips Cautions
  • Key Learning Objectives (KLO’s) Hints & Tips Cautions
  • Key Learning Objectives (KLO’s) Hints & Tips Cautions
  • Key Learning Objectives (KLO’s) Hints & Tips Cautions
  • Key Learning Objectives (KLO’s) Hints & Tips Cautions
  • Key Learning Objectives (KLO’s) Hints & Tips Cautions
  • Key Learning Objectives (KLO’s) Hints & Tips Cautions
  • Key Learning Objectives (KLO’s) Hints & Tips Cautions
  • Key Learning Objectives (KLO’s) Hints & Tips Cautions
  • Key Learning Objectives (KLO’s) Hints & Tips Cautions
  • Key Learning Objectives (KLO’s) Hints & Tips Cautions
  • Key Learning Objectives (KLO’s) Hints & Tips Cautions
  • Key Learning Objectives (KLO’s) Hints & Tips Cautions
  • Key Learning Objectives (KLO’s) Hints & Tips Cautions
  • Key Learning Objectives (KLO’s) Hints & Tips Cautions
  • Key Learning Objectives (KLO’s) Hints & Tips Cautions
  • Key Learning Objectives (KLO’s) Hints & Tips Cautions
  • Don’t include in slide copies.
  • Key Learning Points Good Quality does not always mean High Quality. It is a matter of appropriateness or “fitness for purpose”. Common usage of “Quality” does not apply from hereon. Notes & Hints Use an illustration from everyday life. E.g. do you go shopping in a Rolls Royce? Do you take a bride to a church in a Mini? Cautions Keep the tempo up. Maximum of 3-5 minutes for this discussion.
  • Key Learning Points Quality is seriously treated as an industrial issue. Caution about “implied needs”. Notes & Hints Before showing the the ISO 8402 definition, ask delegates what their definition of “quality” might be. Class discussion. Don’t allow to go on beyond a couple of minutes. Show the definition. Ask “Are you comfortable with this definition?” and “How do you feel about being asked to deliver implied needs?” Bring the discussion to a conclusion that you need to manage the project as much as possible within stated needs. Cautions Don’t dwell on this too long. Maximum 3 minutes. Keep the pace up.
  • Suggested Delivery This slide is key to this whole session. In Slide Show it is hyper-linked to most of the other content slides in this file. Start with the Green Branch (pre-existing in an organisation – outside the scope of the project). Then move on the Project Approach and Customer Quality Expectations and work down the process path. As an example for each hyper-linked box: Hover over Quality Policy and click. This will hyper-link you in the Slide Show to the Quality Policy slide. At the end of the animation for Quality Policy a Back Button will appear. Click this and it will hyper-link you back to this slide in the state you left it. Click the mouse button and the PRINCE2 Manual page reference will appear for Quality Policy. Repeat steps 2-4 for each hyper-linked box. Key Learning Points The Quality Path is the key context to understanding the PRINCE2 approach. Quality should be built-into ‘mainstream’ planning; not a separate, optional activity Stage Plans should include time and resources for quality activities PRINCE2 has close alignment with ISO9001 (the quality standard) Quality checks are not restricted to being quality reviews Notes & Hints How PV2 maps onto our own QMS Cautions Practise the hyper-linking to feel comfortable about the sequence. In delivery ensure all delegates see the hyper-linked navigation so that they have visual reinforcement to the Quality Path as a framework for understanding this component. Ensure delegates understand the function of each product in the process before moving on. The last animated object on this slide is the forward button. Press this to jump forward to the QR exercise slide. DO NOT just go to the next slide.
  • Key Learning Objectives (KLO’s) Hints & Tips Cautions
  • Key Learning Objectives (KLO’s) Hints & Tips Cautions
  • Key Learning Objectives (KLO’s) Hints & Tips Cautions
  • Key Learning Objectives (KLO’s) Hints & Tips Cautions
  • Key Learning Objectives (KLO’s) Hints & Tips Cautions
  • Don’t include in slide copies.
  • Key Learning Objectives (KLO’s) Hints & Tips Cautions
  • TALK THROUGH SLIDE NEW - To emphasise what the Project Board should be doing. Runs from project start-up to closure. To ensure the success of the project, although day to day management is delegated to the PM they need to take key decisions. The Project Board needs to manage the project by exception and not by interfering but being available when major decisions need to be taken. It is important at initiation to ensure that reports are passed to the Board at sufficient intervals to enable them to keep abreast of progress. Their input is needed at the end of each stage in order to determine the continuing viability of the project. Only if they are satisfied that project is viable do they authorise continuing into the next stage. They must agree any proposed changes and determine the outcome of any exception situations.
  • Key Learning Objectives (KLO’s) Hints & Tips Cautions
  • The IPMA (International Project Management Association) is a non-profit Swiss registered organisation whose membership is comprised primarily of national project management associations throughout the world. Organizations continue to adopt, value and utilize project management. IPMA’s international presence – from North & South America to Asia to Europe, the Middle East and Africa – enables it to embrace cultures around the world and spread the word to businesses and project managers in every corner of the globe about the benefits of the project management profession. As we strive toward greater internationalization and to influence more business and government leaders than ever before, it is imperative that project managers be recognized and valued as indispensable leaders and agents of change in the workplace. IPMA actively promotes the importance of efficient, enterprise-wide project management competencies to organizations. We reach across the globe and successfully drive the message of project management’s value. We simultaneously seek to appreciate and understand the cultures of our member associations and to consistently improve the services and value we provide them and their members.

Project Management Trevor Smith What is a Project? Project Management Trevor Smith What is a Project? Presentation Transcript

  • Project Management Trevor Smith
  • What is a Project?
  • What is Project Management? In simple terms: “ The process of planning and executing a piece of work from inception to completion to achieve safe achievement of objectives on time, within cost limitations and to the specified standards of quality” Also important - choosing the optimum position in relation to the success criteria
  • Why do some Projects Fail? Lack of co-ordination of resources and activities Lack of communication, especially with customer Poor time and cost estimations Insufficient measurables Inadequate planning of resources Lack of control over progress Lack of quality control
  • Time – Cost – Quality continuum time quality cost
  • Background - PRINCE 2
    • Sponsored by UK Government – CCTA (now OGC)
    • From PROMPT 1985
    • Then PRINCE® 1989
    • Now PRINCE2 TM 1996
    • OGC owns Copyright
    • Licenses Trainers and Consultants via APMGroup
    PRINCE ® is a Registered Trade Mark and a Registered Community Trade Mark of the Office of Government Commerce, and is Registered in the U.S. Patent and Trademark Office.
  • The Name “PRINCE”
    • PR ojects
    • IN
    • C ontrolled
    • E nvironments
  • PRINCE defines a project as:
    • “ a management environment that is created for the purpose of delivering one or more business products according to a specified business case”
  • A PRINCE Project has:
    • “ A finite and defined life cycle
    • defined and measurable business products
    • a set of activities to achieve these
    • a defined amount of resources
    • an organisation structure”
    • and …
    • its unique!
  • Structure of the Manual Introduction Processes Components Appendices Techniques
  • Processes Introduction Processes Introduction 8 Top-Level Processes Lower-Level Processes
  • Components Introduction Components Business Case Organisation Plans Controls Mgt. of Risk Quality Configuration Mgt. Change Control Processes
  • Planning Components and Processes ©Crown Copyright 2006 Reproduced under licence from OGC
  • Techniques Introduction Processes Components Techniques Product-Based Planning Change Control Quality Review
  • PRINCE2 TM …. It’s Not Everything ©Crown Copyright 2006 Reproduced under licence from OGC
  • The Process Model Corporate or Programme Management Planning - the re-usable process at different points & levels The eight processes of PRINCE 2 Board reports completion to Corporate Mgt . Checking acceptance before closure, loose ends, lessons, follow-up actions, & Post Project Review Preparing End Stage Report, Next Stage Plan, Review of Risks & B.Case Work Package handed back for acceptance upon completion . Work Package Received & work commenced with periodic reporting back to Project Manager The heart of day-to-day project management Communications between the Project Board & the external world Can we proceed with the work? Defining the Project Control Environment - the P.I.D. Project Board: “ Do we have a project?” Prepare a Project Brief & Create a Mgt. Team Controlled Start Controlled Progress Controlled Close Directing a Project Starting up a Project Initiating a Project Managing Stage Boundaries Closing a Project Managing Product Delivery Planning Controlling a Stage
  • Four Layers of Organisation Creators/Change-Makers Team Managers Team Management Project Manager Day-to-Day Management Project Board Corporate / Programme Management ©Crown Copyright 2006 Reproduced under licence from OGC
  • Key Stakeholder Groups ALL 3 INTERESTS MUST BE CONSIDERED & PROTECTED THROUGHOUT THE PROJECT Business User Supplier ©Crown Copyright 2006 Reproduced under licence from OGC
  • The Project Board
    • Provides overall direction & management
    • Accountable for success
    • Project’s “voice” to outside world …
    Project Assurance Responsibilities Project Board Senior User Executive Senior Supplier
  • Executive
    • Ultimate responsibility
    • “Owns” Business Case
  • Senior User
    • Responsible for
    • Providing User resources
    • Ensuring products meet user requirements
    • Ensuring products provide expected benefits
  • Senior Supplier
    • Represents interests of:
      • designers, developers, facilitators, procurers, implementers
    • Accountable for quality of products delivered
    • Must have authority to commit or acquire Supplier resources required
  • Project Manager
    • “ responsible for the project delivering an outcome that is capable of achieving the benefits defined in the Project Initiation Document”
    • Authority to run project on day-to-day basis:
      • on behalf of the Project Board
      • within Project Board’s constraints
    • Normally from Customer side
    • Manage the work – not do the work…
    Project Board Senior User Executive Senior Supplier Project Manager
  • Project Assurance
    • Always the Project Board’s
    • Responsibility
    • May be delegated
    Project Manager Project Assurance Are things going the way we’ve been told? Project Assurance Project Board Senior User Executive Senior Supplier
  • Your Experience
    • How do you currently start up projects?
  • PL Planning DP1 Authorising Initiation SU Starting Up a Project Project Mandate SU1 Appointing an Executive and a Project Manager SU2 Designing a Project Management Team SU3 Appointing a Project Management Team SU4 Preparing a Project Brief SU5 Defining Project Approach SU6 Planning an Initiation Stage Initiation Stage Plan Risk Log Outline Business Case Project Brief Approach CQE ©Crown Copyright 2006 Reproduced under licence from OGC
  • SU4 - Preparing a Project Brief
    • Why?: The Project Board needs to decide if its worth doing with some reliable statement
    • Result: Outline answers to What? Why? Who? Where? How? and When?
    • Outputs:
      • Project Brief
      • Risk Log
      • Daily Log
  • PL Planning DP1 Authorising Initiation SU Starting Up a Project Project Mandate SU1 Appointing an Executive and a Project Manager SU2 Designing a Project Management Team SU3 Appointing a Project Management Team SU4 Preparing a Project Brief SU5 Defining Project Approach SU6 Planning an Initiation Stage Initiation Stage Plan Risk Log Outline Business Case Project Brief Approach CQE ©Crown Copyright 2006 Reproduced under licence from OGC
  • SU5 - Defining the Project Approach
    • Why?: Before any planning, what is the overall strategy for delivery? E.g.
    • Output:
      • Project Approach
    • Which is input to:
      • Project Plan
      • Planning Quality (IP1)
      • Planning Process (PL).
      • Bought ‘off the shelf’
      • ‘ made to measure’
      • developed in-house
      • contracted out to third parties
      • based on existing product
      • built from scratch
      • based on specific technologies.
  • PL Planning DP1 Authorising Initiation SU Starting Up a Project Project Mandate SU1 Appointing an Executive and a Project Manager SU2 Designing a Project Management Team SU3 Appointing a Project Management Team SU4 Preparing a Project Brief SU5 Defining Project Approach SU6 Planning an Initiation Stage Initiation Stage Plan Risk Log Outline Business Case Project Brief Approach CQE ©Crown Copyright 2006 Reproduced under licence from OGC
  • SU6 - Planning Initiation Stage
    • Why?:
    • Proper Initiation may take some time and effort
    • Gives Initiation aim and structure
    • Output: Initiation Stage Plan
  • IP Initiating a Project PID Initiating a Project IP IP5 Setting up Project Files PL Planning DP1 Authorising Initiation DP2 Authorising A Project IP1 Planning Quality IP2 Planning a Project IP4 Setting up Project Controls IP6 Assembling A Project Initiation Document IP3 Refining the Business Case And Risks IP5 Setting up Project Files Project Brief Initiation Stage Plan SB Managing Stage Boundaries ©Crown Copyright 2006 Reproduced under licence from OGC
  • IP1 - Planning Quality
    • Critical Success Factor :
    • Stating & Agreeing Customer Quality Expectations
  • IP2 - Planning a Project
    • Plan at summary level
    • Identify key decision/review points
    • Invokes PL Process
  • High Level Project Plan Detailed Stage Plan
  • IP3 – Refining Business Case
    • “ Why are we doing this?”
    Business Case… Evaluation Investment Appraisal Cost: (Extract from Project Plan) Timescale: (Summarised from Project Plan) Risks: (Key risks of the project) Benefits expected: (Expressed in measurable terms) Options considered for the project: Reasons for undertaking the Project: Business Case
  • Risk Log… IP3 - Refining Risks What problems or threats are out there?
  • Issue Log…
  • Lessons Learned Log…
  • IP6 - Assembling a PID
    • Forms the base document for progress measurement
    Benefits Time Quality Costs Risks Goals People What Who Why How When Where Location
  • PID Contents
    • Stable Information:
    • What? Why? Who? How & When?
        • Background & Project Definition
        • Project Deliverables
        • Assumptions
        • Project Approach
        • Project Tolerances
        • Project Controls
        • Exception Process
    • Dynamic Information:
        • Initial Business Case
        • Initial Project Plan
        • Initial Risk Log
        • Project Quality Plan
        • Project Organisation Structure
        • Communication Plan
  • Product Based Planning Product-Based Planning in the Planning Process ©Crown Copyright 2006 Reproduced under licence from OGC SU6 Planning an Initiation Stage Iterate as necessary
  • Product-Based Planning
    • 4-Step Sequence
    • Write a Product Description of the final product
    • Produce a Product Breakdown Structure
    • Write Product Descriptions
    • Produce a Product Flow Diagram
    • … repeat until stable
  • Footings Services Room Partitions Flooring Chimney Guttering Tiles Windows External Doors Brickwork House Roof Walls Roof Frame Internal Doors Scaffolding Internal Fittings Purchased Land Approved Plan An Example Product Breakdown Structure Exterior Shell Internal Fabric
  • Footings Services Flooring House Room Partitions Brickwork External Doors Windows Tiles Guttering Chimney Internal Doors Roof Frame Purchased Land Approved Plan Internal Fittings Scaffolding An Example Product Flow Diagram Roof Walls
  • Benefits of Product-Based Planning
    • Product Breakdown Structure is:
    • simple
    • a good early view of scope
    • ensures all products included – none left out
    • Product Descriptions are :
    • simple
    • unambiguous
    • specify required quality for completed product
    • Product Flow Diagram is:
    • simple
    • high-level, non-technical “route map”
    • identifies dependencies between products in their creation
    • leads naturally into activity planning.
    As a whole the technique: focuses on results - not busyness
  • What is Quality?
    • Does Good Quality always mean High Quality?
  • What Is “Quality” “… what it is about the project’s products or services that makes them fit for their purpose of satisfying stated needs.”
  • The Path to Quality Project Boundary ISO Quality Policy Quality System Quality Assurance Acceptance Criteria Customer’s Quality Expectations Quality Log (Created) Quality Check  ©Crown Copyright 2006 Reproduced under licence from OGC External to Project PROJECT ASSURANCE INTEREST SU4 Preparing a Project Brief SU5 Defining Project Approach Project Approach IP1 Planning Quality PROJECT QUALITY PLAN SB1 Planning a Stage Stage Quality plan CS1 Authorising a WP/ MP1 Accepting a WP Work Package MP2 Executing a Work Package MP2 Executing a Work Package PL2 Defining & Analysing Products Product Descriptions & Quality criteria Quality Log Results Updated Info/Data from SQP - SB1 Quality Log Planned Dates Info/Data from TQP - MP1
  • What is a Business Case
    • Reasons for the project – justifications
    • Costs and Benefits
    • Covering the entire scope of change
    • Drives the decision making
    • Aligning progress to business objectives
    • Organisational Standards
    • … driving the project
  • Business Case - contents Benefits Reasons Options Risks Costs & Time Investment Appraisal Evaluation
  • Project Mandate Project Brief PID Post-Project Review Plan Project Issues End Stage Report Business Case Reasons for the Project Outline Business Case Enhanced and approved Business Case Expected benefits Reviewed Business Case Updated Business Case Contains basic elements of Business Case Developed in SU4 To enable initiation to be authorised Benefits put in measurable terms – IP3; included in PID – IP6 Business Case provides much of agenda CS4 reviews each Issue for impact on Business Case SB3 - Revised Business Case; for End Stage Report SB5
  • What is “risk”?
    • “ … uncertainty of outcome”
    • whether positive opportunity or negative threat
  • Identify the risks Identify suitable responses to risk Plan and Resource Risk Analysis Risk Management Risk Management Cycle Risk Categories Prevention Reduction Transference Acceptance Contingency Planning the countermeasures Assigning resources ©Crown Copyright 2006 Reproduced under licence from OGC Select Evaluate the risks Monitor and report Mechanisms in place Probability Impact Proximity Balancing risk against action
  • Example Risk Log Entry No change 22 May Contracts Manager
    • Reduce. Include a penalty clause in contract.
    • ContingencySlip other work to the next stage to resource essential rework.
    • ContingencySecond source another supplier for key deliveries
    Stage 4 M H Significant time impact; Possible impact on cost Tech Supplier XYZ fails user tests by due date. Critical user acceptance tests reveal unsatisfactory defects in performance with extensive rework required 16 Feb P Taylor P37/ 049 Status Updated Owner Response Prox Prob Imapct Category Risk Date i/d Author I/d
  • High Medium Low 1, 2 4 Low 3 6, 9 Medium 5 7, 8 High Risk tolerance line Probability Impact Risk Profile May be included in a Highlight Report ©Crown Copyright 2006 Reproduced under licence from OGC
  • Controlling a Stage - Principles
    • Focus on Delivery
    • All work should be authorised
    • Project Board need feedback
    • Can only control against a plan
    • Early detection of threats and deviations
    • Action taken at appropriate level
  • CS7 Taking Corrective Action CS1 Authorising Work Package CS2 Assessing Progress CS Controlling a Stage CS9 Receiving Completed Work Package CS8 Escalating Project Issues CS6 Reporting Highlights CS5 Reviewing Stage Status CS4 Examining Project Issues CS3 Capturing Project Issues DP Directing a Project CP Closing a Project SB Managing Stage Boundaries DP Directing a Project
    • Work Package Management
    • Monitoring, Reporting, Controlling
    • Issues Management
    Three Main “Flows”… CS “drives” MP on a frequent, iterative basis CS Process MP Managing Product Delivery ©Crown Copyright 2006 Reproduced under licence from OGC
  • Managing Product Delivery (MP)
    • Fundamental Principle: it “allows a controlled break between the Project Manager and Team Manager, or Project Manager and product creation/provision by third-party suppliers”
    Agrees Work Reports Produces/ gets it done Delivers/hands it back Project Manager "External" Supplier or Team Manager
  • MP Managing Product Delivery MP2 Executing a Work Package MP3 Delivering a Work Package CS1 Authorising Work Package CS2 Assessing Progress CS9 Receiving Completed Work Package MP Managing Product Delivery MP 1 MP1 Accepting a Work Package Updated Risk Log Quality Log Work Package Approved Work Package Checkpoint Report Quality Log PL Planning ©Crown Copyright 2006 Reproduced under licence from OGC
  • “ The continuing correct focus of the project should be confirmed at the end of each stage”
  • CS5 Reviewing Stage Status SB1 Planning a Stage SB2 Updating a Project Plan SB Managing Stage Boundaries SB3 Updating a Project Business Case DP3 Authorising a Stage or Exception Plan CS8 Escalating Project Issues SB6 Producing an Exception Plan SB4 Updating the Risk Log SB5 Reporting Stage End PL Planning DP2 Authorising a Project IP6 Assembling a Project Initiation Document SB Managing Stage Boundaries EA ESA Updated… Project Plan Business Case Risk Log End Stage Report Exception Plan Stage Plan ©Crown Copyright 2006 Reproduced under licence from OGC Exception Report DP4
  • Why Control?
    • Ensure the project is:
    • delivering products to Quality Criteria
    • carried to budget and schedule
    • still viable Business Case
  • The Controlled Environment CONTROLLED CLOSE CUSTOMER SATISFIED? EVERYTHING DELIVERED? BENEFITS REALISED? LESSONS LEARNED? ASSESSMENTS CONTROLLED PROGRESS MONITORING QUALITY CHECKS CHANGE CONTROL REPORTS CONTROL PLANS CONTROLLED START HOW& WHEN WHO WHAT WHY STAGE SELECTION WHERE
  • Major Board Controls
    • Authorising Initiation/Project
    • Stages
    • End Stage Assessment
    • Highlight Reports
    • Exception Reports
    • Exception Assessment
    • Project Closure
  • Stage 2 Stage 3 PRINCE2 Controls: Communication of Progress to Project Board; and their decision points Highlight Reports Highlight Reports End Stage Report End Stage Report End Stage Assessment End Stage Assessment
  • Project Manager Controls
    • Adjustments within tolerances
    • Work Package Authorisation
    • Checkpoints
    • Quality Control
    • Risk Log
    • Issues Log
  • Benefits of Planning
    • avoids muddle & “ad hoc”ery
    • opportunity to pre-think future action
    • provides targets
    • confirms targets are achievable before start
    • communicates intentions
    • gains commitment
    • yardstick to measure progress.
  • SB1 Planning a Stage IP2 Planning a Project SU6 Planning an Initiation Stage MP1 Accepting a Work Package SB2 Updating a Project Plan SB6 Producing an Exception Plan PL Planning PL1 Designing a Plan PL2 Defining and Analysing Products PL4 Estimating PL5 Scheduling PL6 Analysing Risk PL7 Completing a Plan PL3 Identifying Activities and Dependencies ©Crown Copyright 2006 Reproduced under licence from OGC Iterate as necessary
  • DP Directing a Project IP Initiating a Project CS Controlling A Stage SB Managing Stage Boundaries CP Closing a Project SU Starting up a Project Stage Plan or Exception Plan PID DP1 Authorising Initiation DP2 Authorising a Project DP3 Authorising a Stage or Exception Plan DP5 Confirming Project Closure Corporate/ programme management DP4 Giving Ad Hoc Direction Project Brief Risk Log Initiation Stage Plan Project Closure Products Authorisation to Proceed Authorisation to Proceed Authorisation to Proceed Follow-on Action recommendations Lessons Learned Report Post Project Review Plan Project Closure Notification End Project Report Information from external sources DP1 Authorising Initiation Project Brief Risk Log Initiation Stage Plan Authorisation to Proceed Next Stage Plan Highlight Reports Exception Reports Requests for Advice ©Crown Copyright 2006 Reproduced under licence from OGC
  • How Do Your Projects End?
    • A clear end to a project:
      • Recognises operations must now take over
      • Helps avoid waste and take ‘stock’
      • Helps identify unachieved goals & objectives, for future action
  • Last Stage: eg Stage 4 End Project Report CP Checkpoint Reports Highlight Reports Lessons Learned Report Follow On Recommendations Post Project Review Plan
  • DP4 Giving Ad Hoc Direction DP3 Authorising a Stage CS5 Reviewing Stage Status DP5 Confirming Project Closure CP Closing a Project CS8 Escalating Project Issues CP1 Decommissioning a Project CP2 Identifying Follow-On Actions CP3 Evaluating a Project
    • Customer Acceptance
    • Return of resources
    • Archiving files
    • Post Project Review Plan
    • Follow on Actions
    • End Project Report
    • Lessons Learned
    ©Crown Copyright 2006 Reproduced under licence from OGC
  • The quality and growing recognition of IPMA’s 4 level certification system is one of the most important reasons why practitioners turn to IPMA. Today, project management is used globally by multi-national corporations, governments, and smaller organizations alike as a means of meeting their customers’ or constituents’ needs by both standardizing and reducing the basic tasks necessary to complete a project in the most effective and efficient manner. It is intended for those practitioners who provide project management services to the profession. Obtaining your IPMA CERTIFICATION can go a long way toward enhancing your employment and/or project assignment responsibilities – and getting you recognized in the workplace!
  • Certified Project Management Associate D Exam Certified Senior Project Manager Certified Projects Director C B A Certified Project manager Project report Assessment IPMA -Certification of Project Managers Competence = Knowledge + Experience + Behaviour
  • Adresa pro korespondenci: Společnost pro projektové řízení MZLU, Zemědělská 1, bud. E 613 00 Brno telefon:   545135224, Po 17:00 – 19:00 e-mail: sekretariát SPŘ: Martina Benešová, [email_address] sekretariát Certifikačního orgánu SPŘ: Lucie Chlupatá, [email_address] Prezident společnosti: viz výbor   IČO: 47608749, SPŘ není plátcem DPH   Smluvní partner pro realizaci certifikace: DNV Czech Republic s.r.o. Kateřina Vlasáková Region střední & jižní Evropa Business Unit Česká a Slovenská republika Thákurova 4 Praha 6 - Dejvice 160 00 - CZ Tel.: +420 233 321 231 Fax: +420 233 321 232 e-mail: [email_address] e-mail: [email_address]  
  • Vital and forward thinking – focused on the needs of project management professionals worldwide; that’s the Project Management Institute of today. We’ve long been acknowledged as a pioneer in the field and now our membership represents a truly global community with more than 200,000 professionals, representing 125 countries. PMI professionals come from virtually every major industry including, aerospace, automotive, business management, construction, engineering, financial services, information technology, pharmaceuticals, healthcare, and telecommunications. Prague, Czech Republic (Potential Chapter) ($0 Annually) June 2003 Petr Sestak Vyskocilova 1/1410 PRAHA 140 21 Czech Republic Phone: 420/2/61307337 E-Mail: [email_address]
  • A project is a temporary endeavor undertaken to create a unique product, service, or result. Risk management Procurement management Human resources management Communications management Quality management Cost management Time management Scope management Integration management 9 Knowledge Areas
  • Project Management Professional (PMP®) If you enjoy the prestige that comes from being the best in your field, then you’ll appreciate the professional advantages derived from attaining the PMP, the profession’s most globally recognized and respected credential. The PMP designation following your name tells current and potential employers that you have demonstrated a solid foundation of knowledge from which you can competently practice project management. To be eligible for a PMP Credential, you must first meet specific educational and project management experience requirements and agree to adhere to a code of professional conduct. The final step to becoming a PMP is passing a rigorous multiple-choice examination designed to objectively assess and measure your ability to apply project management knowledge in the following six domains: initiating the project, planning the project, executing the project, monitoring and controlling the project, closing the project, and professional and social responsibility. This computer-based examination is administered globally with translation aids in 10 languages.