PROJECT MANAGEMENT FRAMEWORK

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PROJECT MANAGEMENT FRAMEWORK

  1. 1. PROJECT MANAGEMENT FRAMEWORK Guidebook for Project Boards, Project Managers, and Project Teams August 1999 Version 1.0 Qx372PMF1 12/23/99 2:36 PM Page i
  2. 2. Foreword .................................................................................................................. v Acknowledgements.................................................................................................. vi 1 Introduction ................................................................................................ 1 1.1 Why should I use the PMF? ..................................................................... 4 1.2 Using this Guidebook ............................................................................... 5 1.3 Using the PMF Database ............................................................................ 6 1.4 Overview Diagram ..................................................................................... 8 1.5 Project Sizing .............................................................................................. 10 2 ITO Model ........................................................................................................ 15 3 Project Governance Model ........................................................................ 19 4 Project Boards Guide .................................................................................. 23 4.1 About the Project Board .............................................................................. 25 4.1.1 Purpose ............................................................................................. 25 4.1.2 Membership ...................................................................................... 25 4.2 Role and Responsibilities of the Project Board ...................................... 26 4.3 Role and Responsibilities of Individual Project Board Members ........... 27 4.4 Project Board Charter ................................................................................ 28 4.5 Project Board Meetings ............................................................................. 30 4.6 Project Board Status Reports .................................................................... 31 5 Project Managers Guide ............................................................................ 33 5.1 Role and Responsibilities of the Project Manager .................................. 35 5.2 Starting a Project ........................................................................................ 36 5.2.1 Project Proposal ............................................................................. 36 5.2.2 Project Initiation ............................................................................. 37 5.3 Managing a Project .................................................................................... 39 5.3.1 Phase Management Activities ........................................................ 39 5.3.2 Project Control ............................................................................... 41 5.3.3 Ongoing Project Management ...................................................... 42 5.3.4 Project Reporting ........................................................................... 43 5.4 Finishing a Project ..................................................................................... 45 Training courses relating to Project Management and the ABS Project Management Framework are available. The following courses are currently running: Course Details: y Project Management Techniques – 3 days. y Project Management Introduction – 1 day (this is the first day of the 3–day course). y Project Managers Workbench (PMW) – 2 days. ABS officers who would like to attend one of these courses should complete a training nomination form on the ABS Forms database. Copyright Information Where not otherwise explicitly stated, the content of the ABS Project Management Framework and related products remain the sole copyright of the Commonwealth of Australia. Feedback Feedback on the content of this guidebook can be sent via the ‘feedback’ button (available in both forms and views) in the ABS PMF database. Ordering Guidebooks To order additional copies or newer versions of this guidebook please email your request to Centre of Project Excellence WDB. iiiii Training Information Contents Qx372PMF1 12/23/99 2:36 PM Page ii
  3. 3. This Guidebook for the ABS Project Management Framework (PMF) is designed to provide basic information and assistance to project leaders throughout the ABS. It is a summarised version of the more detailed material contained in the ABS PMF Notes database. It should be seen as a ready reference guide for anyone who has responsibility for managing a project whether it be large or small. The Guidebook complements the ABS PMF Notes database. In particular it is an easy to understand explanation of the key issues, events and processes project leaders should keep in mind when they are preparing for and managing tasks, especially tasks which are time critical and involve the delivery of cost-effective quality results. How many projects have you heard about that don’t come in on time and on budget? By using this Guidebook as a management tool, it will help you bring additional rigour and best practice to your project management skills. The Guidebook is not meant to be a panacea, but it will help you to avoid the chaos which often occurs when projects are not planned for and managed as well as they ought to be. Users of these guidelines are invited to comment on their application so that improvements and any changes can be reflected in future versions of the PMF. The PMF is a significant corporate initiative and has been developed to sustain the reputation of the ABS as a world class national statistical agency. We are delighted to be able to release this Guidebook. We also acknowledge the excellent work of the project leader Adrian Paviour and the assistance of John Smyrk of Sigma Management Science Pty Ltd. Graham Wauchop First Assistant Statistician Corporate Services Division 6 Project Teams Guide .................................................................................... 47 6.1 Role and Responsibilities of the Project Team ........................................ 49 6.1.1 Project Administrator ...................................................................... 49 6.1.2 Change Manager ............................................................................. 50 6.1.3 Issues Manager ................................................................................ 51 6.1.4 Risk Manager ................................................................................... 51 6.1.5 Quality Manager .............................................................................. 52 6.2 Project Team Management Meetings ....................................................... 54 6.3 Reporting to the Project Manager ............................................................ 55 7 PMF Categories ............................................................................................... 57 7.1 Introduction ................................................................................................ 59 7.2 Project Planning .......................................................................................... 60 7.3 Project Administration ................................................................................ 62 7.4 Management of Risk ................................................................................... 64 7.5 Management of Issues ................................................................................ 65 7.6 Management of Change ............................................................................. 66 7.7 Project Quality ............................................................................................ 67 7.8 Project Financial Management ................................................................... 69 7.9 Project Governance .................................................................................... 71 8 Glossary .......................................................................................................... 73 9 Index ............................................................................................................. 79 viv Contents (continued) Foreword Foreword Qx372PMF1 12/23/99 2:36 PM Page iv
  4. 4. Guidebook for Project Boards, Project Managers and Project Teams Co-authored by Adrian Paviour and John Smyrk Edited and revised by Deborah Dwyer Designed and typeset by Theresa Pattugalan Produced by the Australian Bureau of Statistics Acknowledgments The Project Management Framework (PMF) could not have been developed without the help of many teams and individuals. The PMF Team would like to thank every person involved in the PMF, especially those who applied and commented on the framework. In particular, many thanks go to the following people for their contributions: 1. PMF Project Board – Dave Bennison, Rob Edwards and Graham Wauchop. 2. Organisational and People Development (OPD) – Bob Keenan, Michael Hirschfeld and Ivan Kenna. 3. PMF Advisers Group – Patrick Corr, Bruce Green, Ivan Kenna, Ken Tallis, Ian McInnes, Mike Raine and Mike Kulmar. 4. Household Surveys Facilities (HSF) – Fred Wensing, Bruce Green, HSF Project Board and HSF Project Team. In preparing this document a number of sources have been drawn on including: Guidelines for Project Management,Version 2.2, 22nd September 1997: © 1997 Crown Copyright. Publisher & Editor: Information Strategy Unit, Department of Premier and Cabinet (Tasmania). Produced in cooperation with Corporate Information Projects Unit. vi Acknowledgements 1 1. Introduction Qx372PMF1 12/23/99 2:36 PM Page vi
  5. 5. 1.1 Why should I use the PMF? 1.2 Using this Guidebook 1.3 Using the PMF Database 1.4 Overview Diagram 1.5 Project Sizing 2 1. Introduction IntroductionIntroduction The aim of the ABS Project Management Framework (PMF) project is to implement a framework that supports effective project management practices in the ABS. The PMF provides a consistent method of project management that can be adopted by, and individually tailored to, all projects in the ABS. The framework is substantial and concentrates on putting all the information into a form that is usable by ABS staff, and usable in the ABS context. The PMF includes theoretical information, examples, templates and more to assist in the management of a project. The framework should be used by all managers in the ABS. This does not imply that the PMF will hold solutions to every single project management problem, but it should be sufficient to act as a starting point. The majority of ABS projects will be able to use the PMF to some extent. The size of a project can tell you how much of the framework should be applied. For more information see 1.5 Project Sizing (p.10). The Framework is available in a number of formats: y a project management manual y a knowledge repository database y this guidebook for project boards, managers and team members The project management manual is a folder of selected information from the PMF database. The manual includes the theory supporting the framework and an outline of procedures and methodology used for managing projects. The manual is a once only production—it will not be updated. For the most current information, the PMF Database is the best source. The project management manual can be reprinted on request and the convenient folder format allows for the addition of more current information. The PMF Database will be described in 1.3 Using the PMF Database (p.6) and this guide- book will be further explained in 1.2 Using this Guidebook (p.5). 3Introduction 1. Introduction Qx372PMF1 12/23/99 2:36 PM Page 2
  6. 6. Guidebook Versions This guidebook is reviewed regularly. Each guidebook has a version number printed on the front cover. Additional copies or newer versions of this guidebook can be obtained by emailing your request to Centre of Project Excellence WDB. Guidebook Structure This guidebook is divided into 5 major areas: y General Information y Project Boards Guide y Project Managers Guide y Project Teams Guide y PMF Categories ‘General Information’ includes the articles in this chapter, the index and the glossary, but is mainly about the ITO Model (Chapter 2) and the Project Governance Model (Chapter 3). These models are important to all people involved in a project as they provide informa- tion on how the project is approached and structured and how each role fits in to the project. Each of the ‘Guides’ contain information targeted towards the subject of that guide (eg. the Project Board Guide is written to be read by project board members). However, everyone is encouraged to read all sections of the guidebook, even if the section is not specifically directed towards them. All members of a project should be aware of where they fit into the project and what each member’s role is. For example, while project team members probably won’t be going to project board meetings, it will be important for them to know what happens at such meetings and how their work will contribute. Each Guide contains a section on Roles and Responsibilities and explains the tasks involved. The Guides also provide advice on how to go about these tasks. The PMF Categories chapter outlines the main requirements for projects in managing a particular area of work (eg. Risk). Each section in the PMF Categories chapter represents a category used in the PMF database to group documents, templates and examples relating to that topic. One of the questions the team was often asked during the development of the ABS Project Management Framework was ‘Why is a project management framework required?’. Many people noted that the ABS is a world-renowned producer of statistics and so we must be doing a lot of things right. This is certainly true with regard to the ongo- ing production of quality statistics, but our business projects require some attention. Business projects are those projects that are essentially one-off and lead to some form of change in the organisation or to the service we provide to our customers. The ABS has never done any detailed study of its performance in business project work so there is little concrete evidence to back up concerns. However, there is enough qualitative evidence to say that one or more of the following apply to most projects: ‘Spends much more money that originally planned’ ‘Takes far longer than required or planned’ ‘Strays from initial objectives for outcomes and levels of quality’ The ABS Project Management Framework aims to develop a culture in which ABS staff are more aware of project requirements and constraints, and are provided with effective knowledge and tools to ensure that project parameters are controlled and targets are met. The benefits of good project management are extensive. The following are just a few: y better control of projects (resources and scope) by project managers and ABS executive officers; y increased identification and control of project risks; y improved management of project information; y more effective use of corporate funds through control of budgeting elements; y quality is built into project outputs rather than as an afterthought; y improved information flow to project stakeholders; y more predictable project results; y earlier identification and resolution of problems; y improved team morale through clearer project focus. 54 1.1 Why should I use the PMF? Introduction Introduction 1.2 Using this Guidebook Qx372PMF1 12/23/99 2:36 PM Page 4
  7. 7. The PMF database has ten options: Announcements – this view contains documents which tell users about important changes to the framework or to the PMF database. It is the default view when enter- ing the database. Unread documents are marked in red with a star alongside. My Bookmarks – this view stores any documents that have been ‘bookmarked’ by the current user. For information on bookmarking see “How do I Bookmark Documents” in the ‘How do I...?’ view. PMF Overview – this option launches an interactive diagram that gives a general overview of the framework. Objects in the diagram can be clicked on for more information on that object. Tell me about... – this view displays the framework grouped by PMF Categories. Documents are sub-categorised by document type (such as template, article etc). This view is useful for finding all the theory, templates and other information on a particular topic. How do I...? – this view contains Road Maps (which provide a set of steps for carrying out an activity) and Help documents (which answer various questions). The ‘How Do I...?’ view can also be sorted by category by selecting the ‘Sort by Category’ option from the action bar. Step By Step – this view shows documents that explain how to run a project from start to finish. References – this view shows references that contain further information on project management. Books, journals, videos and websites are included. Glossary – this view contains basic glossary entries explaining terms used in the PMF as well as highlighting synonyms for PMF terms. Synonyms point to the preferred term for usage. Index – all the documents in the PMF are indexed. This view groups all the docu- ments by the keywords used to index them. This view is very useful for finding a specific document or piece of information. Exit ABS PMF – this option closes the PMF database. For more help... For more help on using the PMF Database see ‘Using This Database’ and ‘About This Database’ in the Help menu or the document ‘How do I Start in the PMF?’ in the ‘How do I...?’ view. The ABS Project Management Framework (PMF) is a Lotus Notes database that acts as a knowledge base of information about project management. Accessing the PMF Database To access the ABS Project Management Framework database you should open the Notes Database Catalog (available to all ABS Notes users under the ‘Information’ tab on your Notes workspace). Find the entry for ‘ABS Project Management Framework’ and select the document for server NotesACT04. Press the ‘Add Icon’ button on the action bar and return to the Notes Workspace. The ABS Project Management Framework database will now be shown on your Workspace. Inside the PMF Database If you are opening the PMF database for the first time you will be presented with an ‘About This Database’ document that describes the PMF and the PMF database. It is helpful to read this document for information on where to start with the database and for details about the framework. After closing the ‘About This Database’ document, the PMF database will be displayed. The PMF database uses a navigator to help you find your way around (see picture). Each option on the navigator either opens a view or per- forms an action. When a particular option is selected that option will become highlighted in the navigator. In the picture shown, the ‘My Bookmarks’ view is currently selected. To access a navigator option click on the required option with your mouse. 76 1.3 Using the PMF Database Introduction Introduction 1.3 Using the PMF Database (continued) Qx372PMF1 12/23/99 2:36 PM Page 6
  8. 8. The PMF Overview Diagram illustrates the typical life-cycle and structure of a project. This diagram is used and referred to extensively in the PMF and appears as an interactive diagram in the PMF database (each object can be clicked on with the mouse for further information). The left column of the diagram (headed How Do I?) divides a project into three stages— How Do I... 1...Start a New Project 2...Manage a Project 3...Finish a Project The middle column expands on the three stages of a project with the Project Management Life-Cycle. The Life-Cycle divides a project into phases: y Project Proposal – where the project idea is developed and approved (or rejected). y Project Initiation – the initial planning and mapping out of the project. y Work phases – where the actual project work is done and managed using the Phase Management Life-Cycle: Initiate, Plan, Organise, Control, and Close. y Output Delivery – the physical outputs of a project are delivered to the client. y Outcome Delivery – the aims that the project was designed to achieve are realised. The middle column also includes a box titled: ‘How Big is My Project?’. The PMF can be used to varying degrees depending on the size of your project. For more information see 1.5 Project Sizing (p.10). The final column describes a project in terms of PMF categories. Each category represents a major area of project management work. Project Planning is mainly concerned with the start of a project, or the proposal and initiation phases. Project Administration is concerned with managing and finishing a project. The other categories (Management of Risk, Management of Issues, Management of Change, Project Quality, Project Financial Management, and Project Governance) are areas that require ongoing attention throughout the life of a project. 98 1.4 Overview Diagram Introduction Introduction 1.4 Overview Diagram (continued) Start a New Project Manage a Project Finish a Project Management of Risk Management of Issues Management of Change Project Quality Project Financial Management Project Governance ProjectPlanningProjectAdministration The project is proposed The project is fully defined and set up Phase Management Life Cycle is used to manage the work Outputs are delivered to client Outcomes are realised by client Initiate Plan Organise Control Close Project Proposal Project Initiation Phase 1 Phase n Output Delivery Outcome Delivery How do I? PMF CategoriesProject Management Life–Cycle How big is my project? Size determines the extent to which PMF activities need to be carried out. Qx372PMF1 12/23/99 2:36 PM Page 8
  9. 9. After using the table, make appropriate allowances for other (qualitative) factors and adjust your answer (the size of your project) accordingly. Record all assumptions made during this decision process. After the size of your project is decided, you can determine the project management activity required. There are two factors to consider for project management activity—whether the activity needs to be done (requirement) and to what extent the activity should be under- taken (scale). Requirement is either ‘optional’ or ‘mandatory’. If the requirement is mandatory, the work must be done. If the requirement is optional, it is recommended that the work be done, but it is not mandatory. A decision not to undertake project management work should be based on a logical reason. If there is any doubt, the work should be done. Scale is either ‘brief’ or ‘detailed’. Detailed implies a rigid, formal approach be followed. Brief covers all other cases. You should only use this table as a guide and always take other relevant factors into account before making a final decision about which project work is going to be done (and to what extent). The result of this process should be a clearly defined and accepted agreement as to how the project will be managed and the level of detail and discipline that will be employed. Examples 1. A project is to be set up to design, develop and release a new computer system for the National Widgets Survey. The project manager is an EXEC1 (SOC) in the Subject Matter Area, with one part-time staff member. The envisaged system is a clone of an One of the major problems facing any project manager is the extent to which project management elements (such as management of issues, or management of risk) should be applied, and the level of detail in any of those elements. It is not appropriate for all projects to do all project management activities to the same level of detail and with the same level of discipline. This section outlines issues to consider when deciding how much of the framework you are going to use. This section is for guidance only and contains no hard and fast rules. After taking the following discussion into account, the project manager still has to make a decision on how to manage the project in the most suitable way for the problem being addressed. The first step is to determine the size of the project. Projects can be assessed against the following criteria to give an idea of project size. If your project meets two or more of the criteria in the ‘Large’ column then the project should be considered large. If the project is not large, but meets four or more of the ‘Medium’ (or higher) criteria then the project should be considered medium. Otherwise, the project should be considered small. 1110 1.5 Project Sizing Introduction Introduction 1.5 Project Sizing (continued) Project Size Small Medium Large Staff Numbers 1–2 2–5 5+ Elapsed Time < 3 months 3–6 months 7+ months Complexity Easily understood Difficult to understand Both problem and problem and solution either problem solution difficult or solution to define or understand. Strategic Importance Internal interest only Some direct business Affects core ABS impact service delivery Total Cost < $50K $50K–$500K $500K+ Level of Change Impacts few people Impacts many people Impacts whole ABS Staff Skill Level Staff have required Staff have some Staff have none of the skills required skills required skills Dependencies1 No major Some major Major high-risk dependencies dependencies dependencies considered low-risk 1 Other projects providing inputs or services to the project. 3rd party providers are a major dependency. Internal ABS providers may or may not be a major dependency. Project Size Small Medium Large Business Case Mandatory/Brief Mandatory/Detailed Mandatory/Detailed Vision Optional/Brief Optional/Brief Mandatory/Detailed Risk Optional/Brief Mandatory/Detailed Mandatory/Detailed Issues Optional/Brief Mandatory/Brief Mandatory/Detailed Change Optional/Brief Mandatory/Detailed Mandatory/Detailed Linkages Optional/Brief Mandatory/Brief Mandatory/Detailed Process Mandatory/Brief Mandatory/Detailed Mandatory/Detailed Project Management Activities Project Sizing Criteria Qx372PMF1 12/23/99 2:36 PM Page 10
  10. 10. 3. A new survey, the Survey of Motor Vehicle Colours, is to be designed and implement- ed. The survey will piggy-back on other ABS collections but will require a complex but innovative sampling methodology to be developed by Methodology Division. The team of two has five months to develop the collection. A mapping of the project to the size table could result in: On this mapping, the project should be considered a medium project, despite the complexity of the sampling methodology. 4. Prior to despatch to the Census Data Processing Centre (DPC), the completed census forms for the Northern Territory are soaked in an unexpected downpour that flooded the local collection centre. The forms can no longer be read by the machines at the DPC. A decision is made to transcribe all forms onto new forms. Fifty staff are recruit- ed to perform the transcription as the work has to be done in three weeks. The mapping for this project could result in: existing system and only one programmer is required. The project is due for comple- tion in three months. The budget for the project is based on two and a half staff for three months. A mapping of the project to the size table could result in: On this mapping, the project should be considered a small project. 2. A project is set up to investigate the implications of re-designing the Business Register to implement the recently released International Business Register Framework model. The model is a complex and radical rethink of the ABS’ Register strategy and needs careful consideration. A team of five is to be used, representing key stakeholders. Four months is scheduled for the investigation. A mapping of the project to the size table could result in: On this mapping, the project should be considered a large project. As this project is an investigation, little change will result. If the investigation ends by recommending change to the Business Register, a new project will need to be started. 1312 1.5 Project Sizing (continued) Introduction Introduction 1.5 Project Sizing (continued) Project Size Small Medium Large Staff Numbers Elapsed Time Complexity Strategic Importance Total Cost Level of Change Staff Skill Level Dependencies Project Size Small Medium Large Staff Numbers Elapsed Time Complexity Strategic Importance Total Cost Level of Change Staff Skill Level Dependencies Example 1—Project Sizing Example 3—Project Sizing Example 4—Project Sizing Example 2—Project Sizing Project Size Small Medium Large Staff Numbers Elapsed Time Complexity Strategic Importance Total Cost Level of Change Staff Skill Level Dependencies Project Size Small Medium Large Staff Numbers Elapsed Time Complexity Strategic Importance Total Cost Level of Change Staff Skill Level Dependencies Qx372PMF1 12/23/99 2:36 PM Page 12
  11. 11. 2 2. ITO Model Although this project would be considered a small one using the sizing table, the numbers of staff involved indicate that this is a project that should be treated as a large project (many project problems are related to people problems). This is an example of a situation where specific project requirements need to be taken into account to override the initial sizing assessment. 1.5 Project Sizing (continued) Introduction14 Qx372PMF1 12/23/99 2:36 PM Page 14
  12. 12. The traditional view of a project often focuses more on the outputs (deliverables) of the project rather than the objectives the project is supposed to achieve by using the outputs. The Inputs Transformation Outcomes (ITO) model allows projects to be defined with the outcomes (or objectives) in mind. The ITO model requires clear specification of project outcomes as an initial step. Outputs are then planned to address one or more outcomes. The work of the project can then be planned to produce outputs, and estimates can be made for the resources (or inputs) to do the work. Starting anywhere other than with the outcomes is likely to lead to project failure to some degree. The arrows in the diagram reflect the way that project work flows—from left to right. Resources are given to the project, the project does the work, it delivers outputs and outcomes are generated. However, it is important to note that when planning a project the thought process should run from right to left. Planning should always focus on the outcomes first. What outcomes are needed? What outputs are needed to achieve those outcomes? What work is needed to produce the outputs? What resources are needed to do the work? The major elements of the ITO Model are: y Outcomes: the results, changes and effects that the project aims to achieve. y Business Utilisation: the process of stakeholders using the outputs to generate outcomes. y Outputs: the physical deliverables of the project such as computer systems, reports, or a new building. y Project: the total set of activities and tasks required to convert inputs into outputs. The actual work being done. y Inputs: the resources directed into a project (both physical and intellectual), including money, people, data etc. Example Consider a project that is developing a new forms processing system. The Outcomes that the project may hope to achieve could be greater efficiency and accuracy of forms handling and savings in staff resources and time. The Business Utilisation would be the stakeholders actually using outputs such as a com- puter system, documentation and training to achieve the outcomes defined by the project. The main Output from the project would be a computer system, but could also include other items such as specifications, user documentation, and training strategies and programs. The Project would involve developing the actual system, an implementation strategy, training programs and management of the development, programming and reporting. The Inputs to this project would be the staff, money, intellectual effort, computers, phones and possibly hardware for the processing system (plus a whole lot more). 1716 2. ITO Model ITO Model ITO Model 2 ITO Model (continued) Business Utilisation Planning and Thinking Outputs Doing I N P U T S Outcomes HR $ Project Qx372PMF1 12/23/99 2:36 PM Page 16
  13. 13. 18 3 3. Project Governance Model Qx372PMF1 12/23/99 2:36 PM Page 18
  14. 14. The project governance model provides a structure within which a project can be managed. It defines stakeholders, the relationships they have with each other, and their roles and responsibilities within the project. A project governance model should be created at the start of the project by the project manager and should be approved by the project board (as part of the business case). The model can be adjusted to suit the size and complexity of the project. The project governance model includes the following roles: y Corporate Investor – a senior member of the ABS Executive (usually FAS or Group Head) responsible for the organisational grouping in which the project is being managed. y Project Board – a group of officers who will oversee the conduct and progress of the project. y Project Owner – the officer responsible for the project within the executive structure. In many ABS projects this would correspond to an Assistant Statistician. y Project Manager – the officer assigned to manage the conduct of the project. Project Governance Model y Project Team – a number of ABS officers working on a specific project for the majority of their time. y Team Leaders – in large projects, the project may be divided into a number of teams which require team leaders or senior staff to supervise and represent the team. y Business Unit (BU) Customers – the stakeholder groups that will receive the output from the project and who are responsible for the generation of project outcomes. This could be interpreted as the ‘users’ or ‘clients’. y Quality Adviser – the quality adviser will review project deliverables and the conduct of the project against agreed standards and report to the project board. y Specialist Groups – internal or external groups providing specialist expertise or services to the project. y Consultants – any people outside the project team who are contracted to provide the project with a specialist service or advice. 21Project Governance Model 3. Project Governance Model (continued) 20 3. Project Governance Model Project Board Team A Team Leader Team Members Quality Adviser Corporate Investor Project Owner Project Manager BU Customers Specialist Groups Consultants Project Team Project Administrator Change Manager Issues Manager Risk Manager Quality Manager Team B Team Leader Team Members Qx372PMF1 12/23/99 2:36 PM Page 20
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