Your SlideShare is downloading. ×
Policy for Project Management
Upcoming SlideShare
Loading in...5
×

Thanks for flagging this SlideShare!

Oops! An error has occurred.

×
Saving this for later? Get the SlideShare app to save on your phone or tablet. Read anywhere, anytime – even offline.
Text the download link to your phone
Standard text messaging rates apply

Policy for Project Management

496
views

Published on


0 Comments
0 Likes
Statistics
Notes
  • Be the first to comment

  • Be the first to like this

No Downloads
Views
Total Views
496
On Slideshare
0
From Embeds
0
Number of Embeds
0
Actions
Shares
0
Downloads
5
Comments
0
Likes
0
Embeds 0
No embeds

Report content
Flagged as inappropriate Flag as inappropriate
Flag as inappropriate

Select your reason for flagging this presentation as inappropriate.

Cancel
No notes for slide

Transcript

  • 1. Policy for Project Management Overview Effective project management is crucial to the success of HCS Training Centers, Ltd. Project management involves the following. Team management The project manager needs to develop skills that create an efficient production system and a coop- erative and effective team culture. Communication management Communication enables interaction between project stakeholders, the development team, the client and senior management. Risk management Risk management includes strategies and tactics used to identify and avoid project risks. Configuration management This includes a change control procedure and a file naming convention. Quality management Quality management includes the activities and techniques used to ensure that all project activities and work products comply with all relevant standards, procedures and requirements. Time management Project time management includes the processes and techniques used to ensure the timely comple- tion of the project. Cost management Project cost management includes the processes used to ensure that the project is completed within the approved budget. Information Team management Technology Team management includes all the processes that will be engaged to identify, secure and maintain an effective project team. The Team management plan may include sections on these topics: Staffing When, how and from where project staff will be obtained, assigned to and taken off the project team. Team structure Team roles and responsibilities. Team communication How and when the team will communicate including meetings, minutes, email, individual work docu- mentation, project documentation.
  • 2. Information Technology Policy for Project Management Team building The activities to be performed by management and team members, as a group or individually, to improve team performance. Conflict resolution The procedures for resolving conflict between team members, and between the team and other project stakeholders. Performance appraisals The techniques and activities that will be used to review group and individual performance. Training The formal and informal activities that will be undertaken to enhance the skills and knowledge of the project team. A successful team unleashes tremendous synergy and become far greater than the sum of its parts. The difference between successful and unsuccessful project performance can often be linked to the effectiveness of the team process. This includes the processes that transform a group of people into an effective team as well as the continuous activities throughout the project that maintain and sup- port the team and the team skills of members. Communication management Communication management includes the techniques and activities (processes, format, frequency and quality) that will be used to meet the reporting and communication requirements of all project stakeholders. Effective reporting and communication will ensure that the stakeholders gain and maintain a clear understanding of the products, the methods, and responsibilities aiding or inhibit- ing the project, and the project’s progress. The communication strategy may include weekly project team meetings and weekly project status reports that communicate project progress (including risks, schedule and budget status) to project stakeholders and to the development team, client and senior management. Risk management Risk management includes strategies and tactics that will be used to identify, and avoid or mitigate the project risks throughout the life cycle of a project. This may be a self-contained risk manage- ment plan on large or risky projects or may be a section or appendix of the project plan. Risks generally come from three principal sources: Business risks Risks originating from the client and the target environment. Project risks Risks originating from the team and the team environment of these actions.
  • 3. Information Technology Policy for Project Management Technical risks Risks originating from the system complexity, and other aspects of the technology and environment of application. A common strategy for risk management is to use a matrix, the top ten risk matrix, in which the team documents the top ten risk factors; rates these risks ( high, medium or low), identifies and documents mitigation strategies, and tracks progress of these strategies. Configuration management Each project component is produced in various stages or versions. A significant challenge is to en- sure that you can identify each component, as well as different versions of the same component, to ensure that different ‘builds’ of the product incorporate the right version of the components. This is achieved through effective configuration management, which includes a change control pro- cedure and a file naming convention. The configuration management procedures and techniques are determined as part of project plan development during the definition phase and are carried out as an ongoing project management activities. The configuration plan aims to establish and maintain the integrity of all the work products of the project. This plan lists the items of the project that have been placed under configuration management documents how changes to these items will be controlled, recorded and reported documents how the items will be audited to verify conformance to requirements. All project documentation, project hardware and software, and project outputs should be placed under configuration management. A configuration and change control log can be used to log all changes to the controlled items. This log might record fields such as: date recorded by requested by product and component comments recommendation action authorized by action taken result.
  • 4. Information Technology Policy for Project Management Quality management Quality management includes the activities and techniques used to ensure that all project activities and work products comply with all relevant standards, procedures and requirements. Evaluation and testing activities will contribute to overall quality of the package but do not constitute the whole quality management process. The quality of a package is a function of its planning – it is not enough to inspect a package at its completion to ensure it is bug free. Quality planning ensures that quality is of continuing concern. There are a number of elements that you can plan for and these are related to procedural issues as well as deliverable products. A quality management plan should be developed as part of the project plan during the definition phase. Quality assurance Quality assurance requires evaluating project performance on a regular basis to ensure that the standards specified in the planning stage are being met. Some evaluation and testing procedures will be included here. Quality control Quality control involves monitoring individual aspects of the project to establish whether they comply with the standards specified in the planning phase. If not, a procedure will be specified to improve the faulty performance. Quality improvement Quality improvement also requires planning. You should aim to factor-in time to plan for future proj- ects or procedures, with an aim to improving those packages and procedures. A debrief at the end of projects can raise issues to be addressed in the next project’s Quality Management Plan. Responsibilities It will be necessary to specify a team member who will be responsible for coordinating the quality management process. As will be clear from the items listed above, quality management needs to be a part of the culture of the team, and is an on-going process. How the ownership of any role in the process is nominated will have to be decided by the team. Steps in quality planning can include: Specifying all requirements you expect the package to meet. (These definitions should include pro- cedural definitions, product definitions and desired outcomes. They will be iteratively defined over the phases of Initiation, Definition, Specification and design) Identifying which quality standards are relevant to the project and determining how to satisfy them. (For example, when specifying performance requirements, make sure media quality meets the needs of the user. Quality standards will be iteratively defined over the phases of Initiation, Defini- tion, Specification and design) Specify a means by which to measure performance of all the criteria. (These will be specified in the evaluation and testing plan)
  • 5. Information Technology Policy for Project Management Assigning team members to test small sections of the package and process, and to evaluate each section’s performance. Assigning ownership to problems and develop a procedure to track resolutions adding quality assur- ance checking times into your milestones having team debriefs where future performance objec- tives can be planned Time management Project time management includes the processes and techniques used to ensure the timely comple- tion of the project. It involves the development and management of the project work activities and the project schedule. As part of project planning in the definition phase, a detailed project schedule and work breakdown structure should be developed based on the proposals contained in the scope document and agreed to in the project contract. As the project activities progress, you will see differences between planned and actual duration of activities begin to emerge. You will need to monitor and control changes to the schedule of activi- ties as well as to the overall project. Changes are made and communicated according to the project change control procedures and as agreed to with the client and other stakeholders. On small projects, the processes of sequencing, estimating and schedule development may be viewed and conducted as a single process. On larger projects, these may be quite distinct and the skills and resources applied to these processes may be vital for the project’s success. Cost management Project cost management includes the processes used to ensure that the project is completed within the approved budget. The resources and budget required for the project are proposed in the scope document and agreed to in the project contract. This is further detailed as part of project planning in the definition phase. The contract should set the points for review of the project budget (and project schedule). Budget and schedule reviews are necessary especially when the require- ments, design and content of the product are going to be iteratively defined. In all subsequent project phases and after each development cycle, cost management involves the confirmation of resources (people, equipment and materials) and estimation of the budget needed to complete project activities for the phase/cycle. As the project activities progress, you will prob- ably see differences between planned and actual costs emerge and you will need to monitor and control changes to the cost of activities and stages of development, and to monitor their impact on the overall project budget. Changes to the budget are performed and communicated according to the project change control procedures and as agreed to with the client and other stakeholders. On small projects, the processes of determining resources, estimating and budgeting cost may be viewed and conducted as a single process. On larger projects, these may be quite distinct and the skills and resources applied to these processes may be vital for the project’s success. Although project cost management is primarily concerned with the cost of the resources needed to complete project activities, you may need to also consider the effect of project decisions on the eventual cost of using the project product. Certain design decisions or limited testing may result in increased cost to the end user’s operating costs.
  • 6. Information Technology Policy for Project Management Corporate Offi ce-New York: 3900 Veterans Memorial Hwy., Suite 110, Bohemia, NY 11716 ph. 631.981.1048 fx. 631.981.1514 email: info@hcsonline.com Connecticut Offi ce: 65 High Ridge Road #510, Stamford, CT. 06905 ph. 203.938.3325 fx. 203.938.3374 email: jsoodek@hcsonline.com Florida Offi ce: 3321 SW 194th Terrace, Miramar, Florida 33029 ph. 954.322.2640 email: ksoohan@hcsonline.com Virginia Offi ce: 264D McLaws Circle, PMB 177, Williamsburg, VA 23185 ph. 757.810.4554 email: info@hcsonline.com For for more information go to www.hcsonline.com or Call or Call 631.981.1048