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  • Recap – video, what was the general atmosphere…. How did it make you or the person feel…… The point – the PMI’s practices that are generally accepted to work for most projects most of the time are designed to be collaborative. Collaboration Successful projects create successful people
  • What type of work gets done where, who is primarily responsible? Initiating - recognizing that a project of phase should begin and committing to doing so. is a managerial responsibility - Initiation - Understanding the request, getting commitment to move forward with a piece of work. Planning - Create the work plan and control plans, organizing the work - nothing more Execution - All the work that has to do with creating the product or service. From analysis, requirements, procurements, construction, testing, implementation, training. Controlling - All the work that has to do with tracking the progress and problems of the project, making changes, communicating and so on. Closing - Evaluation the project against it original objectives, wrapping up loose ends, turning over to maintenance, and celebrating.
  • It is the shortest of the processes or phases. It is important for it to be short. Statistics 35% Initiating 44 % Planning and Controls 15 % Executing 6 % Closing
  • New Def: Pg 362 PMBOK 3 rd Edition: Those processes performed to authorize and define the scope of a new phase or project…. A large number of the processes are typically done outside of the projects scope of control by the organization, program, or portfolio processes and those processes provide input to the projects initiating process group. Example - When my car is running really crappy I take it in and as a typical customer I walk right up to the counter and tell them, my car is running crappy - I think it needs the carburetor flushed. They ask me a few questions - like what are the symptoms, why do I think the Carb needs flushed. I tell them what happens, and explain I had another car 10 years ago that had the same symptoms and this is what they did. They write the stuff down, review it with me, and ask for authorization to take a look at it and call me back later in the morning, with an estimate. They call me back tell me actually it just needs a tune-up and oil change, and it will cost $125.00. If I want them to go ahead they can have the car ready by 5:00. Another scenario would be I have my car towed in and tell them that it stopped working and can’t be jumped, but I need it fixed by 5:00 to go to the airport. Again, they write the stuff down, review it with me, and ask for authorization to take a look at it and call me back later in the morning with an estimate of what the problem is and what it will cost and how much time it will take to get it working. They let me know it may not be possible to have the car by 5:00 depending on what it is they find is wrong.
  • What does each mean.
  • Think about any type of work you have been associated with – are some of these lessons familiar. Disagreement or dissatisfaction on what was to be delivered. Inability to distinguish if the business issue/need has been resolved – what constitutes the end of a project/phase. Inadequate, unknown, or unresponsive sponsorship and leadership direction. Severely over planned or under planned project/phase. Severe lengthening of time it takes to plan a project/phase
  • Think about any type of work you have been associated with – are some of these lessons familiar. Disagreement or dissatisfaction on what was to be delivered. Inability to distinguish if the business issue/need has been resolved – what constitutes the end of a project/phase. Inadequate, unknown, or unresponsive sponsorship and leadership direction. Severely over planned or under planned project/phase. Severe lengthening of time it takes to plan a project/phase
  • Product Description . The product description documents the characteristics of the product or service that the project is to create. Initially the product description may be a simple request from the customer in the form of an email, conversation, or more formally a memo or request for work. . Strategic Plans. All work requests should be supportive of the DHS Strategic Business Plan and the DHS Information Resources Management (IRM) Plan– the strategic plans of DHS should be considered as a factor in choosing to move forward with a project. . Project Selection Criteria . Criteria that aids in determining: if a piece of work should be managed as a project, level of potential project complexity, risk, and size the level of project management required . Historical Information . Information pertaining to prior projects or related work should be considered to the extent available. When initiation involves approval for the next phase of a project, information about the results of previous phases is often critical.
  • Product Description . The product description documents the characteristics of the product or service that the project is to create. Initially the product description may be a simple request from the customer in the form of an email, conversation, or more formally a memo or request for work. . Strategic Plans. All work requests should be supportive of the DHS Strategic Business Plan and the DHS Information Resources Management (IRM) Plan– the strategic plans of DHS should be considered as a factor in choosing to move forward with a project. . Project Selection Criteria . Criteria that aids in determining: if a piece of work should be managed as a project, level of potential project complexity, risk, and size the level of project management required . Historical Information . Information pertaining to prior projects or related work should be considered to the extent available. When initiation involves approval for the next phase of a project, information about the results of previous phases is often critical.
  • Review Template – Present Exercise
  • The process is a course of proven actions used to guide the organization through the initiating phase. Performing these activities have been proven to reduce the amount of risk and rework in later phases of a project. Performing the process is the primary effort, not creating a document. Creating the document or deliverable is secondary. The following illustrates the process actions and end product or deliverable:
  • The purpose of this activity is to quickly establish a common understanding, of the business need or problem to be resolved, between the initial champions of the idea and OIS. The bulk of this information should be obtained in a single informal meeting. Establishing the common understanding involves discussing and confirming the need for the product or service, defining in broad terms what the end result will be, and the benefit to be obtained by producing a solution. 2.  Charter - as we present the Initiation workshop refer to the business case and discuss in an open dialogue the types of things you would place in each of the different sections within the charter and the types of resources you would probably need, including change management structure or BTM. Discuss the BTCA in the workshop and provide a general construct for a BTCA within the workshop. (i.e. low complexity - move less than 100 miles, moderate - more than 100, less than 300, high complexity - more than 300 miles).
  • What is it that you like about that solution? What are the current problems that this solution will fix. When we’re done, if we do it right, what will you have, what will be the effect. What business purpose does the solution serve, what business functions, what business service?
  • The tools and techniques of the initiating phase assist the organization in assessing if a piece of work should be managed as a project, and clarifying the potential project’s initial complexity, risk, and size.
  • Business and Technical Complexity Assessment – is a simple assessment of both the business complexity and the technical complexity of a potential project. It is designed to take an individual or group 15 minutes to complete. It is an exercise that has the participant rate 7-8 business complexity attributes and technical complexity attributes on a scale from one to five. Once the ratings have been determined, a trend can be obtained for both the business complexity and technical complexity. Expert Judgement – Expertise on assessing a project may be provided by a group or individual with specialized knowledge in project management. The expert(s) must be able to, with limited information, judge the complexities of a potential project and make a solid recommendation of the amount and level of planning and controls needed for the potential project. A project may use expert consulting in lieu of a complexity assessment, as long as the expert(s) is recognized by the organization as such.
  • This is a simple assessment of both the business complexity and the technical complexity of a potential project. It is designed to take an individual or group 15 minutes to complete. It is an exercise that has the participant(s) rate 7-8 business complexity attributes and technical complexity attributes on a scale from one to five. These rating are used to determine a business complexity and technical complexity trend to guide the amount of project management planning and controls.
  • The following matrix are used to determine the business complexity. The assumption is that the participants have very limited data on the business request. Start by using a completed Business Case to provide a brief, common understanding of the business need. The matrices are completed by reviewing each criteria and providing a rating from a "1" low to "5" high . Criteria that do not apply should be rated as "NA" Not Applicable. It is important to note that the absolute accuracy of each score is not necessary, because the final result will be based on a scoring trend. If a group is completing the matrices, each member should individually rate the criteria. The group should then discuss the scores that are different and consensus to a final rating.
  • The following matrix are used to determine the business complexity. It is best to have a person, from your group or a facilitator that is not involved with the work that can facilitate through the matrices - without voting. Common mistakes made is rating on one technical attribute and adding the bases of another. I.e. trying to rate technology and platform and the groups experience with it.
  • Determining a Trend Once the complexity criteria have been scored it is necessary to obtain the business complexity and technical complexity trends. This is not an average . An average would have been 3. The column that has been checked the most determines the trend. For example, three “4s”, two “5s”, two “2s” and three “NAs” on the business matrix would indicate a business complexity trend of “4”. NA criteria are excluded from the overall score. To obtain a trend where there is an evenly distributed set of scores, use the scores from the criteria that more heavily impact this particular project.
  • Using the results Once both the trends are obtained they are used to guide the selection of project management planning and controls appropriate for a project. This is most easily understood by plotting the two scores on a simple grid. A business trend “5” and technical trend “3” are illustrated in the following grid. The grid has been divided into 3 areas. The trends of 5/3 have fallen in the top area “High Complexity”, indicating that the potential project will be difficult to plan and manage and the overall risk of the potential project or phase is high. The results are used both as input to the executive summary and to Charter a project. Medium and High Complexity Projects must be presented in Executive Summary Format to OIS.
  • If a potential projects trends are 5/5, management should seriously consider breaking the project into more manageable pieces. For example a Feasibility Study, a Requirements Analysis, or core functionality only. If it is decided that the work should be delivered in smaller pieces, the project charter should be changed to reflect this decision, and the new work should be assessed using this technique. If the trends are 1/1, management should not consider this piece of work as a project. The delivery of a solution is routine, requires minimal coordination, and contains little to no risk. See Handout -
  • The final activity is to obtain agreements on how the project should be planned and managed. The sponsor and project manager work together in creation of the project charter.
  • The next step is to get concurrence that the concept should move on into a planned work effort, or be canceled or shelved until a later point in time.
  • The concept is presented to management for a go/no-go decision. In some case this may be an escalation of presentations, i.e. business management, OIS Executive Staff, Information Technology Governing Council (ITGC). In some cases it will be a meeting between an OIS manager, and business manager. Besides getting a decision to proceed with chartering a project, at minimum, a single sponsor and project planner should be assigned.
  • Review the T&F handout with class.

Department of Human Services Project Management ... Department of Human Services Project Management ... Presentation Transcript

  • Department of Human Services Project Management Office Project Initiation
  • Agenda Items
    • Background - Project and Project Management
    • What is Project Initiation
      • Inputs – Business Case
      • Process Overview
      • Outputs - Project Charter
    • Help and References
  • Training Goal
    • To understand the Initiation process, it’s purpose and benefits.
    • To learn enough about the process to begin using it.
    • To know where you can access the process and any of the supporting materials.
  • What is a Project?
    • Temporary endeavor with a beginning and an end.
    • Creates unique product, service or result.
    • Is progressively elaborated.
    • Obtains objective then terminates.
  • What is Project Management
    • Application of knowledge, skills, tools, and techniques to project activities to meet or exceed stakeholder needs and expectations from a project.
    • The State of Oregon agencies agree to use the methodologies and processes developed and outlined by the Project Management Institute (PMI).
  • Project Approach Project Management Approach (Participatory) Project Manager (Control with Fear) v.s. Darth Vader School of Management
  • Where Initiating Fits Where BTM Fits Initiate Plan Execute Control Close Strategic Tactical Physical
  • Where Initiating Fits Level of Activity Start Finish Time Initiate Execute Close Monitoring and Control Plan
  • What Initiation is and is not
    • It is launching a process that can result in the authorization and preliminary scope definition of a new project.
    • It is determining how much is known and committing resources to an appropriate course of action.
    • It is not completing a feasibility study, a preliminary plan, or some other equivalent form of analysis.
  • Initiating Objectives
    • Obtain a common understanding of the issue to be resolved by a project/phase.
    • Provide clear and, as far as possible, measurable objectives that a project/phase must deliver based upon the business case.
    • (continued)
  • Initiating Objectives (continued)
    • Provide the initial scope on which a project/phase will be planned.
    • Verify or obtain sponsorship, organizational commitment, and assign key leadership roles.
    • Obtain an initial agreement on how it will be planned and controlled.
  • Potential Issues
    • Disagreement or dissatisfaction on what was to be delivered.
    • Inability to distinguish if the business issue/need has been resolved .
    • Inadequate, unknown, or unresponsive sponsorship and leadership direction.
  • Potential Issues (continued)
    • Severe over planned or under planned project/phase.
    • Severe lengthening of time it takes to plan a project/phase.
    • Lack of acceptance by the community.
  • Initiating Inputs
    • A Business Case
    • Historical Information
      • if available
      • Earlier phase of same project
      • Former project charters
      • Info from a similar projects
    • Stakeholders
  • Initiating Inputs - Continued
    • Project Selection Criteria - to determine
      • if the request should be managed as a project
      • level of potential project complexity, risk, size
      • appropriate level of project management needed
    • Strategic Plans:
      • DHS Strategic Business Plan
      • DHS Information Resource (IRM) Plan
  • DHS Business Case
    • Why do a Business Case?
    • Who is involved?
    • What are the key decision points?
  • Initiating Process Overview Inputs Quick Assessment Technique Develop Product Scope, Risks and Service Objectives and Initial Project Organization 2 Outline Initial Membership, Resources and Obtain Authorities for a Project/Phase 3 Outputs Clarify the Business Concept/Objectives 1
  • 1. Clarify the Business Concept
    • Establish a common Understanding
      • Discuss, understand, and confirm the need
      • Clarify -- what is the problem or issue
      • Define in broad terms what the end result is to be.
      • Clarify the understanding of the benefits – to the customer, and/or a strategic plan.
      • Do not ask the customer to fill out a form.
    Jointly performed by initial champions - Sponsor & PM
  • Tips to uncovering and clarifying a need - ASK
    • What is it that you like about your solution?
    • What are the current problems that this solution will fix?
    • When we’re done, if we do it right, what will you have, what will be the effect?
    • What business purpose does the solution serve, what business functions, what business service?
    Benefits End Results Need Problem
  • Quick Assessment Techniques
    • The purpose of the Initiating Techniques is to assess and clarify:
      • how much is known
      • determine and agree upon the general size of the project,
      • and agree on the best approach - determine amount of planning & controls,
      • the potential project’s risks,
      • required for this size of project.
      • Assessment is early, with limited data, and the results
      • used to confirm understanding and determine initial levels of planning and controls needed.
  • Two Quick Assessment Techniques
    • Business and Technical Complexity Assessment
      • Provides a consistent way to uncover the known and unknown complexities of a piece of work
      • Provides the opportunity to quickly discuss and obtain the results from various points of view.
    • Expert Judgment
      • used in lieu of a complexity assessment, as long as the expert(s) is recognized by the customer and organization as such.
  • Business & Technical Complexity Assessment
    • Designed for a small group to take 15 minutes to complete.
    • 21 business and technical complexity attributes are rated on a scale of one to five, or not applicable.
    • The rating are used to determine a business and technical complexity trend.
  • Business Complexity Assessment The
  • Technical Complexity Assessment
  • Determining a Trend 3
  • Using the Results BC = 5 TC = 3 Result - Potential High Complexity
    • Extreme Trends
    • Low Complexity Trends
    • Medium Complexity Trends
    • High Complexity Trends
    • Hybrids
    Using the Results for Chartering Chartering
  • 2. Initial Project Organization
    • Product Scope Statement
      • Product and Service Objectives
      • Product Scope
      • Product Risks
      • Other Related Projects
    Jointly performed by initial champions - Sponsor & PM
  • 3. Project Organization
    • The sponsor and project manager identify, negotiate, and agree upon:
      • Who has ultimate authority of what’s being developed?
      • What’s the purpose of the ‘Project’ ?
  • Obtain Authorities
    • The final activity - is to use the inputs from previous steps to obtain agreements on how the work should be managed.
    • The sponsor and project manager identify, negotiate, and agree upon:
      • The level/selection of plans and controls
      • Initial Project Leadership Team(s)
      • Other groups involvement with the work
  • Present the Concept for Go/No go a planned work effort - of some type, or to cancel or postpone the concept until a later point in time. The purpose of this step is either to get approval to move forward with:
  • Present the Concept to Management
    • In some cases this may be an escalation of presentations to Business Management.
    • If project contains an IT component:
      • A meeting with an OIS and Business Manager .
      • Than maybe -- OIS Exec Staff,
      • Information Technology Governing Council (ITGC).
  • Output – Project Charter
    • Primary product objectives
    • Assumptions
    • Clear guidance on how the project should be planned and managed
    • Constraints regarding scope, staffing, scheduling, and management of the project.
    • Management approval given.
    • Project Leadership Team assigned.
  • Initiation - Key Points
    • Obtain a common understanding of the business need and issue,
    • Provide the initial scope,
    • Commit resources,
    • Provide clear business objectives,
    • Obtain sponsorship, organizational commitment, and assign key leadership roles,
    • Obtain agreement on how the project will be planned and managed.
  • Applicability of DHS Core Values to Project Management                                                                                                              Professionalism Responsibility Stewardship Integrity Respect
  • Help and References
    • Available on the PMO Web site:
      • Project Management Process Guide
      • Initiating Templates
      • Initiating Examples
      • Initiating Technique - Assessment
      • http://www.oregon.gov/DHS/admin/pmo/
    • Contact the BPM for assistance
      • email – Joan.H.Riley@state.or.us
      • phone – 503-378-3355
  •  
  • Additional Questions
  • Please take some time for Class Evaluation! Please fill out both sides .