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  • 1. MS Engineering/Science Management Educational Effectiveness Assessment Plan 2003-2004 Adopted by The Engineering/Science Management faculty: Unknown Date Submitted to The Dean of the School of Engineering : Unknown Date The Office of Academic Affairs: Unknown Date SOE_Engineering&ScienceMgmt_MS_Plan_Fall03.doc Submitted Fall 2003 Page 1 of 21
  • 2. TABLE OF CONTENTS Introduction ___________________________________________________________________________________ Program Objectives ____________________________________________________________________________ Program Outcomes _____________________________________________________________________________ Assessment Tools _______________________________________________________________________________ Program Objectives Results ______________________________________________________________________ Analysis of Objective Results _____________________________________________________________________ Program Outcomes Results ______________________________________________________________________ Analysis of Outcome Results _____________________________________________________________________ Appendix: Advisory Board Review ________________________________________________________________ Appendix: ESM Thesis or Final Project ____________________________________________________________ Appendix: Alumni Survey _______________________________________________________________________ Appendix: Enrollment Growth ___________________________________________________________________ Appendix: Student Course Evaluation and Comment Sheet ___________________________________________
  • 3. INTRODUCTION The mission of the Engineering/Science Management program is to provide state of the art management and leadership education for technical professionals, including engineers and scientists functioning within technology-oriented organizations, while creating new knowledge and disseminating new knowledge through research and professional activities. The ESM currently offers two M.S. degrees: • M.S. in Engineering Management • M.S. in Science Management Both degrees follow the same curriculum with the distinction being the student’s undergraduate degree, i.e., engineering vs. non-engineering. In addition, a proposal is currently under review by the UAA Provost to establish a Masters of Science, Project Management degree. This degree is a natural extension of the Engineering Management program and is envisioned to be cross disciplinary (that is, reaching out to a multitude of undergraduate technological backgrounds) in nature. This ESM program serves a unique group of students and its curriculum has been developed toward their needs. The students attend the program to learn technology-related management skills, while they continue to improve their technical (engineering and science major) capabilities. These students are engineering managers, research managers, project managers, first-time managers, etc. The ESM program’s courses and students are different from those of MBA in School of Business in that our focus is on management technology-oriented activities for the Engineering worker and manager, whereas the MBA focuses on non-technical management activities, such as accounting, investment or business development. Both are needed to form a balanced set of training courses at the university, and for the engineering community. The ESM focus provides engineering-specific management science to the challenging, unique, and often hazardous discipline of engineering management. While the MBA does offer a great foundation for general management, to complete the engineering leadership training and education demands a balance of engineering economy and engineering knowledge management together with some of the accounting and human behavior aspects of the MBA. That is why there will always be a crossover of a few courses between the MBA and ESM programs. With such a cooperative approach to leadership training, the ESM student becomes a leader among their peers. The ESM Advisory Board annually reviews the program and curriculum to ensure the communities needs are being met and to offer suggestion for improvement and change. In addition, student evaluations are given and analyzed each semester. The ESM Program also went through an external review process which was finalized by the review committee March 2003. The provost and vice president of academic affairs along with the Dean and Chair of the department will meet in November 2003 to review the outcomes. SOE_Engineering&ScienceMgmt_MS_Plan_Fall03.doc Submitted Fall 2003 Page 3 of 21
  • 4. PROGRAM OBJECTIVES It is the objective of the UAA Engineering/Science Management program to produce graduates that: 1. have a strong general engineering or science foundation and are able to use modern technological tools to solve complex multidisciplinary problems. 2. can effectively work in teams to solve real world problems through information research, with economic justification of the solution, using project management tools and techniques and effective written and/or communications. 3. are poised to assume leadership positions in their chosen discipline of work. 4. are able to apply engineering/science management resources to effectively plan, staff, organize, and control projects for successful department operation. 5. will contribute lessons learned to advance knowledge in management areas of engineering/science management.
  • 5. PROGRAM OUTCOMES The graduates of the UAA Engineering/Science Management program will: 1. Approach engineering and business problems from a real-world environmental and cultural perspective, rather than relying solely on a static textbook environment. 2. Focus on the fundamental management principles for significant, long-lasting improvements, instead of just dealing with day-to-day operational efficiency. 3. Seek systematic problem understanding and solutions, rather than simple reactive adjustments to individual components. 4. Be able to work in changing local, national, and international business environments. 5. Be able to form an integrated problem statement from various, often uncertain, ambiguous data and recommend decisions. 6. Be a contributing member of the engineering management community by examining, questioning, and providing alternatives to today’s management, business, and engineering challenges and issues. 7. Have team-building, leadership, and communication skills. 8. Be able to integrate feasibility requirements with current conditions for using engineering management resources. 9. Be able to identify risks and offer solutions for minimizing risk. 10. Develop a life long commitment to learning and through the required design project form the skills necessary research a new topic and apply new skills. In the fast paced changing business environment this learning skill may be the most valuable to the graduate. SOE_Engineering&ScienceMgmt_MS_Plan_Fall03.doc Submitted Fall 2003 Page 5 of 21
  • 6. ASSESSMENT TOOLS A description of the tools used in the assessment of the program objectives and their implementation are summarized in Table 1. The tools and their relationships to the program objectives are listed in Table 2. A description of the tools used in the assessment of the program outcomes and their implementation are summarized in Table 3. The tools and their relationships to the program outcomes are listed in Table 4. There is a separate appendix for each tool that includes a more detailed description than is provided here and also describes the factors that affect the results and give examples of the tools and how they will be implemented. Table 1 Program Objectives Assessment Tools and Administration Frequency/ Collection Administered Tool Description Start Date Method by Administered Advisory In person, Program yearly Board Annual Advisory Board Meeting phone, or Faculty and beginning Review email Staff February 2002 ESM Evaluation of student performance Annually Program Thesis or relative to program outcomes in the Instructor and beginning Faculty Final execution of their thesis or final Peers Spring 2004 Committee Project project One and three Alumni will be surveyed one and years after Alumni three years after graduation to School of graduation Online survey Survey evaluate program and course Engineering beginning objectives Spring 2004 Semester, Enrollment Student Semester Enrollment Statistics beginning Staff Growth Enrollment Spring 2004
  • 7. Table 2 Association of Assessment Tools to Program Objectives 0 = Tool is not used to measure the associated objective. 1 = Tool is used to measure the associated objective. ESM Advisory Thesis or Alumni Enrollment Board Final Survey Growth Review Project have a strong general engineering or science foundation and are able to use 1 1 0 1 modern technological tools to solve complex multidisciplinary problems. can effectively work in teams to solve real world problems through information research, with economic justification of the solution, using project management 1 1 0 1 tools and techniques and effective written and/or communications. are poised to assume leadership positions in their chosen discipline of work. 1 1 1 1 are able to apply engineering/science management resources to effectively plan, 1 1 1 1 staff, organize, and control projects for successful department operation. will contribute lessons learned to advance knowledge in management areas of 1 0 0 1 engineering/science management. SOE_Engineering&ScienceMgmt_MS_Plan_Fall03.doc Submitted Fall 2003 Page 7 of 21
  • 8. Table 3 Program Outcomes Assessment Tools and Administration Frequency/ Collection Administered Tool Description Start Date Method by ESM Evaluation of student performance Annually Program Thesis or relative to program outcomes in the Instructor and beginning Faculty Final execution of their thesis or final Peers Spring 2004 Committee Project project One and three Alumni will be surveyed one and years after Alumni three years after graduation to School of graduation Online survey Survey evaluate program and course Engineering beginning objectives Spring 2004 Student Course Each semester Evaluation at semester end of Student Evaluation at semester School of instructor and course objective Evaluation by and end starting Engineering achievement student Comment Fall 2003 Sheet
  • 9. Table 4 Association of Assessment Tools to Program Outcomes 0 = Tool is not used to measure the associated objective. 1 = Tool is used to measure the associated objective. Student ESM Course Thesis or Alumni Evaluation Final Survey and Project Comment Sheet Approach engineering and business problems from a real-world environmental and cultural 1 0 1 perspective, rather than relying solely on a static textbook environment. Focus on the fundamental management principles for significant, long-lasting improvements, 1 1 1 instead of just dealing with day-to-day operational efficiency. Seek systematic problem understanding and solutions, rather than simple reactive adjustments 1 0 1 to individual components. Be able to work in changing local, national, and international business environments. 1 1 1 Be able to form an integrated problem statement from various, often uncertain, ambiguous data 1 0 1 and recommend decisions. Be a contributing member of the engineering management community by examining, questioning, and providing alternatives to today’s management, business, and engineering 1 1 1 challenges and issues. Have team-building, leadership, and communication skills. 1 1 1 Be able to integrate feasibility requirements with current conditions for using engineering 1 0 1 management resources. Be able to identify risks and offer solutions for minimizing risk. 1 0 1 Develop a life long commitment to learning and through the required design project form the skills necessary research a new topic and apply new skills. In the fast paced changing business 1 1 1 environment this learning skill may be the most valuable to the graduate. SOE_Engineering&ScienceMgmt_MS_Plan_Fall03.doc Submitted Fall 2003 Page 9 of 21
  • 10. Program Objectives Assessment Program: BS Civil Engineering Department: Engineering/Science Management College/School: School of Engineering Academic Year: 2003-2004 CIP Coordinator: 18 Program Objective Assessment Results ESM Advisory Thesis Alumni Enrollment Weighted Board or Final Survey Growth Average Review Project have a strong general engineering or science foundation and are able to use modern 1 Grade NG NG NG NG technological tools to solve complex multidisciplinary problems. Value NG NG NG NG Weight 1.0 1.0 1.0 can effectively work in teams to solve real world problems through information research, with economic justification of the solution, 2 Grade NG NG NG NG using project management tools and techniques and effective written and/or communications. Value NG NG NG NG Weight 1.0 1.0 1.0 are poised to assume leadership positions in 3 Grade NG NG NG NG their chosen discipline of work. Value NG NG NG NG NG Weight 1.0 1.0 1.0 1.0
  • 11. are able to apply engineering/science management resources to effectively plan, 4 Grade NG NG NG NG staff, organize, and control projects for successful department operation. Value NG NG NG NG NG Weight 1.0 1.0 1.0 1.0 will contribute lessons learned to advance 5 knowledge in management areas of Grade NG NG NG NG engineering/science management. Value NG NG NG Weight 1.0 1.0 SOE_Engineering&ScienceMgmt_MS_Plan_Fall03.doc Submitted Fall 2003 Page 11 of 21
  • 12. Program Objectives Assessment Discussion Program: BS Civil Engineering Department: Engineering/Science Management College/School: School of Engineering Academic Year: 2003-2004 CIP Coordinator: 18 Analysis of Objective Assessment Results Explanation of Objective Result Results have a strong general engineering or science foundation and are able to use modern technological tools No explanation 1 NG to solve complex multidisciplinary problems. given. can effectively work in teams to solve real world problems through information research, with No explanation 2 economic justification of the solution, using project management tools and techniques and effective NG given. written and/or communications. No explanation 3 are poised to assume leadership positions in their chosen discipline of work. NG given. are able to apply engineering/science management resources to effectively plan, staff, organize, and No explanation 4 NG control projects for successful department operation. given. will contribute lessons learned to advance knowledge in management areas of engineering/science No explanation 5 NG management. given.
  • 13. Program Outcomes Assessment Program: BS Civil Engineering Department: Engineering/Science Management College/School: School of Engineering Academic Year: 2003-2004 CIP Coordinator: 18 Program Outcomes Assessment Results ESM Student Course Thesis or Alumni Evaluation and Weighted Final Survey Comment Average Project Sheet Approach engineering and business problems from a real-world environmental and cultural perspective, 1 Grade NG NG NG F rather than relying solely on a static textbook environment. Value NG NG Weight NG NG Focus on the fundamental management principles for 2 significant, long-lasting improvements, instead of just Grade NG NG NG F dealing with day-to-day operational efficiency. Value NG NG NG Weight NG NG NG Seek systematic problem understanding and solutions, 3 rather than simple reactive adjustments to individual Grade NG NG NG F components. Value NG NG Weight NG NG Be able to work in changing local, national, and 4 Grade NG NG NG F international business environments. Value NG NG NG Weight NG NG NG SOE_Engineering&ScienceMgmt_MS_Plan_Fall03.doc Submitted Fall 2003 Page 13 of 21
  • 14. Be able to form an integrated problem statement from 5 various, often uncertain, ambiguous data and Grade NG NG NG F recommend decisions. Value NG NG Weight NG NG Be a contributing member of the engineering management community by examining, questioning, 6 Grade NG NG NG F and providing alternatives to today’s management, business, and engineering challenges and issues. Value NG NG NG Weight NG NG NG Have team-building, leadership, and communication 7 Grade NG NG NG F skills. Value NG NG NG Weight NG NG NG Be able to integrate feasibility requirements with 8 current conditions for using engineering management Grade NG NG NG F resources. Value NG NG Weight NG NG Be able to identify risks and offer solutions for 9 Grade NG NG NG F minimizing risk. Value NG NG Weight NG NG Develop a life long commitment to learning and through the required design project form the skills 1 necessary research a new topic and apply new skills. In Grade NG NG NG F 0 the fast paced changing business environment this learning skill may be the most valuable to the graduate. Value NG NG NG Weight NG NG NG
  • 15. Program Outcomes Assessment Discussion Program: BS Civil Engineering Department: Engineering/Science Management College/School: School of Engineering Academic Year: 2003-2004 CIP Coordinator: 18 Analysis of Outcome Assessment Results Explanation of Outcome Result Results Approach engineering and business problems from a real-world environmental and cultural No explanation 1 F perspective, rather than relying solely on a static textbook environment. given. Focus on the fundamental management principles for significant, long-lasting improvements, instead No explanation 2 F of just dealing with day-to-day operational efficiency. given. Seek systematic problem understanding and solutions, rather than simple reactive adjustments to No explanation 3 F individual components. given. No explanation 4 Be able to work in changing local, national, and international business environments. F given. Be able to form an integrated problem statement from various, often uncertain, ambiguous data and No explanation 5 F recommend decisions. given. Be a contributing member of the engineering management community by examining, questioning, and No explanation 6 F providing alternatives to today’s management, business, and engineering challenges and issues. given. No explanation 7 Have team-building, leadership, and communication skills. F given. Be able to integrate feasibility requirements with current conditions for using engineering management No explanation 8 F resources. given. No explanation 9 Be able to identify risks and offer solutions for minimizing risk. F given. SOE_Engineering&ScienceMgmt_MS_Plan_Fall03.doc Submitted Fall 2003 Page 15 of 21
  • 16. Develop a life long commitment to learning and through the required design project form the skills 1 No explanation necessary research a new topic and apply new skills. In the fast paced changing business environment F 0 given. this learning skill may be the most valuable to the graduate.
  • 17. APPENDIX: ADVISORY BOARD REVIEW Tool Description: The Engineering/Science Management (ESM) Advisory Board consists of industry leaders in many area’s of ESM. Their knowledge and expertise will keep the department focused on the changing needs of the project management community. The Advisory Board members were instrumental in the development of the program offering many suggestions for program content. As practicing professionals, they are able to give extreme insight into the areas of project management that need more support in which to ensure program objectives are met. The advisory board meets annually at a half day seminar. Meetings with select Board members occur as needed throughout the year, depending on the particular topic to be discussed in the program. Additionally, phone or email surveys occur on an as needed basis if a particular issue regarding the program is to be decided. Factors that affect the collected data: The Advisory Board members comprise many different areas of business and industry where engineering and science management is practiced. There may be other areas of engineering and science management that may not be represented in our board members. How to interpret the data: Input from Advisory Board members should be discussed and outcomes should be compared against ESM needs by local project management associations, State ESM needs, and National and Global trends in ESM. Sample Survey. A sample survey is provided on the next page. Tabulating and Reporting Results Results will be gathered via email or in person at annual advisory board meetings and evaluated by faculty. Overall review will take place by the advisory board. SOE_Engineering&ScienceMgmt_MS_Plan_Fall03.doc Submitted Fall 2003 Page 17 of 21
  • 18. APPENDIX: ESM THESIS OR FINAL PROJECT Tool Description: The instructor survey evaluates the student’s performance against program outcomes. The thesis or final project integrates the knowledge, concepts, and skills associated with the entire sequence of study in the program. A senior or graduate student thesis or research project provides the student an opportunity to demonstrate a mastery of an array of skills and knowledge appropriate to ESM as well as to their specific study area of management. Factors that affect the collected data: How to interpret the data: Instructor and peer evaluations will be discussed and interpreted to determine if specific program knowledge and skills-based areas have been achieved. Project or thesis evaluation will be examined. Suggestions will be made for program improvement as related to student's research and thesis outcomes. Sample Survey. A sample survey is provided on the next page. Tabulating and Reporting Results Evaluation scores will be gathered by staff and tabulated and results given to faculty for review and discussion.
  • 19. APPENDIX: ALUMNI SURVEY Tool Description: An online survey will ask graduates to evaluate the program and course objectives as related to their individual work environments. These graduates are experienced managers, many with 10 plus years of on the job experience. Their evaluation will be greatly weighted. Factors that affect the collected data: Some graduates may not respond to the survey. The data may not reflect all areas of project management they do not respond. How to interpret the data: The survey results should be compiled and discussed among faculty members. These results should be compared with student surveys to see if they are inline with alumni evaluations. Tabulating and Reporting Results The survey is prepared by faculty, administered and collected online. Staff will tabulate the result and submit them for review to faculty. SOE_Engineering&ScienceMgmt_MS_Plan_Fall03.doc Submitted Fall 2003 Page 19 of 21
  • 20. APPENDIX: ENROLLMENT GROWTH Tool Description: Student enrollment in courses with particular interest in student credit hours (SCH) will show if the program is inline with student project management needs. Increase in growth will show program objects are being met. Decrease in enrollments will show a disinterest in the program and program and course objectives will need to be reviewed. Factors that affect the collected data: Student enrollment may be capped due to student maximum capacity per classroom. Available classroom size may dictate enrollment growth. Students may wish to enroll in a course but because of financial situations are not able. This would show a decrease in enrollment, not related to program interest or quality. How to interpret the data: Data should be compared on a semester basis with previous semester Program enrollments. Outcomes should be compared with student semester course evaluations. Outcomes should also be compared with overall UA and UAA enrollments. Sample Survey. A sample survey is provided on the next page. Tabulating and Reporting Results Results will be obtained from UA enrollment records and tabulated by staff. Faculty will discuss and outcomes used in the program review.
  • 21. APPENDIX: STUDENT COURSE EVALUATION AND COMMENT SHEET Tool Description: Students will determine whether or not course objectives have been met. Our students are practicing professionals, many having management jobs for more than 10 years. These professionals will offer valuable insight to course weaknesses and be able to offer suggestions for improvements. Factors that affect the collected data: Some students may not be present when the evaluation is given. In addition, the survey is voluntary and some students may choose not to participate. How to interpret the data: The survey should be reviewed for course weaknesses and suggestions for change and improvements be discussed with faculty and advisory board members. These results should be compared with current with educational and community needs as perceived by the faculty and the advisory board. Tabulating and Reporting Results Results will be tabulated via school staff. The attachment to the survey will be sent to the department chair and the instructor for evaluation. SOE_Engineering&ScienceMgmt_MS_Plan_Fall03.doc Submitted Fall 2003 Page 21 of 21

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