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ConvertingMacFilesForCTCIComputers_16Dec2006.doc.doc.doc

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  • 1. Moving Your Old Files to Your New Computer If you have created files using your old Macintosh computer that you would like to have available on your new Windows PC (to print and edit), you will have to save them onto your flash drive and copy them onto your new PC. This document guides you through that process. If you have not received your flash drive from Anne Bailey, please obtain one. Plugging the Flash Drive into the Macintosh Computer A flash drive is a small portable hard drive. It plugs into a computer where there a USB (Universal Serial Bus) port. (A port is a “female” socket that accepts some type of “male” plug or jack.) The flash drive enables you to make backup safety copies of your files as well as move files from one computer to another just like you used to do with floppy discs, except flash drives have a lot more space than floppy discs, so you can store many more files. USB plugs and ports are “unidirectional” which means your flash drive can be plugged in only one way. Looking directly into the plug or the port, you’ll notice that they have a plastic piece on one side and an open slot on the other. The flash drive plastic piece fits into the port’s open slot and vice versa, so if the flash drive doesn’t slide easily into the port, reverse the direction. While there is a USB port on many of the Mac keyboards, it may not work (due to power limitations). Therefore, it is recommended that you plug the flash drive directly into one of the USB ports on the computer. The USB ports on most of the Macs are located on the right side of the computer, one above the other. The keyboard is plugged into one of the USB ports; the other has the printer plugged into it. Remove the USB printer cable (not the keyboard cable), and plug the flash drive into that port when you are ready to save your files onto the flash drive. When you insert the flash drive into the Macintosh computer, an icon should appear on your desktop that looks like this: flash drive icon on desktop untitled This represents the flash drive and is where you will copy files you want to move to the new PC. If you don’t see this icon on your Mac desktop, send email to Anne Bailey requesting assistance. Safely Removing the Flash Drive from a Macintosh Computer Do not just yank the flash drive out of the USB port. Instead: 1. Click and drag the flash drive icon to the trash can. 2. Wait for the computer to show a message that you may remove the cartridge from the USB device. 3. Unplug the flash drive. 4. Don’t forget to plug the printer cable back into the USB port. 5. You may need to restart your computer so that it recognizes the printer. Page 1 of 6
  • 2. Understanding File Formats and Why Some Need To Be Converted Every computer file has a particular “format” and different computer programs will open only certain file formats. For example, I cannot open a Microsoft Word file using my Hypersnap picture editing software program because Hypersnap wasn’t designed to “read” MS Word files. There are no software programs on your new PC that are able to open AppleWorks or Claris Works files. Therefore, if you want to be able to open, edit, and/or print files you created on your old Mac, some of them will have to be converted to a format that the software on your new computer will be able to understand. Fortunately, some file formats are “cross-compatible” meaning that it doesn’t matter which operating system or program was used to create them. As long as there is software on the new computer able to read that type of file format, you don’t have to convert them. For file formats that are cross-compatible, all you need to do to move them to your new computer is to copy them from the Macintosh onto the flash drive, insert the flash drive into the new PC’s USB port, and then copy them onto your new computer. That process is outlined later. The types of files you don’t need to convert are listed in the following table. If you are unsure whether or not any other types of files are cross-compatible, please send email to Vanessa Else. When you look at the contents of your hard drive or a folder on your Mac desktop, it will tell you the file format if you are viewing the contents as a list. To do this, 1. Click on the View menu. 2. Select As List from the drop-down menu. 3. In the Kind column you can see the file format for each file. (You may have to use the horizontal scroll bar at the bottom of the window to scroll to the right and see this column.) You may or may not see a “file extension” at the end of your files depending on your computer’s settings. A file extension is appended automatically to the file name you type when saving a file so that a computer knows what type of file it is and what program should run when you open the file. The file extension code (3 or 4 letters) follows the period at the end of the file name. Caution: Do not put periods in file names that you plan to use on your new PC because the Windows operating system will confuse anything after a period as a file extension. Therefore, remove any periods that you typed into a file name by renaming the file before saving them to your flash drive; don’t remove the period before a file extension. Cross-Compatible File Formats Note: The asterisk is a “wildcard” indicating a file name much like an “x” or “y” indicates an algebraic variable. File Format File File Format File Extension(s) Extension(s) Web Pages *.html, *.htm Various picture files *.jpg, *.gif, *.tif, *.tiff, *.png Microsoft Word *.doc Text only *.txt Microsoft Excel *.xls Rich Text Format *.rtf Microsoft PowerPoint *.ppt Audio files *.wav, *.mpg These are the most common cross-compatible formats. If you have others and are unsure, contact Vanessa Else. Page 2 of 6
  • 3. Saving Cross-Compatible Files onto the Flash Drive 1. Login to the computer if you haven’t done so already. 2. Find the file name (on your desktop, in a folder, or on the computer’s hard drive). 3. Click on the file and drag it on top of the flash drive icon. 4. If the copy is successful, you will see the file name in the file list on your flash drive. To check this: a. Double-click the flash drive icon to open it. b. Make sure the file name is there. 5. If you want to remove the flash drive at this time, follow the procedure on page1. Converting Other File Formats – First Create a Storage Folder For files that are not cross-compatible, you will have to convert them to a cross-compatible format on your Macintosh first before saving them to the flash drive. The easiest way to do this is to save the converted files into one folder and then, when you are finished with all your conversions, copy the entire folder onto the flash drive. To create a new folder on your desktop: 1. Login to the computer if you haven’t done so already. 2. Click anywhere on the desktop to make it active. 3. Click on the File menu. 4. Select New Folder from the drop-down menu. 5. If you don’t click on anything else, the new folder is in rename mode, so just type a folder name. We recommend “ConvertedFiles” as this is the folder name used in the rest of this document. Converting AppleWorks Word Processing Files 1. Open the file you want to convert. 2. Click the File menu. 3. Select Save As… from the drop-down menu. 4. In the Save window, select the where the file should go by first selecting “Desktop” in the destination field. Then select the ConvertedFiles folder from the file list by double-clicking the folder name. Note: the correct destination may already be selected. 5. Change the file format to the highest version of MS Word (e.g., Word 2001) if that option is available, or RTF (Rich Text Format) if Word is not an option. 6. Click the Save button. Save Use the arrow keys to select ▲ Desktop in the destination field. Desktop ▼ Then, from the file list, select the ConvertedFiles folder you created file list on your desktop by double-clicking it. The destination field should now File Format say, ConvertedFiles. ▲ RTF ▼ Save Use the arrow keys to change the file format to the highest version of Word available, or RTF. Page 3 of 6
  • 4. Converting AppleWorks Spreadsheet Files Converting AppleWorks spreadsheet files is a little more complicated if you have an older version of AppleWorks. This first procedure is for newer versions that have the ability to save documents as an Excel spreadsheet. If you don’t have that file format option available, see the next procedure. 1. Open the file you want to convert. 2. Click the File menu. 3. Select Save as… from the drop-down menu. 4. In the Save window, select the destination by first selecting Desktop, and then select the ConvertedFiles folder from within the desktop. The destination may already be selected. 5. Change the file format to the highest version of Excel available (such as Excel 98/2001). 6. Click the Save button. Save Use the arrow keys to select Desktop in the destination field. ▲ Desktop ▼ Then, from the file list, select the ConvertedFiles folder you created file list on your desktop by double-clicking it. The destination field should now File Format say, ConvertedFiles. ▲ Excel ▼ Save Use the arrow keys to change the Converting Older AppleWorks Spreadsheet Files format to the highest version file If you have an older version of AppleWorks that does not have the optionExcel available. as an of of saving the file Excel file format you will have to copy the data into an Excel spreadsheet, and then save the new Excel file. This process will copy only the data. If you have any calculations in the AppleWorks spreadsheet, you will need to manually enter the formulas using Excel formulas. For those few of you who have this problem, please contact Vanessa Else and she will help you figure out what you need to do. 1. Close all programs and files you have open. 2. Open Microsoft Excel. 3. Open the AppleWorks spreadsheet file you want to convert. 4. Click and drag to select all the cells in the AppleWorks spreadsheet that have data. 5. Click on the AppleWorks Edit menu and select Copy from the drop-down menu. 6. Click in cell A1 of the blank Excel file. 7. Click on the Excel Edit menu and select Paste from the drop-down menu. 8. Click the File menu and select Save from the drop-down menu. 9. In the Save window, select the destination by first selecting the Desktop and then selecting the ConvertedFiles folder from the list as described above. 10. Type a descriptive file name in the Name field. Do not put periods in the file name. 11. Click the Save button and close the file. Page 4 of 6
  • 5. Saving Your ConvertedFiles Folder to the Flash Drive After you have converted Mac files that you want on your new computer, you will copy the ConvertedFiles folder to the flash drive. 1. Login to the computer if you haven’t done so already. 2. Click on the ConvertedFiles folder and drag it on top of the flash drive icon. 3. If the copy is successful, you will see the folder on your flash drive. To check this: a. Double-click the flash drive icon to open it. b. Make sure the folder is there. 4. If you want to remove the flash drive at this time, follow the procedure on page1. Computer Terminology You Need to Know for the Next Section Taskbar The bar at the bottom of the new computer screen that has the start button on the left and the current time on the right. Active Window The window that will accept what you type on the keyboard. While you can have many windows and programs open simultaneously, there is only one active window at a time. You can tell which window is active by looking at the taskbar; the active window is the button that is darker (or a different color) than the others. System Tray The grouping of icons on the right side of the Taskbar that includes the current time and icons for other useful system functions. Copying Your Files from the Flash Drive to Your New Computer Make sure you have all your files from the Macintosh copied onto the flash drive. Remove the flash drive from the Macintosh (using the procedure described on page 1). Now you are ready to copy them onto the new computer. To do this: 1. Insert the flash drive into one of the USB ports on the new computer. There are two USB ports on the front of the new computer located to the left of the power button. 2. Wait a bit after you plug in the flash drive, and a window will appear showing you the contents of the flash drive. Don’t close this window. In the Taskbar you will see a button for the flash drive identified as “Removable Disk (E:).” At this time, this is the active window. Whenever you want to make your flash drive the active window, just click on this button in the Taskbar. 3. Click on the start button (bottom left of the computer screen) and select Run… 4. In the Open: field, of the Run window, type “explorer” (w/o quotation marks) and click OK. 5. A second window appears that is identified as “My Documents” in the Taskbar. 6. Position the “Removable Disk (E:)” and “My Documents” windows so that you can see both. 7. Click on the “Removable Disk (E:)” window to make it the active window. Then, click and drag a box around all the file names and the ConvertedFiles folder. This should select them all and the file/folder names will be outlined in dark blue with white fonts. 8. Click on any one of the outlined file/folder names and drag the cursor to the “My Documents” window. Make sure that when you let go of the mouse button, the cursor is positioned anywhere in the white part of the bottom right frame of the “My Documents” window. The bottom right frame is the part of the window that contains folders named “My eBooks,” “My Music,” “My Pictures,” etc. This will copy your files from the flash drive to the new computer. Page 5 of 6
  • 6. The “My Documents” folder is the default storage location for Windows computers. So, when using Microsoft Word or Excel, and you go to open a file by clicking on the File menu and selecting Open from the drop-down menu, it automatically looks for the file in the My Documents folder. There, you will see your cross-compatible files and your ConvertedFiles folder. Now there is one last step… (Yay!) Safely Removing the Flash Drive from a Windows Computer You can use your flash drive as a backup device so that you have important files stored on the flash drive as well as your computer hard drive (in case your computer crashes and dies). You also can use the flash drive to transport files between your home computer and the one at school. The flash drive will hold approximately 256M of computer files. You already know how to insert the flash drive into a USB Port. The following instructions are how you should remove the flash drive from a Windows computer. 1. Do not just yank the drive out of the USB port without properly shutting it down. 2. In the system tray, you should see an icon with a green arrow pointing to the left. If you don’t see it, expand the system tray by clicking on the icon at the left of the system tray that looks like this: 3. When you move the cursor over the icon with the green arrow, you’ll see that it is called “Safely Remove Hardware.” Double-click this icon and a “Safely Remove Hardware” window will open. 4. The “USB Mass Storage Device” should be selected already. Click the Stop button. 5. A “Stop a Hardware device” window will appear in which the “USB Mass Storage Device” should be selected. Click the OK button. 6. When a message appears near the system tray that says “Safe to Remove Hardware” you can remove the flash drive from the USB port. 7. Lastly, close the “Safely Remove Hardware” window. Final note: if you insert your new flash drive into another computer (such as your home computer) and a Hardware Configuration Wizard opens up, or you get a message that the drive is not configured, click the Cancel button, do not reconfigure the flash drive, and notify Anne Bailey of the problem the next time you come to work. Be sure to write down the text of any error messages you received. Telling Annie merely that, “It didn’t work,” is not sufficient information to troubleshoot the problem. Thank you, Kealakehe Elementary Computer Support Page 6 of 6

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