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  • Lets have a look at how Flex works and fits into existing infrastructure. First is the application server, Flex uses the existing application server. If you don’t have one, Macromedia can provide one for you. On top of the application server, sits the Flex Presentation Server. Flex is broken down into two areas. A client-side Application Framework and the server-side Run-time services. The Application Framework consists of an XML declarative programming language for laying out and defining rich user experiences, which is code named MXML ActionScript which is the Flex programming language for procedural programming The class library, which consists of components like containers & controls and managers for commonly used services. These provide the building blocks for creating great user experiences Flex Run-time Services provide services for Flex Web Services proxy for interaction between the client and enterprise data sources Java object connectivity which allows you to invoke methods on local or remote objects Player detection which detects and locally deploys Flash client as necessary and performance optimizations like content caching and deferred instantiation. And Flex applications can be built using leading IDEs or text editors. We’re also working on a new technology, code named Brady, which is based on Dreamweaver MX 2004 and enables visual layout and code editing of Flex applications. Note to speaker: If you click on the “IDEs and text editor” box, that will take you a large screen shot of Flexstore code in Brady. If you click that image, it will take you back to this slide. If you click on the Brady box, it will take you to a large screenshot of Brady. And then if you click on that image it will take you back again.
  • Transcript

    • 1. Flex - AIR Boot Camp 2009 Duane Nickull, James Ward Sr. Technology Evangelists Adobe Systems
    • 2. Description (DO NOT PRESENT) <ul><li>Join us for an introduction to working with Adobe AIR, in which we will build several projects from start to finish. Projects include &quot;HelloWorld.air,&quot; a video player, a &quot;full screen&quot; application, a web service client, a simple example of how to make remote calls, a chromeless window application, writing data to and from a hard disk, working with XML (including RSS feeds), and packaging AIR applications for later distribution. Course materials include the presentation, all code for the projects, and a step-by-step written tutorial. </li></ul>
    • 3. Agenda <ul><li>An overview of AIR & Flex </li></ul><ul><li>Architecture </li></ul><ul><li>Runtime Architecture </li></ul><ul><li>Development environment </li></ul><ul><li>What’s new in AIR 2.0, Flash Builder 4 and Flex4? </li></ul><ul><li>Coding! </li></ul><ul><li>Note: While AIR 2.0 almost ready, please note that 1.5 is still recommended for production as of Oct 4, 2009. This will change so please consider when you read this. This course will use 1.5.2. </li></ul>
    • 4. What’s new in AIR 2.0 <ul><li>A new version of WebKit is included in the latest builds comparable to the version included in the Safari 4 beta. </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Includes a new JavaScript engine (&quot;SquirrelFish Extreme&quot;). </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Preliminary results show that the updated JavaScript engine is running twice as fast in some tests. http://www2.webkit.org/perf/sunspider-0.9/sunspider.html </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Open a file with the default application </li></ul><ul><li>Mass storage device detection </li></ul><ul><li>New and enhanced networking classes (DatagramSocket, InterfaceAddress, NetworkInterface, NetworkInfo, NetworkInterface, ServerSocket and more) </li></ul><ul><li>Preliminary screen reader support for Flash-based applications </li></ul><ul><li>Mac vector printing support </li></ul><ul><li>And an upcoming brand new AIR Boot Camp! </li></ul>
    • 5. ®
    • 6. <ul><li>The Adobe® AIR™ runtime lets developers use proven web technologies to build rich Internet applications that run outside the browser on multiple operating systems. </li></ul>What is AIR?
    • 7. A quick overview of AIR <ul><li>AIR runtime runs on Linux, Mac and Windows </li></ul><ul><li>AIR applications distributed (*.air) </li></ul><ul><li>Installs as native app on OS (*.exe, *.app, etc…) </li></ul><ul><li>Custom Chrome (Chromeless too) </li></ul><ul><li>Rich Component Library </li></ul><ul><li>Declarative and Scripting programming models </li></ul><ul><li>Can be built using text tools and free AIR SDK. FREE! </li></ul><ul><li>Current version 2.0 </li></ul><ul><li>Fast adoption! </li></ul><ul><li>Easy to program AIR apps. </li></ul>
    • 8. How Flex Works on the Desktop (Adobe Integrated Runtime) Compile & Package Flash Builder IDE Halo and Spark Flex Class Libraries MXML ActionScript SOAP HTTP/S AMF/S RTMP/S Web Server Desktop AIR Client Runtime Files SQLite Notifications Clipboard Flex SDK Existing Applications & Infrastructure J2EE App Servers Data Services XML/HTTP REST SOAP Web Services
    • 9. <ul><li>Applications can be built using the following technologies </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Flash / Flex IDE’s (ActionScript + MXML) </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>HTML / JavaScript / CSS / AJAX (can build with CS4) </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Combination of these technologies </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>PDF can be leveraged with any application </li></ul></ul>How AIR Applications get Composed? Flash HTML ActionScript XML Video Audio PDF HTML Flash JavaScript CSS XML PDF AIR Runtime/APIs Mac, Windows, Linux
    • 10. Compiled Executable vs. Script vs. Declarative <ul><li>Declaring new objects: </li></ul><ul><li>Typical Compiled Language: </li></ul><ul><li>TypeOfObject myObject = new ObjectFactory.createObject(); </li></ul><ul><li>Typical Script Language: </li></ul><ul><li>var myObject:TypeOfObject = null; </li></ul><ul><li>Declarative Language: </li></ul><ul><li><mx:SomeObject/> </li></ul>All map to underlying API’s and Objects
    • 11. Compiled Executable vs. Script vs. Declarative <ul><li>Declaring object properties: </li></ul><ul><li>Typical Compiled Language: </li></ul><ul><li>myObject.setColor(“#FF44C8”); </li></ul><ul><li>Typical Script Language: </li></ul><ul><li>myObject.setColor(“#FF44C8”); </li></ul><ul><li>Declarative Language: </li></ul><ul><li><mx:SomeObject color=“#FF44C8” /> </li></ul>
    • 12. Compiled Executable vs. Script vs. Declarative <ul><li>Handling Events: </li></ul><ul><li>Typical Compiled Language: </li></ul><ul><li>try { MyObject.registerEventHandler ( ”MOUSE_CLICKED_HANDLER”, com.adobe.livecycle.PostEventHandler&quot; ); } catch (SDKException e) { if (e.getErrorCode() != e.E_EVENT_HANDLER_NOT_RECOGNIZED) throw (e); } </li></ul><ul><li>// then write your actual event handler </li></ul><ul><li>Typical Script Language: </li></ul><ul><li>myObject.onMouseOver(“CallSomeFunction()”); </li></ul><ul><li>Declarative Language: </li></ul><ul><li><mx:Button id=“me” click=“me.visible=(false)”/> </li></ul>
    • 13. ActionScript <ul><li>Scripting language based on ECMAScript </li></ul><ul><li>ActionScript class library </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Layout </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Effects, skins, etc. </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Networking and data </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Object Oriented </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Strongly Typed </li></ul></ul><ul><li>If you know Javascript, ActionScript will be easy. </li></ul>
    • 14. ActionScript 3 <ul><li>Both compile-time and runtime type checking </li></ul><ul><li>Improved performance from a class-based inheritance system separate from the prototype-based inheritance system. </li></ul><ul><li>Support for packages, namespaces, and regular expressions. </li></ul><ul><li>Compiles to an entirely new type of bytecode, incompatible with AS1, AS2. </li></ul><ul><li>Revised Flash Player API, organized into packages. </li></ul><ul><li>Unified event handling system based on the DOM event handling standard. </li></ul><ul><li>Integration of ECMAScript for XML (E4X) for purposes of XML processing. </li></ul><ul><li>Direct access to the Flash runtime display list for complete control of what gets displayed at runtime. </li></ul><ul><li>Completely conforming implementation of the ECMAScript Fourth Edition Draft specification. </li></ul>
    • 15. <ul><li>No more marketing BS - let’s start coding!!! </li></ul>
    • 16. Code Projects <ul><li>PROJECT 1: AN ADVANCED HELLO WORLD </li></ul><ul><li>PROJECT 2: CHROME-LESS APPLICATIONS: </li></ul><ul><li>PROJECT 3: VIDEO CAPTURE </li></ul><ul><li>PROJECT 4: VIDEO AND FULL SCREEN (BFS) </li></ul><ul><li>PROJECT 5: WORKING WITH PDF </li></ul><ul><li>PROJECT 6: HTML </li></ul><ul><li>PROJECT 7: READING AND WRITING TO LOCAL DISK </li></ul><ul><li>PROJECT 8: WORKING WITH XML </li></ul><ul><li>PROJECT 9: REST </li></ul><ul><li>PROJECT 10: AIR 3D </li></ul><ul><li>PROJECT 11: SQLITE </li></ul><ul><li>PROJECT 12: WEB SERVICE INTROSPECTION AND CONSUMPTION </li></ul><ul><li>PROJECT 13: EXPORTING, SIGNING, DISTRIBUTING AND INSTALLING AIR APPLICATION </li></ul><ul><li>PROJECT 14: SCRIBBLER APPLICATION </li></ul><ul><li>PROJECT 16: WINDOWING API’S </li></ul>
    • 17. <ul><li>Can be initiated using Inline Install badge or by double-clicking on an .air file </li></ul><ul><li>A runtime-managed installation dialog is always presented </li></ul><ul><li>Nothing is actually installed until the user walks through the entire installation process </li></ul><ul><li>Applications must be signed by either a chained cert to an approved CA (Verisign or Thawte), or a self-signed cert </li></ul><ul><li>Self-signed applications are (should be) treated effectively as unsigned during the install to the user </li></ul>Installation
    • 18. File -> Export -> Release Build
    • 19. Create new Certificate
    • 20. Pick your cert and sign
    • 21. The End <ul><li>Thank you! </li></ul><ul><li>Courses: </li></ul><ul><li>http://web2open.org/courses.html </li></ul><ul><li>Duane Blog: </li></ul><ul><li>http://technoracle.blogspot.com http://www.duanesworldtv.com </li></ul><ul><li>Jame’s Blog: </li></ul><ul><li>http://www.jamesward.com/wordpress/ </li></ul>
    • 22.  

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