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Introduction to the Internet for Macintosh/Windows
 

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    Introduction to the Internet for Macintosh/Windows Introduction to the Internet for Macintosh/Windows Document Transcript

    • Introduction to the Internet for Macintosh/Windows Northside Independent School District Department of Instructional Technology
    • Internet Explorer Macintosh and Windows Table of Contents Introduction......................................................................................................................... 1 What is the World Wide Web (WWW)? ............................................................................ 1 How to get on the Internet .................................................................................................. 2 Internet Etiquette................................................................................................................. 2 Northside’s Acceptable Use Guidelines ............................................................................. 3 What is Internet Explorer? .................................................................................................. 3 Browsing the World Wide Web.......................................................................................... 4 The Internet Explorer Screen .............................................................................................. 4 Using Help .......................................................................................................................... 5 History................................................................................................................................. 6 Practice Using the Browser................................................................................................. 7 Text Size ............................................................................................................................. 7 Selecting a Home Page ....................................................................................................... 8 Northside’s Intranet ............................................................................................................ 8 Visiting a WWW Site ......................................................................................................... 9 Uniform Resource Locator ................................................................................................. 9 Printing a Page .................................................................................................................. 11 Working with Favorites .................................................................................................... 11 Adding a Page to the Favorites List.................................................................................. 12 Organizing Your Favorites List ........................................................................................ 13 Saving Your Favorites to a Diskette ................................................................................. 14 Deleting Favorites............................................................................................................. 15 Importing Favorites from a Diskette................................................................................. 15 Using Search Tools ........................................................................................................... 16 Directories......................................................................................................................... 16 Search Engines.................................................................................................................. 17 The Search Button............................................................................................................. 19 Customizing Search Settings ............................................................................................ 20 Search Engine Tips ........................................................................................................... 21 Copying Text from Your Browser.................................................................................... 21 Saving Images from the WWW........................................................................................ 22 Inserting an Image to Word .............................................................................................. 22 Citing Internet Sources ..................................................................................................... 22 Practice Searching............................................................................................................. 23 Sites, Sites, and More Sites............................................................................................... 24 Glossary ............................................................................................................................ 26 Test Your Skills ................................................................................................................ 29 ©Northside I.S.D. Department of Instructional Technology 6/14/01
    • Internet Explorer Macintosh and Windows Introduction The Internet really is an international network of networks. The Internet began in 1969, created by Department of Defense researchers and contractors working for the Advanced Research Project Agency (ARPA). Called the “information super-highway” by former Vice-President Al Gore, the Internet is an interconnected, web-like system of millions of computers linked together with telecommunications software and hardware. The Internet connects huge corporations, small businesses, educational institutions and individuals and is the largest cooperative effort in the history of mankind! The main components of the Internet are: the World Wide Web, e-mail, news groups, gopher servers, telnet, and FTP (File Transfer Protocol sites. (The Glossary provides information about these components.) The largest and fastest growing component, by far, is the World Wide Web (WWW). What is the World Wide Web (WWW)? The World Wide Web is a hypertext-based, multimedia point-and-click interface to information on the Internet. Information on the Internet can consist of text, graphic images, sounds, animations, interactive forms and movies. The Web links documents to documents, not just computers to computers and has proven to be powerfully intuitive and easy-to-use. What can a person do with the Internet? 1. Find Information…tons of it! • by going directly to a known Internet site • by employing a search engine to find sites related to a specific topic of interest 2. Publish information! • develop a Web site and “post” it on a Web server • participate in e-mail and newsgroups THIS class primarily addresses #1 above – finding information. ©Northside I.S.D. Department of Instructional Technology6/14/01
    • Internet Explorer Macintosh and Windows How to get on the Internet There are two methods of access to the Internet: Direct Connect and Dial-Up. The Direct Connect method is used at most Northside schools. What You Need for Direct Connect Access • A network-ready computer • Cabling to connect your computer to the Internet • An “IP” address for your computer (configured by a District technician) • Browser software (Netscape Communicator, Netscape Navigator, or Internet Explorer) What You Need for Dial-Up Access • A computer • A modem (internal or external) • A telephone line • An Internet service Provider or an Online Service (costs from $10-$30 a month) • Browser software Internet Etiquette Just as in our everyday lives we must adhere to proper etiquette, the Internet has its own set of rules to be followed called netiquette. Here are a few netiquette points to consider. • Be careful about copyrights and licenses. You cannot freely take information on the Internet and claim it as your own. Go to http://fairuse.stanford.edu/ for more information. • Always cite Internet sources and references when using information in your work. Go to www.apa.org/journals/webref.html for more information. • Consider the source when reading information on the Internet. Just because it is on the Internet doesn’t make it true. Go to http://muse.mse.jhu.edu:8001/research/education/net.html for more information. • Always follow the Acceptable Use Policy of the system you are using or the system you are visiting. © Northside I.S.D. Department of Instructional Technology 6/14/01 2
    • Internet Explorer Macintosh and Windows Northside’s Acceptable Use Guidelines Internet access is coordinated through a complex association of government agencies, regional and state agencies and local or wide area networks (like NorthsideNet) and commercial providers. The purpose of NorthsideNet is to support research, education and work-related activities by providing access to unique resources and the opportunity for collaborative work. “Northside ISD believes that the valuable information and interaction available on this worldwide network far outweighs the possibility that users may acquire material that is not consistent with the educational goals of the District. It is the individual’s responsibility to exercise good judgment and follow access and usage guidelines.” Please read your Northside Employee Handbook for more details concerning Internet Access- Acceptable Use Guidelines. Guidelines for Student Use It is preferable for Northside students to use a specific URL (Uniform Resource Locator) or an address that has been placed on the Favorite list to find information. Students should use only kid safe search engines when specific URL’s are not available. (A list of kid safe search engines is provided later in this manual.) The teacher should always monitor student use of the Internet. Prior to class, the teacher should preview any web sites that the students will be using. What is Internet Explorer? Microsoft Internet Explorer is a web browser. A “browser” is a program that allows us to view or browse the information on the Internet. The browser is known as a client, and it accesses data from a remote computer called a server. © Northside I.S.D. Department of Instructional Technology 6/14/01 3
    • Internet Explorer Macintosh and Windows Browsing the World Wide Web The WWW is a collection of information stored in computers physically located throughout the world. The information on the WWW is organized onto pages. You’ll bring one page to your computer screen, discover its contents, and have the option of bringing more pages of information – a linked page - to your screen. This is accomplished by pointing and clicking your mouse button on a “hot spot” word or picture – a hyperlink. Like pages of a magazine, you’ll want to flip from one screen page to another, sometimes to continue with the same topic and other times to begin a new topic. The Internet Explorer Screen Let’s spend a few minutes familiarizing ourselves with the NISD site and using the browser. • Launch Internet Explorer. The NISD home page will be automatically displayed. The home page is the starting point for information provided by an organization or individuals. Back Refresh Home Search Favorites Standard Buttons Status Toolbar Indicator Go Address Bar URL Hyperlink Status Bar © Northside I.S.D. Department of Instructional Technology 6/14/01 4
    • Internet Explorer Macintosh and Windows Using Help There are a number of ways to get Help in Internet Explorer. From the Help menu you can go to Contents and Index to search for help, you can view the Tip of the Day, view help for Netscape Users and even take a tour. • Click Help on the Menu bar and click Tour. • Click the basics link. • Click the Basics of Internet Explorer link and look at the explanation of the buttons used in the toolbar. Back button: Click this to return to the previous page. Forward button: Click this to go to the next page in a series of pages you have already visited. Stop: Click this button when a page you are trying to view is taking too long. Refresh button: Click this to update the current page if all the latest or expected information did not appear. This is helpful if you see old information on a page that is updated frequently or if graphics appear incorrectly. Home button: Click this button to go to your home page (the first page you see when you open your browser). Search button: Click this to open the Search bar, where you can choose a search service and search the Internet. Favorites button: Click this to open the Favorites bar, where you can store links (shortcuts) to your most frequently visited Web sites or documents. This button provides the same function as “bookmarks” in Netscape. © Northside I.S.D. Department of Instructional Technology 6/14/01 5
    • Internet Explorer Macintosh and Windows History button: The History list shows where you've been - today, yesterday, or a few weeks ago. Click a name from the list to display the page. Address bar: Type Web page addresses (URLs) here, or paths to documents on your computer. Go Button: Click this button to move to a new page after you have typed in the URL. Status bar: Watch the left side of the bar for Web-page loading progress. The right side tells you which security zone the current page is in, and shows a lock icon if you are on a secure site. Status Indicator: Located in the top right corner of the screen, this icon will animate to indicate that the browser is searching for the page you requested. • Click the Home button to return to the NISD home page History There are several ways to find Web sites and pages you've viewed in the last few days, hours or minutes. To find a page you've seen in the last few days • Click the History button (The History bar appears, containing links for Web sites and pages visited in previous days and weeks.) © Northside I.S.D. Department of Instructional Technology 6/14/01 6
    • Internet Explorer Macintosh and Windows • In the History bar, click a week or day, click a Web site folder to display individual pages and then click the page icon to display the Web page • To sort or search the History bar, click the drop down arrow next to the View button at the top of the History bar and select By Date, By Site, By Most Visited or By Order Visited Today To find a page that you just visited • To return to the last page you viewed, click the Back button on the toolbar • To view one of the last nine pages you visited in this session, click the arrow to the side of the Back or Forward button, and then click the page you want from the list Practice Using the Browser • From the NISD home page, click the Schools link • Click Elementary Schools • Follow the link to Thornton Elementary • Follow the Classroom Pages PK-5 link to find out what’s going on in the second grade • Use the BACK button to return to the Schools page • Follow the link to Marshall High School and check out the Ramazine • Use the HOME button to return to the NISD home page • Follow the Departments link to check out Instructional Technology • Click the drop down arrow of the Back button to quickly return to the Thornton Elementary home page Text Size • To change the size of text in the Internet Explorer window: From the View menu, point to Text Size and then click the option you want from Largest to Smallest • Not all sites will change when you select a different size © Northside I.S.D. Department of Instructional Technology 6/14/01 7
    • Internet Explorer Macintosh and Windows Selecting a Home Page You can designate your own home page by supplying a URL as an Internet Explorer preference. Each time you launch Internet Explorer or click the Home button, your designated home page will be brought to the screen. • From the Tools menu, click Internet Options • Carefully type the following URL in the Address field: http://www.yahooligans.com/docs/tdih • Click OK • Now click the Home button and note the change • You may spend a minute or two exploring this site and then please reset the home page preference to the NISD site! http://www.nisd.net/nisd.main Northside’s Intranet An intranet is the generic term for the collection of private computer networks within an organization. Intranets generally use standard network technologies like Ethernet and TCP/IP (Telecommunications Protocol/Interface Protocol). An organization's intranet often enjoys Internet access but is firewalled so that its computers cannot be reached directly from the public Net. From Northside’s intranet you can submit an ITS Workorder, access the Personnel Directory, look at Board Policy, look at and print Training Manuals and much more. • Type the word Intranet on the Address Bar • Spend a few minutes exploring Northside’s Intranet © Northside I.S.D. Department of Instructional Technology 6/14/01 8
    • Internet Explorer Macintosh and Windows Visiting a WWW Site Every Internet site has a unique address known as a URL (Uniform Resource Locator). You may access a site directly if you know its URL. Type the URL directly onto the Address bar and click Go or press Enter on the keyboard. Enter the following URL onto your Address bar. Uniform Resource Locator An Internet or Web address (the URL) typically is composed of four parts: • A protocol name (a protocol is a set of rules and standards that enable computers to exchange information) • The location of the site • The name of the organization that houses the server and maintains the site • A suffix that identifies the kind of organization it is (such as .com for a commercial organization) For example, the address http://www.yale.edu/ provides the following information: This Web server uses Hypertext Transfer Protocol – the rules that allow http: computers to communicate www This site is on the World Wide Web yale The Web server is named yale .edu This is the extension, which signifies it is an educational institution When you are viewing a Web page, the page's address appears in the Address bar in Internet Explorer. © Northside I.S.D. Department of Instructional Technology 6/14/01 9
    • Internet Explorer Macintosh and Windows URLs are case-sensitive, never contain spaces, and must be typed carefully to work! The extension (last three letters) in the server name is an indication of the type of site you will be visiting. Some common extensions are: .org a non-profit organization .edu educational institution .com a commercial entity .net an Internet service provider .gov a government agency .mil a military site • Visit the My San Antonio site. The URL is: http://www.mysanantonio.com • Spend a minute or two following links that interest you. (Remember to use the FORWARD and BACK buttons.) As you navigate this site, notice: • After you click a link, the Internet Explorer Status Indicator animates (top, right of screen) to show you that the transfer of the page to your computer is in progress. • When your cursor points over a link, the Status Indicator Message Field on the Status Bar (bottom of screen) displays the URL of the page that one click will bring to the screen. • Un-followed and followed links are highlighted in different colors. (By default, un-followed links are blue and followed links are purple.) © Northside I.S.D. Department of Instructional Technology 6/14/01 10
    • Internet Explorer Macintosh and Windows Printing a Page You may want to print a WWW page in order to read it at a later date (off-line). Here’s how: • Go to the page you want to print. • From the File menu, click Print. This will bring up the Print window. • Choose the printing options that you want. • Click Print. Note: Some pages are divided into frames, which are rectangular areas that display their own pages. When printing a page containing frames, the Print Frame command replaces the Print command. Right click anywhere inside the frame you wish to print and then click Print or Print Frame Note: If you don’t need to select print options, you can click the print button on the toolbar. Working with Favorites When you find Web sites or pages that you like, you can keep track of them by adding them to your Favorites List, so it's easy to open them in the future. Any time you want to open that page, just click the Favorites button on the toolbar, and then click the shortcut in the Favorites list. Favorites Button Favorites List © Northside I.S.D. Department of Instructional Technology 6/14/01 11
    • Internet Explorer Macintosh and Windows Adding a Page to the Favorites List • Go to the page you want to add to your Favorites list. • On the Favorites menu, click Add to Favorites or click the Favorites button on the toolbar and then click Add in the Favorites window. Favorites Button • Type a new name for the page if you want to. • Click OK. • To place this page into a folder, click the Create in button. • Click the folder you want to place this page in and click OK. • If you want a new folder, click the New Folder button, give the folder a name, and click OK. • Click OK to close the Add Favorite dialogue box. © Northside I.S.D. Department of Instructional Technology 6/14/01 12
    • Internet Explorer Macintosh and Windows • The name of the page will be added to your Favorite pages list. New Page is listed in Favorites • Click the Home button on the Standard Toolbar to leave your favorite site. Now you will return to your favorite site. • Click the Favorites button on the Standard Toolbar. • Find your favorite site from the list (it will be the last one unless you placed it in a folder) and click it. • Explore this site and add several pages to your Favorites list. Organizing Your Favorites List Because favorites are such a powerful and convenient feature, Internet Explorer provides a Favorites list. As your list of favorites grows, you can keep it organized by creating folders. • Click the Favorites button to view the list. © Northside I.S.D. Department of Instructional Technology 6/14/01 13
    • Internet Explorer Macintosh and Windows • Click the Organize button. • Click the Create Folder button. • Type a name for the folder and press Enter. Use your name. Drag the pages you added to your Favorites list to the new folder. • Click the Close button. A new folder now appears in the Favorites list with your favorite pages inside. • Click the folder to view its contents. Saving Your Favorites to a Diskette There may be times when you want to save your list of favorites and take them with you on a diskette. For example: when attending a workshop where you have listed important favorite sites visited during your session. You may also want to save a group of bookmarks for your students so that they may easily visit sites without having to type URLs. To save just one favorite to a disk: • While viewing the list of favorites, right click the favorite page or the folder you want to save to a floppy disk. • From the shortcut menu, point to Send To and click 31/2 Floppy (A:). © Northside I.S.D. Department of Instructional Technology 6/14/01 14
    • Internet Explorer Macintosh and Windows Deleting Favorites • Click the Favorites button. • Right click the name of the favorite page that you want to delete. • Click Delete. • Click Yes when asked if you are sure. Importing Favorites from a Diskette • Minimize Internet Explorer. • Open My Computer. • Open the 3 ½ Floppy (A:) drive. • Restore Internet Explorer from the Taskbar. • Click the A:/ drive button on the Taskbar. • Drag the favorites or the folders to the Favorite List in Internet Explorer. • Close the A:/ drive window. © Northside I.S.D. Department of Instructional Technology 6/14/01 15
    • Internet Explorer Macintosh and Windows Using Search Tools There will be many times when you want to find information on the Internet but you do not know any specific URLs related to your topic. This is the time to use some of the many Internet Search Tools. You must decide WHAT to search, WHERE to search, and HOW to search. Two specific types of search tools are Search Engines and Directories. Directories A directory is a catalog of sites collected and organized by humans. Directories are often called “trees” because they start with a few main categories and then branch out into subcategories, topics, and subtopics. Many directories include a keyword search option which would help prevent having to work through many levels of topics and subtopics. Directories are your best choice for general browsing. Here are the names and URLs of some popular directories: Yahoo http://www.yahoo.com Yahooligans (for kids) http://www.yahooligans.com Excite http://www.excite.com Try it! Spend several minutes browsing interesting topics by visiting the above directories. © Northside I.S.D. Department of Instructional Technology 6/14/01 16
    • Internet Explorer Macintosh and Windows Search Engines Search engines use computer programs called spiders or robots to search the Web and catalog the words from each page. Search engines allow you to enter search terms and retrieve a list of relevant documents or sites. The search engine scans its database and returns a list with links to websites containing the word or words you specified. Because the databases are so large, the results of a search can return thousands of hits. It is very important to use strategies that narrow down your search and bring the most relevant pages to the top of your results list. Without these search strategies, finding what you want can be like finding a needle in a haystack. Here are names and URLs of some popular search engines: Cyber411 http://www.cyber411.com MetaCrawler http://www.metacrawler.com Lycos http://www.lycos.com Alta Vista http://wwwaltavista.com Excite http://www.excite.com WebCrawler http://www.webcrawler.com © Northside I.S.D. Department of Instructional Technology 6/14/01 17
    • Internet Explorer Macintosh and Windows Search Engines for Kids Use the following list of kid safe search engines when working with students. Have the students go to one of these search engines first and then perform a search. Ask Jeeves for Kids www.ajkids.com A natural language search engine that is filtered. By natural language, you can enter in questions like "why is the sky blue." Yahooligans: www.yahooligans.com A database of about 20,000 sites that are kid safe. You can search or select from a directory SuperSnooper www.supersnooper.com A search engine with built in filters that screen-out pornographic, violent and hate- related sites OneKey www.onekey.com/live/index.htm A closed search engine that requires web sites to meet an editorial policy KidsClick! sunsite.berkeley.edu/KidsClick! Put together by librarians for kids, the database, as of July, 1998, contained about 2600 records. Well organized and easy to use, though not as thorough as the others. Study Web www.studyweb.com 73,000 "research quality" web sites AOL Search Kids Only http://www.aol.com/netfind/kids A search engine that links only to sites that are safe for kids. As kids get into secondary and high school, they may need to use larger and more sophisticated search engines like Yahoo www.yahoo.com, Lycos www.lycos.com AltaVista www.altavista.com and Excite www.excite.com. For a natural language quary engines site there is Ask Jeeves www.askjeeves.com © Northside I.S.D. Department of Instructional Technology 6/14/01 18
    • Internet Explorer Macintosh and Windows The Search Button • Click the Search button on the Standard toolbar • Enter your search criteria (polar bears) and press Enter or click the Search button • A list of relevant sites will be displayed • Click the site you want to visit © Northside I.S.D. Department of Instructional Technology 6/14/01 19
    • Internet Explorer Macintosh and Windows Customizing Search Settings • From the Search window, click Customize. • Select the Search Engine or Directory you want to use and click the Move Up arrow to move your selection to the top of the list. • Click the Autosearch settings button. • Click the drop down arrow to choose a search provider. • Click OK. © Northside I.S.D. Department of Instructional Technology 6/14/01 20
    • Internet Explorer Macintosh and Windows Search Engine Tips Carefully constructing your search terms will give you the best results. Here are some tips: • Take time to study any instructions and FAQs to find out what kind of search strings the search engine accepts. • Understand exactly what it is you are looking for (know your subject). • Use Boolean operators (AND, OR, NOT) • Capitalize the first letter of each word when searching for a proper name. • Use quotation marks when doing a phrase search. • Use commas to separate words that are not part of a phrase. Try it! Spend several minutes conducting some searches on topics of your choice. Use more than one search engine. Here are some possible topics. • Women in sports • Robert Frost • Greek mythology • Dinosaurs • Maps of Africa Copying Text from Your Browser Sometimes it is useful to copy text from a Web page and paste it into a word processing document. • Select the text needed by dragging across it with your mouse to highlight the selection. • Right click the mouse to get the shortcut menu. • Click the Copy command. • Minimize your browser window, open your word processing application and paste the text at the desired insertion point. • Restore the browser window. • Be sure not to violate copyright law. © Northside I.S.D. Department of Instructional Technology 6/14/01 21
    • Internet Explorer Macintosh and Windows Saving Images from the WWW Sometimes it is useful to use an image from a Web page in a slide show, report cover, etc • Point to the desired image using your mouse pointer. • Right-click the mouse and you will see a shortut menu. • Click the Save Picture As command. • Set the Save In location in which you wish to save the image. (Hint: You’ll find it easily on the Desktop!) • Keep the default name for the image or type a new file name, then click Save. • The image is now stored as a separate file (in a GIF or JPG format) and may be inserted into Word, PowerPoint, etc. • Be sure not to violate copyright law. Inserting an Image to Word • Restore the word processing document. • From the Insert menu, point to Picture and click From File. • Navigate to find the location of the image file. • Select the image file. • Click Insert. Citing Internet Sources Remember you cannot freely take information on the Internet and claim it as your own. Text found on the Internet should be paraphrased and rewritten in your own words. Even then, you must cite the source. Images taken from the Internet cannot be used for commercial/profit purposes or public use outside the educational setting without the owner’s permission. Here’s how to cite an Internet source: General Structure Author. Title of item. [Online] Available http://address, date of document or download. Example Yule, James. The Cold War Revisited: A Splintered Germany. [Online] Available http://usa.coldwar.server.gov/index/cold.htm, November 1998. © Northside I.S.D. Department of Instructional Technology 6/14/01 22
    • Internet Explorer Macintosh and Windows Practice Searching Use your new search strategies and techniques to complete a scavenger hunt exercise. Go to the following URL and use the search engines at the bottom of the page to find the answers to the questions. http://home.sprintmail.com/~debflanagan/hunt.html © Northside I.S.D. Department of Instructional Technology 6/14/01 23
    • Internet Explorer Macintosh and Windows Sites, Sites, and More Sites Here is a collection of sites that educators will love! There are, of course, thousands of other valuable sites. This is only the beginning! Take some time to explore these sites as you familiarize yourself with the Internet and Internet Explorer. Administrative Milken Family Foundation: www.mff.org refdesk.com: www.refdesk.com Community Newspapers on the Web: http://www.naa.org/hotlinks/index.asp KMOL TV: http://www.kmol.com National Geographic: http://nationalgeographic.com Teacher/Parent Resources Ask an Expert Categories: http://www.askanexpert.com PBS Kids’ Neighborhood: http://www.pbs.org/kids/ Scholastic: http://scholastic.com The Teacher’s Internet Use Guide: http://www.rmcdenver.com/useguide/map.htm Region 20 Curriculum Using Technology Resources: http://www.esc20.net/cut/materials/Default.html Tips for Parents: http://www.ed.gov/pubs/ Classroom Connect: http://www.classroom.net Project Based Learning with Multimedia: http://pblmm.k12.ca.us/index.html Fact Monster: www.factmonster.com Big Chalk: www.bigchalk.com Teams Distance Learning K-12: http://teams.lacoe.edu Discovery School: http://school.discovery.com/info/sitemap.html Light Span: http://www.lightspan.com/ Kid’s Health: www.kidshealth.org Texas Education Network: http://www.tenet.edu The American Library Association’s Parents & Kids Section: http://www.ala.org/parents/index.html © Northside I.S.D. Department of Instructional Technology 6/14/01 24
    • Internet Explorer Macintosh and Windows Math Sites Math Stories: www.mathstories.com Mathematics TEKS Toolkit: http://www.tenet.edu/teks/math/index.html Saxon Pub. Basic Facts: http://www.saxonpub.com/tech/basic_facts/basicFacts.html A+Math: www.aplusmath.com Science Sites Science TEKS Toolkit: http://www.tenet.edu/teks/science/index.html Kapili: Chem4kids: www.chem4kids.com The Nine Planets: http://www.seds.org/billa/tnp/ Bill Nye The Science Guy: http://nyelabs.kcts.org Extreme Science: http://extremescience.com Social Studies Sites The History Net: http://thehistorynet.com/ American Indians: http://www.germantown.k12.il.us/html/intro.html This Day in History: http://www.yahooligans.com/docs/tdih/ Map Quest: http://mapquest.com Reference Sites Littler Explorers: www.enchantedlearning.com/Dictionary.html Internet Public Library Youth Division: http://www.ipl.org/youth/ On-line Curriculum Activities FunBrain: www.funbrain.com Quia: www.quia.com Brain Pop: www.brainpop.com School Express: http://www.freeworksheets.com/ Technology Related Sites TCET Research: http://www.tcet.unt.edu/research/index.htm Net Tech: Educational Tech Coordinator: http://www.nettech.org/tc/sitemap.html International Society for Technology in Education: http://www.iste.org/index.html © Northside I.S.D. Department of Instructional Technology 6/14/01 25
    • Internet Explorer Macintosh and Windows Glossary browser Software that permits the viewing of hypertext documents and allows the user to follow links on the Web. Most offer full sound and graphic capabilities (ex. Netscape, Mosaic). directory A search tool created by humans that provides subject categories and subcategories related to many topics of interest; follow links to appropriate documents or sites. download To copy a file or information from one computer or server to your computer. e-mail (electronic mail) Electronic mail involves sending and receiving messages over a network. favorite Method of remembering specific Web sites. Many web browsers enable you to store the name and location of interesting sites for quick and easy access to the certain Web site. FTP File Transfer Protocol. A software tool that is used to move files from one computer to another. Helps in the movement of large files very quickly over the Internet. FTP can download and upload binary files, such as computer programs, as well as text files. Sometimes called “anonymous FTP” because it is usually available to any Internet user without regard to the user’s identity. gopher A tool which provides simple, menu-based access to Internet resources. There are thousands of gopher servers in operation worldwide. This system was very popular before the World Wide Web. © Northside I.S.D. Department of Instructional Technology 6/14/01 26
    • Internet Explorer Macintosh and Windows home page A hypertext page or document on the Web that is presented first. It is the starting point for information provided by an organization, institution or individual. HTML Hyper Text Markup Language. A type of programming language used to create home pages. http Hyper Text Transfer Protocol. The collection of rules used by computers of the Internet so that they can transmit, share and comprehend information written in hypertext. hypertext Documents that are tied to each other by links. The links permit the user to move from one document to another by “linking” on the connection points. Internet The largest cooperative effort in the history of mankind! It is an international “network of networks” that communicates via a common communication language protocol called TCP/IP. The Internet connects huge corporations, small businesses, educational institutions and individuals. Internet Explorer A web browser that handles multimedia files. Internet Service Provider A company that will give you access to the Internet for a fee (ex. Internet Direct, Texas Net, Southwestern Bell). link A hypertext association to another location on the Internet. Computers utilize URL addresses to make connections. © Northside I.S.D. Department of Instructional Technology 6/14/01 27
    • Internet Explorer Macintosh and Windows online-service Commercial services like CompuServe, America Online, Prodigy, Microsoft Network that allow dial-up Internet access, e-mail, server space, and other Internet services. search engine A search tool which allows a user to enter search terms and retrieve a list of relevant documents or sites. (ex. Cyber411, Dogpile, Infoseek, Lycos). snail mail Name given to the regular postal service by people who use electronic-mail. Telnet An Internet protocol that allows you to logon to a remote computer, sometimes called a remote host. One use of Telnet is for searching a remote database (ex. Texas A & M Library). URL Uniform Resource Locator. A succession of characters used to identify the type (Gopher, FTP, http) and address of particular items or sites on the Internet. ex.: http://netvet.wustl.edu/e-zoo.htm. The section before the colon refers to the access method. The section immediate after the double slashes is the address for the computer where the resource is located. The section after the address is the specific directory path and file name. World Wide Web (WWW, the Web) A hypertext-based, multimedia interface or bridge to the Internet. The Web links documents to documents, not just computers to computers, as is the case with the gopher system. WAN Wide Area Network which connects computers across a large geographic area, such as a city or country. The NorthsideNet, which connects the entire District, is an example of a WAN. The Internet is the largest WAN of all! © Northside I.S.D. Department of Instructional Technology 6/14/01 28
    • Internet Explorer Macintosh and Windows Test Your Skills • Add the following sites to your Favorites list: http://www.ask.com/ http://gallery.yahoo.com http://www.lycos.com/ • Create a new folder • Name the folder using your last name • Place these three favorites into the new folder • Open the folder so the list is visible and take a screen shot • Paste the screen shot into Word • Save the document on your disk as “Favorites” • Print the document • Delete the three Favorites you created • Delete the folder you created • Have the test administrator verify that the Favorites have been deleted • Access the Northside Intranet and follow the School Improvement Plans link • Follow the link to your school • Follow the link to Goal 5 Technology Integration • Save the picture of the bus on your disk • Copy all the text above the chart • Open Microsoft Word • Type your name at the top of the page • Paste the text 2 lines below your name • Insert the picture of the bus below the text • Cite the source of this information at the bottom of the page • Save the Word document as “Goals” on your disk • Print the Goals document © Northside I.S.D. Department of Instructional Technology 6/14/01 29
    • Internet Explorer Macintosh and Windows Session Evaluation Form Date_______________________ Workshop Title_______________________________________ I Learned Most Helpful Least Helpful Suggestions © Northside I.S.D. Department of Instructional Technology 6/14/01 30