Chapter 1

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  • Chapter 1

    1. 1. Chapter 1:Computers & You Copyright © 2009 Pearson Education, Inc. Publishing as Prentice Hall 1
    2. 2. Computer Fundamentals  A computer is a device that performs the information-processing cycle which consists of four basic operations:  Input  Processing  Output  Storage Copyright © 2009 Pearson Education, Inc. Publishing as Prentice Hall 2
    3. 3. Computer Fundamentals Copyright © 2009 Pearson Education, Inc. Publishing as Prentice Hall 3
    4. 4. Computer Fundamentals  The computer system components are categorized into two main groups:  Hardware  Software Copyright © 2009 Pearson Education, Inc. Publishing as Prentice Hall 4
    5. 5. Computer Fundamentals  Hardware-physical parts of the computer  System unit  Monitor  Keyboard  Printer.  Software-programs that instruct the computer. Copyright © 2009 Pearson Education, Inc. Publishing as Prentice Hall 5
    6. 6. Computer Fundamentals  Software can be grouped into:  System software programs that assist with the proper functioning of the computer.  OS – Operating System  Application software programs used to perform tasks. Copyright © 2009 Pearson Education, Inc. Publishing as Prentice Hall 6
    7. 7. Computer Fundamentals  Input-enables the computer to accept data.  Data refers to facts that are raw and unorganized.  Data is entered into the computer for processing through the use of input devices  Keyboard, mouse, scanner, microphone, digital camera Copyright © 2009 Pearson Education, Inc. Publishing as Prentice Hall 7
    8. 8. Computer Fundamentals  Processing-converts data into information.  Information refers to organized, processed data.  The central processing unit (CPU) processes the data into information.  Random access memory (RAM) temporarily stores programs and data needed by the CPU. Most important. Copyright © 2009 Pearson Education, Inc. Publishing as Prentice Hall 8
    9. 9. Computer Fundamentals  Output-displays processed data that users can understand.  Output devices  Monitors, speakers and printers. Copyright © 2009 Pearson Education, Inc. Publishing as Prentice Hall 9
    10. 10. Computer Fundamentals  Storage- stores the processed results so that they can be used in the future.  Storage devices save programs and the data used by the computer system  Hard drives  Inside a Hard Drive  CDs  USB drives Copyright © 2009 Pearson Education, Inc. Publishing as Prentice Hall 10
    11. 11. Computer Fundamentals  Communications, the moving of data within or between computers, is sometimes considered the fifth operation in the information-processing cycle.  Communication devices connect computers to a network of two or more computers.  A network shares input/output devices and other resources. Copyright © 2009 Pearson Education, Inc. Publishing as Prentice Hall 11
    12. 12. Computer Fundamentals 12
    13. 13. Types of Computers  Types of computers can be separated into two main categories:  Computers for one user at a time.  Computers to be used by many people at the same time. Copyright © 2009 Pearson Education, Inc. Publishing as Prentice Hall 13
    14. 14. Types of Computers 14
    15. 15. Types of Computers  Computers for individuals  Personal computers (PCs) - MAC (Apple’s Macintosh) systems or IBM-compatible systems.  Notebook computers for mobility.  Subnotebooks or ultraportables have fewer components than traditional notebooks, weigh less, and are smaller. Copyright © 2009 Pearson Education, Inc. Publishing as Prentice Hall 15
    16. 16. Types of Computers  Computers for individuals (continued)  Tablet PCs can be used to input data with a keyboard or mouse, and the user can write on the monitor with a special pen or stylus.  Personal digital assistants (PDAs), also called handheld computers, have many of the capabilities of a notebook but are much smaller and lighter.  Smartphones are similar to PDAs and have additional mobile phone and Web capabilities. Copyright © 2009 Pearson Education, Inc. Publishing as Prentice Hall 16
    17. 17. Types of Computers  Computers for individuals (continued)  All-in-one computers provide the space- saving features of a notebook and the performance of a desktop computer.  Network computers (NCs) and Internet appliances are mostly used for network and Internet connection.  Professional workstations are intended for technical applications for which very powerful processing and output are necessary. Copyright © 2009 Pearson Education, Inc. Publishing as Prentice Hall 17
    18. 18. Types of Computers  Computers for organizations  Servers enable users connected to a computer network to have access to the programs, hardware, and data.  Clients include the user computers connected to the network.  A client/server network includes the use of client computers with centralized servers. Copyright © 2009 Pearson Education, Inc. Publishing as Prentice Hall 18
    19. 19. Types of Computers  Computers for organizations (continued)  Minicomputers or mid-range servers for smaller companies.  Mainframes for very large processing jobs for large companies or the government.  Supercomputers perform extremely high- speed processing and show underlying patterns Copyright © 2009 Pearson Education, Inc. Publishing as Prentice Hall 19
    20. 20. Computers, Society, & You There are a number of advantages and disadvantages to using computers. Copyright © 2009 Pearson Education, Inc. Publishing as Prentice Hall 20
    21. 21. Computers, Society, & You  When using computer hardware:  Do not plug too many devices into electrical outlets.  Use surge protectors.  Place hardware where it can’t fall or be damaged.  Provide adequate space for air circulation around hardware.  Securely fasten computer cables, cords, and wires. Copyright © 2009 Pearson Education, Inc. Publishing as Prentice Hall 21
    22. 22. Computers, Society, & You  Software programs contain flaws.  These flaws cause slower processing, performing added tasks, and miscalculations.  The greater the number of lines of code, the harder it is to eliminate errors. Copyright © 2009 Pearson Education, Inc. Publishing as Prentice Hall 22
    23. 23. Computers, Society, & You  Computer ethics involve moral dilemmas relating to computer usage.  Unethical behavior includes:  Sending viruses  Stealing credit card information  ATM Skimmers  Computer stalking  Installing illegitimate copies of software Copyright © 2009 Pearson Education, Inc. Publishing as Prentice Hall 23
    24. 24. Computers, Society, & You  E-learning-allows students to learn without requiring them to be at a specific location at a specific time. Copyright © 2009 Pearson Education, Inc. Publishing as Prentice Hall 24
    25. 25. Computers, Society, & You  Labor demand is shifting as a result of computer use.  Automation is the replacement of people by computers.  Computer technology is responsible for globalization and the resulting outsourcing of jobs Copyright © 2009 Pearson Education, Inc. Publishing as Prentice Hall 25
    26. 26. Computers, Society, & You  Be aware of e-waste and the proper disposal of outdated computer hardware.  E-Waste Copyright © 2009 Pearson Education, Inc. Publishing as Prentice Hall 26
    27. 27. Computers, Society, & You  Stay informed about advances in computer technology.  Upgrading software  Staying informed about new computer viruses. Copyright © 2009 Pearson Education, Inc. Publishing as Prentice Hall 27

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