Earned Value Management Tutorial Module 1: Introduction to Earned Value Management Prepared by:
Module1: Introduction to Earned Value <ul><li>Welcome to Module 1. The objective of this module is to introduce you to Ear...
What is Earned Value Management? <ul><li>Earned Value Management (EVM) is a systematic approach to the integration and mea...
Why use Earned Value Management? <ul><li>By using Earned Value and implementing an Earned Value Management System (EVMS), ...
DOE guidance for Earned Value <ul><li>A memorandum from the Deputy Secretary of Energy, dated September 19, 2001…. </li></...
DOE guidance for Earned Value <ul><li>Current Department of Energy policy, DOE Order 413.3, Program and Project Management...
Earned Value Management History <ul><li>With the understanding of what Earned Value is and why it used, let’s take a brief...
Traditional Management vs. Earned Value Management <ul><li>To better understand Earned Value Management, let’s take a look...
Traditional Management <ul><li>In Traditional management, there are two data sources, the budget (or planned) expenditures...
Earned Value Management <ul><li>In Earned Value Management, unlike in traditional management, there are three data sources...
Earned Value Management <ul><li>Notice the three lines on the graph below. These lines correspond to the three components ...
Earned Value Management <ul><li>In addition to tracking budget and actual expenditures, the graph indicates  what has been...
Earned Value Management <ul><li>There are two conclusions the earned value data will immediately let you make; they deal w...
Earned Value Management <ul><li>Cost Variance - the project is experiencing a cost variance of -15. This is derived from c...
Summarizing Traditional Management vs. Earned Value Management <ul><li>In summarizing,  Traditional management provides yo...
Earned Value in a Management Environment <ul><li>Understanding how Earned Value fits into the program and project manageme...
What is Program/Project Management? <ul><li>Program/Project Management is the application of knowledge, skills, tools, and...
What is a Project vs. Program <ul><li>The Characteristics of a Project are: </li></ul><ul><li>Temporary endeavor undertake...
Earned Value Management vs Program/Project Management Earned Value is a Program/Project management technique used to objec...
Framework for an Earned Value Management System (EVMS) <ul><li>So far, we have discussed what Earned Value is, why to use ...
Inputs needed for Earned Value Management System (EVMS) <ul><li>As you recall, the first phase of Earned Value is inputs. ...
Earned Value Method needed for Earned Value Management System (EVMS) <ul><li>The second phase of Earned Value is the earne...
Outputs needed for Earned Value Management System (EVMS) <ul><li>The last phase of Earned Value is the outputs .  The outp...
Review of Module 1 <ul><li>“ You cannot manage what you cannot measure…and what gets measured gets done.” </li></ul><ul><l...
Summary of Module 1 <ul><li>At this point,   we have examined the basics of earned value. As explored previously, the foll...
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  • The graph show the unit on the vertical axis and the budgets and actual amounts on the horizontal axis. The horizontal axis uses months as the units. There are two lines. A blue line that represents actual cost and a red line that represents the amount budgets. The graph starts with January and status is through June. The actual cost line is above the budget line for every month.
  • The graph show the unit on the vertical axis and the budgets, actual amounts, and earned value on the horizontal axis. The horizontal axis uses months as the units. There are three lines. A blue line that represents actual cost, blue line that represents the amount budgets, and a black line that represents the earned value. The graph starts with January and status is through June. The actual cost line is above the budget line and earned value line for every month. Additionally the earned value line is above the budget line for every month. There is also a dashed blue line extending from the actual cost line. This dashed line represents the forecasted cost.
  • The graph show the unit on the vertical axis and the budgets, actual amounts, and earned value on the horizontal axis. The horizontal axis uses months as the units. There are three lines. A blue line that represents actual cost, blue line that represents the amount budgets, and a black line that represents the earned value. The graph starts with January and status is through June. The actual cost line is above the budget line and earned value line for every month. Additionally the earned value line is above the budget line for every month. There is also a dashed blue line extending from the actual cost line. This dashed line represents the forecasted cost.
  • The graph show the unit on the vertical axis and the budgets, actual amounts, and earned value on the horizontal axis. The horizontal axis uses months as the units. There are three lines. A blue line that represents actual cost, blue line that represents the amount budgets, and a black line that represents the earned value. The graph starts with January and status is through June. The actual cost line is above the budget line and earned value line for every month. Additionally the earned value line is above the budget line for every month. There is also a dashed blue line extending from the actual cost line. This dashed line represents the forecasted cost.
  • The graph show the unit on the vertical axis and the budgets, actual amounts, and earned value on the horizontal axis. The horizontal axis uses months as the units. There are three lines. A blue line that represents actual cost, blue line that represents the amount budgets, and a black line that represents the earned value. The graph starts with January and status is through June. The actual cost line is above the budget line and earned value line for every month. Additionally the earned value line is above the budget line for every month. There is also a dashed blue line extending from the actual cost line. This dashed line represents the forecasted cost.
  • A triangle with the word scope on the top edge, the word time on the bottom left edge, the word cost/resources on the bottom right edge and the word quality is in the middle of the triangle.
  • A graphic showing the input needed for earned value. These input are showed going into a box called Earned Value Management System. Then there is an arrow showing the outputs from the EVMS box. The graphic is emphasizing the inputs with shading.
  • A graphic showing the input needed for earned value. These input are showed going into a box called Earned Value Management System. Then there is an arrow showing the outputs from the EVMS box. The graphic is emphasizing the EVMS box with shading.
  • A graphic showing the input needed for earned value. These input are showed going into a box called Earned Value Management System. Then there is an arrow showing the outputs from the EVMS box. The graphic is emphasizing the outputs from the EVMS box with shading.
  • Earned Value Management Tutorial Module 1: Introduction to ...

    1. 1. Earned Value Management Tutorial Module 1: Introduction to Earned Value Management Prepared by:
    2. 2. Module1: Introduction to Earned Value <ul><li>Welcome to Module 1. The objective of this module is to introduce you to Earned Value and lay the blueprint for the succeeding modules. </li></ul><ul><li>This module will include the following topics: </li></ul><ul><li>Earned Value Management defined </li></ul><ul><li>The differences between Traditional Management and Earned Value Management </li></ul><ul><li>How Earned Value Management fits into a Program and Project environment </li></ul><ul><li>The framework necessary for proper Earned Value implementation </li></ul>
    3. 3. What is Earned Value Management? <ul><li>Earned Value Management (EVM) is a systematic approach to the integration and measurement of cost, schedule, and technical (scope) accomplishments on a project or task. It provides both the government and contractors the ability to examine detailed schedule information, critical program and technical milestones, and cost data. </li></ul><ul><li>Earned Value Management is intended to provide data from a contractor’s management system to the government in standard data elements that… </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Relate time-phased budgets to contract tasks </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Integrate cost, schedule, and technical performance </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Indicate work progress objectively </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Are valid, timely and auditable </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Are from the internal system the contractor uses to manage </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Are at a practical level of summarization </li></ul></ul>
    4. 4. Why use Earned Value Management? <ul><li>By using Earned Value and implementing an Earned Value Management System (EVMS), the following questions can be answered objectively : </li></ul><ul><li>Where have we been? </li></ul><ul><li>Where are we now? </li></ul><ul><li>Where are we going? </li></ul><ul><li>Why use Earned Value? For one, it is mandated by some key DOE directives and guidance that Earned Value will be implemented. The following pages will discuss these. </li></ul>
    5. 5. DOE guidance for Earned Value <ul><li>A memorandum from the Deputy Secretary of Energy, dated September 19, 2001…. </li></ul><ul><li>“ I intend to continue the direction contained in DOE Order 413.3. The responsibilities contained in the Order require that you know what is going on with your projects and that you assist your program managers and project managers in resolving issues and problems. The quarterly performance reviews, monthly status updates utilizing the Earned Value Management System as a metric, and periodic independent reviews are all sources for project information that allow us the opportunity to intercede before projects get off track.” </li></ul><ul><li>Now let’s look at the DOE Order 413.3 </li></ul>
    6. 6. DOE guidance for Earned Value <ul><li>Current Department of Energy policy, DOE Order 413.3, Program and Project Management for the Acquisition of Capital Assets, states the requirements for contractor’s project management system </li></ul><ul><li>“ The industry standard for project control systems described in American National Standards Institute (ANSI) EIA-748, Earned Value Management Systems, must be implemented on all projects with a total project cost (TPC) greater than $20M for control of project performance during the project execution phase.” </li></ul><ul><li>Finally, below let’s look at some Best Practice guidance currently in the DOE. </li></ul><ul><li>The Office of Field Management has issued a series of 33 Good Practice Guides. Though they are not official guidance, each guide describes the good practices used throughout DOE and industry for specific topic including Earned Value Management, and provides examples of performance objectives, criteria, and measures. </li></ul>
    7. 7. Earned Value Management History <ul><li>With the understanding of what Earned Value is and why it used, let’s take a brief look at the history of Earned Value. </li></ul><ul><li>1960s - Earned value-based performance management began in the 60s, based initially on Department of Defense (DOD) Cost/Schedule Control Systems Criteria (C/SCSC). </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Earned Value was used as an objective measure for progress, i.e., physical accomplishment </li></ul></ul><ul><li>1970s-80s – The DOD continued the use of Earned Value in response to bearing cost and schedule risk in cost-plus contracting. </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Contractors pushing high tech, newly developed weaponry </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Military having critical schedule needs (“Arms Race”) </li></ul></ul><ul><li>1990s – Policy moved Earned Value into all Federal agencies </li></ul><ul><ul><li>OMB Circular: A-11, NASA Policy Directive 9501.3, DOD 5000.2R, and DOE Order 413.3 to name a few </li></ul></ul>
    8. 8. Traditional Management vs. Earned Value Management <ul><li>To better understand Earned Value Management, let’s take a look at how earned value management compares with traditional management. </li></ul><ul><li>There is an important and fundamental difference between the data available for analysis in a traditional management environment as compared to an environment using earned value. </li></ul><ul><li>Following pages will discuss and contrast the different between the two management approaches. </li></ul>
    9. 9. Traditional Management <ul><li>In Traditional management, there are two data sources, the budget (or planned) expenditures and the actual expenditures. The comparison of budget versus actual expenditures merely indicates what was planned to be spent versus what was actually spent at any given time. But how much has been produced? </li></ul><ul><li>As you can see, with this approach there in no way to determine the physical amount of work performed. It does not indicate anything about what has actually been produced for the amount of money spent nor whether it is being produced at the rate, or according to the schedule, originally planned. In other words, it does not relate the true cost performance of the project. </li></ul>As the graph shows, this comparison only represents the relationship of what was budgeted (planned) versus what was actually spent. F 0 10 20 30 40 50 60 70 Budget 5 10 15 20 25 30 35 40 45 50 55 60 Actuals 10 20 30 40 50 60 J M A M J J A S O N D Time Now Time Now 0 10 20 30 40 50 60 70 Budget 5 10 15 20 25 30 35 40 45 50 55 60 Actuals 10 20 30 40 50 60 J M A M J J A S O N D Time Now Time Now
    10. 10. Earned Value Management <ul><li>In Earned Value Management, unlike in traditional management, there are three data sources: </li></ul><ul><ul><li>the budget (or planned) value of work scheduled </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>the actual value of work completed </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>the “earned value” of the physical work completed </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Earned Value takes these three data sources and is able to compare the budgeted value of work scheduled and compare it to the “earned value of physical work completed” and the actual value of work completed. </li></ul><ul><li>Let’s take a closer look at how earned value appears in a graph. </li></ul>
    11. 11. Earned Value Management <ul><li>Notice the three lines on the graph below. These lines correspond to the three components of earned value: budget (in red), actual expenditures (in blue), and the earned value of the production (in black). Note how the budget line is below both the actual expenditures and the earned value lines. What does this indicate? </li></ul><ul><li>First, it is obvious that the project is expending more (blue line) than it was budgeted to spend, to date </li></ul>(red line). Given the progression of each line, it is also apparent that this trend has occurred since the beginning of the project. But what else can be interpreted from the graph? Let’s take a closer look on the next page.
    12. 12. Earned Value Management <ul><li>In addition to tracking budget and actual expenditures, the graph indicates what has been completed or “earned”. </li></ul><ul><li>By comparing the budget line (in red) to the earned value line (in black), it is immediately apparent that the project is producing more than it was budgeted to produce to date. Additionally, by comparing the actual expenditures (in blue) to the earned value line (in black), it is immediately apparent that the project is spending more then it was budget to date. So while the project is expending more (blue line) than budgeted (red line), it is also producing more (black line) than budgeted. </li></ul><ul><li>So what conclusions can be drawn from this graph? Let’s find out on the next page. </li></ul>0 25 50 75 100 125 150 Budget 5 10 15 20 25 30 35 40 45 50 55 60 Actuals 10 20 30 40 50 60 Earned 8 15 25 30 35 45 Forecast 70 80 90 100 110 120 J F M A M J J A S O N D 0 25 50 75 100 125 150 5 10 15 20 25 30 35 40 45 50 55 60 10 20 30 40 50 60 8 15 25 30 35 45 70 80 90 100 110 120 J F M A M J J A S O N D Time Now
    13. 13. Earned Value Management <ul><li>There are two conclusions the earned value data will immediately let you make; they deal with schedule and cost variances. </li></ul><ul><li>Schedule Variance - the project is experiencing a schedule variance of 15. This is derived from comparing the Earned (45) to the Budget (30). Another way of stating this is that the project is ahead of schedule in comparison to what was supposed to be done in the frame time measured. </li></ul>0 25 50 75 100 125 150 Budget 5 10 15 20 25 30 35 40 45 50 55 60 Actuals 10 20 30 40 50 60 Earned 8 15 25 30 35 45 Forecast 70 80 90 100 110 120 J F M A M J J A S O N D 0 25 50 75 100 125 150 5 10 15 20 25 30 35 40 45 50 55 60 10 20 30 40 50 60 8 15 25 30 35 45 70 80 90 100 110 120 J F M A M J J A S O N D Time Now
    14. 14. Earned Value Management <ul><li>Cost Variance - the project is experiencing a cost variance of -15. This is derived from comparing the Earned (45) to the Actual expenditures (60). Another way of stating is that the project is experiencing an overrun of 15. This cost variance is very important because history tells us that overruns in cost do not correct themselves and need management intervention. </li></ul><ul><li>Along with the schedule and cost results discussed, earned value management enables you to forecast the final results of the project (blue dashed line). </li></ul>0 25 50 75 100 125 150 Budget 5 10 15 20 25 30 35 40 45 50 55 60 Actuals 10 20 30 40 50 60 Earned 8 15 25 30 35 45 Forecast 70 80 90 100 110 120 J F M A M J J A S O N D 0 25 50 75 100 125 150 5 10 15 20 25 30 35 40 45 50 55 60 10 20 30 40 50 60 8 15 25 30 35 45 70 80 90 100 110 120 J F M A M J J A S O N D Time Now
    15. 15. Summarizing Traditional Management vs. Earned Value Management <ul><li>In summarizing, Traditional management provides you with… </li></ul><ul><li>How much money and time a particular job is likely to require prior to starting and once stated, how much money was spent at any given time. </li></ul><ul><li>While Earned Value Management provides you with… </li></ul><ul><li>How much money and time a particular job is likely to require prior to starting and once stated, how much money was spent at any given time. </li></ul><ul><li>Plus </li></ul><ul><li>Once started, what work has been accomplished to date for the funds expended (what you got for what you spent) </li></ul><ul><li>Once started, what the total job will cost at completion, and how long it will take to complete </li></ul>
    16. 16. Earned Value in a Management Environment <ul><li>Understanding how Earned Value fits into the program and project management environment is also essential . </li></ul><ul><li>On the following page we will discuss and define items such as project vs. program, project management, program management and the relationship between them. </li></ul>
    17. 17. What is Program/Project Management? <ul><li>Program/Project Management is the application of knowledge, skills, tools, and techniques to meet or exceed stakeholder needs and expectations. </li></ul><ul><li>Program/Project Management requires the ability to get the job done: </li></ul><ul><ul><li>On Time! </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Within Budget! </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>According to Specifications! </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>With a High Level of Customer Satisfaction </li></ul></ul><ul><li>These requirements are know as the </li></ul><ul><li>“ Triple Constraint” </li></ul>So how do projects and programs differ? Take a look on the next page.
    18. 18. What is a Project vs. Program <ul><li>The Characteristics of a Project are: </li></ul><ul><li>Temporary endeavor undertaken to create a unique product or service </li></ul><ul><li>Having a definite beginning and a definite end </li></ul><ul><li>The Characteristics of a Program are: </li></ul><ul><li>A group of projects </li></ul><ul><li>Managed in a corresponding way </li></ul><ul><li>To obtain benefits not available from managing them individually </li></ul>
    19. 19. Earned Value Management vs Program/Project Management Earned Value is a Program/Project management technique used to objectively evaluate cost and schedule efficiency, thereby facilitating better management of customer needs and expectations. Program Management Project Management Budgeting Cost Proposals/Negotiations Cost Collection Change Control Earned Value Management Forecasting Funding Resource Management Reporting Risk Management Scheduling Earned Value Management is a subset of Program/Project Management. As this hierarchy indicates, Earned Value Management is a component of Project Management, which in turn is a component of Program Management. While many components comprise Program and Project Management, this tutorial focuses on the Earned Value Management component.
    20. 20. Framework for an Earned Value Management System (EVMS) <ul><li>So far, we have discussed what Earned Value is, why to use it, and how it fits into a program and project management environment. Next, we need to discuss the framework needed to implement earned value. </li></ul><ul><li>The EVMS framework can be divided into three phases: </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Inputs - what is needed to implement Earned Value </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Earned Value Methods – formulas, metrics and performance measurements used </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Outputs – reporting requirements (structure, time-phases, details) </li></ul></ul><ul><li>On the following pages these three phases for developing an Earned Value Management System (EVMS) will be discussed in more detail. </li></ul>
    21. 21. Inputs needed for Earned Value Management System (EVMS) <ul><li>As you recall, the first phase of Earned Value is inputs. The inputs required for an EVMS include: </li></ul><ul><li>Work Breakdown Structure (WBS) </li></ul><ul><li>Organizational Breakdown Structure (OBS) </li></ul><ul><li>Project Schedule </li></ul><ul><li>Time-phased Baseline Budget </li></ul><ul><li>Cost/Resource Control Plan </li></ul><ul><li>Change Control Plan </li></ul><ul><li>If any of these items are not completed or are not completed appropriately, the use of Earned Value will be compromised and your outputs will not properly represent the program/project current and future status. </li></ul>These Items are covered in Modules 2 through 4 and Module 8 Earned Value Management System Project Schedule Resource Planning Define/Assign Schedule/Budget Establish Baseline Accounting System WBS/OBS Actuals Plan Funding $$$ Performance Measurement Early Warning & Detection Informed Management Decisions Corrective Actions Recovering Planning
    22. 22. Earned Value Method needed for Earned Value Management System (EVMS) <ul><li>The second phase of Earned Value is the earned value method. The Earned Value method required for an EVMS include: </li></ul><ul><li>Planned Value (PV), Earned Value (EV) Actual Cost (AC) </li></ul><ul><li>Metrics and Performance Measurements </li></ul><ul><li>Forecasting </li></ul><ul><li>Integrated Baseline Review </li></ul><ul><li>Once again, if any of these items are not completed or are not completed appropriately, the use of Earned Value will be compromised and your outputs will not properly represent the program/project current and future status. </li></ul>These Items are covered in Modules 5 through 7 Earned Value Management System Project Schedule Resource Planning Define/Assign Schedule/Budget Establish Baseline Accounting System WBS/OBS Actuals Plan Funding $$$ Performance Measurement Early Warning & Detection Informed Management Decisions Corrective Actions Recovering Planning
    23. 23. Outputs needed for Earned Value Management System (EVMS) <ul><li>The last phase of Earned Value is the outputs . The outputs required for an EVMS include: </li></ul><ul><li>Reporting requirements </li></ul><ul><li>Proper Analysis of Reports </li></ul><ul><li>Correct Action taken </li></ul><ul><li>Even if the first two phases are completed appropriately, improper analysis of the outputs could cause inappropriate or inadequate actions to be taken against the program/project and could either create problems that otherwise would not exist or fail to fix the real problem that does exist. </li></ul>These Items are covered in Modules 9,10 & 12 Earned Value Management System Project Schedule Resource Planning Define/Assign Schedule/Budget Establish Baseline Accounting System WBS/OBS Actuals Plan Funding $$$ Performance Measurement Early Warning & Detection Informed Management Decisions Corrective Actions Recovering Planning
    24. 24. Review of Module 1 <ul><li>“ You cannot manage what you cannot measure…and what gets measured gets done.” </li></ul><ul><li>--- Bill Hewlett, Hewlett Packard </li></ul><ul><li>Reviewing the major items of this module: </li></ul><ul><li>Earned Value Management (EVM) is a systematic approach to the integration and measurement of cost, schedule, and technical (scope) accomplishments on a project or task </li></ul><ul><li>DOE Order 413.3 is the approved policy </li></ul><ul><li>In comparing Earned Value Management to Traditional Management, Traditional Management does not allow for analysis of the physical amount of work performed. Earned Value Management allows for both schedule and cost analysis against physical amount of work performed </li></ul><ul><li>Earned Value Management is a subset of Program/Project Management </li></ul><ul><li>EVMS can be divided into three phases (Inputs, Earned Value method, outputs) and all three most be completed appropriately for proper management of the program/project </li></ul>
    25. 25. Summary of Module 1 <ul><li>At this point, we have examined the basics of earned value. As explored previously, the following modules address in depth the components that comprise earned value to help you incorporate earned value into your projects. </li></ul><ul><li>If you have a firm grasp of the concepts covered in this module, you are ready to progress to the next modules. Otherwise, review this module again to ensure you have a solid understanding of the basics of the Earned Value Management System. </li></ul><ul><li>This concludes Module 1. </li></ul>
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