OSI Risk Management Plan Template

6,163 views
5,928 views

Published on

Published in: Business, Economy & Finance
0 Comments
5 Likes
Statistics
Notes
  • Be the first to comment

No Downloads
Views
Total views
6,163
On SlideShare
0
From Embeds
0
Number of Embeds
4
Actions
Shares
0
Downloads
489
Comments
0
Likes
5
Embeds 0
No embeds

No notes for slide

OSI Risk Management Plan Template

  1. 1. Department of Transportation Project Name Risk Management Plan Project ID: Division, Program Name Prepared by: Date:
  2. 2. Approval Signatures Name: Name: Title: Project Sponsor Title: Project Manager Name: Name: Title: Technical Lead Title: Business Lead Name: Name: Title: Title: i
  3. 3. Template Revision History REVISION HISTORY REVISION DATE OF RELEASE OWNER SUMMARY OF CHANGES 1.0 9/2009 ETID - PMO Initial Release of Caltrans Risk Management Plan template Remove template revision history and insert Risk Management Plan revision history. Template Revision Approvals REVISION NAME ROLE DATE Insert template approvals here. Template Instructions: This template is color coded to differentiate between boilerplate language, instructions, sample language, and hyperlinks. In consideration of those reviewing a black and white hard copy of this document we have also differentiated these sections of the document using various fonts and styles. Details are described below. Please remove the template instructions when the document is finalized. Standard boilerplate language has been developed for this management plan. This language is identified in black Arial font and will not be modified without the prior approval of the Enterprise Technology Investment Division (ETID), Project Management Office (PMO). If the project has identified a business need to modify the standard boilerplate language, the request must be communicated to the PMO for review. Instructions for using this template are provided in blue Times New Roman font and describe general information for completing this management plan. All blue text should be removed from the final version of this plan. Sample language is identified in red italic Arial font. This language provides suggestions for completing specific sections. All red text should be replaced with project-specific information and the font color replaced with black text. Hyperlinks are annotated in purple underlined Arial text and can be accessed by following the on-screen instructions. To return to the original document after accessing a hyperlink, click on the back arrow in your browser’s toolbar. The “File Download” dialog box will open. Click on “Open” to return to this document. ii
  4. 4. Table of Contents 1. INTRODUCTION...............................................................................................................................1 1.1 PURPOSE......................................................................................................................................1 1.2 SCOPE.........................................................................................................................................1 1.3 REFERENCES.................................................................................................................................1 1.3.1 External References............................................................................................................1 1.3.2 Project Centralized Document Repository ..........................................................................1 1.4 DOCUMENT MAINTENANCE................................................................................................................1 2. PARTICIPANTS ROLES AND RESPONSIBILITIES .......................................................................2 2.1 <PROJECT NAME> PROJECT RISK TEAM.............................................................................................2 2.1.1 Project Sponsor...................................................................................................................2 2.1.2 Project Director....................................................................................................................2 2.1.3 Project Manager .................................................................................................................2 2.1.4 Risk Manager......................................................................................................................2 2.1.5 Risk Owner..........................................................................................................................2 2.1.6 Project Team.......................................................................................................................3 2.1.7 Project Stakeholders and Vendors......................................................................................3 2.2 OTHER PARTICIPANTS......................................................................................................................3 2.2.1 Independent Project Oversight Consultant (IPOC)..............................................................3 2.2.2 Independent Verification and Validation (IV&V) Consultant ................................................3 2.2.3 Legal Counsel......................................................................................................................3 2.2.4 Solution Vendor...................................................................................................................3 3. <PROJECT NAME> PROJECT RISK MANAGEMENT...................................................................4 3.1 RISK MANAGEMENT PROCESS...........................................................................................................4 4. PROJECT CLOSEOUT...................................................................................................................20 4.1 RISK REVIEW..............................................................................................................................20 4.2 LESSONS LEARNED.......................................................................................................................20 4.3 ARCHIVE AND STORAGE.................................................................................................................20 5. GENERAL INFORMATION.............................................................................................................20 5.1 ACRONYMS.................................................................................................................................20 5.2 GLOSSARY..................................................................................................................................21 5.3 RISK MANAGEMENT PLAN REVISION HISTORY.....................................................................................24 ATTACHMENTS..................................................................................................................................23 Appendix A – Risk Identification & Response Plan Appendix B – Project Risk Register Appendix C – Risk Management Form - For Risks Elevated to Office of the State Chief Information Officer iii
  5. 5. 1.INTRODUCTION 1.1Purpose The purpose of this risk management plan is to describe the methodology for identifying, tracking, mitigating, and ultimately retiring <Project Name> Project risks. This document defines the risk management roles and responsibilities of the <Project Name>Team. 1.2Scope The scope of this document pertains to the <Project Name> Project and its internal and external risks. The risk management methodology identified in this document will be primarily used by <Project Name> and is to be used during the entire <Project Name> Project. The <Project Name> Vendor’s risk management methodology will be provided as a contractual deliverable and developed as a separate risk management plan. The <Project Name> Vendor will be responsible for managing their project risk and reporting to the <Project Name> project manager. 1.3References 1.3.1External References PMBOK Guide, 3rd Edition, Section 11 - Project Risk Management Office of the State Chief Information Officer (OCIO) Information Technology Project Oversight Framework- Section 5: Risk Management and Escalation Procedures IEEE Standard 1012-1998: IEEE Standard for Software Verification and Validation Software Engineering Institute (SEI) Taxonomy-based Risk Identification 1.3.2Project Centralized Document Repository If applicable, indicate the name of the document management tool the project is using. If the project is not using a specific tool, list any relevant documents that can be used as references for this document and its corresponding location. A copy of all project management plans, control agency approval documents, and project status reports must be saved into the IT Project Management Office (PMO) centralized document repository. These files are located on the network in the directory N:PMO_New. 1.4Document Maintenance This document will be reviewed at least quarterly and updated as needed, as the project proceeds through each phase of the system development life cycle. If the document is written in an older format, the document should be revised into the latest PMO template format at the next quarterly review. This document contains a revision history log. When changes occur, the document’s revision history log will reflect an updated version number as well as the date, the owner making the change, and change description will be recorded in the revision history log of the document. 1
  6. 6. 2.PARTICIPANTS ROLES AND RESPONSIBILITIES This section describes the roles and responsibilities of the <Project Name> team with regard to the risk management plan. Note that these are roles, not positions or titles. One person may fulfill more than one role. There are various staff resources and stakeholders involved in managing project risks. In some cases, one individual may perform multiple roles in the process. 2.1<Project Name> Project Risk Team 2.1.1Project Sponsor The role of the <Project Name> Project Sponsor is to participate in risk identification and risk activities as part of the steering committee. The sponsor receives escalated risks and assists with mitigation and contingency actions as needed. 2.1.2Project Director The <Project Name> Project Director is involved in monitoring risk action effectiveness and participating in risk escalation. The project director also has the responsibility to communicate to certain project stakeholders on an as needed basis. 2.1.3Project Manager The role of the <Project Name> Project Manager is to develop and approve the <Project Name> Project Risk Management Plan, define the risk management process, participate in the risk management process, take ownership of risk mitigation and contingency planning, and execution. The project manager, in consultation with the project sponsor and/or project director, is responsible for the final decision on risk actions. 2.1.4Risk Manager The <Project Name> Risk Manager is responsible for leading the risk management effort, sponsoring risk identification activities, facilitating communication throughout the execution of the risk management process, and ensuring the risk register is maintained and the statuses assigned to risks and risk activities are current. The risk manager is responsible for providing the project manager with recommendations and statuses on risk actions. 2.1.5Risk Owner The role of the risk owner is to conduct a risk analysis for assigned risks, develop risk mitigations, contingencies, measurements, mitigation action plans, and to implement and track mitigation action plan progress for their risks. The risk owner will brief the risk manager and project manager of the proposed risk mitigation/contingency plans, monitor risk triggers, and notify the risk manager when they occur. The risk owner will provide a < weekly, monthly> status of their assigned risks to the risk manager. 2
  7. 7. 2.1.6Project Team The <Project Name> project team participates in the risk identification process and discusses risk monitoring and mitigation activities at team meetings. Team participants may include the project sponsor, the IT Project Lead, and PMO consultants. 2.1.7Project Stakeholders and Vendors The role of <Project Name> Project stakeholders and vendors is to participate in the Risk Management process by providing candidate risk input, and supporting risk mitigation planning and execution activities. 2.2OTHER PARTICIPANTS 2.2.1Independent Project Oversight Consultant (IPOC) The <Project Name> IPOC provides independent oversight of the project and reports to external stakeholders including the OCIO. The IPOC may perform their own risk identification interviews/reviews, may participate in project risk meetings and reviews, and may request risk reports and status from the Project and/or Risk Manager. 2.2.2Independent Verification and Validation (IV&V) Consultant The <Project Name> IV&V consultant considers project risk management as it relates to the software engineering aspects of the project. The IV&V consultant assists the project team through the process of verifying and validating that the software system meets specifications and fulfills its intended purpose. The IV&V consultant may report to internal and external project stakeholders. 2.2.3Legal Counsel The <Project Name> legal representative provides counsel on risks which may have legal ramifications and/or which are of a sensitive nature. 2.2.4Solution Vendor The <Project Name> Project solution vendor is responsible for identifying risks to the project and risks to the successful completion of their contractual obligations. They are responsible for managing risks internal to their activities and assisting with mitigation and contingency activities for project risks and external risks. They are required to report their risks in their monthly status reports and raise potential project risks to the project team at designated status meetings. 3
  8. 8. 3.<PROJECT NAME> PROJECT RISK MANAGEMENT 3.1Risk Management Process The <Project Name> Project Risk Management Paradigm, depicted in Figure 1, summarizes the risk management process for the <Project Name> Project. This paradigm (adopted from the SEI Taxonomy-based Risk Identification methodology) portrays the high-level process steps of the risk management process, which are: • Step 1 – Identify • Step 4 – Implement • Step 2 – Analyze • Step 5 – Track and Control • Step 3 – Plan • Continuous Process – Communicate Figure 1: <Project Name> Project Risk Management Paradigm Step 5: Track/Control Identify Identify Step 1: Monitor risk indicators and Search and locate risks BEFORE they Search and locate risks BEFORE they mitigation actions m itigation k/ materialize rac tr o l Id m aterialize Correct for deviations from planned risk actions T en n tif Co y y I m p le m Implem Communicate Com m unicate e Step 4: Implement Im plem ent yz ent ent Execute decisions and Analyze Analyze Step 2: al mitigation action plans m itigation Process risk data into decision-m aking Process risk data into decision-making An A inform ation information Plan Plan Com m unicate Steps 1 – 5: Communicate Plan 3: Plan Step Inform ation and feedback throughout all risk Information and feedback throughout all risk Translate risk inform ation into decisions and Translate risk information into decisions and m anagem ent functions and project organizations management functions and project organizations actions (m itigations) actions (mitigations) Communication is an essential part of the Risk Management and occurs at every step of the process among the <Project Name> stakeholders and vendors. Figure 2 depicts the Risk Management Process flow. 4
  9. 9. 5
  10. 10. Project Name: (Project Name) Risk Management Plan Project Number: (FSR Number) <Date> Criticality Rating: (Low, Medium, High) Figure 2: Risk Management Process Communicate Process Steps Identify Analyze Plan Implement Track/Control Risk 1-1 Identify Candidate 2-1 Determine Risk Classification 3-4 Review Mitigations 4-2 Update Risk 5-2 Track Action Plan & Manager / Risks 2-2 Determine Risk Impact & Measurements Register Provide Feedback Project 1-3 Review Candidate 2-3 Determine Risk Probability 3-7 Update Risk 5-3 Re-Assess Risks Manager Risks 2-4 Determine Risk Timeframe Register 5-4 Report Risk Status 1-4 Record Identified 2-5 Determine Risk Exposure Weekly 5-5 Maintain Risk Register Risks in Project Risk 2-6 Determine Risk Severity Status Report 5-6 Escalation of Project Register 2-7 Develop Recommended Mitgations / Risk Status Risk Feedback Contingencies 5-7 Risk Retirement <Project 1-2 Provide Candidate 3-1 Assign Risk Owner 5-1 Oversee Action Plan 2-8 Review Risks Name> Risk Inputs to RM 3-4 Review Mitigations & Execution Project 1-3 Review Candidate Measurements 5-4 Report Risk Status Director &/or Risks 3-5 Approve Mitigation & 5-7 Risk Retirement Designee Measurements Risk 3-2 Develop Mitigations /Contin. 4-1 Execute Mitigation/ 5-2 Track Action Plan & 3-3 Develop Measurements Conting. Action Plans Provide Feedback Owners 3-6 Develop Mitigation/Contig. Action Plans Project 1-2 Provide Candidate 2-8 Review Risks at least 5-4 Report Risk Status at least Sponsor Risk Inputs to RM monthly monthly Stakeholders , 1-2 Provide Candidate 2-8 Review Risks as needed 4-1 Execute Mitigation 5-4 Review Risk as needed Vendors & Risk Inputs to RM Action Plans Project Team 5
  11. 11. Project Name: (Project Name) Risk Management Plan Project Number: (FSR Number) <Date> Criticality Rating: (Low, Medium, High) Step 1 – Identify The objective of Step 1 – Identify is to search and find risks before they become problems using risk identification. Risk identification involves a process where concerns about a project are transformed into identified risks. Identified risks can be described and measured. A detailed discussion of the identification process is provided in the sub-paragraphs below. 1-1 Identify and Collect Candidate Risks Through the use of risk identification methods and the application of industry standards (e.g., OCIO, IEEE, PMI), the risk manager and project manager search for and identify potential issues and concerns which could impact the overall success of the project. Methods to identify risks may include: monitoring project activities, examining artifacts and documentation, observing, interviewing, polling, surveying, brainstorming, participating in discussions and meetings, conducting focus sessions, and applying the OCIO Oversight guidelines. These potential issues and concerns result in candidate risks. Risk identification methods will collect candidate risk inputs from the <Project Name> Project participants. <Project Name> Project participants include the <Project Name> Project team, stakeholders, and vendors. 1-2 Identify and Provide Candidate Risk Input to the Risk Manager/Project Manager The <Project Name> Project participants, including the project team, stakeholders, and vendors, are key sources for identifying issues and concerns and submitting these as candidate risks for input to the risk management process. The <Project Name> Project participants voluntarily submit candidate risks to the risk manager/project manager as input to Step 1-3. The methods used by the <Project Name> Project participants to submit candidate risks to the risk manager include, but are not limited to, the following: verbal, email, or written communication. Project participants may submit candidate risks to the risk manager using the <Project Name> Risk Identification & Response Plan Template provided in Attachment A, ensuring the key risk identification components identified in Table 2 are captured. The Risk Management Form provided in Attachment C is also used to identify and report medium to high project risks to the OCIO for all reportable IT projects. 6
  12. 12. Project Name: (Project Name) Risk Management Plan Project Number: (FSR Number) <Date> Criticality Rating: (Low, Medium, High) While this form will be the primary tool used for this process, any communication method is acceptable. If this form is not used for submission, the risk manager/project manager will enter the risk data into the risk register and provide a copy of the data entered to the originator for verification. 1-3 Review Candidate Risks This step involves collecting candidate risk input from <Project Name> Project participants and reviewing these candidate risks. Candidate risks that can be described and measured become “identified risks”. The risk manager/project manager will work with risk originators and the <Project Name> project director and/or designee to achieve consensus on deciding whether or not candidate risks become identified risks. Reviewing candidate risks includes defining the risk statement and capturing appropriate information about the candidate risk to support risk analysis in Step 2 – Analyze. Defining the risk involves understanding the definition of a risk (see Appendix E: Key Terms), and applying the Criteria for Risk Identification provided in Table 1 as a guide. Table 1: Criteria for Risk Identification 1. Is it a risk? Is the concern a risk? A risk is a potential event that would have an impact on the success of the project if the event were to occur. The following considerations support the question “Is it a risk?” 2. Impact: This step identifies consequences of the risk materializing. Is the impact of the potential risk event on the project significant enough to warrant inclusion in the risk management process? This is an initial, informal determination of the risk impact. A formal assessment of the risk impact is done in Step 2 – Analyze. 3. Potential Event. What is the minimum likelihood of the potential risk event occurring? This question considers the degree of uncertainty of the potential risk event. Risk events which have already occurred represent issues, not risks. However, if there is little or no likelihood of the risk event occurring, the risk may not warrant inclusion in the risk management process. Potential risk events that have an extremely low likelihood of occurring do not necessarily require the risk to be formally recognized by the <Project Name> risk management process. This is an initial, informal determination of the risk probability. A formal assessment of the risk probability is done in Step 2 – Analyze. 7
  13. 13. Project Name: (Project Name) Risk Management Plan Project Number: (FSR Number) <Date> Criticality Rating: (Low, Medium, High) Table 2: Key Risk Identification Components (Attachment A: Risk Identification & Response Plan Template) COMPONENT DESCRIPTION Risk ID/Title A brief (phrase or one sentence) description of the candidate risk that captures the key subject of the candidate risk or summarizes the risk description. The Risk ID is obtained from the project risk register. Originator Name and organization of the person who identified and submitted the candidate risk to the risk manager/project manager. Risk Statement Each risk contains three components that must be separated and distinctly identified. Those components are the risk description, the root causes of the risk, and the effect that it will have on the project if it occurs. Constructing the risk statement using a standard format allows the risk originator to distinguish each component and gives consistency for risk descriptions. Risks are expressed using the following format: “As a result of <concern>, <uncertain event or risk> may occur, which will lead to <effect>.” “As a result of <inadequate infrastructure specifications>, <the infrastructure may not be built correctly> which will lead to <rebuilding the infrastructure and a delay in the completion of the project>.” 8
  14. 14. Project Name: (Project Name) Risk Management Plan Project Number: (FSR Number) <Date> Criticality Rating: (Low, Medium, High) COMPONENT DESCRIPTION Risk Analysis/Context Detailed description of the candidate risk, including circumstances and supporting detail. Capturing the context of a risk involves recording information regarding the circumstances, events, and interrelationships within the project that supplements the risk statement. Context provides more detail than is presented by the risk statement. Primary Risk Area The originator documents the risk area(s) that would be primarily affected (Schedule, Cost, or Scope) and why. Risk Owner The person assigned to the risk. The risk owner conducts the risk analysis and develops risk mitigations, contingencies, measurements, mitigation action plans, and implements and tracks the mitigation action plan progress for their risks. Probability The likelihood of the occurrence of the risk (high, medium, low) expressed as a percentage for the likelihood of risk occurrence. Refer to Table 4: Probability Assessment. Impact The impact describes the resulting effect on the project should the risk event occur. Refer to Table 3: Impact Assessment. Time Frame The period of time within which the risk is expected to occur [short term (< 180 days), medium-term (180-360 days), or long term (> 360 days)]. Refer to Table 5: Criteria for Risk Timeframe. Risk Exposure Derived from the risk attributes impact and probability, and is used in conjunction with time frame to prioritize risks for mitigation and escalation. Refer to Table 6: Guide for Determination of Risk Exposure. Severity A determination of the importance of the risk based upon: 1) potential impact of the risk on the project, 2) the probability of occurrence, and 3) the risk timeframe. Refer to Table 7: Guide for Determination of Risk Severity. 9
  15. 15. Project Name: (Project Name) Risk Management Plan Project Number: (FSR Number) <Date> Criticality Rating: (Low, Medium, High) COMPONENT DESCRIPTION Risk Avoidance Risk avoidance involves changing aspects of the overall project management plan to eliminate the threat, isolating project objective’s from the risk’s impact, or relaxing the objectives that are threatened (e.g. extending the schedule or reducing the scope). Risks that are identified early in the project can be avoided by clarifying requirements, obtaining more information, improving communications, or obtaining expertise. Risk Acceptance Risks are typically accepted when a risk reduction plan or risk enhancement plan has not eliminated the risk or if it is deemed too expensive to attempt reduction or enhancement. Contingency reserves are established for these risks including amounts of time, money, or resources. Accepted risks are monitored and if the risk event should happen, the project team deals with it when it occurs. Risk Mitigation Risk mitigation is used to reduce the probability and/or impact of an adverse risk event to an acceptable threshold. Taking early action to reduce the probability and/or impact is often more effective than trying to repair damage if the risk occurs. Risk Transfer Risk transfer requires shifting the negative impact of a threat along with ownership of the response to a third party. Transferring the risk gives another party responsibility for its management. Purchasing insurance is an example of risk transfer. Risk Response Description Explanation of what will be done to avoid, mitigate, or transfer the risk. Contingency Plan Trigger Description of the event that would cause the contingency plan to be implemented as the risk becomes an issue. Contingency Plan Description of each action that needs to be taken and by whom. 1-4 Record Identified Risks in the Project Risk Register Candidate risks will be recorded in the risk register while they are being analyzed. If after analysis, it is determined not to be a risk to the project, it will be retired. 10
  16. 16. Project Name: (Project Name) Risk Management Plan Project Number: (FSR Number) <Date> Criticality Rating: (Low, Medium, High) Candidate risks that become identified risks will be actively mitigated and tracked in the risk register. The risk manager/project manager records the identified risk from step 1-3 in the risk register as a discrete risk item. Step 2 – Analyze The objective of Step 2 – Analyze is to transform risk items into information that can be used to aid decision-making and to validate the risk information, using risk analysis. Risk analysis involves classification and prioritization of risk items, providing recommendations for mitigating and measuring risk items, and reviewing risk item information. The tools and methodologies used for analysis may include: a project risk database, expert knowledge, and root cause analysis. The risk manager, project manager, and the <Project Name> project director and/or designee will review resulting risk analyses with the <Project Name> project sponsor and stakeholders as required. The outputs of this step are retired identified risks or identified risks that have been classified and prioritized with recommended mitigations and measurements. A detailed discussion of the analysis process is provided in the sub-paragraphs below. 2-1 Verify/Determine Risk Classification The risk owner, with the assistance of the risk manager and project manager, perform root cause analysis to determine risk class. Risk classes are categories for risk items. Risk classes are usually a higher level of abstraction derived from individual risk items. Individual risk items can belong to one or more classes. The level of abstraction should be tailored to meet the specific needs of the <Project Name> Project. The SEI Risk Taxonomy from Taxonomy-Based Risk Identification, 1993, and the PMI A Guide to the Project Management Body of Knowledge, 2004, were the sources used as guidelines for identifying risk classes. Identified <Project Name> Risk Classes are: • Cost • Schedule • Scope • Quality • Human Resources • Communications 11
  17. 17. Project Name: (Project Name) Risk Management Plan Project Number: (FSR Number) <Date> Criticality Rating: (Low, Medium, High) • Procurement • Integration 2-2 Verify/Determine Risk Impact Determining the risk impact considers the consequences the risk would have on the project if the risk event occurs. Risk impact is a description of the anticipated consequences of a risk event occurring. The Impact Assessment in Table 3 is a guide for evaluating the risk consequences and determining the risk impact, expressed as very low, low, moderate, high, and very high. The determination of risk impact is a subjective, qualitative process which considers the criticality of internal and external project factors within the specific context of the <Project Name> Project. The risk owner, with the assistance of the risk manager and project manager, may use the criteria identified in Table 3 as an initial guide for assigning risk impact, but will confirm the risk impact with the <Project Name> project director or designee, project sponsor, and stakeholders as required (step 2-8) Table 3: Impact Assessment RISK IMPACT RATING COST EFFECT SCHEDULE EFFECT TECHNICAL/QUALITY PERFORMANCE 1 - Very Low <1% Possible slip of Possible reduction non-critical in performance activities 2 - Low 2-4% No milestone slips, Slight reduction of work-around performance required 3 - Moderate 5-7% Minor slip of Minor performance milestone degradation 4 - High 8-10% Major slip of Serious milestone performance degradation 5 - Very High >10% Unacceptable slip Unacceptable of milestone performance degradation 2-3 Verify/Determine Risk Probability Determining risk probability involves considering the likelihood of the risk occurrence. The Criteria for Risk Probability in Table 4 is a guide for determining the risk probability expressed as very low, low, probable (moderate), high, or very high. The determination of risk probability is a 12
  18. 18. Project Name: (Project Name) Risk Management Plan Project Number: (FSR Number) <Date> Criticality Rating: (Low, Medium, High) subjective, qualitative process which considers the criticality of internal and external project factors within the specific context of the <Project Name> Project. The risk owner, with the assistance of the risk manager and project manager, will use the criteria identified in Table 4 as an initial guide for assigning risk probability, but will confirm the risk probability with the <Project Name> project director or designee, project sponsor, or stakeholders as required in step 2-8. Table 4: Probability Assessment PROBABILITY RATING PROBABILITY PROBABILITY DEFINITION PERCENTAGE 1. Very Low 10% Remote - risk event not expected to occur. 2. Low 30% Unlikely - Risk event less likely than not to occur. 3. Probable 50% Likely - Risk event may or may not occur. (select “Moderate” on the risk register) 4. High 70% Highly Likely - Risk event more likely than not to occur. 5. Very High 90% Nearly Certain - Risk event expected to occur. 2-4 Verify/Determine Risk Timeframe The risk timeframe is the period of time within which the risk is expected to occur. The Criteria for Risk Timeframe in Table 5 is a guide for evaluating the period of time a risk is expected to occur and determining the risk timeframe, expressed in terms of short-term, medium-term, or long-term. The determination of risk timeframe is a subjective, qualitative process which considers the criticality of internal and external project factors within the specific context of the <Project Name> Project. The risk owner, with the assistance of the risk manager and project manager, will use the criteria identified in Table 5 as an initial guide for assigning risk timeframe, but will confirm the risk timeframe with the <Project Name> project director or designee, project sponsor, or stakeholders as required in step 2-8. Table 5: Criteria for Risk Timeframe TIMEFRAME CRITERIA Short-Term The risk is expected to occur within a very short period of time, e.g., ≤ 180 days. 13
  19. 19. Project Name: (Project Name) Risk Management Plan Project Number: (FSR Number) <Date> Criticality Rating: (Low, Medium, High) TIMEFRAME CRITERIA Medium-Term The risk is expected to occur within the near future, e.g., > 180 and ≤ 360 days. Long-Term The risk is expected to occur in the far future, e.g., > 360 days in the future. 2-5 Verify/Determine Risk Exposure The risk exposure is derived from the risk attributes of impact and probability, and is used in conjunction with timeframe to prioritize risks for mitigation and escalation. Determine risk exposure for each risk from the intersection of that risk’s impact and probability in Table 6. A risk with a 90% probability and an impact of 4 has a risk exposure rating of 3.6 and has a higher priority than a risk with a probability of 70% and an impact of 2 (exposure rating 1.4). The risk exposure value and the risk timeframe are then used to calculate the risk severity. Table 6: Guide for Determination of Risk Exposure Risk Probability Exposure: High Medium Low Impact Very High High High Medium High High Medium Low Moderate Medium Low Low 2-6 Verify/Determine Risk Severity The severity of the risk is a determination of the importance of the risk based upon 1) potential impact of the risk on the project, 2) the probability of occurrence, and 3) the risk timeframe. Table 7 contains a guide for evaluating risk impact, risk probability, and risk timeframe to determine the risk severity, and to prioritize the risks in terms of high, medium, or low. The risk severity and the project criticality values are used to determine the appropriate risk escalation procedure in step 5-6. The determination of risk severity is a subjective, qualitative process which considers the criticality of internal and external project factors within the specific context of the <Project Name> Project. The risk manager/project 14
  20. 20. Project Name: (Project Name) Risk Management Plan Project Number: (FSR Number) <Date> Criticality Rating: (Low, Medium, High) manager will use the criteria identified in Table 7 as an initial guide for assigning risk severity, but will confirm the risk severity with the <Project Name> project director or designee in step 2-8. Table 7: Guide for Determination of Risk Severity Risk Exposure Severity: High Medium Low Time Frame Short-Term High High Medium Medium- High Medium Low Term Long-Term Medium Low Low 2-7 Develop Recommended Mitigations and/or Contingencies Develop recommended actions to mitigate the risk. Mitigation is a response to a risk, designed to reduce or eliminate the probability and/or impact of the risk: • Elimination – removing the threat of the risk event occurring by eliminating the cause. • Reduction – reducing the severity of the risk by either reducing the impact on the project, the probability of occurrence, or both. If no mitigation actions are available, the risk impact is accepted: • Acceptance – accepting the consequences of the risk event. Acceptance can be active (e.g., developing a contingency plan to be executed if the risk event occurs), or acceptance can be passive (e.g., taking no action, allowing the risk event to occur, and accepting the resulting consequences). Recommended mitigation is developed by the risk owner with the assistance of the risk manager and project manager and will be reviewed and approved by the <Project Name> project director or designee. The recommended mitigation will be further defined in Step 3 – Plan after the review addressed by step 2-8. There may be multiple recommended mitigations identified for any single risk item. 15
  21. 21. Project Name: (Project Name) Risk Management Plan Project Number: (FSR Number) <Date> Criticality Rating: (Low, Medium, High) 2-8 Review Risks with <Project Name> Project Director, Project Sponsor, and Stakeholders The <Project Name> project director or designee, the risk manager, and the project manager review the risk with the project sponsor to validate all of the risk information identified at this time, including the risk class, risk impact, risk probability, risk timeframe, risk severity, and recommended mitigations. The risk review will include stakeholders, as needed. Risk information is revised based on input from the reviewers. The result of this step is to validate the risk as a confirmed risk. Step 3 – Plan The objective of Step 3 – Plan is to take ownership of risk mitigation. Risk planning involves assigning risk ownership, developing risk mitigations, contingencies, developing measurements, reviewing and approving risk mitigations and measurements, translating mitigations into action plans, and updating risk measures in the project risk register. A detailed discussion of the planning process is provided in the sub-paragraphs below. 3-1 Assign Risk Owner Identify the person to be assigned responsibility for developing risk mitigations, contingencies, measurements, mitigation action plans, and implementing and tracking mitigation action plan progress. When someone external to the <Project Name> project team can control risk events or mitigation, a risk owner will be identified on the <Project Name> Project team and will be responsible for coordination and reporting on risk planning with the external contact. 3-2 Develop Mitigations and Contingencies Develop the plan designed to eliminate, reduce, or accept the risk. The risk owner is responsible for developing mitigations for the risk. Mitigations developed by the risk owner may be based on previously identified mitigations as identified in step 2-7 or may be developed independently. The risk owner will also be required to develop contingency plans for each risk. These contingency plans will be executed as actions if the risk event occurs. 16
  22. 22. Project Name: (Project Name) Risk Management Plan Project Number: (FSR Number) <Date> Criticality Rating: (Low, Medium, High) 3-3 Develop Measurements Develop the methods to track the risk mitigation actions and to measure the effectiveness of the actions. The risk owner is responsible for developing measurements of risk mitigation. Contingency plan measurements will be focused on the effectiveness of the contingency plan in addressing the actual impacts of the event. 3-4 Review Mitigations, Contingencies and Measurements The risk manager, project manager, and the <Project Name> project director or designee, review the risk mitigations, contingencies, and measurements developed by the risk owner. Review by the project director or designee determines if the risk has been assigned the appropriate probability, impact, and timeframe, and provides direction regarding whether the mitigation and contingency plans are appropriate for the severity of the risk. If needed, risk mitigations, contingencies, and measurements are revised based on the review. 3-5 Approve Mitigations, Contingencies and Measurements <Project Name> project director or designee approves the risk mitigations, contingencies and measurements. 3-6 Develop Mitigation and Contingency Action Plans The risk owner will develop detailed action plans to implement risk mitigations and contingencies. While the risk owner may delegate the action plan development, the responsibility for the mitigation/contingency plan remains with the assigned risk owner. As a result, the risk owner will remain the primary point of contact with the risk manager and project manager for tracking mitigation/ contingency action plans for the risk. 3-7 Update Project Risk Register The risk manager updates the project risk register based on risk planning, including risk owner, risk mitigations, and mitigation and contingency action plans developed by the risk owner. Step 4 – Implement The objective of Step 4 – Implement is to actively mitigate risks. Risk implementation involves the execution of risk mitigation action plans and recording risk information 17
  23. 23. Project Name: (Project Name) Risk Management Plan Project Number: (FSR Number) <Date> Criticality Rating: (Low, Medium, High) changes in the risk register. A detailed discussion of the implementation process is provided in the sub-paragraphs below. 4-1 Execute Mitigation and Contingency Action Plans The risk owner is responsible for the execution of the risk mitigation and contingency action plans. The <Project Name> project director or designee will delegate and authorize the risk owners, as needed, to enable the execution of the action plans. 4-2 Update Project Risk Register The risk manager will update the project risk register with risk status information based on the implementation status of the action plans, as provided by the risk owner. Step 5 – Track and Control The objective of Step 5 – Track and Control is to insure that all steps of the risk management process are being followed and, as a result, risks are being mitigated and contingency plans are followed as necessary. Risk tracking and control involves the oversight and tracking of risk mitigation and contingency action plan execution, re-assessment of risks, reporting risk status, and recording risk information changes in the project risk register. Detailed discussions of the track and control processes are provided in the sub-paragraphs below. 5-1 Oversee Mitigation and Contingency Action Plan Execution The <Project Name> project director or designee is responsible for oversight of the execution of mitigation and contingency action plans for all risks identified in the project risk register. 5-2 Track Action Plan Execution and Provide Feedback The risk owner is responsible for tracking the execution of mitigation and contingency action plans and providing feedback to the risk manager and project manager on risk status. Risk mitigation or contingency activities will continue until the risk has been retired. 5-3 Re-Assess Risks The risk manager and project manager will re-assess the risk information in the project risk register to determine if any changes are needed, e.g., risk severity and timeframe. At a minimum, re-assessment of risk 18
  24. 24. Project Name: (Project Name) Risk Management Plan Project Number: (FSR Number) <Date> Criticality Rating: (Low, Medium, High) information will be performed on a monthly basis; however it may be performed more frequently on an as-needed basis. 5-4 Report Risk Status The project manager will report risk status as part of the weekly <Project Name> project risk reports (summary and detailed ranked risks) to the project director and/or project sponsor, functional managers, and other designated parties. Risk status reporting will focus on high severity risks. Information presented will include the status of risk mitigation and contingency action plans, changes in risk severity for known risks, new risks identified, and any risks scheduled for retirement. At a minimum, the risk manager and project manager will meet with the project director and/or project sponsor to review all risks on a monthly basis. If required by the OCIO, the IPOC will report high severity/high criticality project risks on a monthly basis to the PMO, and the OCIO as part of its Independent Project Oversight Report. 5-5 Maintain the Project Risk Register The risk manager will maintain the risk information in the project risk register. 5-6 Escalation of Project Risk The weekly <Project Name> project risk reports will be used to report all risks (Low, Medium and High Severity) to the project sponsor. These risks are discussed at the project advisory committee and steering committee meetings. The <Project Name> project director is a member of the advisory committee executive team. During the weekly advisory committee executive team meeting, the advisory committee executive team will use these reports to escalate enterprise level risks (for example, risks that affect more than one Caltrans project). Risks that have a high severity determination as well as medium severity/high criticality and medium severity/medium criticality risks are reported and escalated to the steering committee by the project sponsor. 5-7 Risk Retirement Risk are closed when the risk event actually occurs or when the likelihood of the risk is reduced such that it is not worth expending resources to track it. At this time, action plans are halted and closed. If the risk could possibly arise again, the risk may be reduced to a watch status and evaluated periodically. The risk owner and risk manager may recommend a risk for retirement. The project manager makes the final decision to 19
  25. 25. Project Name: (Project Name) Risk Management Plan Project Number: (FSR Number) <Date> Criticality Rating: (Low, Medium, High) retire a risk. In some cases, the project sponsor should be involved in the decision to retire a risk. Once approved for closure, the risk is updated and retired in the project risk register. Communicate – Continuous Process: Effective risk management requires ongoing communication throughout the project life cycle. The <Project Name> will include communication of project risks as an ongoing activity throughout each of the above 5 steps (Identify, Analyze, Plan, Implement, Track and Control). As the primary contact between the risk management process and the risk owners, the risk manager and project manager bear the responsibility of ensuring that members of the project team understand the value of their input in the process and feel free to submit risks in a forum and format with which they are most comfortable. 4.PROJECT CLOSEOUT 4.1Risk Review At the completion of the project or retirement of the system, the risk manager will lead a final risk review to document the final status and results of mitigation and contingency actions. The results of the risk actions (whether successful or unsuccessful) will be documented in the <Project Name> Lessons Learned meeting. 4.2Lessons Learned The risk manager and the <Project Name> management team will develop a set of Lessons Learned based on the results of the final risk review. The results of the lessons learned sessions will be shared with the PMO for inclusion in division-level lessons learned and the PMO Risk List, as appropriate. 4.3Archive and Storage Once the final documentation of risks and outcomes is completed, the <Project Name> project risk register will be archived and stored with all other project related documentation in the PMO project centralized document repository. 5.GENERAL INFORMATION 5.1Acronyms 20
  26. 26. Project Name: (Project Name) Risk Management Plan Project Number: (FSR Number) <Date> Criticality Rating: (Low, Medium, High) Acronym Description BTH Business, Transportation and Housing Agency IEEE Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers ETID Enterprise Technology Investment Division IPOC Independent Project Oversight Contractor IV&V Independent Verification & Validation OCIO Office of the Chief Information Officer PMBOK Project Management Body of Knowledge PMI Project Management Institute PMO Project Management Office SEI Software Engineering Institute 5.2Glossary A standard glossary of terms, including the names of all methodologies and stages, is included in the standard Glossary. This section defines additional terms, including those specific to this business or project. Term Definition Accepted Risk A confirmed risk that has been evaluated with the determination that the consequences will be accepted. Candidate Risk Potential concern being considered by the <Project Name> Project risk management process as a tangible risk that can be described and measured. Confirmed Risk A risk item after analysis and validation, i.e., the risk has been classified and prioritized. Recommended mitigation and measurements have been developed. The risk has been reviewed and validated by the risk manager, project manager, the <Project Name> project director or their designee. Expert Judgement A subjective or qualitative decision-making technique, employing expertise, knowledge, experience, or skills and used as an alternative or supplement to mathematical based decision-making techniques. 21
  27. 27. Project Name: (Project Name) Risk Management Plan Project Number: (FSR Number) <Date> Criticality Rating: (Low, Medium, High) Identified Risk A candidate risk becomes an identified risk when it has been determined to be a tangible risk that can be described and measured. The identified risk is recorded in the <Project Name> project risk register as a risk item. Issue A matter that requires the attention of project management staff or a matter that may impede the success of a project task. Project Office The project office for the <Project Name> Project is managed by the project director for the project, and consists of the project team/staff and consultants who report to and support the project director. Retired Risk A confirmed risk that is either no longer applicable or a confirmed risk that has been closed. Risk A potential event that is expected to have a negative impact on the success of the project, if that event were to occur. Risk Acceptance Accepting the consequences of the risk event. Acceptance can be active (e.g., developing a contingency plan to be executed if the risk event occurs), or acceptance can be passive (e.g., taking no action, allowing the risk event to occur, and accepting the resulting consequences). Risk Analysis A method to transform potential risk items into information used to aid decision-making and evaluate potential risk impacts. Risk analysis involves classification and prioritization of risk items, providing recommendations for mitigating and measuring risk items, and reviewing risk item information with the risk manager, project manager, and the <Project Name> project director or their designee. Risk Class/Area Categories for risk items that are usually a higher level of abstraction derived from individual risk items. Risk Event A future occurrence of the risk item; the potential event, expected to have a negative impact on the success of the project, if the event were to occur. Risk Identification A method used to search and find risks before they become problems. The risk identification process transforms issues and concerns about a project into tangible risks, which can be described and measured. Risk identification involves searching for and identifying candidate risks, then submitting, collecting, and reviewing the candidates. Selected risks become identified risks in the project risk register. Risk Impact A description of the anticipated consequences of a risk event occurring. Expressed as a number between one and five with one representing a low impact and five representing a high impact to the program. Risk Implementation A method used to actively mitigate risks. Risk implementation involves the execution of risk mitigation action plans and recording risk information changes in the project risk register. 22
  28. 28. Project Name: (Project Name) Risk Management Plan Project Number: (FSR Number) <Date> Criticality Rating: (Low, Medium, High) Risk Manager Staff assigned to identify, collect, review and analyze candidate risks. The risk manager assigns the initial risk owner for a risk and begins the reporting and communications processes. The risk manager provides oversight of all project risks and risk processes. Risk Measurement Methods to track the risk mitigation and to measure the effectiveness of the mitigation. Risk Mitigation Response to an identified risk, designed to eliminate or reduce the probability of risk occurrence. • Elimination – removing the threat of the risk event occurring by eliminating the cause. • Reduction – reducing the exposure of the risk by either reducing the impact on the project, the probability of occurrence, or both. Risk Owner The person assigned responsibility for developing risk mitigation/contingency measurements, and mitigation/contingency action plans. The Risk Owner is also responsible for implementing and tracking mitigation/contingency action plans. Risk Planning A method used to take ownership of risk mitigation. Risk planning involves assigning risk ownership, developing risk mitigation, developing measurements, reviewing and approving risk mitigation and measurements, translating mitigation into action plans, and recording risk information changes in the project risk register. Risk Severity A determination of the importance of the risk based upon: 1) potential impact of the risk on the project, 2) the probability of occurrence, and 3) the risk timeframe. Risk Probability The likelihood of the occurrence of the risk (very low – 10%, low – 30%, probable/moderate – 50%, high – 70%, very high – 90%) expressed as a percentage for the likelihood of risk occurrence. Risk Timeframe The period of time within which the risk is expected to occur [short-term (< 180 Days), medium-term (180-360 Days), or long-term (> 360 Days)]. Risk Tracking and Control A method to insure that all steps of the risk management process are being followed and risks managed methodically. Risk tracking and control involves the oversight and tracking of risk mitigation action plan execution, re-assessment of risks, reporting risk status, and recording risk information changes in the project risk register. Root Cause Analysis A problem solving method aimed at identifying and evaluating the cause or causes that created a risk. 23
  29. 29. Project Name: (Project Name) Risk Management Plan Project Number: (FSR Number) <Date> Criticality Rating: (Low, Medium, High) Watched Risk An identified risk that will be reviewed frequently to determine if the risk needs to be mitigated, retired, or if the risk is out of project management’s sphere of influence but the outcome needs to be recorded. 5.3Risk Management Plan Revision History REVISION HISTORY VERSION # DATE OF RELEASE OWNER COMMENTS Insert Risk Management Plan revision history. 24
  30. 30. Attachments LIST ATTACHMENTS AS NEEDED ATTACHMENT A: RISK IDENTIFICATION & RESPONSE PLAN TEMPLATE ATTACHMENT B: PROJECT RISK REGISTER ATTACHMENT C: RISK MANAGEMENT FORM (FOR RISKS ELEVATED TO THE OCIO) A-1

×