LBNL Project Management Training Series January 2003
Project Management Training <ul><li>ISS in partnership with the Integrated Project Management Office will provide four lev...
ISS/IPMO Project Management Series   Executive Briefing on Project Management Project Management Overview IT Application S...
Why this series of classes? <ul><li>Introduce the LBNL project management strategy with its roles and responsibilities </l...
LBNL Project Management Overview <ul><li>LBNL </li></ul><ul><li>Project Management Overview </li></ul>January 2003
Objectives <ul><li>Describe the basic concepts of project management </li></ul><ul><li>Describe the LBNL project managemen...
Agenda <ul><li>Introduction to Project Management </li></ul><ul><li>Project Initiation </li></ul><ul><li>Project Planning ...
A.  Introduction to Project Management A.  Introduction to Project Management
What is a Project? <ul><li>Temporary   Has a  definite beginning and end , not an  </li></ul><ul><li>on-going effort. </li...
Projects in Contrast to Operations <ul><li>Projects </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Finite duration </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Speci...
The 3 Dependent Variables of a Project What are you going to do for me? How much money do I have to pay? When can I get it...
Project Definition & Constraints The project must be able to control at least one of these. If all three are constrained, ...
Project Definition & Constraints <ul><li>Schedule and resources are often finite </li></ul><ul><li>Sometimes scope (object...
Project Definition & Constraints “  Interactions with those beyond your control who can  influence your chance of success”...
Project Definition & Constraints <ul><li>Environment  may  be supportive of high-quality,  </li></ul><ul><li>high-quantity...
Project Definition & Constraints <ul><li>Access </li></ul><ul><ul><li>can you see whom/what you need for     research/idea...
Why Projects Fail <ul><li>Lack of user involvement </li></ul><ul><li>Lack of management system </li></ul><ul><li>Lack of w...
What is Project Management? <ul><li>The application of knowledge, skills, </li></ul><ul><li>tools, and techniques to proje...
Project Management <ul><li>Meeting or exceeding stakeholder needs and expectations of a project </li></ul><ul><li>Maintain...
Functional & Project Management <ul><li>Functional Management </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Well-defined steady state operation </...
Project Management Expertise Areas <ul><li>Integration Management </li></ul><ul><li>Scope Management </li></ul><ul><li>Tim...
Expectations for the Project Manager <ul><li>Get to Done </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Quality </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Schedule...
The Attributes of a Project Manager <ul><li>The intelligence of Einstein </li></ul><ul><li>The patience of two saints </li...
Project Methodology <ul><li>Why do we need one? </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Provides a consistent framework for all projects to ...
Methodology – Cradle to Grave <ul><li>Initiation </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Project request </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Project ...
Project Life Cycle Phases Initiating Planning Controlling Executing Closing
Characteristics of Life Cycle <ul><li>Defines the beginning and end of the project </li></ul><ul><li>Deliverables are usua...
Characteristics of Life Cycle   (cont.) <ul><li>Cost and staffing levels are low at the start, higher towards the end, and...
Phase Characteristics <ul><li>Deliverables   Tangible, verifiable work products </li></ul><ul><li>Reviews   Evaluation of ...
Detailed Project Life Cycle Adapted from The Strategic Project Office , J. K. Crawford Deliverables  Review Lessons Learne...
Project Initiation B.  Project Initiation
Project Initiation  <ul><li>Project Request </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Scope and objectives </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Business...
The Project Charter <ul><li>Purpose </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Recognizes existence of the project </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>D...
The Project Charter <ul><li>Content </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Project description </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Business backgrou...
C.  Project Planning C.  Project Planning
Project Planning Project Planning <ul><li>Purpose: to determine </li></ul><ul><ul><li>What needs to be done </li></ul></ul...
Project Planning <ul><li>Integration Management </li></ul><ul><li>Scope Management </li></ul><ul><li>Time Management </li>...
Integration Management Integration Management <ul><li>Project plan development </li></ul><ul><li>Project plan execution </...
Scope   Management Scope Management <ul><li>Initiation </li></ul><ul><li>Scope planning </li></ul><ul><li>Scope definition...
Time Management Time Management <ul><li>Activity identification </li></ul><ul><li>Activity sequencing </li></ul><ul><li>Ac...
Cost Management Cost Management <ul><li>Financial resource planning </li></ul><ul><li>Cost estimating </li></ul><ul><li>Co...
Quality Management Quality Management <ul><li>Chartering </li></ul><ul><li>Quality planning </li></ul><ul><li>Quality asse...
HR Management Human Resources Management <ul><li>Organizational planning </li></ul><ul><li>Team recruitment </li></ul><ul>...
Communications Management <ul><li>Communications planning </li></ul><ul><li>Information distribution </li></ul><ul><li>Per...
Communications Management <ul><li>Audience  –  Who needs to know? </li></ul><ul><li>Message  –  What do they need to know?...
Risk Management Risk Management <ul><li>Risk management planning </li></ul><ul><li>Risk identification </li></ul><ul><li>Q...
Risk Management <ul><li>Reactive – managing surprises, “ putting out fires ” </li></ul><ul><li>Proactive – risk avoidance,...
Procurement Management Procurement Management <ul><li>Procurement planning </li></ul><ul><li>Solicitation planning </li></...
Change Management <ul><li>A set of formal procedures that provide for  </li></ul><ul><li>the orderly control of change in ...
Project Organization - Overview <ul><li>Functional Organization </li></ul><ul><li>Matrix Organization </li></ul><ul><li>Pr...
Functional Organization Light colored boxes:  involved in projects Project Coordination
<ul><li>Specialists grouped by function </li></ul><ul><li>Difficult to cross functional lines </li></ul><ul><li>Barriers e...
Light colored boxes:  involved in projects Project Coordination Matrix Organization
<ul><li>Multiple-command system </li></ul><ul><li>Individuals from functional areas assigned on temporary basis to Project...
<ul><li>Advantages </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Visible objectives </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Efficient utilization of resources ...
Project Coordination Light colored boxes: involved in projects Projectized Organization
<ul><li>Emerges from functional when latter impedes progress </li></ul><ul><li>Line of authority is the Project Manager </...
Project Coordination Balanced Matrix Organization Light colored boxes: involved in projects
PM A PM B PM C FMA FM B FM C Organic Projectized Organization
Organic Projectized Organization <ul><li>Core teams </li></ul><ul><li>Strategic alignments </li></ul><ul><li>Functional an...
Work Breakdown Structure - Overview A method to achieve  logical decomposition   of a large, complex thing The Whole Its P...
Work Breakdown Structure (WBS) <ul><li>The WBS is a framework for identifying and displaying all activities the team must ...
Work Breakdown Structure (WBS) roll up to roll up to Project WBS Work Components Deliverables Task Task Task Task
WBS Example <ul><li>Build Project Management Courseware ( project ) </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Build Overview Courseware ( work...
Project Scheduling - Overview <ul><li>Concentrate on deliverables / milestones </li></ul><ul><li>Assume fulltime dedicatio...
The Project Activities Network <ul><li>Project Schedule Goal: </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Optimum use of required resources  </l...
Project Activities Network Functions <ul><li>The Project Activities Network will help determine the following important in...
Time Planning <ul><li>Backward </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Due date is given </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>“ Time Boxed” </li></ul>...
Backward Planning <ul><li>Choose agreeable go live dates </li></ul><ul><li>Choose user acceptance testing dates (same rule...
Forward Planning <ul><li>Is classical textbook planning </li></ul><ul><li>Is best done using project planning software </l...
Forward Planning 1. Solidify Deliverables “ If you don’t know where you want to go, then it doesn’t much matter what you p...
Project Resources - Overview <ul><li>After a project time schedule is developed, plans should be prepared which identify t...
Resource Leveling <ul><li>After the initial scheduling of tasks, it is common to find that one or more resources are overb...
D. Project Execution and Control D.  Project Execution and Control
Project Execution and Control <ul><li>Lead </li></ul><ul><li>Delegate </li></ul><ul><li>Communicate </li></ul><ul><li>Coor...
Project Closing E.  Project Closing
Closing a Project <ul><li>Obtain approvals – proof of completion </li></ul><ul><li>Ensure user and stakeholder satisfactio...
LBNL Enterprise Computing F.  LBNL Enterprise Computing (EC)
LBNL Project Management Strategy  <ul><li>Strengthen partnership between technical and functional organizations </li></ul>...
From Strategy To Projects Strategy Programs Purpose Benefits Projects Reviews Integrated Project Management Office Influence
Project Related Endeavors <ul><li>Strategy  –  A framework guiding those choices that determine the nature and direction t...
EC Project Structure IT Technical Specialists Project Steering Committee End User Business Specialists Internal Audit Proj...
EC Project Oversight Project Director IT Technical Specialists Project Steering Committee Project Manager End User Busines...
EC Program Structure Enterprise Computing Program CIO ECSC BLIS Project Director Diana Brown IT Technical Specialists Inte...
EC Roles and Responsibilities <ul><li>Approves Enterprise Computing Program Plan </li></ul><ul><li>Approves Program-sponso...
EC Roles and Responsibilities <ul><li>Chair of Enterprise Computing Steering Committee (ECSC) – makes recommendations to P...
EC Roles and Responsibilities <ul><li>Joint authors/owners of Enterprise Computing Program Plan </li></ul><ul><li>Prioriti...
EC Roles and Responsibilities <ul><li>Senior manager of a business area </li></ul><ul><li>Submits budget requests for Prog...
EC Roles and Responsibilities <ul><li>Executive Program Manager </li></ul><ul><li>Responsible for maintaining Program/Proj...
EC Roles and Responsibilities <ul><li>Acts as a resource to provide Program and project management assistance and training...
EC Roles and Responsibilities <ul><li>Selected from the functional and technical areas impacted by the project </li></ul><...
EC Roles and Responsibilities <ul><li>Supports the project team in identifying internal controls </li></ul><ul><li>Acts as...
EC Roles and Responsibilities <ul><li>Senior Manager with authority for project execution </li></ul><ul><li>Held accountab...
EC Roles and Responsibilities <ul><li>Recommended by the Project Director and the Program Coordinator with concurrence of ...
EC Roles and Responsibilities EC Roles and Responsibilities <ul><li>Provides technical expertise </li></ul><ul><li>Conduct...
EC Roles and Responsibilities EC Roles and Responsibilities <ul><li>Represents constituents and serves as communication co...
EC Roles and Responsibilities EC Roles and Responsibilities <ul><li>Serves as subject matter expert </li></ul><ul><li>Work...
Enterprise Computing Program Methodology Project Director Project Management Team Project Sponsor/Director Project  Team P...
ECSC Project Initiation   <ul><li>Project Request </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Includes return on investment (ROI) estimate </li>...
ECSC Project Planning   <ul><li>Approved charter authorizes project planning process </li></ul><ul><li>Project Plan </li><...
ECSC Project Planning   <ul><li>Project Plan </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Reviewed by Program Coordinator and IPMO prior to submi...
ECSC Project Execution and Control   <ul><li>Project Change Management </li></ul><ul><li>Risk Management </li></ul><ul><li...
ECSC Project Close   <ul><li>End deliverables review and acceptance </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Project Sponsor </li></ul></ul><...
Summary G.  Recommended Reading
Recommended Reading <ul><li>Project Retrospectives: A Handbook for Team Reviews by Norman L. Kerth </li></ul><ul><li>Contr...
Recommended Reading <ul><li>Quality Software Management, Vol. 1: Systems Thinking by Gerald M. Weinberg </li></ul><ul><li>...
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Class 1: Project Management Overview

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Class 1: Project Management Overview

  1. 1. LBNL Project Management Training Series January 2003
  2. 2. Project Management Training <ul><li>ISS in partnership with the Integrated Project Management Office will provide four levels of customized training: </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Executive Briefing </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Project Management Overview </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>IT Application Specific Project Management </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>In-Depth Project Management </li></ul></ul>
  3. 3. ISS/IPMO Project Management Series Executive Briefing on Project Management Project Management Overview IT Application Specific Project Management In-Depth Project Management
  4. 4. Why this series of classes? <ul><li>Introduce the LBNL project management strategy with its roles and responsibilities </li></ul><ul><li>Share project management concepts and terminology with IT customers </li></ul><ul><li>Increase project management skills of IT staff </li></ul>Note: These classes will not train you how to use a project management software tool.
  5. 5. LBNL Project Management Overview <ul><li>LBNL </li></ul><ul><li>Project Management Overview </li></ul>January 2003
  6. 6. Objectives <ul><li>Describe the basic concepts of project management </li></ul><ul><li>Describe the LBNL project management strategy </li></ul><ul><li>Describe your placement in the new project management organization </li></ul><ul><li>Use project management terms consistent with their approved definitions </li></ul><ul><li>Access additional references about project management </li></ul>By the end of this course, you will be able to:
  7. 7. Agenda <ul><li>Introduction to Project Management </li></ul><ul><li>Project Initiation </li></ul><ul><li>Project Planning </li></ul><ul><li>Project Execution and Control </li></ul><ul><li>Project Closing </li></ul><ul><li>LBNL Enterprise Computing </li></ul><ul><li>Recommended Reading </li></ul>
  8. 8. A. Introduction to Project Management A. Introduction to Project Management
  9. 9. What is a Project? <ul><li>Temporary Has a definite beginning and end , not an </li></ul><ul><li>on-going effort. </li></ul><ul><li>Ceases when objectives have been attained. </li></ul><ul><li>Unique The deliverable or service is different in </li></ul><ul><li>some way from other deliverable or services. </li></ul><ul><li>Deliverable characteristics are progressively </li></ul><ul><li>elaborated. </li></ul>A temporary endeavor undertaken to create a unique deliverable or service
  10. 10. Projects in Contrast to Operations <ul><li>Projects </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Finite duration </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Specific goal </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Exploits resources </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Uses infrastructure </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Operations </li></ul><ul><ul><li>On going </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Continuous service </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Provides resources </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Provides infrastructure </li></ul></ul>
  11. 11. The 3 Dependent Variables of a Project What are you going to do for me? How much money do I have to pay? When can I get it? • Technical Performance (Scope) • Cost (Resources) • Schedule
  12. 12. Project Definition & Constraints The project must be able to control at least one of these. If all three are constrained, the project is incapable of adapting to (inevitable) change. SCOPE RESOURCES SCHEDULE
  13. 13. Project Definition & Constraints <ul><li>Schedule and resources are often finite </li></ul><ul><li>Sometimes scope (objectives and boundary) waxes infinite </li></ul><ul><li>Ensure stakeholder agreement on project constraints </li></ul>X Scope X Resources X Schedule Open Optimizeable Fixed
  14. 14. Project Definition & Constraints “ Interactions with those beyond your control who can influence your chance of success” - Robert Block <ul><li>Politics is an organic part of organizational life </li></ul><ul><ul><li>we can evaluate the intentions toward which </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>others play politics </li></ul></ul>Project Politics:
  15. 15. Project Definition & Constraints <ul><li>Environment may be supportive of high-quality, </li></ul><ul><li>high-quantity work </li></ul><ul><ul><li>can you create privacy? </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>how many square feet of floor are yours? </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Fragmentation of participant loyalties/energies </li></ul><ul><ul><li>how many assignments are currently on your desk? </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Cross-purposes among team/community members </li></ul><ul><ul><li>what is your project within the formal project? </li></ul></ul>
  16. 16. Project Definition & Constraints <ul><li>Access </li></ul><ul><ul><li>can you see whom/what you need for research/ideas? </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>can you get the decisions you need when you </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>need them? </li></ul></ul>
  17. 17. Why Projects Fail <ul><li>Lack of user involvement </li></ul><ul><li>Lack of management system </li></ul><ul><li>Lack of well-defined deliverables </li></ul><ul><li>Poor communications </li></ul><ul><li>Poor change management </li></ul><ul><li>Incorrect technical architecture </li></ul><ul><li>Inadequate planning </li></ul><ul><li>Lack of sponsorship & functional commitment </li></ul><ul><li>Inability to manage risk and uncertainty </li></ul>
  18. 18. What is Project Management? <ul><li>The application of knowledge, skills, </li></ul><ul><li>tools, and techniques to project </li></ul><ul><li>activities in order to meet or exceed </li></ul><ul><li>stakeholder needs and expectations </li></ul>Stakeholders : Individuals and organizations involved in or affected by the project activities
  19. 19. Project Management <ul><li>Meeting or exceeding stakeholder needs and expectations of a project </li></ul><ul><li>Maintaining the balance of </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Scope / resources / schedule </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Various stakeholder expectations </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Identified requirements (needs) Unidentified requirements (expectations) </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Iterative and continuous </li></ul>
  20. 20. Functional & Project Management <ul><li>Functional Management </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Well-defined steady state operation </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Organized along discipline and functional lines </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Small, incremental changes </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Project Management </li></ul><ul><ul><li>New activity in finite duration of time </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Organization cuts across functional lines </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>New systems and new technology </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Unless home-based, organization ends with project end </li></ul></ul>
  21. 21. Project Management Expertise Areas <ul><li>Integration Management </li></ul><ul><li>Scope Management </li></ul><ul><li>Time Management </li></ul><ul><li>Cost Management </li></ul><ul><li>Quality Management </li></ul><ul><li>Resource Management </li></ul><ul><li>Communications Management </li></ul><ul><li>Risk Management </li></ul><ul><li>Procurement Management </li></ul>
  22. 22. Expectations for the Project Manager <ul><li>Get to Done </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Quality </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Schedule </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Costs </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Set up the Future </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Support model </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Useful, usable and accessible documentation </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Skills Needed*: </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Communication </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Organization </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Budgeting </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Problem Solving </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Negotiation & Influencing </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Leading </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Team Building & Human Resources </li></ul></ul>*as defined by the Project Management Institute (PMI)
  23. 23. The Attributes of a Project Manager <ul><li>The intelligence of Einstein </li></ul><ul><li>The patience of two saints </li></ul><ul><li>The integrity of a Supreme Court Justice </li></ul><ul><li>The negotiating skills of a Mongolian Horse Trader </li></ul><ul><li>The savvy of James Bond </li></ul><ul><li>The charisma of Sir Ralph Richardson </li></ul><ul><li>The communication skills of Tom Peters </li></ul><ul><li>The planning skills of General Schwartzkopf </li></ul><ul><li>The personal drive of Donald Trump </li></ul><ul><li>The skin of an armadillo </li></ul><ul><li>The ego of Mother Theresa </li></ul>As Listed in “On Time / On Budget”
  24. 24. Project Methodology <ul><li>Why do we need one? </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Provides a consistent framework for all projects to follow throughout the project life cycle </li></ul></ul>The basic source of information for the processes, standards, approaches, practices, tools, techniques, templates and checklists used for managing projects
  25. 25. Methodology – Cradle to Grave <ul><li>Initiation </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Project request </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Project Charter </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Planning </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Project Plan </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Standards and procedures </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Execution and Control </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Development </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Reporting and status monitoring </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Change management </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Close </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Completion of requirements </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Lessons learned </li></ul></ul>
  26. 26. Project Life Cycle Phases Initiating Planning Controlling Executing Closing
  27. 27. Characteristics of Life Cycle <ul><li>Defines the beginning and end of the project </li></ul><ul><li>Deliverables are usually approved before work starts on the next phase </li></ul><ul><li>Sometimes a subsequent phase is begun prior to approval of the previous phase. This is called fast tracking. </li></ul><ul><li>Defines technical work and implementers </li></ul>
  28. 28. Characteristics of Life Cycle (cont.) <ul><li>Cost and staffing levels are low at the start, higher towards the end, and drop as project closes </li></ul><ul><li>Probability of project success is low at the start of the project and gets progressively higher as the project continues </li></ul><ul><li>Cost of changes and of error correction generally increases as the project continues </li></ul>
  29. 29. Phase Characteristics <ul><li>Deliverables Tangible, verifiable work products </li></ul><ul><li>Reviews Evaluation of deliverables and project performance </li></ul><ul><li>Phase Exit Criteria Measurements used to determine </li></ul><ul><li>if a project should go into next phase </li></ul>
  30. 30. Detailed Project Life Cycle Adapted from The Strategic Project Office , J. K. Crawford Deliverables Review Lessons Learned Post Implementation Project Completion Manage Cost, Schedule, Resource Variance Control Changes Manage Performance to Requirements Manage Risk Phase Assessment Manage and Control Project Project Request Project Start Up Project Charter Phase Assessment Manage Technical Performance Control Changes Manage Project Team Manage Quality/ Performing to Requirements Manage Risk Phase Assessment Closing Review Project Requirements Build Project Team Conduct Project Kickoff Meeting Baseline Project Plan Phase Assessment Develop Project Plan Initiating Planning Controlling Executing
  31. 31. Project Initiation B. Project Initiation
  32. 32. Project Initiation <ul><li>Project Request </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Scope and objectives </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Business case </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Preliminary resource estimates </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Review & Authorization </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Requests prioritized and funded </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Project Charter </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Developed after request approval </li></ul></ul>
  33. 33. The Project Charter <ul><li>Purpose </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Recognizes existence of the project </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Describes the project at a high level </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Explains the business need for project </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Authorizes use of resources for planning </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Organization and timing </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Completed after an approved project request </li></ul></ul>Initial contract between developers and customers
  34. 34. The Project Charter <ul><li>Content </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Project description </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Business background </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Project scope </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Objectives (ROI if not in request) </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Deliverables </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Constraints </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Assumptions </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Planning budget </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Typical Participants </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Business Area Manager </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Project Manager </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Steering Committee </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Core Project Team </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Others if relevant </li></ul></ul>
  35. 35. C. Project Planning C. Project Planning
  36. 36. Project Planning Project Planning <ul><li>Purpose: to determine </li></ul><ul><ul><li>What needs to be done </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Who will be involved </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>How objectives will be met </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>When it will be implemented </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>How much it will cost </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Project Plan </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Statement of Work </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Project Organization </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Work Breakdown Structure </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Schedule </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Resource requirements </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Standards and Procedures </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Communications </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Risk Management </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Change Management </li></ul></ul></ul>
  37. 37. Project Planning <ul><li>Integration Management </li></ul><ul><li>Scope Management </li></ul><ul><li>Time Management </li></ul><ul><li>Cost Management </li></ul><ul><li>Quality Management </li></ul><ul><li>Resource Management </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Environment </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Participants </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Tools </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Communications Management </li></ul><ul><li>Risk Management </li></ul><ul><li>Procurement Management </li></ul>All project management expertise areas are needed in planning:
  38. 38. Integration Management Integration Management <ul><li>Project plan development </li></ul><ul><li>Project plan execution </li></ul><ul><li>Integrated change management </li></ul>Processes required to ensure that the various elements of the project are properly coordinated:
  39. 39. Scope Management Scope Management <ul><li>Initiation </li></ul><ul><li>Scope planning </li></ul><ul><li>Scope definition </li></ul><ul><li>Scope verification </li></ul><ul><li>Scope change control </li></ul>Processes required to ensure that the project includes all of the work required, and only the work required, to complete the project successfully:
  40. 40. Time Management Time Management <ul><li>Activity identification </li></ul><ul><li>Activity sequencing </li></ul><ul><li>Activity duration </li></ul><ul><li>Estimating </li></ul><ul><li>Schedule development </li></ul><ul><li>Schedule control </li></ul>Processes required to ensure timely completion of the project:
  41. 41. Cost Management Cost Management <ul><li>Financial resource planning </li></ul><ul><li>Cost estimating </li></ul><ul><li>Cost budgeting </li></ul><ul><li>Cost control </li></ul>Processes required to ensure that the project is completed within the approved budget:
  42. 42. Quality Management Quality Management <ul><li>Chartering </li></ul><ul><li>Quality planning </li></ul><ul><li>Quality assessment </li></ul><ul><li>Quality control </li></ul>Processes required to ensure that the project will satisfy the needs for which it was undertaken:
  43. 43. HR Management Human Resources Management <ul><li>Organizational planning </li></ul><ul><li>Team recruitment </li></ul><ul><li>Team development </li></ul>Processes required to make the most effective use of the people involved with the project:
  44. 44. Communications Management <ul><li>Communications planning </li></ul><ul><li>Information distribution </li></ul><ul><li>Performance reporting </li></ul><ul><li>Administrative closure </li></ul>Processes required to ensure timely and appropriate generation, collection and dissemination, storage and ultimate disposition of project information:
  45. 45. Communications Management <ul><li>Audience – Who needs to know? </li></ul><ul><li>Message – What do they need to know? </li></ul><ul><li>Intent – Why do they need to know? </li></ul><ul><li>Media – How are they going to know? </li></ul><ul><li>Timeframe – When are they going to know? </li></ul><ul><li>Responsibilities – Who is delivering the message? </li></ul><ul><li>Goals: </li></ul><ul><ul><li>No surprises </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Up and down the chain </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Repetition, reinforcement, regularity </li></ul></ul>
  46. 46. Risk Management Risk Management <ul><li>Risk management planning </li></ul><ul><li>Risk identification </li></ul><ul><li>Qualitative Risk Analysis </li></ul><ul><li>Quantitative Risk Analysis </li></ul><ul><li>Risk response planning </li></ul><ul><li>Risk monitoring and control </li></ul>Processes required to systematically identify, analyze, and respond to project risks:
  47. 47. Risk Management <ul><li>Reactive – managing surprises, “ putting out fires ” </li></ul><ul><li>Proactive – risk avoidance, “ buy off ” risk </li></ul><ul><li>Risk “ management ” </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Identify it </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Analyze it </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Plan for it (mitigation planning) </li></ul></ul>
  48. 48. Procurement Management Procurement Management <ul><li>Procurement planning </li></ul><ul><li>Solicitation planning </li></ul><ul><li>Source selection </li></ul><ul><li>Contract administration </li></ul><ul><li>Contract close-out </li></ul>Processes required to acquire goods and services from outside the performing organization:
  49. 49. Change Management <ul><li>A set of formal procedures that provide for </li></ul><ul><li>the orderly control of change in </li></ul><ul><li>a dynamic environment: </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Added functionality </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Incorrect assumption </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Imposed delays </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>New standards / practices </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Environment alterations </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Extended approval times </li></ul></ul>Change includes: Change management does not prohibit or inhibit change!!
  50. 50. Project Organization - Overview <ul><li>Functional Organization </li></ul><ul><li>Matrix Organization </li></ul><ul><li>Projectized Organization </li></ul><ul><li>Balanced Matrix Organization </li></ul><ul><li>Organic Projectized Organization </li></ul>
  51. 51. Functional Organization Light colored boxes: involved in projects Project Coordination
  52. 52. <ul><li>Specialists grouped by function </li></ul><ul><li>Difficult to cross functional lines </li></ul><ul><li>Barriers exist on horizontal information flow </li></ul><ul><li>Functional emphasis – loyalties may impede completion </li></ul>Functional Organization Functional Organization Functional Manager: An individual responsible for activities in a specialized department or function
  53. 53. Light colored boxes: involved in projects Project Coordination Matrix Organization
  54. 54. <ul><li>Multiple-command system </li></ul><ul><li>Individuals from functional areas assigned on temporary basis to Project Manager </li></ul><ul><li>Individuals return to functional organization </li></ul><ul><li>Careful plans and procedures needed to minimize effects of dual reporting </li></ul>Matrix Organization Project Manager: An individual responsible for managing a project
  55. 55. <ul><li>Advantages </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Visible objectives </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Efficient utilization of resources </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Better co-ordination </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Better information flow </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Retention of home after project </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Disadvantages </li></ul><ul><ul><li>More than one boss </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Complex structure to control </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Differing priorities of Project Manager and Functional Manager </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Duplication of effort </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Conflict </li></ul></ul>Matrix Organization
  56. 56. Project Coordination Light colored boxes: involved in projects Projectized Organization
  57. 57. <ul><li>Emerges from functional when latter impedes progress </li></ul><ul><li>Line of authority is the Project Manager </li></ul><ul><li>Uncertainty where to go on completion of project </li></ul><ul><li>Tendency to retain assigned personnel too long </li></ul><ul><li>Functional Managers feel threatened as people are removed from their areas </li></ul>Projectized Organization
  58. 58. Project Coordination Balanced Matrix Organization Light colored boxes: involved in projects
  59. 59. PM A PM B PM C FMA FM B FM C Organic Projectized Organization
  60. 60. Organic Projectized Organization <ul><li>Core teams </li></ul><ul><li>Strategic alignments </li></ul><ul><li>Functional and project managers work as a team </li></ul><ul><li>Department /division boundaries are immaterial </li></ul><ul><li>Requires permeating trust – up and down </li></ul>
  61. 61. Work Breakdown Structure - Overview A method to achieve logical decomposition of a large, complex thing The Whole Its Pieces Pieces are successively decomposed into smaller and smaller pieces until each piece is a manageable size
  62. 62. Work Breakdown Structure (WBS) <ul><li>The WBS is a framework for identifying and displaying all activities the team must perform in order to complete the project. </li></ul><ul><li>It includes the breaking out of project work into increasingly smaller pieces called Work Components which: </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Are more precisely defined </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Require smaller amounts of time and resources to complete </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Usually consist of sets of deliverables </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Estimating resources for a number of small, well-defined deliverables is easier than estimating a complex work component </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Each deliverable estimate is evaluated by an expert(s) in the associated task(s) </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>The person responsible for the deliverable “owns” the estimate </li></ul></ul>
  63. 63. Work Breakdown Structure (WBS) roll up to roll up to Project WBS Work Components Deliverables Task Task Task Task
  64. 64. WBS Example <ul><li>Build Project Management Courseware ( project ) </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Build Overview Courseware ( work component ) </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>… </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>… </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Build IT Application Specific Courseware ( work component ) </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>… </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>… </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Build In Depth Courseware ( work component ) </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Approved table of Contents ( deliverable ) </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>First draft of Slides ( deliverable ) </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Feedback from Dry Run delivery ( deliverable ) </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Revised Slides ( deliverable ) </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Approval from D. Brown and L. Suarez ( deliverable ) </li></ul></ul></ul>
  65. 65. Project Scheduling - Overview <ul><li>Concentrate on deliverables / milestones </li></ul><ul><li>Assume fulltime dedication to deliverables (first-cut) </li></ul><ul><li>Always work with project activity networks prior to timelines </li></ul><ul><li>No schedule is realistic without resource considerations </li></ul><ul><ul><ul><ul><li>People </li></ul></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Space </li></ul></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Equipment </li></ul></ul></ul></ul>
  66. 66. The Project Activities Network <ul><li>Project Schedule Goal: </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Optimum use of required resources </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Complete all deliverables on time </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Schedule development by identifying </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Effort required to create each deliverable in the WBS </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>The order in which the deliverables must be completed . </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Network diagram is a format to display interrelationships among activities; it consists of three basic elements: </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Activities/Tasks – work necessary to progress from one project milestone to the next </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Milestones – important occurrences that demonstrate continued successful project progress </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Span times – calendar (or elapsed) times required to complete deliverables </li></ul></ul>
  67. 67. Project Activities Network Functions <ul><li>The Project Activities Network will help determine the following important information: </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Critical Path – sequence of activities which takes the longest time to complete – or the shortest time in which you can complete the project </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Float Time – time which a deliverable can be delayed without affecting the overall time to complete the project </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Earliest Start Date – earliest date that a deliverable may be started </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Latest Start Date – latest date that a deliverable may be started without affecting the overall project schedule </li></ul></ul>
  68. 68. Time Planning <ul><li>Backward </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Due date is given </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>“ Time Boxed” </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Releases </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Forward </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Classical thought </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>How long will this take to do? (scope) </li></ul></ul>
  69. 69. Backward Planning <ul><li>Choose agreeable go live dates </li></ul><ul><li>Choose user acceptance testing dates (same rules as go live) </li></ul><ul><li>Determine time for implement phase </li></ul><ul><li>Time box the scope </li></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Estimate chunks of scope through </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Analysis </li></ul></ul></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Design </li></ul></ul></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Build </li></ul></ul></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Test </li></ul></ul></ul></ul></ul><ul><li>Prepare clients for moving functions out of scope as date approaches </li></ul>
  70. 70. Forward Planning <ul><li>Is classical textbook planning </li></ul><ul><li>Is best done using project planning software </li></ul><ul><li>Still benefits from following a process </li></ul>
  71. 71. Forward Planning 1. Solidify Deliverables “ If you don’t know where you want to go, then it doesn’t much matter what you plan to do.” - paraphrased from the Cheshire Cat 2. Build WBS Based on Deliverables. Go to low level to get all Activities. 3. Build Network 5. Level Resources 4. Build Calendar Precedence diagrams. Use Finish to Start as much as possible Holidays, vacations, education Balancing Act
  72. 72. Project Resources - Overview <ul><li>After a project time schedule is developed, plans should be prepared which identify the amount of each resource needed and the time at which it must be available </li></ul><ul><li>Resource plans should be prepared for every deliverable </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Helps to decrease uncertainty of resource requirement forecasts </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Overall project resource plans can then be derived by combining the plans for the individual deliverables </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Personnel </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Funds </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Equipment </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Facilities </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Material </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Information </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Project resources include: </li></ul>
  73. 73. Resource Leveling <ul><li>After the initial scheduling of tasks, it is common to find that one or more resources are overbooked during certain periods </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Mostly the case with key personnel </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>The more skills a person has, the more he/she is likely to be in demand </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Often space or equipment can be limiting </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Always the case during installation of the hardware </li></ul></ul><ul><li>The resource loading charts uncover conflicts </li></ul><ul><li>These conflicts must be resolved </li></ul><ul><li>Resource loaded schedule is always longer </li></ul>
  74. 74. D. Project Execution and Control D. Project Execution and Control
  75. 75. Project Execution and Control <ul><li>Lead </li></ul><ul><li>Delegate </li></ul><ul><li>Communicate </li></ul><ul><li>Coordinate ongoing activities </li></ul><ul><li>Measure </li></ul><ul><li>Evaluate </li></ul><ul><li>ADJUST </li></ul><ul><li>Document </li></ul><ul><li>Report </li></ul>Whew! The planning is done. Now build it! Project Manager needs to:
  76. 76. Project Closing E. Project Closing
  77. 77. Closing a Project <ul><li>Obtain approvals – proof of completion </li></ul><ul><li>Ensure user and stakeholder satisfaction </li></ul><ul><li>Lessons learned </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Improve estimates for future projects </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Improve project methodologies </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Recognize team members and contributions </li></ul><ul><li>CELEBRATE! </li></ul>At onset, the project creates the team. At closure, the team created the project!
  78. 78. LBNL Enterprise Computing F. LBNL Enterprise Computing (EC)
  79. 79. LBNL Project Management Strategy <ul><li>Strengthen partnership between technical and functional organizations </li></ul><ul><li>Undertake projects with Lab-wide perspective </li></ul><ul><li>Ensure wide participation by the Laboratory user community </li></ul><ul><li>Establish project charters as prerequisite for project initiation </li></ul>
  80. 80. From Strategy To Projects Strategy Programs Purpose Benefits Projects Reviews Integrated Project Management Office Influence
  81. 81. Project Related Endeavors <ul><li>Strategy – A framework guiding those choices that determine the nature and direction to attain an objective through programs and projects within an organization </li></ul><ul><li>Program – Consists of a group of projects supporting broad, general goals and managed in a coordinated way so as to achieve a set of defined objectives, giving effect to various (and often overlapping) initiatives and/or implementing a strategy. </li></ul><ul><li>Subproject – A distinct group of activities that comprise their own project which in turn is a part of a larger project. </li></ul>
  82. 82. EC Project Structure IT Technical Specialists Project Steering Committee End User Business Specialists Internal Audit Project Team Project Sponsor Project Director Project Manager As of 1/2/03
  83. 83. EC Project Oversight Project Director IT Technical Specialists Project Steering Committee Project Manager End User Business Specialists Internal Audit ECSC Integrated Project Management Office Program Coordinator Project Team Project Sponsor Program Sponsor Enterprise Computing Program CIO As of 1/2/03
  84. 84. EC Program Structure Enterprise Computing Program CIO ECSC BLIS Project Director Diana Brown IT Technical Specialists Integrated Project Management Office Project Steering Committee Chemical Inventory Project Director Robin Wendt Project Steering Committee Project Y Project X Project Manager TBD End User Business Specialists Internal Audit Project Manager Steve Abraham IT Technical Specialists End User Business Specialists Internal Audit Program Coordinator Project Sponsor Project Sponsor Program Sponsor As of 1/2/03
  85. 85. EC Roles and Responsibilities <ul><li>Approves Enterprise Computing Program Plan </li></ul><ul><li>Approves Program-sponsored project priority list </li></ul><ul><li>Allocates annual Program-sponsored project budget </li></ul>Program Sponsor:
  86. 86. EC Roles and Responsibilities <ul><li>Chair of Enterprise Computing Steering Committee (ECSC) – makes recommendations to Program Sponsor </li></ul><ul><li>Formal liaison to Program Sponsor </li></ul><ul><li>Responsible for Enterprise Computing Program’s success </li></ul><ul><li>With guidance from ECSC, appoints Project Directors </li></ul><ul><li>Establishes methodology and reporting requirements for Program-sponsored projects </li></ul>Program CIO:
  87. 87. EC Roles and Responsibilities <ul><li>Joint authors/owners of Enterprise Computing Program Plan </li></ul><ul><li>Prioritizes Enterprise Computing projects </li></ul><ul><li>Reviews budget requests for Program-sponsored projects </li></ul><ul><li>Reviews and approves Program-sponsored project steering committee memberships </li></ul><ul><li>Reviews and approves Program-sponsored project plans </li></ul><ul><li>Holds quarterly meetings to review EC project status </li></ul><ul><li>Makes strategic decisions impacting EC projects </li></ul>Enterprise Computing Steering Committee (ECSC):
  88. 88. EC Roles and Responsibilities <ul><li>Senior manager of a business area </li></ul><ul><li>Submits budget requests for Program-sponsored projects </li></ul><ul><li>Articulates the vision, benefits and meaning of changes to the business operation at high level </li></ul><ul><li>Member of the project steering committee </li></ul><ul><li>With Program Coordinator concurrence, recommends Project Director candidates to CIO </li></ul><ul><li>Provides leadership to implement best business practices imbedded in the standard software </li></ul>Project Sponsor:
  89. 89. EC Roles and Responsibilities <ul><li>Executive Program Manager </li></ul><ul><li>Responsible for maintaining Program/Project methodology </li></ul><ul><li>Information manager for Program and all Program-sponsored projects </li></ul><ul><li>Ensures quality and consistency of management of Program- sponsored projects </li></ul><ul><li>Assists project directors with administration of projects (budget, scope, schedules) </li></ul>Program Coordinator:
  90. 90. EC Roles and Responsibilities <ul><li>Acts as a resource to provide Program and project management assistance and training </li></ul><ul><li>Reviews project charters/plans in Program context </li></ul><ul><li>Works with Program Coordinator to ensure quality management of Program-sponsored projects </li></ul>Integrated Project Management Office:
  91. 91. EC Roles and Responsibilities <ul><li>Selected from the functional and technical areas impacted by the project </li></ul><ul><li>Serves as the project change control board to provide oversight on scope/budget/schedule </li></ul><ul><li>Provides oversight to minimize software customization and changes to original project scope </li></ul><ul><li>Removes barriers </li></ul><ul><li>Advises Project Director </li></ul><ul><li>Provides formal end user representation </li></ul>Project Steering Committee:
  92. 92. EC Roles and Responsibilities <ul><li>Supports the project team in identifying internal controls </li></ul><ul><li>Acts as control consultant, not decision maker </li></ul><ul><li>Exercises independence in system development review </li></ul><ul><li>Provides recommendations for operational improvements </li></ul><ul><li>Communicates audit opinions to, and receives timely dispositions from the Project Manager, Project Director, and Project Steering Committee </li></ul>Internal Audit:
  93. 93. EC Roles and Responsibilities <ul><li>Senior Manager with authority for project execution </li></ul><ul><li>Held accountable for project success and has the metrics to measure the success </li></ul><ul><li>Reports project progress to the CIO </li></ul><ul><li>Works with Project Steering Committee to document and maintain project change control </li></ul><ul><li>Responsible for minimizing customization </li></ul><ul><li>Negotiates resolution of cross functional issues </li></ul><ul><li>Ensures wide project participation from the user community, including establishing user focus groups with formal representatives from scientific divisions </li></ul>Project Director:
  94. 94. EC Roles and Responsibilities <ul><li>Recommended by the Project Director and the Program Coordinator with concurrence of the project steering committee, and is appointed by the CIO and his/her respective line manager </li></ul><ul><li>Develops and drives the execution of the overall project plan </li></ul><ul><li>Manages the project team </li></ul><ul><li>Ensures project is compliant with appropriate standards </li></ul>Project Manager:
  95. 95. EC Roles and Responsibilities EC Roles and Responsibilities <ul><li>Provides technical expertise </li></ul><ul><li>Conducts feasibility studies </li></ul><ul><li>Provides estimates to Project Plan </li></ul><ul><li>Performs data modeling and analysis </li></ul><ul><li>Performs development programming and unit/system testing </li></ul><ul><li>Performs deployment to production </li></ul><ul><li>Adheres to technical standards </li></ul><ul><li>Provides and maintains technical documentation </li></ul><ul><li>Supports business specialists in developing and conducting training and materials </li></ul><ul><li>Supports technology-driven process re-engineering efforts </li></ul><ul><li>Supports enhancements to existing infrastructure </li></ul>IT Technical Specialist:
  96. 96. EC Roles and Responsibilities EC Roles and Responsibilities <ul><li>Represents constituents and serves as communication conduit </li></ul><ul><li>Participates in requirements definition </li></ul><ul><li>Reviews requirements for clarity </li></ul><ul><li>Participates in training, testing and acceptance </li></ul><ul><li>Member of the deployment team </li></ul>End User:
  97. 97. EC Roles and Responsibilities EC Roles and Responsibilities <ul><li>Serves as subject matter expert </li></ul><ul><li>Works with end users to address requirements </li></ul><ul><li>Establishes functional requirements with concurrence from end user representatives </li></ul><ul><li>Identify business procedures that must change and adopt best practices </li></ul><ul><li>Responsible for testing and quality assessment </li></ul><ul><li>Develops and conducts training with assistance from IT Technical Specialists </li></ul>Business Specialist:
  98. 98. Enterprise Computing Program Methodology Project Director Project Management Team Project Sponsor/Director Project Team Project Manager Lessons Learned ROI ABBA – Activity Based Budget Authorization Closeout Execution/Control Planning Initiation Project Request ECSC Prioritization & Approval Project Charter ABBA ECSC Review & CIO Approval Project Plan Commun- ication Plan ECSC Review & CIO Approval Project Change Management Risk Management Status Reporting Post Review End Deliverables Review & Approval
  99. 99. ECSC Project Initiation <ul><li>Project Request </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Includes return on investment (ROI) estimate </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Business case analysis (BCA) </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Submitted by Project Sponsor (Business Area Manager) </li></ul></ul><ul><li>ECSC Review & Approval </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Requests prioritized </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Funded based on annual allocation by Program Sponsor </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>CIO presents prioritized list to Program Sponsor for acceptance </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Project Charter developed after request approval </li></ul></ul>
  100. 100. ECSC Project Planning <ul><li>Approved charter authorizes project planning process </li></ul><ul><li>Project Plan </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Work breakdown structure (WBS) </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Schedule </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Budget </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Communication Plan </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Risk Management Plan </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Resource Assignments </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Change Management Plan </li></ul></ul>
  101. 101. ECSC Project Planning <ul><li>Project Plan </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Reviewed by Program Coordinator and IPMO prior to submission </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Presented by Project Director for ECSC review </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Approved by CIO as Chair of ECSC and Program Coordinator </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Approved plan authorizes project execution / control and released project budget </li></ul>
  102. 102. ECSC Project Execution and Control <ul><li>Project Change Management </li></ul><ul><li>Risk Management </li></ul><ul><li>Status and progress reporting </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Monthly updates to CIO / Program Coordinator </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Quarterly to ECSC </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Issues / Action Items log </li></ul>
  103. 103. ECSC Project Close <ul><li>End deliverables review and acceptance </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Project Sponsor </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>CIO / ECSC </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Close-out post implementation </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Lessons learned </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Business case analysis (ROI) follow up </li></ul></ul>Celebrate!
  104. 104. Summary G. Recommended Reading
  105. 105. Recommended Reading <ul><li>Project Retrospectives: A Handbook for Team Reviews by Norman L. Kerth </li></ul><ul><li>Controlling Software Projects: Management, Measurement, and Estimates by Tom Demarco, Barry W. Boehm </li></ul><ul><li>Peopleware : Productive Projects and Teams, 2nd Ed. by Tom Demarco, Timothy Lister </li></ul><ul><li>The Politics of Projects by Robert Block </li></ul><ul><li>The Deadline: A Novel About Project Management by Tom Demarco </li></ul><ul><li>People and Project Management by Rob Thomsett </li></ul><ul><li>Becoming a Technical Leader: An Organic Problem-Solving Approach by Gerald M. Weinberg </li></ul><ul><li>Are Your Lights On?: How to Figure Out What the Problem Really Is by Donald C. Gause, Gerald M. Weinberg </li></ul><ul><li>Teaching the Elephant to Dance: The Manager's Guide to Empowering Change by James A. Belasco </li></ul><ul><li>A Whack on the Side of the Head: How You Can Be More Creative by Roger Von Oech </li></ul>
  106. 106. Recommended Reading <ul><li>Quality Software Management, Vol. 1: Systems Thinking by Gerald M. Weinberg </li></ul><ul><li>Quality Software Management, Vol. 2: First-Order Measurement by Gerald M. Weinberg </li></ul><ul><li>Quality Software Management, Vol. 3: Congruent Action by Gerald M. Weinberg </li></ul><ul><li>Quality Software Management, Vol. 4: Anticipating Change by Gerald M. Weinberg </li></ul>

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