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                                   MS Office Suite X
                                            Basics


Overview:
MS ...
2
“Open” button at the bottom of the Project Gallery window.


Menus and Tools

The difference between a command and a too...
3

Tools can be accessed from the Menus or from the tool bars. The toolbars can be viewed by
selecting the “View” menu and...
4
Saving and naming files

The first time you save a new document, you need to name the file and tell the computer
where t...
5
To get to the top of the directories (desktop) on a Mac, use the horizontal scroll bar found at
the bottom of the Browsi...
6
printing out a text outline of your presentation (great for students to have as a review of your
lesson).




Additional...
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  1. 1. 1 MS Office Suite X Basics Overview: MS OFFICE SUITE® is a set of software packages that were developed to work together. The suite uses a set of common “tools” that allow you to perform a variety of task related to the use of this software. This software is also designed to be “cross-platform” so that you can exchange files between a Macintosh computer and a Windows computer with relative ease. (It isn’t always flawless, but the files generally will open in either operating system.) Office Suite X is the version intended for the Macintosh operating system 10 (OS X) and is the focus of this handout. If you are using the Office Suite XP with a Windows machine, the tools and software operations are the very similar but may appear with slightly different icons or in different locations. If you can use the Office Suite on a Windows machine, you can use it on a Mac and vise versa. Skill Objectives: • You should be able to create a blank, new document in any of the suite applications • You should be able to open a template from the Project Gallery for a specific application and be able to fill in needed information to make a new document (PowerPoint or Word) • You should be able to open and use the tool bars when needed • You should understand the difference between a menu and a tool bar You should be able to select parts of a document to copy, cut, paste, or move it • You should be able to use keyboard short cuts when available to activate tools • You should understand the difference between the “save” and the “save as” command and when to use each and be able to correctly name a file • You should know how to create a PDF file (available only in the Mac version) • You should be able to use the printing options available for each of the suite applications • You should be able to use the Help assistant to learn how to use the software The Project Gallery (⇑ P) (shift- command- p) When you first open the Office Suite, a window appears that shows the “Project Gallery.” This allows you to choose a type of document to create. You can open any of the three kinds of software documents from this window even if it is different than the application you “launched.” Launching an application is the term used to describe what happens when the software is activated on your computer. The Project Gallery will automatically open with the choice of a blank, new document in the software you launched. You can however, choose to use pre-made documents (templates) that are also available under the “category” column on the left side of the Project Gallery window. There are a variety of “templates” available for each of the Suite applications. To use any of the templates, choose the category of template you wan to use and then choose from the available designs. After you have clicked on the one you want to use, the click on the ©2003 Vicki S. Napper. Reproduction of this handout is allowed to students enrolled in the ED3110 course. Other copying is not allowed without permission. Images copied from MS OFFICE SUITE X © Microsoft Corporation. (Created 12/03).
  2. 2. 2 “Open” button at the bottom of the Project Gallery window. Menus and Tools The difference between a command and a tool is that commands are generally procedure such as “save” or “print” whereas tools are generally activities such as using an image that looks like a pencil to draw a table. The metaphor of a “tool” is used to represent a complex command that a software programmer has created for use with the software and is represented by a visual image signifying the type of activity the tool performs. Menus: On a Macintosh, there is always a menu bar appearing at the very top of the monitor screen and is constantly changing according to what you are doing on the machine. On a Windows machine, the menus appear inside of the “windows” related to the application you are currently working on. Menus are the way that commands or tools are organized and activated for use. Menus are presented as text commands and are a way of organizing commands to the computer so that people can find them and use them. The keyboard commands used to activate the various procedures or tools appear next to them when you view the menus. The keys generally consist of a combination of keys such as the command key (the key next to the space bar that has a on it), option key, or the sift key. On a Windows machine the equivalent keys are control (instead of command) and alt (instead of option). The commands you use on a Mac or PC are similar but generally substitute the command/control keys and the option/alt keys. So to save a file on a Mac you use the keyboard keys: command-S. To save a file on a Windows machine you use the keyboard keys: control-S. All of the commonly used commands for working on files such as open, print, undo, underline, bold, italic are use the same letter but substitute the command or control keys. Tools are complex commands used to activate a variety of actions you use with the software. Tools can be activated from the Menus or from a set of “toolbars” on the screen. Toolbars are a way of organizing the “icons” (images that represent the tools) so that people can find them and use them. The most useful toolbar is the ones containing the “standard” tools (all of the commonly used commands such as creating a new document, opening a file, saving a file, printing or previewing files, cut, copy, paste, creating a table, look up a word, changing the size of the viewable image, activate help) Another useful toolbar is the “formatting” tool bar (change the style of the text or paragraph, change the size of the font, bold, italic, underline, change alignment of text, add numbers to lists, add bullets to lists, create boards around text or images, highligh text, change the color of the text) The drawing toolbar provides access to tools that allow you to create graphics inside your document (for example insert 3d squares or circle), add arrows, add color to boxes, etc. ©2003 Vicki S. Napper. Reproduction of this handout is allowed to students enrolled in the ED3110 course. Other copying is not allowed without permission. Images copied from MS OFFICE SUITE X © Microsoft Corporation. (Created 12/03).
  3. 3. 3 Tools can be accessed from the Menus or from the tool bars. The toolbars can be viewed by selecting the “View” menu and choosing “Toolbars.” A special toolbar is the “Formatting Palette.” The formatting palette contains several tools and changes according to what you are working on at the moment. If you are working on text, then the formatting palette shows tools related to formatting text. If you are working on images, then the palette shows tools related to formatting images. Not all of the available tools appear on the formatting palette, just the ones for “formatting” or altering the appearance of something. To use the formatting palette, you first must select something (highlight text by clicking on it or dragging across a range of text; select an image by clicking on it). Then the formatting palette will change to the options available for formatting the selected item. You can also activate a variety of formatting options for images (clipart, pictures, charts) by double clicking on them (Right mouse click on the select object also works). Selecting Objects A standard procedure for telling the Office Suite software what you want to do is to “select” something you see on the computer screen. You can select something by clicking and dragging across the object or area or double clicking on it. • To select text, click on one side of the text and drag across the text you want to select (a highlight color will appear when the text is successfully selected) • To select an image, click on the image and a solid line around the image will appear. Also you will see small squares appear at the corners and in the middle of the edges of the images. Those small square are where you click to “drag” the image to change its size • To select a row or rows of text, move the cursor to the left margin of the document and it will change to an arrow. Once you see the arrow shaped cursor, you can then click and drag the cursor down the margin of the document and it will “select” lines of text. Help The Office Suite has a good “Help” system in place. There is the Help menu and there is the Office Assistant. The Help menu allows you to choose a topic for more help if you know what the topic is called. The Office Assistant is a “context sensitive” program that runs beside the open documents. If the Office Assistant window doesn’t appear on your screen, you can activate it from the Help menu. The Office Assistant will attempt to figure out what you are doing and give you advise. If you don’t want the Office Assistant around, you can turn it off by clicking on the button on the side of the window it appears in. You can also change the character that appears as the Office Assistant by double clicking on the window it appears in and choosing “options” to see the other assistants available. ©2003 Vicki S. Napper. Reproduction of this handout is allowed to students enrolled in the ED3110 course. Other copying is not allowed without permission. Images copied from MS OFFICE SUITE X © Microsoft Corporation. (Created 12/03).
  4. 4. 4 Saving and naming files The first time you save a new document, you need to name the file and tell the computer where to save the file. The next time you save the document, you can again use the “save” command. If you rename the document or save it somewhere else from where you saved it originally, then use the “save as” command. Don’t use the save as command if you are simply updating a file with new information. The computer may jump to a different directory than the one you were working in and then you will have multiple copies of the file you are working on but with different contents because you save the file in different places. This confuses the computer and the computer user. Naming a file is very important. The computer has rules about how a file should be named. The computer needs to be able to read the file name in order to correctly open the file. If you use symbols (such as quote marks, apostraphies, & marks, slashes, periods, commas, or most other symbols) the computer gets confused and stops reading the file name when it encounters a symbol. That will cause the computer to tell you it can’t open the file. Also, the name of the file should be SHORT and not contain spaces between words. For example you have a lesson plan you are saving and the lesson is about the history of utah in the 1800’s. PLEASE DON’T NAME IT THIS: Lesson Plan for Utah in the 1800’s.doc The computer will freak out sooner or later and give up trying to figure out what you want it to do. A much better name would be lpUtah1869.doc It contains information you can figure out and the computer can read. You can use numbers in the names of your files but don’t put the numbers after the “extension” that appears on the end of the file. The extension is also another way the computer determines what KIND of file it is opening. The different extensions you will see used with the Office Suite software are: .doc (Word document), .ppt (Powerpoint), .xls (Excel spreadsheet). When you save a file, a window appears that allows you to tell the computer where you want to save the file. “Browse” to the location of the directory where the file will be saved. The directory structure of a computer begins at the highest level (the desktop on a Mac, the drive letter on a Windows machine) and cascades down through successive levels within other directories (that means you have a directory folder that can contain several other sub-directory folders which in turn can contain more sub-subdirectories, etc.) ©2003 Vicki S. Napper. Reproduction of this handout is allowed to students enrolled in the ED3110 course. Other copying is not allowed without permission. Images copied from MS OFFICE SUITE X © Microsoft Corporation. (Created 12/03).
  5. 5. 5 To get to the top of the directories (desktop) on a Mac, use the horizontal scroll bar found at the bottom of the Browsing window. If you can’t see one, then click on the downward facing arrow beside the directory that is appearing in the window. That will open the levels of the directories for you to browse. To ensure the “extension” appears, make sure the “Append file extension” is checked. To change the format of the document, click on the drop-down format menu. Printing The normal command to print a document is P (or control P on a Windows machine). This activates the print window. You can select the whole document or a range of pages to print. You can also create a PDF file (one you need Adobe Reader to open) by printing it and choosing the Save as PDF option on the bottom of the printing window (not available on Windows machines). There are also specialized options for printing pages for PowerPoint presentations. To activate those options, choose Print, then click on the “Copies and Pages” drop down menu to see a selection of options. The Microsoft Word choice allows you to take advantage of a variety of printing options such as printing PowerPoint slides as a handout with 3 or more slides per page, printing the Notes pages you have for the PowerPoint slides, or ©2003 Vicki S. Napper. Reproduction of this handout is allowed to students enrolled in the ED3110 course. Other copying is not allowed without permission. Images copied from MS OFFICE SUITE X © Microsoft Corporation. (Created 12/03).
  6. 6. 6 printing out a text outline of your presentation (great for students to have as a review of your lesson). Additional handouts are available about features for each of the Office Suites applications (Word, Excel, and PowerPoint). Check the ED3110 handout folder (available at: http://faculty.weber.edu/vnapper/3110/handouts.htm ©2003 Vicki S. Napper. Reproduction of this handout is allowed to students enrolled in the ED3110 course. Other copying is not allowed without permission. Images copied from MS OFFICE SUITE X © Microsoft Corporation. (Created 12/03).

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