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OEM Licensing Overview
OEM Licensing Overview
OEM Licensing Overview
OEM Licensing Overview
OEM Licensing Overview
OEM Licensing Overview
OEM Licensing Overview
OEM Licensing Overview
OEM Licensing Overview
OEM Licensing Overview
OEM Licensing Overview
OEM Licensing Overview
OEM Licensing Overview
OEM Licensing Overview
OEM Licensing Overview
OEM Licensing Overview
OEM Licensing Overview
OEM Licensing Overview
OEM Licensing Overview
OEM Licensing Overview
OEM Licensing Overview
OEM Licensing Overview
OEM Licensing Overview
OEM Licensing Overview
OEM Licensing Overview
OEM Licensing Overview
OEM Licensing Overview
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OEM Licensing Overview

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  • If you buy a car, you would be annoyed if an essential part such as the battery was missing. The same applies to a PC: without an OS, it is useless. Hardware vendors want to offer their customers a turn-key solution, i.e. a preinstalled system with an OS and drivers. Lower cost OEM Licensing provides the lowest cost because the software is bundled and sold with new hardware. But there are some restrictions: 1. OEM Licensing cannot be redeployed on a different system. The licence is tied to the PC it is installed on – if the PC dies the licence dies with it. 2. The product portfolio is quite limited. Naked PCs Many customer order naked PCs (PCs without an OS) to move their existing OS from the old to the new system. This is not allowed because OEM Licensing can only be transferred with the hardware with which it was sold. Cost savings Microsoft Office and Microsoft Windows OEM software cost much less than full versions. E.g. in some cases Microsoft Office XP Professional is half the price of a full version. No second thoughts Windows is available as either a full version, only available as FPP, or an OEM version pre-installed on a fully assembled PC. Selling opportunity Every hardware sale is a potential OEM licence selling opportunity Bundling vs. unbundling Application and server programs may only be distributed pre-installed on a fully assembled computer system. OEM licences may not be downgraded with the exception of Windows XP Professional and Windows Server 2003. Pre-installation is mandatory when a PC is bundled with a desktop software such as Windows or Office . It is optional for server products
  • Who can buy OEM licences? OEM licences are sold by OEMs and System Builders and must be sold with hardware Windows XP Pro, Office, Windows Server and Small Business Server must be sold with a fully assembled PC OEM software is licensed per device – so a licence can only be installed on one machine OEM software must not be copied A System Builder can distribute unopened OEM system builder packs to other System Builders.
  • Windows must be sold pre-installed on a fully assembled PC Whoever installs the OS onto hardware acts as a system builder and should comply with the terms of the agreement
  • End User licence Agreement (EULA) This is a critical legal document. It is the legal text that appears when a user first installs or uses a new piece of software. The EULA is a legal agreement between the user and Microsoft that sets the parameters of use for each product. Each Licence may be specific and unique to that product and the way in which it was purchased, but it has the common basis of granting the rights to use the product. These conditions must be accepted (agreed to) in order to use the product as detailed whenever customers set about installing software. - they must click “I agree” to continue. If they do not agree to the licence, they may not use the product and may return it for a refund.
  • OEM licences can only be purchased with hardware and the licence is tied to that hardware for ever. The Windows OEM Operating System cannot be transferred from the PC even if it has been upgraded through retail or Volume licensing. A new licence is required if the motherboard is replaced or upgraded unless it is still under warranty when the original licence can be reinstalled.
  • Windows XP Professional (not Home Edition) can be downgraded to Windows 2000, NT4 and 98 SE Windows Server 2003 Standard Edition can be downgraded to Windows Server 2000 and NT4 only Windows Server 2003 Enterprise Edition can be downgraded to Windows 2000 Advanced Server and NT4 Enterprise Edition only SBS 2003 Premium Edition can be downgraded to SBS 2000 or SBS 4.5 Conditions If a customer downgrades they cannot take the spare copy to install on any other machine When installing a downgraded licence the customer must have the necessary media There is no support from either Microsoft or the OEM on the downgraded operating system Customers are not allowed to downgrade across languages. OEM licences do not include cross language rights Finally, when the customer moves back to the original operating system they must ensure that they delete the other copy
  • OEM customers who have perpetual Volume licensing agreements have the option to enrol their licences in Software Assurance. This must be done within 90 days of purchase and not only gives the rights to upgrades released during the term of their agreement but all the extra SA benefits that are available. Just because a licence is enrolled in Software Assurance it does not guarantee the change in use rights. Except for Office 2003, all licences retain the OEM use rights. Office 2003 takes on the use rights of a Volume licence (such as transfer and imaging rights)
  • Support Support is an important issue with regards to OEM licensing. Licence agreements between Microsoft and OEM partners clearly state that the support is to be provided by the OEM in all cases. This is reflected in the amount that Microsoft charges OEMs for its software. The OEM End User Licence Agreement is between the OEM and the customer, not Microsoft and the customer.
  • What materials should a customer receive? The documentation accompanying software will vary according to the solution that the OEM has opted for, but some items remain constant, regardless of who the OEM partner is. These are: A printed manual (if applicable) A Certificate of Authenticity (COA) which must be stuck to the chassis of the PC or server. OEMs with a direct relationship (multinationals and named accounts) may choose to put their logo on the manual, but this isn’t mandatory. Recovery media options Recovery media is the means by which customers can rebuild the OS in the event of a complete failure. Direct OEMs have three options: BIOS locked recovery allows OEMs to create CDs with the OS and device drivers that restore factory settings. The CD features the OEM’s name and is locked into the machines to combat piracy. OEMs can also place additional back-up copies of the OS onto the hard drive – usually on a separate partition. Sometimes OEMs do not provide any back up media. However, the OEM is still obliged to provide a recovery solution on a case by case basis. System builders are required to distribute the hologram CD as part of the complete OEM system builder software package: The Edge to Edge (E2E) hologram CD acts as the recovery CD. In addition to the CD, system builders can also put an additional copy of Windows onto the hard drive, configured to each customer’s requirements.
  • Recovery media - OEMs Recovery media - the means by which customers can rebuild the OS in the unlikely event of a complete failure - is an area that has undergone much change in recent years. Here, direct OEMs have slightly more flexibility than System Builders and the 3 options are listed above: BIOS locked recovery - allows an OEM to produce a CD that will get the machine back to its factory settings. As well as the operating system OEMs are also allowed to copy device drivers and other helpful material onto the CD. The CD will feature the name of the OEM and will be locked into that particular manufacturer’s machines to combat piracy. OEMs are also allowed to place an additional back up copy of the operating system onto the hard drive – usually on a separate partition. The third option for Direct OEMs is to provide the customer with no back up media. The OEM is still obligated to provide the customer with a recovery solution, but handles this on a case by case basis. It is an option seldom used as OEMs find the first 2 options meet their needs.
  • Recovery media - System Builders They must provide the customer with the Edge to Edge (E2E) hologram (similar but not necessarily identical to the one above) which is an integral part of the system builder pack that they would buy from Authorised Distribution Partners. In addition to the CD (System Builders must provide customers with the E2E CD) System Builders can also put an additional copy of Windows onto the hard drive, custom configured to each customer’s requirements.
  • The Certificate of Authenticity or COA OEM operating system licences are stickers attached to the machine chassis. Examples are shown above. This form of COA was introduced at the same time as the launch of Microsoft ® Windows 2000 (February 2000) and it is now common to all the OEM desktop operating systems. The purpose of the COA is to help combat piracy with visible evidence of authenticity. But note how the counterfeiters have exploited this – by stealing genuine COAs and supplying them with counterfeit disks and documentation. This is why Microsoft change the design of their COAs on a regular basis. Please remember that the OEM O/S licence is licensed to the machine - not the user - so that if the machine is disposed of, the licence goes with it. The OEM licence is not transferable. However, to prove ownership, the original End User License Agreement, media and manual should be kept. If you or your customers are in any doubt about the legality of the software on machines, visit the www.howtotell.com website. It takes you through exactly what you should receive and tells you what you should be looking for.
  • Information - the key to the solution Which OEM operating systems you can use as the base for enrolling a machine within a Microsoft volume licence programme is determined by which programme and what version. There are also differences when a brand new agreement is being signed and when a customer is purchasing additional or replacement machines for inclusion into an existing agreement. There is an important distinction between new agreements (where customers will be entering into their first volume based agreement with Microsoft and may have a disparate network of machines, each with different OS) and those instances where customers have an agreement already in place and are buying new machines as additions or replacements.
  • Education Customers - new agreements The table above details the situation when considering the two education volume licence programmes – Schools and Campus Agreements and shows the which product qualify as an underlying operating system when talking about new agreements. The key factor to identify is which version of Schools or Campus agreement your customer has.
  • Education Customers - existing agreements Existing agreements where customers are purchasing new or replacement machines.
  • Commercial Customers - new agreements The different licensing programmes for Commercial customers including Open, (including OV & OV Subscription), Select and Enterprise Agreements are itemised above. Commercial Licensing programmes are split into 2 halves. Here, we deal with instances where customers are signing an agreement with Microsoft for the first time and are looking at enrolling existing hardware into that agreement.
  • Commercial Customers - existing agreements Where customers are looking at adding new or additional hardware to their agreements – matters are slightly more complicated, particularly with regard to Enterprise Agreements. It is critical in this area to identify which version of Enterprise Agreement your customer has as, for example, 5.1 has rights that versions 5.2 and 6.0 do not have. Dates and the duration of each of the type of agreement are included – to help people identify which agreement they have and also what options are open to them.
  • Misconceptions One matter that raises more questions than any other when people are talking about OEM licensing and Volume licensing is the statement, “I’ve got a Select agreement, therefore I don’t need an operating system licence for the machine...” This is an INCORRECT assumption. There are no exceptions to this rule and even Microsoft buys its machines with the operating systems already installed, effectively paying for its own product. To clarify any confusion, please contact askoem@microsoft-contact.co.uk.
  • The Windows Product Lifecycle The idea behind this programme is to give clear guidelines about exactly how Microsoft intends to manage the lifecycle of each operating system. The full guidelines can be found at the url listed above. The biggest change is that we’ve extended the life of those operating systems that are currently in their mainstream phase (Windows 2000, Windows XP Home and Windows XP Professional) out to 5 years – the most immediate effect this has is on Windows 2000 which under the old scheme would have been retiring March 2003.
  • The basics The basic principle is that the life of the OS is broken down into 3 phases concerning the availability of the licence (where you can buy it from) and what support offerings are available. Mainstream – where the OS is placed from launch. Licences are available in all standard product distribution channels (eg. direct OEM, authorised OEM distributors, retail, and Volume Licensing programs via licences or via downgrade rights). Standard support offerings available (eg. Premier Support, incident support (per warranty), hotfix support, online self-help support information, etc.). Extended Phase - licences only available in the authorised OEM distribution channel and through downgrade rights available in Volume Licensing programmes. In addition to Premier Support, paid incident support, paid hotfix support, and online self-help support information will be available. Non Supported - licences will continue to be available in the authorised OEM distribution channel and through downgrade rights available in Volume Licensing programmes. Online self-help support information will continue to be available. After this point the OS will be deemed to have gone ‘end of life’ and licensing and support will no longer be available. The following slide displays this in graphical format.
  • The complete picture Here is the complete picture with all of Microsoft’s relevant OS releases shown. Those at the top of the slide (Win98, WinNT4, Win ME) will be governed by the old scheme – ie. as they have already entered the extended phase of the programme they will continue down that path. Those at the bottom (Win2000, Windows XP Professional and WinXP Home) are under the new scheme. You can see that we have extended the mainstream phase of the current OS’s. The last slide adds dates to the OS’s, presenting the full picture.
  • Note: Windows XP dates are currently under review. Microsoft will publish new end dates for Windows XP availability in early 2006
  • Transcript

    • 1. Microsoft OEM Licensing: An Overview
    • 2. OEM Licensing <ul><li>The purpose of this presentation is to provide an overview of the role that OEM plays in the Microsoft licensing model. In this module, we look at: </li></ul><ul><li>who is eligible </li></ul><ul><li>what they deliver </li></ul><ul><li>what the customer can expect </li></ul><ul><li>the differences between volume licensing and OEM </li></ul><ul><li>how this applies to each different type of customer </li></ul>
    • 3. OEM Licensing <ul><li>Positioning </li></ul><ul><li>OEM Software Licensing </li></ul><ul><li>Software Assurance (SA) </li></ul><ul><li>Support </li></ul><ul><li>End-User Deliverables </li></ul><ul><li>OEM Licences and Volume Licensing </li></ul><ul><li>Product road map </li></ul><ul><li>Summary </li></ul>
    • 4. Positioning <ul><li>OEM Licences provide customers with a complete solution as the software is pre-installed </li></ul><ul><li>Offers substantial savings over FPP </li></ul><ul><li>Must be sold with new hardware (‘bundling’) and never separated from that hardware (no ‘unbundling’) </li></ul><ul><li>Most convenient and attractive way for acquiring your desktop operating system </li></ul><ul><li>BUT... </li></ul><ul><li>Limited product portfolio </li></ul><ul><li>Non-transferable </li></ul><ul><li>Restricted use rights (e.g. downgrade) </li></ul><ul><li>Mandatory pre-installation </li></ul>
    • 5. Who Can Buy an OEM Licence? <ul><li>Customers buying new PCs </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Office (Small Business, Basic and Professional) </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Windows XP Pro and Home </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Windows Server 2003 </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Small Business Server 2003 </li></ul></ul>
    • 6. OEM Software Portfolio <ul><li>Windows desktop operating systems, Microsoft Office Small Business Edition, Office Professional, Works, Works Suite, Windows must be pre-installed on a fully assembled PC </li></ul><ul><li>Small Business Server &amp; CALs, Windows Server &amp; CALs must be distributed with a fully assembled system only </li></ul><ul><li>* List is non-exhaustive </li></ul>
    • 7. End User Licensing Agreement <ul><li>The OEM EULA is between the OEM/System Builder and the customer </li></ul><ul><li>Stipulates the terms of use by which the user can use the software </li></ul><ul><li>Customer is buying the right to use the software – they are not buying the software! </li></ul>
    • 8. OEM Use Rights <ul><li>OEM licences are tied to the PC they are installed on and cannot be transferred to another PC </li></ul><ul><li>Buy a new licence if the motherboard is replaced </li></ul><ul><ul><li>A new licence is not required if the motherboard is replaced under warranty </li></ul></ul>
    • 9. OEM EULA Downgrade Rights <ul><li>Only Windows XP Professional, Windows Server 2003 (Standard &amp; Enterprise Editions) and SBS 2003 Premium Edition have downgrade rights </li></ul><ul><li>Conditions apply: </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Cannot transfer ‘spare’ copy onto another machine </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Customer must provide the media for downgrade </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>No support for downgrade (Microsoft or OEM!) </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Cannot downgrade across languages </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>When customer goes back to initial licensed product they must delete other OS </li></ul></ul>
    • 10. Optional Software Assurance <ul><li>Available for OEM versions of: </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Windows XP Professional </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Server systems </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Office Professional 2003 and Office Small Business Edition 2003 </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Must be acquired within 30 or 90 days of the OEM licensing purchase (depending on agreement being enrolled into) </li></ul><ul><li>Purchase of SA does not give Volume Licensing usage rights to the OEM Licences (except for Office) </li></ul>
    • 11. Software Support <ul><li>Support for all OEM licensed products is provided by the hardware assembler, not Microsoft </li></ul><ul><li>This is stipulated in the system builder licence (attached to the side of the system builder pack) </li></ul><ul><li>Value of OEM providing end-user support justifies lower pricing for OEM software </li></ul>
    • 12. End-User Deliverables <ul><li>Documentation – must include: </li></ul><ul><ul><li>A printed manual </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>A Certificate of Authenticity (COA) </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Recovery Media </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Direct OEMs: OEM-branded CD, hard drive recovery solution or no media </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>System builders: Hologram CD and hard drive recovery solution </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Refer to http://www.microsoft.com/piracy for further details </li></ul>
    • 13. Recovery Media <ul><li>Direct OEMs have 3 options </li></ul><ul><ul><li>BIOS locked recovery CD </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Hard disk based solution (partition on hard drive) </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>No media provided, OEM obliged to handle customer issues on a case by case basis </li></ul></ul>
    • 14. Recovery Media <ul><li>System Builders have 2 options </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Edge 2 Edge hologram CD </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Plus </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Hard drive recovery solution (not mandatory) </li></ul></ul>
    • 15. <ul><li>A security feature meant to help customers to recognise a PC supplied with genuine software </li></ul><ul><li>Note though: Counterfeiters have been known to supply counterfeit software, covered by a loose, but stolen, genuine COA </li></ul><ul><li>For Operating Systems and Servers the COA attaches to the PC chassis </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Introduced at Windows 2000 launch (Feb 2000) </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Customer in doubt – direct to : </li></ul><ul><ul><li>www.howtotell.com </li></ul></ul>Certificate of Authenticity (COA)
    • 16. OEM &amp; Volume Licence Agreements <ul><li>Key to solution – Information </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Is it a new agreement? </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>If existing, what agreement does the customer have? </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>What version of that agreement? </li></ul></ul>
    • 17. Education Customers Any version of Windows Windows 2000 Professional Windows NT Workstation 4.0 or 3.51 Windows 98, Windows 95, Windows Millennium Edition, and Windows XP Home Edition Windows 3.x, Windows for Workgroups 3.x OS/2 Macintosh UNIX: SCO (Xenix, UnixWare), Sun (Solaris/SPARC, SunOS), Hewlett-Packard (HP-UX), IBM (AIX), Digital (Ultrix, OSF/1, Digital UNIX), SGI (IRIX), or IBM 4680/90 Any version of Windows Windows 2000 Professional Windows NT Workstation 4.0 or 3.51 Windows 98, Windows 95, Windows Millennium Edition, and Windows XP Home Edition Windows 3.x, Windows for Workgroups 3.x OS/2 Macintosh UNIX: SCO (Xenix, UnixWare), Sun (Solaris/SPARC, SunOS), Hewlett-Packard (HP-UX), IBM (AIX), Digital (Ultrix, OSF/1, Digital UNIX), SGI (IRIX), or IBM 4680/90 3.1 2.0 (Sept 30 th 2002 but customer can order from agreement for further 12 months) 3.1 2.0 (Sept 30 th 2002 but customer can order from agreement for further 12 months) Version Number (and retirement date) Version Number (and retirement date) Campus Agreement Schools Agreement New Agreements – Existing Hardware – Eligible OS Educational Licensing
    • 18. Education Customers (cont.) Windows XP Home, Windows 2000 or Windows XP Professional Windows XP Home, Windows 2000 or Windows XP Professional Windows XP Home, Windows 2000 or Windows XP Professional Windows XP Home, Windows 2000 or Windows XP Professional Eligible OEM Operating Systems available under Direct OEM licence Eligible OEM Operating Systems available under Direct OEM licence Eligible OEM Operating Systems available under Direct OEM licence Eligible OEM Operating Systems available under Direct OEM licence Campus Agreement 3.1 Campus Agreement 2.0 Schools Agreement 3.1 Schools Agreement 2.0 Existing Agreements – New or replacement hardware – Eligible OS
    • 19. Commercial Customers Windows 2000 Professional Windows NT Workstation 4.0/3.51 Windows 98, Windows 95, Windows Millennium Edition, and Windows XP Home Edition Windows 3.x, Windows for Workgroups 3.x OS/2 Macintosh UNIX: SCO (Xenix, UnixWare), Sun (Solaris/SPARC, SunOS), Hewlett-Packard (HP-UX), IBM (AIX), Digital (Ultrix, OSF/1, Digital UNIX), SGI (IRIX), or IBM 4680/90 Windows 2000 Professional Windows NT Workstation 4.0/3.51 Windows 98, Windows 95, Windows Millennium Edition, and Windows XP Home Edition Windows 3.x, Windows for Workgroups 3.x OS/2 Macintosh UNIX: SCO (Xenix, UnixWare), Sun (Solaris/SPARC, SunOS), Hewlett-Packard (HP-UX), IBM (AIX), Digital (Ultrix, OSF/1, Digital UNIX), SGI (IRIX), or IBM 4680/90 Windows 2000 Professional Windows NT Workstation 4.0/3.51 Windows 98, Windows 95, Windows Millennium Edition, and Windows XP Home Edition Windows 3.x, Windows for Workgroups 3.x OS/2 Macintosh UNIX: SCO (Xenix, UnixWare), Sun (Solaris/SPARC, SunOS), Hewlett-Packard (HP-UX), IBM (AIX), Digital (Ultrix, OSF/1, Digital UNIX), SGI (IRIX), or IBM 4680/90 New Agreements – Existing Hardware – Eligible OS Enterprise Agreement Select Open Licensing (e.g. Open Value, OV Subscription) Commercial Licensing
    • 20. Commercial Licensing (cont.) 5.1 – Windows XP Home, Windows 2000 Professional or Windows XP Professional 5.2 – Windows 2000 Professional or Windows XP Professional 6.0 – Windows 2000 Pro or Windows XP Professional Windows XP Home, Windows 2000 or Windows XP Professional Windows XP Home, Windows 2000 or Windows XP Professional Eligible OEM Operating Systems available under Direct OEM licence Eligible OEM Operating Systems available under Direct OEM licence Eligible OEM Operating Systems available under Direct OEM licence 5.1 (31st Oct 2001 – 36 months) 5.2 (31 st Oct 2001 – 36 months) 6.0 (Current program) 5.1 (31st July 2002 – 24 months) 6.0 (Current program) 5.0 (30th September 2001 – 24 months) 6.0 (Current program) Version Numbers (Date on which customer can last sign agreement and duration) Version Numbers (Date on which customer can last sign agreement and duration) Version Numbers (Date on which customer can last sign agreement and duration) Enterprise Agreement Select Open Licensing (OV, MYO, OSL, etc.) Existing Agreements – New or replacement hardware – Eligible OS
    • 21. OEM &amp; Volume Licence Agreements <ul><li>Common Beliefs </li></ul><ul><li>“ I’ve got a Select/ Enterprise/ Schools/ Campus/ Open Agreement with Microsoft – I don’t need to buy my machines with an OEM OS pre-installed” </li></ul>Wrong! No Exceptions!
    • 22. Windows Product Lifecycle <ul><li>Provides Microsoft, partners and customers with clarity </li></ul><ul><li>Relates to availability of licences and support </li></ul><ul><li>http://www.microsoft.com/windows/lifecycle/ default.mspx </li></ul><ul><li>2nd iteration of Lifecycle document </li></ul>
    • 23. Windows Product Lifecycle <ul><li>The Basics - 3 Phases: </li></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Mainstream </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Extended Phase </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Non Supported </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><li>After ‘Non Supported’ OS will go end of life! </li></ul>
    • 24. Windows Product Lifecycle
    • 25. Windows Product Lifecycle December 31, 2005 December 31, 2004 December 31, 2003 Windows Millennium Edition March 31, 2008 March 31, 2007 March 31, 2005 Windows 2000 Professional June 30, 2004 June 30, 2003 June 30, 2002 Windows NT 4.xx December 31, 2007 December 31, 2006 December 31, 2006 Windows XP Home Edition December 31, 2009 December 31, 2008 December 31, 2006 Windows XP Professional June 30, 2004 June 30, 2003 June 30, 2002 Windows 98 / 98 SE December 31, 2002 December 31, 2001 N/A Windows NT 3.5x December 31, 2002 December 31, 2001 December 31, 2000 Windows 95 December 31, 2002 December 31, 2001 N/A Windows 3.xx December 31, 2002 December 31, 2001 N/A MS DOS x.xx End of Life Entering Non-Supported phase Entering Extended phase Operating System
    • 26. <ul><li>http://www.microsoft.com/windows/lifecycle/default.mspx </li></ul>Windows Product Lifecycle
    • 27. OEM Licensing Summary Single point of contact for hardware and software-related issues Supported by hardware vendor Single transaction for hardware and software Bundled with hardware Easier to deploy than other licences Pre-installed Low TCO Low price Benefit Feature

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