Your SlideShare is downloading. ×
Project management procedures
Upcoming SlideShare
Loading in...5
×

Thanks for flagging this SlideShare!

Oops! An error has occurred.

×

Saving this for later?

Get the SlideShare app to save on your phone or tablet. Read anywhere, anytime - even offline.

Text the download link to your phone

Standard text messaging rates apply

Project management procedures

6,632
views

Published on


0 Comments
2 Likes
Statistics
Notes
  • Be the first to comment

No Downloads
Views
Total Views
6,632
On Slideshare
0
From Embeds
0
Number of Embeds
1
Actions
Shares
0
Downloads
243
Comments
0
Likes
2
Embeds 0
No embeds

Report content
Flagged as inappropriate Flag as inappropriate
Flag as inappropriate

Select your reason for flagging this presentation as inappropriate.

Cancel
No notes for slide

Transcript

  • 1. Plymouth City Council Project Management System Project Management Procedures Project Management Procedures Purpose of this document The purpose of this document is to provide an overview and general understanding of the Project Management Procedures adopted by Plymouth City Council to improve the control of its projects. It will enable project managers, clients, stakeholders and new users to understand the control steps a project must follow in order to deliver a successful outcome. Each control step identified within this procedure document will have a separate more detailed document to explain in full what is required. The procedures do not describe the normal day to day tasks that would be required to deliver a project merely how a project will be controlled. The order of the procedures has assumed a traditional procurement route amendments to this order will be required on a project by project basis dependant on the nature of the project and it’s procurement route. Document History Revision History Revision date Author Summary of Changes New Version Ref: 9th May ‘09 Tony Hopwood Draft for review/comment 1.02 27 August 09 Tony Hopwood Inclusion of Executive Board 1.03 29 Sept 09 S Gregson Amendment to include all PM documents 1.04 07/10/09 J London Amendments to include PST team comments 1.05 Distribution History Name Title Date of Issue Version Project Services Team Status: Final Page 1 of 27 Page 1 of 27 Filename: project-management- Author: John London Date of Issue: 03/06/2010 procedures4266.doc Comments:
  • 2. Plymouth City Council Project Management System Project Management Procedures Contents 0.Project Management ...........................................................................................................3 1.RIBA Stages A – B (Project Appraisal)................................................................................5 1.15.Approval to Proceed by Capital Programme Board......................................................13 Once the Capital Programme Business Case has been approved by the Capital Programme Board and the project has gone through the Gateway 1 Review then the project is able to proceed to the next stage..........................................................................13 RIBA Stage C (Project Proposals/Concept Design).............................................................14 3.RIBA Stages D – E (Project Design/Development)...........................................................17 3.13.Approval to Proceed by Capital Programme Board......................................................20 4.RIBA Stages F – H (Production Information and Tender Action)......................................21 5.RIBA Stages J – K (Construction)......................................................................................24 6.RIBA Stage L (Post Construction).....................................................................................26 Project Services Team Status: Final Page 2 of 27 Page 2 of 27 Filename: project-management- Author: John London Date of Issue: 03/06/2010 procedures4266.doc Comments:
  • 3. Plymouth City Council Project Management System Project Management Procedures 0. Project Management 0.1. What is a project? A project is a unique set of co-ordinated activities, with definite starting and finishing points, undertaken by an individual or team to meet specific objectives within defined time, cost and performance parameters as specified in the business case. It should have the following characteristics: • a finite and defined lifespan • defined and measurable business products (that is, deliverables and/or outcomes to meet specific business objectives) • a corresponding set of activities to achieve the business products • a defined amount of resources • an organisation structure, with defined responsibilities, to manage the project. Projects should contribute to business objectives; typically their funding is identified as part of business planning. They may be part of an overall programme of business change. 0.2. What is project management? Project management is much more than the tasks carried out by a Project Manager. Project management is a combination of the roles and responsibilities of individuals assigned to the project, the organisational structure that sets out clear reporting arrangements and the set of processes to deliver the required outcome. It ensures that everyone involved knows what is expected of them and helps to keep cost, time and risk under control. 0.3. Why use project management? Experience has shown that projects are inherently at risk - through overrunning on time and cost and/or failing to deliver a successful outcome. Such failures are almost invariably caused by: • poor project definition by the project's owner, perhaps because of insufficient consultation with stakeholders or their failure to be specific about requirements and desired outcomes • lack of ownership and personal accountability by senior management • inadequately skilled and experienced project personnel • inadequate reporting arrangements and decision-making • inconsistent understanding of required project activities, roles and responsibilities. Project Services Team Status: Final Page 3 of 27 Page 3 of 27 Filename: project-management- Author: John London Date of Issue: 03/06/2010 procedures4266.doc Comments:
  • 4. Plymouth City Council Project Management System Project Management Procedures Project management helps to reduce and manage risk. It puts in place an organisation where lines of accountability are short and the responsibilities of individuals are clearly defined. Its processes are clearly documented and repeatable, so that those involved in the project can learn from the experiences of others. The principles of project management are equally valuable for smaller and/or less complex projects. The nature of your project will determine the project management approach you need, which should be adapted as required – see Define Project. 0.4. Critical success factors Successful projects have: • a well-defined scope and agreed understanding of intended outcome • active management of risks, issues and timely decision-making supported by clear and short lines of reporting • ongoing commitment and support from senior management • a senior individual with personal accountability and overall responsibility for the successful outcome of the project • an appropriately trained and experienced project team and in particular a Project Manager whose capabilities match the complexity of the project • defined and visibly managed processes that are appropriate or the scale and complexity of the project. For cross-cutting projects, there may be nominated senior owners from each organisation involved in the project and its delivery. Where this is the case, there must be a single owner who is responsible for the whole project. All projects will follow key stages and the following outlines the control steps that must be taken in each stage: Project Services Team Status: Final Page 4 of 27 Page 4 of 27 Filename: project-management- Author: John London Date of Issue: 03/06/2010 procedures4266.doc Comments:
  • 5. Plymouth City Council Project Management System Project Management Procedures 1. RIBA Stages A – B (Project Appraisal) The Project Appraisal stage enables the client department to identify the need for a project, its objectives, business case and possible constraints on development. It assesses various options and their feasibility to enable the client to decide whether to proceed. The following identifies the key steps to be taken within the stage. 1.1. Statement of Need The Statement of Need defines and documents client objectives in consultation and will establish how their achievement will be measured. The aim is to uncover the underlying need that may be initially expressed by stakeholders in the form of a solution. In order not to rule out alternatives and to objectively evaluate solutions, the statement sets out the "What" rather than the "How". The information contained is used in tandem with the Project Mandate to trigger starting up a Project. It will be produced by the Client Department and issued with the Project Mandate to the Departmental Management Team (DMT) to enable the Department to consider the scheme and it’s fit with the Department’s and Council’s strategic requirements. No external fees and only minimal officer time is to be spent on the scheme until such a time as the Initial Project Proposal (IPP) has been approved and funding to develop the scheme identified and approved by the Capital Programme Board and/or Cabinet – see Statement of Need. 1.2. Initial Project Appraisal The Client SRO may wish to assure themselves that the ideas for the project are feasible in broad/property/construction terms before advancing any further into the appraisal stage. In such a situation the Client SRO can request a Portfolio Manager to provide an Initial Project Appraisal by making a request to the Project Services Manager. It will enable the Client SRO to advance into the initial stage of the project with more confidence – see Initial Project Appraisal. 1.3. Project Mandate The information in the mandate is used to trigger starting up a Project. It should contain sufficient information to identify at least the objectives of the project. The Project Mandate will be produced by the Client Department and issued to the Client Departmental Management Team (DMT) to enable the Department to consider the scheme and it’s fit with the Department’s and Council’s strategic requirements. Project Services Team Status: Final Page 5 of 27 Page 5 of 27 Filename: project-management- Author: John London Date of Issue: 03/06/2010 procedures4266.doc Comments:
  • 6. Plymouth City Council Project Management System Project Management Procedures Upon receipt of DMT approval the Project Mandate is forwarded to the Project Services Manager who will assign a Portfolio Manager to develop the mandate and produce a Project Brief in consultation with the Senior Responsible Officer (SRO). No external fees and only minimal officer time is to be spent on the scheme until such a time as the Initial Project Proposal has been approved and funding to develop the scheme identified and approved by the Capital Programme Board and/or Cabinet – see Project Mandate. 1.4. Define Project (Major/Minor) This step determines which Project Procedures shall be adopted and the approach to risk identification. All projects with an estimated cost in excess of £500,000 shall be deemed as major projects regardless of their complexity. If the cost is >£100,000 and <£500,000 then the Project Manager shall undertake an assessment of the project risk level against the following criteria: Council requirement risk • Council and user requirements complete, accurate and agreed • Council/Departmental reputation criticality • Time/occupation criticality • Intensity of use and design life Regulatory risk • Safety criticality • Environmental criticality • Other regulatory requirements Design/construction risk • Cost of build • Novelty of key technology or building services • Design complexity/interfaces • Level of recent experience/capability Each of the above criteria shall be scored on a scale of 1-6 to indicate the most likely risk value. The higher the risk or level of uncertainty the higher the score (1=low risk, 6=high risk). A simple spreadsheet tool (below) shall be used for this purpose. Project Services Team Status: Final Page 6 of 27 Page 6 of 27 Filename: project-management- Author: John London Date of Issue: 03/06/2010 procedures4266.doc Comments:
  • 7. Plymouth City Council Project Management System Project Management Procedures Schemes with an estimated cost less that £100,000 are to be considered minor unless there are particular complexities and/or political issues that would require the greater level of control exercised on more major schemes. The final decision shall be made in consultation with the Capital Programme Director. The Project Services Manager shall undertake the assessment with the support from specialists (as required) and key stakeholders as part of the development of the Project Brief. This may be undertaken as part of an initial Risk Management Workshop. The result of the assessment shall be stated in the Project Brief/Execution Plan. This shall be used for determining which Project Procedures shall be adopted and the approach to risk identification – see Define Project (Major/Minor). 1.5. Allocate Portfolio Manager Once the Project Services Manager has defined the project, they will then allocate the project to a Portfolio Manager who will work with the project throughout its lifetime – see Allocate Portfolio Manager. 1.6. Produce Project File & Programme The Portfolio Manager will ensure that any new project is allocated a project file, project number and will immediately prepare a Project Programme – see Produce Project File & Programme. 1.7. Project Brief The project Brief provides a firm foundation for the initiation of the project. If approval is given to proceed to production of a Capital Programme Business Case (CPBC), the Project Brief is extended and refined into the Project Execution Plan. For construction projects, the Project Brief is a formal statement of the objectives and functional and operational requirements of the finished project. It should be in sufficient detail to enable the construction team to execute the design and specification of the work and is therefore an essential reference for the construction team. The Project Brief is a key document in its own right. Any significant change to the material contained in the Project Brief will thus need to be referred to corporate or programme management. For construction projects the Project Brief is a key component of the Project Execution Plan. Fitness for purpose content: • Does the Project Brief accurately reflect the mandate for the project? • Does it form a firm basis on which to initiate a project? Project Services Team Status: Final Page 7 of 27 Page 7 of 27 Filename: project-management- Author: John London Date of Issue: 03/06/2010 procedures4266.doc Comments:
  • 8. Plymouth City Council Project Management System Project Management Procedures • Does it indicate how the customer will assess the acceptability of the finished product(s)? The Project Brief is to be developed between the Client SRO and the Portfolio Manager and should be approved by the Project Board as the basis for the scheme – see Project Brief. 1.8. Project Structure and Governance The Portfolio Manager will identify, produce and gain approval of a suitable Project Structure and Governance to successfully deliver the project. The following identifies the essential roles to be included in any Project Structure and Governance: • Investment decision-making - takes the investment decision based on affordability and cost justification this role is the responsibility of the Director of the Department sponsoring the project • Ownership - defines the scope and content of the project for delivering the benefits; personally accountable for the success of the project (usually known as the Senior Responsible Owner, as this role must be taken by a senior individual in the organisation). The SRO should have the status and authority to provide the necessary leadership and must have the clear accountability for delivering the project outcome • Interface between ownership and delivery (sponsorship/directing)- ongoing management on behalf of the owner to ensure that the desired project objectives are delivered; must have adequate knowledge and information about the business and the project to be able to make informed decisions. This may be known as the Project Sponsor; sometimes referred to as the Project Director (the Portfolio Manager). • Project management - leading, managing and co-ordinating the project team on a day-to-day basis (the Project Manager) • Project team - delivers the required outputs or deliverables (the Project Team) In addition to the essential roles described above, there will be a requirement for specialists, design consultants such as architects, and others who are appointed by the Project Sponsor/Project Director or Project Manager. For all major, and some minor projects there may be a Project Board chaired by the SRO. Membership of the Project Board, which is through formal appointment by the SRO, should be a single role representing key stakeholder interests (described in more detail below) and a single role addressing technical/supply issues (typically a representative from the supplier organisation). The Project Board provides the owner with stakeholder/technical input to decisions affecting the project; ultimate authority and accountability resides with the SRO. There will always need to be active project assurance - to assure the owner that the project is employing good practice - making sure stakeholders are being consulted appropriately and their needs are being addressed, Project Services Team Status: Final Page 8 of 27 Page 8 of 27 Filename: project-management- Author: John London Date of Issue: 03/06/2010 procedures4266.doc Comments:
  • 9. Plymouth City Council Project Management System Project Management Procedures for example. Project assurance is ultimately the responsibility of the SRO and will be included in the responsibilities of project board members, or may be fulfilled by individuals external to the project acting on behalf of the owner. In practice, some roles may be combined, subject to an overriding proviso that the person combining the roles possesses the requisite competencies, experience, expertise and time. For example, the roles of project ownership and project sponsor/director can be combined where the responsibilities of both roles can be fulfilled by a single individual. Where roles are combined the allocation of the functions must always be absolutely clear, with delegations and responsibilities that do not overlap. The role of Project Manager should be clearly defined and implemented, and not simply another member of the project team. Where two roles are combined, the person appointed must have at least the authority and status of the 'higher' role; however, it is important to note that the roles of Investment Decision-Maker, Senior Responsible Owner and Project Sponsor/Project Director cannot be allocated to a single individual – see Project Structure and Governance. 1.9. Initial Project Proposal The Initial Project Proposal (IPP) document is used to alert the key and significant persons outside of the project related client department of a possible future project and that work is being undertaken to appraise the potential project. Submission of the IPP to CPB and/or Cabinet enables them to ask questions about the development of the project and to approve/decline its further progress – see Initial Project Proposal. 1.10.Tender Process for Consultant/Project team The Portfolio Manager will identify and undertake the most effective tender process to procure the relevant consultants/project team. This must include the appointment of a Construction Design Management Co- ordinator (CDM-C) on all relevant CDM projects. All procurements must comply with PCC Financial Regulations and OJEU requirements where applicable. Advice and approval is to be sort from the PCC Procurement Team. In addition the procurement method will need to be approved by the Project Services Manager before commencement – see Tender Process for Consultant/Project team. 1.11.Feasibility Study Stage B Report The feasibility study consists of two main sections (see Feasibility Study Stage B Report): Part 1: Statement of Requirements The purpose of the feasibility study is to further define the statements of need, bring together relevant information and establish clear operational and business requirements. It will make use of the objectives defined by the stakeholders. The sections below could be used to provide the above: 1.1 Executive summary 1.2 Project Background Project Services Team Status: Final Page 9 of 27 Page 9 of 27 Filename: project-management- Author: John London Date of Issue: 03/06/2010 procedures4266.doc Comments:
  • 10. Plymouth City Council Project Management System Project Management Procedures 1.3 Statement of Objective 1.4 Project Context – including Strategic, Operational Environmental and Safety 1.5 Council Requirements including Time, Cost and Quality 1.6 Risk Part 2: Basis of Design This section translates the business need into technical requirements such as process flows, building areas, etc. The sections below could be used to provide the above: 2.1 Site/location requirements 2.2 Accommodation requirements 2.3 Standard 2.4 Plant/Equipment Systems 1.12.Project Control Documentation The following control documentation will be compiled during the Appraisal stage it will be reviewed, updated and reported on throughout the life of the project. 1.12.1.Communications Plan The Communications Plan is used to define all parties with an interest in the project and the means and frequency of communication between them and the project. The Project Director owns this plan with the Project Manager, to ensure all necessary communication is issued out to relevant parties. Communication Plans are required for all major projects – see Communications Plan. 1.12.2.Risk Management Procedure and Risk Register The purpose of risk management is to identify and manage risks as opportunities or threats to the project objectives. Risk management aims to maximise the results of positive events (opportunities) and minimise the consequences of adverse events (threats). Identification and management of risk is required to provide assurance to key stakeholders that the project will achieve its stated benefits to cost, time and quality. Certainty of outcome increases, through reduction in risk exposure, as the project progresses – see Risk Management Procedure and Risk Register. 1.12.3.Project Execution Plan Project Services Team Status: Final Page 10 of 27 Page 10 of 27 Filename: project-management- Author: John London Date of Issue: 03/06/2010 procedures4266.doc Comments:
  • 11. Plymouth City Council Project Management System Project Management Procedures The project Execution Plan (PEP) is the core document for the management of a project. It is a statement of policies and procedures defined by the project director, although usually developed by the Project Manager for the Project Sponsor/Project Director's approval. It sets out in a structured format the project scope, objectives and relative priorities – see Project Execution Plan. 1.12.4.Project Deliverables & Design Approval Approvals will be required for the project deliverables and designs using a standard pro forma: Documents requiring this sign-off include, but are not limited to, the following (see Project Deliverables & Design Approval): • Statement of Need – DMT signature only • Project Mandate – DMT signature only • Project Brief – DMT/Stakeholders • Initial Project Proposal (IPP) – Head of Service/Finance Officer/CPB and possibly Cabinet • Capital Programme Business Case – Accountable Project Officer/Finance Officer/Head of Service/CPB and possibly Cabinet • Communications Plan • Feasibility report • Stage reports • Cost Plans • CPB/Cabinet Papers • Post Project Review • Etc............. 1.12.5.Cost Management Procedure The purpose of this procedure is to provide a structured approach to the management of all costs associated with the project. This shall ensure the project achieves a balanced and logical distribution of available funds between the various elements of the works, that the total expenditure is within the approved budget and that overall the final product represents good value for money. The Cost Management process comprises a set of tasks which span the life of a project from the earliest stages of project appraisal up to construction, but with implications for the operation and maintenance of a building or facility during the post-construction stage. The outlined tasks and activities shall be undertaken as described for project appraisal to post- construction stages of a normal project. Project Services Team Status: Final Page 11 of 27 Page 11 of 27 Filename: project-management- Author: John London Date of Issue: 03/06/2010 procedures4266.doc Comments:
  • 12. Plymouth City Council Project Management System Project Management Procedures 1.12.6.Project Performance Management Process The purpose of this document is to drive continuous improvement in the delivery of the Council’s projects. The procedure sets out how performance is recorded and managed throughout a project against a set of Key Performance Indicators. The outputs of this procedure will be; a set of KPI Targets, Performance Measurement against the KPI Targets, Project Team Performance Data and a Project Review Report contained within the End of Project Report. 1.12.7.Request for Information (RFI) This document enables anybody within the project to formally request information and to record when the information requested and returned. 1.12.8. Lessons Learned Log The purpose of the Lessons Learned Report is to bring together any lessons learned during the project that can be usefully applied to other projects. At the close of the project it is completed and prepared for dissemination. As a minimum, lessons learned should be captured at the end of each stage of the project; ideally a note should be made of any good or bad point that arises in the use of the management and specialist products and tools at the time. 1.13.Capital Programme Business Case The Business Case is a description of the reasons for the project and the justification for undertaking the project, based on the estimated costs of the project, the risk and the expected benefits to the Council. The Business Case is used continuously to align the projects progress to the business objectives through consideration and approval by the Capital Programme Board. The Business Case also requires approval by Head of Service and possibly Cabinet – see Capital Programme Business Case. 1.14.Gateway 1 Review This review focuses on the project's justification from a regulatory (including H&S), commercial or operational perspective. It provides assurance to the Council stakeholders that the need for the project expenditure is valid and shall provide a net benefit – see Gateway 1 Review. Objectives of this Gateway Project Services Team Status: Final Page 12 of 27 Page 12 of 27 Filename: project-management- Author: John London Date of Issue: 03/06/2010 procedures4266.doc Comments:
  • 13. Plymouth City Council Project Management System Project Management Procedures • Confirm Project Brief document has been endorsed and approved • Compilation of Project Risk Log using appropriate procedures and documentation • Confirm Initial Project Proposal has been endorsed and approved • Any feasibility studies and initial surveys are complete, relevant and valid • Appointment of the Professional Team with appropriate approvals and agreements • Production of a Project Programme with date and version reference • Production of a Project Execution Plan • Production of a Project File for use in the project office • Ensure a clear Project Organisational Structure through the establishment of the Project Board and if appropriate advisory boards or user committees including production of an organogram to illustrate project relationships • Facilitate Project Board sign-off of Stage and secure approval to proceed • Facilitate submission of Capital Programme Business Case to the Capital Programme Board to seek corporate approval to proceed 1.15.Approval to Proceed by Capital Programme Board Once the Capital Programme Business Case has been approved by the Capital Programme Board and the project has gone through the Gateway 1 Review then the project is able to proceed to the next stage. Project Services Team Status: Final Page 13 of 27 Page 13 of 27 Filename: project-management- Author: John London Date of Issue: 03/06/2010 procedures4266.doc Comments:
  • 14. Plymouth City Council Project Management System Project Management Procedures RIBA Stage C (Project Proposals/Concept Design) The Project Proposals Stage implements the Design Brief and the preparation of additional data. This will include the preparation of a concept design, proposals for structural and building services systems, outline specifications, a preliminary cost plan and a review of the procurement route. 2.1. Update Project Brief The Project Manager will update the Project Brief for the project stage. At this stage the following items should have been considered and finalised: • Operational requirements and any functional relationships • Size of the facility, i.e. physical area • Specific technical requirements, e.g. design life, performance standards, procurement strategy and alignment with framework agreements • Formal communication structure The brief will be submitted to the Project Client for approval – see Update Project Brief. 2.2. Update Control Documentation All the project control documentation will be reviewed and updated during this stage. 2.3. Re-appoint/Confirm Consultant/Project team There will be a requirement to either appoint a new project team or to re-engage the project team from the Project Appraisal Stage. Additional team members from the appraisal stage may also be required – Re- appoint/Confirm Consultant/Project team. 2.4. Value Engineering Value management during the design development stage is termed “Value Engineering”. The objectives are to ascertain elements of the design and specification that add no value to the project in terms of satisfying the brief and objectives of the Council or those which could be provided through another method thus increasing value to the Council – see Value Engineering. 2.5. Whole Life Costing Whole-life costing must be undertaken in accordance with the British and International Standard: BS ISO 15686 – service life planning of buildings and constructed assets. Project Services Team Status: Final Page 14 of 27 Page 14 of 27 Filename: project-management- Author: John London Date of Issue: 03/06/2010 procedures4266.doc Comments:
  • 15. Plymouth City Council Project Management System Project Management Procedures 2.6. RIBA Stage C Report The RIBA Stage C report will enable the sign off of the stage. The RIBA Stage C report will include the following (see RIBA Stage C Report): • Introduction • Architectural • Structural Engineering • Cost • Programme and Planning • Procurement • Risk • Health and safety • Way Forward • Key Performance Indictors • Mechanical & Electrical 2.7. RIBA Stage C Report Sign Off The RIBA Stage C report must be signed off by the Project Board. There must be evidence of stakeholder consultation and agreement with the design proposal. 2.8. Gateway 2 Review This review shall establish that the project scope, objectives and strategy for implementation has been clearly defined in view of risks and regulatory requirements. It provides the Client and Project Director with assurance that the most cost effective approach to implementation has been selected prior to developing the design and entering to commitments with suppliers – see Gateway 2 Review. Objectives of this Gateway • Confirm any updates to the Project Brief document • Ensure any changes made to the project undertaken in value engineering exercises have been communicated to all project stakeholders and duty holders • Ensure the Project Risk Register has been updated • Compliance with Stage C sign-off procedures • Ensure that the project cost plan per the Project Brief/Project Execution Plan is detailed and achievable Project Services Team Status: Final Page 15 of 27 Page 15 of 27 Filename: project-management- Author: John London Date of Issue: 03/06/2010 procedures4266.doc Comments:
  • 16. Plymouth City Council Project Management System Project Management Procedures • Ensure the procurement strategy is appropriate in view of scope, risks and Building Projects experience • Ensure compliance with client’s statutory duties under CDM/Health and Safety Regulations • Ensure the Project Execution Plan is up to date • Production of a Project Programme with date and version reference • Ensure that the project plan as per the Project Brief and Project Execution Plan an is detailed and achievable • Compliance with Monthly Reporting procedures and requirements • Ensure all surveys are complete, relevant and valid • Ensure compliance with any planning requirements • Drawings (including floor naming and room numbering) are produced to Council standards Project Services Team Status: Final Page 16 of 27 Page 16 of 27 Filename: project-management- Author: John London Date of Issue: 03/06/2010 procedures4266.doc Comments:
  • 17. Plymouth City Council Project Management System Project Management Procedures 3. RIBA Stages D – E (Project Design/Development) The Design Development Stage (D) enables the development of the concept design to structural and building services systems, updated outline specifications and cost plan. It also allows the completion of the Project Brief. Once approval has been gained for the Stage D report the planning application can be submitted. The Technical Design Stage (E) enables preparation of technical design(s) and specification sufficient to co- ordinate components and elements of the project and information for statutory standards and construction safety. 3.1. Update Project Brief The Project Manager will update the Project Brief following the previous project stage. At this stage the following items should have been considered and finalised (see Update Project Brief): • Functional layouts • Circulation/Operational Strategy • Phasing/Demolition/Decanting Strategies • Design Concept and Proposed Services Strategy • Procurement Strategy 3.2. Update Project Documentation All the project control documentation will be reviewed and updated during this stage. 3.3. Value Engineering Review Value management during the design development stage is termed “Value Engineering”. The objectives are to ascertain elements of the design and specification that add no value to the project in terms of satisfying the brief and objectives of the Council or those which could be provided through another method thus increasing value to the Council – see Value Engineering. 3.4. Whole Life Costing Review Whole-life costing must be undertaken in accordance with the British and International Standard: BS ISO 15686 – service life planning of buildings and constructed assets. 3.5. RIBA Stage D Detailed Design Report The RIBA Stage D report will enable the sign off of the stage. The RIBA Stage D report will include the following (see RIBA Stage D Detailed Design Report): • Introduction Project Services Team Status: Final Page 17 of 27 Page 17 of 27 Filename: project-management- Author: John London Date of Issue: 03/06/2010 procedures4266.doc Comments:
  • 18. Plymouth City Council Project Management System Project Management Procedures • Architectural • Structural Engineering • Cost • Programme and Planning • Procurement • Risk • Health and safety • Way Forward • Key Performance Indicators • Mechanical & Electrical 3.6. Stage D Detailed Design Report Sign Off The stage D report must be signed off by the Project Board. There must be evidence of stakeholder consultation and agreement with the design. 3.7. Planning Application The full planning application will be made by the Project Manager on behalf of the Client. Details about Planning Applications along with the online form are available at www.plymouth.gov.uk/planningapplications - see Planning Application. 3.8. Value Engineering Review Following the tender return a value engineering review should take place. The objective will be to ascertain any further elements of the design and specification that can be amended or removed without effecting the value to the project in terms of satisfying the brief and objectives of the Council or those which could be provided through another method and increase the value to the Council. A full value engineering exercise maybe required if the tender value exceeds that allowed in the budget – see Value Engineering Review. 3.9. Whole Life Costing Review Whole-life costing must be undertaken in accordance with the British and International Standard: BS ISO 15686 – service life planning of buildings and constructed assets. 3.10.RIBA Stage E Final Design & Cost Report The RIBA Stage E report will enable the sign off of the stage. The RIBA Stage E report will include the following (see RIBA Stage E Final Design & Cost Report): • Introduction • Architectural Project Services Team Status: Final Page 18 of 27 Page 18 of 27 Filename: project-management- Author: John London Date of Issue: 03/06/2010 procedures4266.doc Comments:
  • 19. Plymouth City Council Project Management System Project Management Procedures • Structural Engineering • Cost • Programme and Planning • Procurement • Risk • Health and safety • Way Forward • Key Performance Indicators • Mechanical & Electrical 3.11.Stage E Final Design & Cost Report Sign Off The Stage E report must be signed off by the Project Board. There must be evidence of stakeholder consultation and agreement with the final design. The Project Board will approve the submission of the planning application. 3.12.Gateway 3 Review This review confirms that appropriate design reviews and approvals have been undertaken and that the recommended final proposal is appropriate before entering into the production information stage. It provides assurance over the effectiveness of the design development. This is important to ensure that the final proposal design is cost effective and consistent with Council/user requirements (per Proposals Stage) – see Gateway 3 Review. Objectives of this Gateway • Confirm any updates to the Project Brief • Ensure any changes made to the project undertaken in value engineering exercises have been communicated to all project stakeholders and duty holders • Ensure the Project Risk Register has been updated • Compliance with Stage E sign-off procedures • Ensure that the project cost plan per the Project Brief/Project Execution Plan is detailed and achievable • Ensure compliance with client’s statutory duties under CDM/Health and Safety Regulations • Ensure the Project Execution Plan is up to date • Ensure the Project Programme is updated with date and version reference • Ensure that the project plan as per the Project Brief and Project Execution Plan is detailed and achievable • Compliance with Monthly reporting procedures and requirements • Ensure all surveys are complete, relevant and valid Project Services Team Status: Final Page 19 of 27 Page 19 of 27 Filename: project-management- Author: John London Date of Issue: 03/06/2010 procedures4266.doc Comments:
  • 20. Plymouth City Council Project Management System Project Management Procedures • Ensure compliance with any planning requirements • Drawings (including floor naming and room numbering) are produced to Council standards • Confirm the business case (cost vs. benefits) now that final proposal design is complete • Approved in line with regulatory requirements (including H&S) and Council delegations of authority • Ensure that project controls are in place to manage cost, time and quality in view of risk and change • Ensure approval of the final proposals and decision to proceed to production information by the Client/Project Sponsor • Ensure that timescales for delivery are communicated and integrated with departmental plans. 3.13.Approval to Proceed by Capital Programme Board Once the Stage E Report has been approved by the Capital Programme Board and the project has gone through the Gateway Review 3 then the project is able to proceed to the next stage. Project Services Team Status: Final Page 20 of 27 Page 20 of 27 Filename: project-management- Author: John London Date of Issue: 03/06/2010 procedures4266.doc Comments:
  • 21. Plymouth City Council Project Management System Project Management Procedures 4. RIBA Stages F – H (Production Information and Tender Action) The Production Information Stage (F) is enables the preparation of detailed information for construction and the application for statutory approvals. The Tender Documentation Stage (G) enables the preparation and/or collation of tender documentation in sufficient detail to enable a tender or tenders to be obtained for the project. Tender Action Stage (H) sees the identification and evaluation of potential contractors and/or specialists for the project. At the end of the stage tenders will be obtained and appraised with a clear recommendation submitted to the client for approval. 4.1. Forward Plan For projects greater then £500K in value a forward plan template must be prepared and submitted to notify the public and Councillors that a key decision will be required in the near future. This will be undertaken by the Portfolio Manager. Approval of the Forward Plan is required by the relevant Cabinet Member before the Forward Plan is published. Cabinet will not approve any requests to enter into contract unless a Forward Plan has been previously submitted at the appropriate time – see Forward Plan. 4.2. Update Project Documentation All the project control documentation will be reviewed and updated during this stage. 4.3. Tender Process for Contractor The tender process must comply with all PCC Financial Regulations and OJEU requirements as applicable. Advice and approval should be sort from PCC Procurement Team and all required PCC Processes followed. In addition the procurement method will need to be approved by the Project Services Manager before commencement. 4.4. Value Engineering Review Following the tender return a value engineering review should take place. The objective will be to ascertain any further elements of the design and specification that can be amended or removed without effecting the value to the project in terms of satisfying the brief and objectives of the Council or those which could be provided through another method and increase the value to the Council. A full value engineering exercise maybe required if the tender value exceeds that allowed in the budget – see Value Engineering Review. Project Services Team Status: Final Page 21 of 27 Page 21 of 27 Filename: project-management- Author: John London Date of Issue: 03/06/2010 procedures4266.doc Comments:
  • 22. Plymouth City Council Project Management System Project Management Procedures 4.5. Whole Life Costing Review Whole-life costing must be undertaken in accordance with the British and International Standard: BS ISO 15686 – service life planning of buildings and constructed assets. 4.6. Update Capital Programme Business Case The Business Case is used continuously to align the projects progress to the business objectives and at this stage will be updated to reflect the tender return – see Update Capital Programme Business Case. 4.7. Prepare Contract Documentation The contract documentation should start to be prepared and put in place ready for the Gateway 4 Review. The Portfolio Manager will liaise with the PCC Legal Team to prepare the contract. The Capital Programme Approval Form needs to be fully approved before the contract can be signed and the Contractor appointed. 4.8. Gateway 4 Review This review confirms that appropriate design review and approvals have been undertaken and that the recommended contract decision (for construction works only contracts) is appropriate before entering into contract. It provides assurance over the effectiveness of the design development and tendering process (as appropriate). This is important to ensure that the implemented design is cost effective and consistent with Council/user requirements (per Proposals Stage) – see Gateway 4 Review. Objectives of this Gateway • Confirm the Business Case (cost vs. benefits) now that design is complete • Obtain additional authorisation for increased spend (as appropriate) using Change Request Form/CPAF • Confirm that tenders have been properly evaluated and the recommended contract decision is cost effective and • Approved in line with regulatory requirements (including H&S) and Council delegations of authority • Ensure that project controls are in place to manage cost, time and quality in view of risk and change • Ensure approval of the detail design and decision to proceed to Construction Stage by the Client/Project Sponsor • Ensure that timescales for delivery are communicated • Departmental plans 4.9. Capital Programme Approval Form The Capital Programme Approval Form must be completed by the Portfolio Manager and all required approvals identified within the document obtained before contracts can be signed and the Contractor Appointed – see Capital Programme Approval Form. Project Services Team Status: Final Page 22 of 27 Page 22 of 27 Filename: project-management- Author: John London Date of Issue: 03/06/2010 procedures4266.doc Comments:
  • 23. Plymouth City Council Project Management System Project Management Procedures Project Services Team Status: Final Page 23 of 27 Page 23 of 27 Filename: project-management- Author: John London Date of Issue: 03/06/2010 procedures4266.doc Comments:
  • 24. Plymouth City Council Project Management System Project Management Procedures 5. RIBA Stages J – K (Construction) The Mobilisation Stage (J) enables the letting of the building contract and the main contractor to be appointed, the issuing of information and arrangement site hand over to them. Construction to Practical Completion Stage (K) enables the administration of the building contract to practical completion, provision to the contractor of further information as and when reasonably required and review of information provided by contractors to specialists 5.1. Appoint Main Contractor A contract signed by both the Contractor and relevant PCC signatories must be in place before any works can commence on site. Appointment of the main contractor requires approval and sign-off by the Project Services Manager before taking place. Only in exceptional circumstances will letters of intent be approved to enable certain elements of work or orders placed for products to commence prior to the contract being signed. Once this is complete the site should be handed over to the contractor – see Appoint Main Contractor. 5.2. Update Project Documentation All the project control documentation will be reviewed and updated during this stage. 5.3. Mobilisation and Construction Throughout the Construction Period the Project Manager will continue to provide Monthly Reports to the Portfolio Manager and Project Board. The Project Manager will also organise and report monthly site progress meetings to the Portfolio Manager. Using the monthly reporting and site progress reports the Portfolio Manager will track the progress of the project ensuring the Project Manager has tight control of the project. They will ensure all certified payments are made within the required time scales and will monitor the overall budget using a PCC internal Budget Monitoring Spreadsheet, collecting data on both external and internal costs to the project. 5.4. Testing and Commissioning The Project Manager will ensure that a detailed programme for testing and commissioning is prepared (approx two months before handover), communicated and undertaken prior to Handover. This must include the training of the relevant “Person In Control” of the property. Project Services Team Status: Final Page 24 of 27 Page 24 of 27 Filename: project-management- Author: John London Date of Issue: 03/06/2010 procedures4266.doc Comments:
  • 25. Plymouth City Council Project Management System Project Management Procedures 5.5. Project Handover The Project Manager will ensure a detailed handover programme is prepared (two weeks prior to handover), communicated and undertaken. The Project Manager will ensure the Portfolio Manager, End User and Clerk of Works attend the Handover meeting. The practical completion certificate will be signed and issued by the Project Manager on successful completion of the handover. 5.6. Review Capital Programme Business Case The Capital Programme Business Case must be reviewed to assess its alignment with the business objectives and to identify any required actions – see Review Capital Programme Business Case. 5.7. Gateway 5 Review This review focuses on ensuring that the project delivers the outcome defined in the Statement of Need and Strategic Brief/Business Case. It provides assurance that the deliverables are satisfactory and capable of being properly put into service to achieve the stated benefits – see Gateway 5 Review. Objectives of this Gateway • Ensure that the contract records are up to date • Ensure that the construction works are properly tested and accepted prior to final payment • Check that the business case remains valid and the project shall provide the stated benefits • Ensure that handover is properly controlled • Ensure that risks and issues are properly managed during construction and reflected in revised contingency levels • Ensure that necessary testing is done (including user acceptance) • Ensure that appropriate arrangements are in place for maintenance and operation following handover. Project Services Team Status: Final Page 25 of 27 Page 25 of 27 Filename: project-management- Author: John London Date of Issue: 03/06/2010 procedures4266.doc Comments:
  • 26. Plymouth City Council Project Management System Project Management Procedures 6. RIBA Stage L (Post Construction) 6.1. End Project Report This report is the Project Manager's report to the SRO on how well the project has performed against the Project Brief, including the original planned cost, schedule and risk allowances, the revised business case and final version of the project plan – see End Project Report. 6.2. Final Account and Cost Analaysis The final account should be agreed and signed off within three months of practical completion. The cost manager will undertake a full cost analysis on the final contract figures and report accordingly. 6.3. Post Occupancy Review A Post Occupational Review must be carried out when the facility has been in use for long enough to determine whether the business benefits have been achieved (typically, twelve months after completion and while the change is still recent enough for users to be aware of the impact of the change). This review establishes: • whether the expected business benefits have been achieved from the investment in the facility, as justified in the business case. • if lessons learned from the business-focused aspects of the project will lead to recommendations for improvements in performance on future projects. As a minimum this review will assess: • the achievement of business case objectives to date • whole life costs and benefits to date against those forecast, and other benefits realised and expected continued alignment to the business strategy • the effectiveness of improved business operations (which may include functions, processes and staff numbers) • ways of maximising benefits and minimising whole-life cost and risk • the sensitivity of the business service to expected business change business and user satisfaction. • There should be regular post implementation reviews over the operational life of the facility. These reviews are essential inputs to Gate 6 Review. 6.4. Gateway 6 Review Project Services Team Status: Final Page 26 of 27 Page 26 of 27 Filename: project-management- Author: John London Date of Issue: 03/06/2010 procedures4266.doc Comments:
  • 27. Plymouth City Council Project Management System Project Management Procedures This Review focuses on ensuring that the project achieves the benefits identified in the Business Case. This review shall be undertaken within six to twelve months following project handover or when evidence of the in-service benefits is available. It must align with the Post Occupancy Review and use the information gathered at that review – see Gateway 6 Review. Objectives of this Gateway Assess whether the justification for the project, per the business case, was realistic. Assess whether the planned benefits are now being delivered. Ensure that any on-going contract services meet user/Council requirements and plans are in place to manage the contract to its conclusion. 6.5. Project File Closed The project file with then be brought to a close and the PCC Programme Support Officer will ensure that the file is appropriately archived – see Project File Closed. Project Services Team Status: Final Page 27 of 27 Page 27 of 27 Filename: project-management- Author: John London Date of Issue: 03/06/2010 procedures4266.doc Comments: