PMI's career framework: Project Management

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  • This 60 minute presentation will introduce you to PMI’s career framework Internet based project management career development system.
  • Advocating for the profession! Today, the world has an extreme shortage of project managers! And, it is going to get worse. I plan to discuss with you a new, talent management tool, available at no cost to organizations that employ project managers and to PMI members and holders of PMI credentials.
  • Corporations that have used PMI resources as they have created project management job ladders are: Microsoft Corporation Unilever Gap Incorporated HSBC NASA HP IBM and Intel Organizations that piloted PMI’s career framework are: Microsoft Corporation Gap Incorporated Direct (the online presence of Gap) Portugal Telecom and TransField Services To date, over 400 organizations and over 4,600 users have registered to use PMI’s project management career framework.
  • Employees state that the top three retention strategies are (in priority): Career development opportunities Competitive salary Flexible work schedules (this particular response is from female participants of the study)(research funded by the Society for Human Resource Management (SHRM)) and Consistently for the last 5 years of research performed by the American Society for Training & Development (ASTD), increased employee satisfactions and retention are most often attributed to career development programs, linking competencies to skill levels and more clearly developed roles. Both of these organizations are now international organizations. Why is employee retention important? When viewed from the corporate point of view, it costs $150,000 to hire and prepare a each new employee for their role! So employee satisfaction and retention is tied to career development – what 67% of organizations do not have for project managers.
  • Employees state that the top three retention strategies are (in priority): Career development opportunities Competitive salary Flexible work schedules (this particular response is from female participants of the study)(research funded by the Society for Human Resource Management (SHRM)) and Consistently for the last 5 years of research performed by the American Society for Training & Development (ASTD), increased employee satisfactions and retention are most often attributed to career development programs, linking competencies to skill levels and more clearly developed roles. Both of these organizations are now international organizations. Why is employee retention important? When viewed from the corporate point of view, it costs $150,000 to hire and prepare a each new employee for their role! So employee satisfaction and retention is tied to career development – what 67% of organizations do not have for project managers.
  • This is a screen shot of an organization specific job description. It was created by convening a team of associate project managers tasked to identify specific skills required for the job of associate project manager. It was based on the PMI baseline Project Manager I job description.
  • This slide builds as you click your mouse. (click) Through our role delineation study process, PMI has identified the professional – project management skills that practitioners in the role of project manager, program manager and portfolio manager apply as they perform their roles. (click) Through a survey of practitioners, identified the interpersonal and (click) leadership skills that practitioners apply as they perform their roles (project management, program management, and portfolio management). (click) Through the same survey, PMI identified a project typology that may be used to categorize projects. One of the sets of categorization variables is linked to project complexity. Finally, (click) we believe that project managers must be able to speak to subject matter experts in their language (aerospace, automotive, pharmaceutical, etc.) and that project team members must understand some project management terms (e.g., project charter, work breakdown structure, etc.) Through the same survey, identified required levels of proficiency for each of the skills for the (click) Project Manager I, (click) Project Manager II, (click) Project Manager III, (click) Program Manager, and (click) Portfolio Manager jobs. Using the research results obtained above, created a set of job descriptions for the jobs of Project Manager I, Project Manager II, Project Manager III, Program Manager, and Portfolio Manager. Created an Internet based system to enable Organizations to modify PMI baseline skills and job descriptions to meet their organizational requirements.
  • As jobs are created with increasing responsibility, the project for which the job is responsible also typically increase in responsibility and complexity. PMI has performed significant literature search as well as research on our own part to identify variables of project typology and complexity. These variables are: The range of development cost – expressed as a monetary value typically based on time and materials The size of the project team The duration of the project in days, months, or year The speed of development required for the project The level of risk Additionally, the complexity of the project should be described. The variable for this are: The span of impact within the organization – departmental, one business unit, or the entire organization The number of interfaces The number of geographic regions affected The number of functional disciplines or stakeholders The number of subprojects The scope definition – well defined, moderately well defined, or not well defined at all The level of innovation required to achieve the goals of the project – existing/proven, existing/with minor modifications, or never used before in the organization The sample project profile displayed in this screen shot is a work package, the lowest level of decomposition of the project that is able to be managed.
  • This is a screen shot of a sample project profile (describing a Work Package - the lowest level of decomposition of the project that is able to be managed). In this sample the values for the variables are: The range of development cost: <$100,000 The size of the project team: < 6 participants The duration of the project: < 6 months The speed of development required for the project: the lowest speed in the system – When time/resources are available The level of risk: Low (scale here is low, medium, high) Additionally, the complexity of the project for this project profile is: The span of impact within the organization: departmental The number of interfaces: one The number of geographic regions affected: one The number of functional disciplines or stakeholders: < 6 The number of subprojects: none – this is the lowest level of the Work Breakdown Structure (WBS) The scope definition: well defined (thus very stable) The level of innovation required to achieve the goals of the project: existing/proven
  • Proficiency assessments enable practitioners to evaluate themselves against PMI’s sample job descriptions or the custom organizational job descriptions. Additionally, practitioners may request assessments from their supervisor, peers, stakeholders, customers, etc.
  • This is a screen shot of the results of a proficiency assessment performed by the practitioner and one additional person. If the supervisor had responded, a column of evaluations would have been listed under ‘Supervisor Assessment’. Additionally, if other people had been requested to perform an assessment on this individual, their results would have been listed in separate columns under ‘Assessed by Others’.
  • PMI’s career framework will aid your organization and increase your competitive advantage. Most importantly, one organization reported to ASTD in 2004 that their employee turnover dropped from 9.7% to 1.2% following the introduction of a formal career development program! This savings goes directly to the bottom line of the organization!
  • PMI's career framework: Project Management

    1. 1. PMI’s career framework: Project Management Career Paths Dr. John Roecker Manager, Career Planning Project Management Institute
    2. 2. PMI’s Long Term Goal <ul><li>Long – term = 10 – 30 years </li></ul>Worldwide, organizations will embrace, value and utilize project management and attribute their success to it.
    3. 3. Organizational Timeline
    4. 4. Effectiveness of Retention Strategies? <ul><ul><ul><li>The top three retention strategies, when viewed from the employees perspective, are: </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Career development opportunities </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Competitive salary </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Flexible work schedules </li></ul></ul></ul>SHRM Research (2006)
    5. 5. Linking Learning & Performance <ul><ul><li>Use corporate strategic plans to guide development and delivery </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Establish position-based curricula tied to organizational goals </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Provide learning maps that link skills development to career progression </li></ul></ul>ASTD (2007) State of the Industry <ul><ul><ul><li>67% of organizations do not have a project management career path </li></ul></ul></ul>PMI (2005)
    6. 6. Job Ladder <ul><li>Sequence of jobs, typically with increasing responsibility, that guides an employee as they grow within the organization and plan their development opportunities. </li></ul>Job Title Definition Duties Skills Project Profile Other Requirements PMI resources – sample: Job Title Definition Duties Skills Project Profile Other Requirements Job Title Definition Duties Skills Project Profile Other Requirements Job Title Definition Duties Skills Project Profile Other Requirements Job Title Definition Duties Skills Project Profile Other Requirements Job Title Definition Duties <ul><li>Job title/definition/duties (11) </li></ul>Skills <ul><li>Skills (107) </li></ul>Project Profile <ul><li>Project profiles (5) </li></ul>Other Requirements <ul><li>Credentials (3) </li></ul>
    7. 7. Sample Job Description
    8. 8. Resources? Plan Project Close Project Initiate Project Execute Project Control Project Project Management Delegates Work & Empowers Stakeholders Delegates Work & Empowers Others Supports Team Building Leadership Competency Communicates with Others Professional Competency Program Management Possess Good Listening Skills Speaks Clearly Encourages Partnering Profile Industry Specific Interpersonal Competency Portfolio Management Advocates Change Engages Others Conflict Resolution Establish Portfolio Framework Select Portfolio Manage Portfolio Conflict Resolution Communicate with Others Speaks Clearly Supports Team Building Comm unication Speaks Clearly Encourages Partnering Initiate Program Plan Program Execute Program Control Program Close Program Define Program Inspires Others @ Project Management Institute. All rights reserved. Development Cost Span of Impact Number of Sub-projects Uncertainty in goals Uncertainty in methods Pharmaceutical Construction Automotive Team Size Level of Risk Project/Program Duration Professional Skills - 85 PjM: 1636 respondents PgM: 2160 respondents PfM: 196 respondents Interpersonal Skills - 7 1794 respondents Leadership Skills - 15 1794 respondents Project Profile 1794 respondents Industry Specific Project Manager I Project Manager II Project Manager III Program Manager Portfolio Manager
    9. 9. Project Typology? <ul><li>Name & Description </li></ul><ul><li>Range of Development Cost </li></ul><ul><li>Range of Team Size </li></ul><ul><li>Duration of Project </li></ul><ul><li>Speed of Development </li></ul><ul><li>Level of Risk </li></ul><ul><li>Project Complexity: </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Span of impact within organization </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Number of interfaces </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Number of geographical regions </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Number of functional disciplines/stakeholders </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Number of subprojects </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Project scope definition </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Level of innovation required/means to achieve goals </li></ul></ul>
    10. 10. PMI’s career framework: Project Typology
    11. 11. Employee Development <ul><li>Proficiency assessment against a job description </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Customizable to meet organizational requirements </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Performed by whom? </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Self assessment </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Supervisor assessment </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Colleague/client/etc. assessment </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Summary results viewable by supervisor and employee </li></ul>
    12. 12. Report Selection
    13. 13. Proficiency Assessment Report
    14. 14. User Registrations 31 December 16 Organizations > 5 users 3 Organization > 10 users
    15. 15. Benefit - Competitive Advantage <ul><li>Organizations that are more mature in project management have better project performance (estimating accuracy) </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Less mature – miss budget by 20% </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Less mature – miss schedule by 40% </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Organizations that are more mature in project management have better cost/schedule predictability (precision) & lower project management direct costs </li></ul><ul><li>One organization reduced its employee turnover from 9.7% to 1.2% following the introduction of a formal career development program! </li></ul>W.Ibbs, J.Reginato, Quantifying the Value of Project Management , PMI 2002 B. Sugrue, K-H. Kim, State of the Industry , ASTD 2004
    16. 16. PMI Career Framework <ul><li>Please contact us about the career framework: </li></ul><ul><li>Dr. John Roecker, Manager </li></ul><ul><li>[email_address] </li></ul><ul><li>1-610-356-4600 ext 5005 </li></ul><ul><li>Faith Hill, Career Framework Specialist </li></ul><ul><li>[email_address] </li></ul><ul><li>1-610-356-4600 ext 5062 </li></ul>

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