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  1. 1. WinMac Dene Font System for Windows 1. INTRODUCTION-----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------2 2. HISTORY----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------2 3. INSTALLING WINMAC DENE FONTS------------------------------------------------------------------------3 4. INSTALLING KEYMAN--------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------4 5. STARTING KEYMAN-----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------5 6. USING KEYMAN WITH WINMAC FONTS-------------------------------------------------------------------7 7. TYPING NUMBERS--------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------7 A. VOWEL FIRST KEYBOARD LAYOUT INSTRUCTIONS ------------------------------------------------------------------------7 B. DENE KEY KEYBOARD LAYOUT INSTRUCTIONS----------------------------------------------------------------------------8 8. CROSS PLATFORM CONSIDERATIONS---------------------------------------------------------------------9 9. TECHNICAL EXPLANATIONS - WHY USE RTF?--------------------------------------------------------10 WinMac Dene Fonts are based on the SIL Encore fonts and distributed under licence. They may only be distributed unchanged and free of charge. Encore © Copyright 1994-1997 Summer Institute of Linguistics WinMac Dene Font System © Copyright 1997-1998 Jim Stauffer, Stauffer Photo & Design WMKEYMAN.EXE is adapted from Keyman, the Tavultesoft Keyboard Manager version 3.2 release. The purpose of this special edition is to simplify installation and use by people who wish to use Keyman exclusively with WinMac Dene Fonts. Sample keyboards and documentation on writing keyboard layouts have been removed. The complete, original Keyman archive, as downloaded from the Summer Institute of Linguistics website <http://www.sil.org>, is on the “WinMac for Windows” diskette in the file KEYMAN32.EXE. You will not need the extra files in that archive unless you wish to write your own custom keyboard layout. It is only included to fulfill the distribution requirements of this copyrighted freeware. A newer version may be available from the website above. Keyman © Copyright 1994, 1996 Tavultasoft For more information or free product support phone Jim Stauffer at 867-573-3251 (help is free but the long distance phone charges are yours.) email <xjimst@ssimicro.com>
  2. 2. Documentation - WinMac Dene Font system for Windows Page 2 1. Introduction WinMac Dene TrueType Fonts contain the 66 special vowels and consonants required for writing the Athabaskan languages (Chippewyan, Dogrib, and North and South Slavey) of the Northwest Territories. For those needing to read and print documents in a Dene Language, installing the fonts will be sufficient. Those needing to create or edit documents will need some additional tools to type these characters. Because the special Dene characters are in the extended portion of the Windows and Macintosh character maps, they are not readily accessible from the keyboard. The WinMac system includes specialized keyboard remapping programs that enable these extra characters to be typed on any ordinary keyboard -- sometimes with one extra keystroke-- while still keeping the full set of standard “English” letters. The WinMac system was designed for cross-platform file sharing. Dene language documents can be shared between Windows machines and Macintosh machines as long as both have the WinMac Dene fonts installed. Keyboard utilities for both platforms use the same keystrokes, making it easy for a user to move from one system to another. 2. History In the past Dene language word processing was the exclusive domain of the Macintosh. The character mapping used (both by the older DeneKey fonts and the more recent Vowel First Dene Fonts) was totally incompatible with Windows. In 1995 I had a huge document (a two hour film script) typed using a DeneKey font which I absolutely had to edit on a Windows machine. Not only that but I had to be able to send it back to the Mac for repeated proofreading, then edit some more on Windows. The result was the development of the WinMac system. Not only does it permit cross platform document sharing, it is now possible to convert documents from the Mac-only DeneKey and Vowel First fonts to the WinMac fonts with no loss of characters. Conversion is cumbersome, must be done on a Mac, and requires the document to be reduced to plain text before conversion. In the future I hope to develop a Word Macro to do this conversion without losing document formatting. For more information or product support phone Jim Stauffer at 867-573-3251 (help is free but the long distance phone charges are yours.) email <xjimst@ssimicro.com>
  3. 3. Documentation - WinMac Dene Font system for Windows Page 3 3. Installing WinMac Dene Fonts WinMac Dene Fonts are compressed to save space on the floppy. They must first be extracted and copied to your hard drive, then installed. Fonts are contained in the self-extracting archive "WMFONTS.EXE". Double-click this file to expand and copy the font files to your hard drive. After copying the fonts to your hard disk you must also "install" them so Windows can recognize them. To actually Install WinMac Dene Fonts on your system so they are available to your applications, use the "Fonts" icon from the Windows Control Panel. See your Windows documentation if you are not sure how to install fonts. 1. From the "Add Fonts" dialogue Window, navigate to the directory where you put the font files (c:tempdenefont if you used the WinZip self-extractor default). 2. Select all 16 of the WinMac font names that appear there. You can probably use the "Select All" button. 3. Make sure to check the box "Copy Fonts to Windows Directory". (Win95 “Copy to Fonts Folder”) 4. Then click "OK". Fonts are available immediately after installing them. You should not need to restart your computer. If your word processor application was running while you installed the fonts, you may need to quit and restart the application before the new fonts appear in the application's Font menu. There are 4 font families, Charis, Doulos, Manuscript, and Sophia, each in regular, bold, italic, and bold italic for a total of 16 fonts. Only the 4 font family names should be visible in your font menus. The 4 styles will be available from font style menu or buttons. Charis and Doulos are serif fonts, Manuscript is monospaced, and Sophia is a sans-serif font. Doulos looks better on screen at small point sizes than Charis, however Charis prints up very nicely on a laser or inkjet printer at 300 dpi or better. For more information or product support phone Jim Stauffer at 867-573-3251 (help is free but the long distance phone charges are yours.) email <xjimst@ssimicro.com>
  4. 4. Documentation - WinMac Dene Font system for Windows Page 4 4. Installing Keyman NB If you have installed the older Keyman version 3.1, I recommend you remove it and install this newer version. All of Keyman’s files are installed in its own directory except for the KEYMAN.INI in the Windows directory and the Program Manager group it creates. You should delete these as well before installing the newer version To install Keyman, double click the self-extracting archive WMKEYMAN.EXE. It will recommend a temporary directory on your hard disk c:tempkeyman to which it will copy the setup files. (You can delete this directory later, after you’re sure Keyman is operating correctly.) I recommend leaving the box checked beside the words, “When Done Unzipping Run: SETUP.EXE” so the Setup program will automatically install Keyman. (If you uncheck this box, files will only be copied to your hard drive. You will then need to run the SETUP.EXE program manually to install Keyman.) When the Tavultasoft Setup Program runs (either automatically or if you run SETUP.EXE manually) it will suggest a destination directory for installing the actual Keyman program. The default is C:KEYMAN. This will be the permanent location of the program. You may type a different location. I keep all my utilities in a subdirectory on my startup drive, so my path is C:UTILITYKEYMAN. After choosing the destination, you will see another dialogue window asking you to choose how Keyman will behave on startup. I recommend you select both of the available keyboards, “WinMac DeneKey” and “WinMac Vowel First Dene”. I also strongly recommend you UN-CHECK both check boxes at the bottom of the dialogue window. Say "no" to the offer to start Keyman when Windows starts, and say "no" to the offer to hide Keyman window after starting. Click the “Continue” button to complete the installation of Keyman for WinMac. For more information or product support phone Jim Stauffer at 867-573-3251 (help is free but the long distance phone charges are yours.) email <xjimst@ssimicro.com>
  5. 5. Documentation - WinMac Dene Font system for Windows Page 5 5. Starting Keyman Keyman Setup will add a new program group to your Program Manager in Windows 3.1 and a shortcut on the Win95 start button menu. Double click the Keyman Icon. You will see an introductory splash screen and then the Tavultesoft Keyboard Manager window with 5 buttons. Choose Hide for now (or play with the options if you're not in a hurry to go anywhere). When you click on "Hide" the window disappears and the black barred D and V on a dark red field will appear. Click on this D or V button to activate the desired keyboard configuration (D for DeneKey, V for Vowel First). The button changes to show a white D or V on a red field when the keyboard is active. Clicking on the button again will deactivate that keyboard In order to type the special Dene Characters in the WinMac font you must activate one of the WinMac Dene keyboards in Keyman. (Click on the button so it shows white letter D or V on red background.) It is not enough that Keyman is running; one of the keyboards must be active. A RIGHT mouse-click on the D or V button (whether active or inactive) will bring back the Keyboard Manager window. From there you can exit the Keyboard Manager program, or select Options or Help. For more information or product support phone Jim Stauffer at 867-573-3251 (help is free but the long distance phone charges are yours.) email <xjimst@ssimicro.com>
  6. 6. Documentation - WinMac Dene Font system for Windows Page 6 The Options button will bring up a dialogue which allows you to choose where and how the D and V buttons are displayed on your screen. If your Word processor uses the title bar for a status bar or message bar, it will hide the buttons on the title bar when the message changes. The Keyman buttons still work if you click on them, but you cannot see them. You can use the Keyman Options to move the buttons from the title bar to a floating window. Changes in the title bar will not cover buttons when they are displayed up there in a floating window. Checking the “Grab-Tag” box puts a handle on the floating buttons window which allows you to drag the buttons anywhere you want them on your screen. The on-line help may be useful to you. You can find more information on how to use the various options available from the “Options” button. Start with the section “Using the Options Dialog Box”. The help file is out of date and does not accurately reflect all the current version’s dialogue windows. It also makes reference to sample keyboards and document files that have been removed from this limited edition. For more information or product support phone Jim Stauffer at 867-573-3251 (help is free but the long distance phone charges are yours.) email <xjimst@ssimicro.com>
  7. 7. Documentation - WinMac Dene Font system for Windows Page 7 6. Using Keyman with WinMac Fonts N.B. If WinMac SILSophia Dene font is not installed some characters on this page will not display correctly. If the following character is a RingA the font is not installed. Å It should be a barred L. For those already familiar with typing Dene languages on a Macintosh, this program includes a choice of two keyboard configurations which emulate the "Dene Key" and “Vowel First Dene” keystrokes used on Macintosh computers in the NWT. There are a few things to keep in mind: 1. First, you must select one of WinMac Dene fonts before typing special characters, or everything except high and low tones will look wrong. (You can select characters and change them afterward if you forget and start typing without selecting the proper font.) 2. You must activate one of the WinMac Dene keyboards in Keyman (Click on the button so it shows white letter D or V on red background). It is not enough that Keyman is running; one of the keyboards must be active. While the WinMac Keyboards are active some keys will not work as you may expect. The letter Q is relocated to the ~ (tilde) key since the Q key is used for the North Slave shwa. The semi colon and colon are relocated to the right square bracket key because the colon key is used for the voiceless L. The numbers are used for accenting vowels so they do not behave normally. See the next section “Typing Numbers” for more information. Keyman follows the standard Macintosh DeneKey or Vowel First Dene keystroke combinations. High tones are produced by pressing 4 before a vowel, 5 for low tones, 6 for nasals, 7 for high tone-nasal combinations, and 8 for low tone nasals. (Press the number AFTER the vowel when using the Vowel First keyboard layout.) The shwa (except for North Slave as noted) is on the 2 and 3 keys (Uppercase on 2, lowercase on 3) and can be modified by pressing 4, 6, or 7. Barred L å is on the ; (semicolon) key and glottal stop æ is on the [ (left bracket) key. Both the Barred L Å and the glottal Æ can be capitalized in the normal way by pressing the shift key. It is not necessary to start Keyman if you only want to type one or two Dene characters in a document. You can use the Windows Character Map applet or you can hold down the ALT key and type the 4 digit code on the numeric keypad. For example to type a barred L for Åutsel K'e (Snowdrift), hold down the Alt Key and press 0197 on the numeric keypad. You will see this, Å. Select this character and change to one of the WinMac Dene fonts and it will turn into a Å barred L. 7. Typing Numbers Typing numbers presents a challenge in the WinMac system because the number keys are used to add diacritics to a vowel. In the case of the shwa (Ÿ & ÿ on the 2 and 3 keys) this character can be overridden in several ways. Type 2 & 3 from the number keypad, or hold down the control key while typing a 2 or a 3. a. Vowel First keyboard layout instructions If you want to type the numbers 4, 5, 6, 7, or 8 it is no problem until you want to put the number immediately after a vowel. Since numbers 4 thru 8 are used for accenting vowels, the problem is how to keep from accenting a vowel when one wants to type “a4, b4, c4, d4, e4," or “a5, a6, a7, a8," etc. The way this is done is to place a / (slash) before the number. Pressing the number key will then absorb the slash, print the number, and will prevent the number from accenting the vowel. For consistency’s sake the same may be applied to any number; the slash is not required and need not be typed after consonants or before numbers 1, 9, and 0. But if one gets used to doing so it will be absorbed in those cases as well. For more information or product support phone Jim Stauffer at 867-573-3251 (help is free but the long distance phone charges are yours.) email <xjimst@ssimicro.com>
  8. 8. Documentation - WinMac Dene Font system for Windows Page 8 To type a 2 or a 3 instead of Ÿ and ÿ one can also place a / (slash) immediately before pressing the 2 or the 3 key. If one wants to put a slash between two numbers (e.g. 4/5) then the slash must be typed twice because one is absorbed by the following number. To type 2/3 the keystrokes required are "/", "2", "/", "/", "3" By using the control key or typing numbers from the numeric keypad this last awkwardness can be avoided. b. Dene Key keyboard layout instructions If you want to type the numbers 4, 5, 6, 7, or 8 it is no problem until you want to put the number immediately before a vowel. To type 4a, 4b, 4c, 4d, 4e, 5a, 6a, 7a, 8a, etc., place a / (slash) AFTER the number. Typing the vowel will then absorb the slash, print the vowel, and will prevent the number from accenting the vowel. For consistency’s sake the same may be applied to any of the numbers from 1 thru 9 and 0; the slash is not required and need not be typed but if one gets used to doing so it will be absorbed after a 1, 9, or 0. If one wants to put a slash between two numbers (e.g. 4/5) then the slash must be typed twice because the first one is absorbed even when it is not followed by a vowel. To type 2/3 the keystrokes required are "2", "/", "/", "3", "/" By using the control key or typing numbers from the numeric keypad this last awkwardness can be avoided. For more information or product support phone Jim Stauffer at 867-573-3251 (help is free but the long distance phone charges are yours.) email <xjimst@ssimicro.com>
  9. 9. Documentation - WinMac Dene Font system for Windows Page 9 8. Cross Platform Considerations The main reason for the development of the WinMac Dene font system was to be able to share Dene language document files back and forth between Windows and Macintosh applications. This works very well within the same application. MS Word 6 for Mac and Word 6 for Windows read each other’s files. The Database program, FileMaker Pro, does an excellent job of exchanging files seamlessly and transparently between its Macintosh and Windows versions. (At least version 2.1 did. I have not tested version 3 but they make the same claims.) However when one begins to share files, not only across different computer platforms, but between different software manufacturers or different versions of the same software, things can get complicated. Most word processors include some file translators but they can’t cover everything. The following tips will help to keep things as compatible as possible 1. Always save your WP document in Rich Text Format before sending it to another user. Use the “Save As...” command and chose “RTF” from the file type drop-down menu. 2. Avoid the use of specialty fonts that may not be on someone else’s computer. Times New Roman and Arial are standard with Windows. Times and Helvetica will be on most Macintosh machines. (Of course, WinMac Dene fonts are specialty fonts but you are assuming the target machine will have those installed.) 3. If you need to share database or spreadsheet files between different programs, try using standard interchange formats or tab delimited text files. I have not yet tested exchanging Qattro Pro files with Excel. If you are opening a document from another user, you may need to select all the text and set the font to one of the WinMac Dene fonts. RTF does not always retain font names. You may also be opening a document containing an earlier version of WinMac Dene fonts where the font name is not the same as those installed on your system. Some word processors will allow you to change font formatting with search and replace. For more information or product support phone Jim Stauffer at 867-573-3251 (help is free but the long distance phone charges are yours.) email <xjimst@ssimicro.com>
  10. 10. Documentation - WinMac Dene Font system for Windows Page 10 9. Technical Explanations - Why use RTF? When translating a Dene language document from Mac to Windows or from Windows to Mac, the conversion utility must be able to perform standard Upper ASCII character map translations as well. The regular English letters in the first 127 locations on the character maps are identical on both platforms, but characters in the upper ASCII set, 128 to 255, are vastly different. The WinMac Dene Font system places the special characters used in Dene languages in locations between 128 and 248 in. Furthermore, the WinMac system places them in locations ordinarily used for accented European language characters. Most major word processors have translators built in which automatically convert these international character locations between Windows and Macintosh. Mac Link (for Mac) and Conversions Plus (for Windows) also make these character conversions when translating files between platforms. This CANNOT happen however, if the conversion utility does not recognize the source file format. For instance, in the WinMac system a lower case nasal "a" is at 226 in the Windows Character Map but it is at 137 in the Macintosh Character map. MS Word ordinarily performs these translations when opening its own documents from the other platform. It seems to do so when opening RTF files as well. However when Word for Macintosh tries to open a WordPerfect for Windows document (or a document created with a later version of Word) it does not have the appropriate translator. You can sometimes force it to open the file anyhow but the upper ASCII characters (above 127) do not get converted. In the case of the nasal "a" that came from the Windows document, you will see the character in Mac location 226 instead of 137, a character similar to a comma. The rest of the unique Dene characters are similarly displaced on the Mac when the proper conversion cannot be carried out. In some cases you will see strange characters, blank spaces, or empty boxes. The standard English letters however will appear normal because they need no translation, having the same address in both character maps. For this reason I urge everyone sharing Dene Language documents containing WinMac fonts to save in RTF format before passing the file on to another user. There is no way an earlier version of one company's word processor can be expected to read their own or their competitor's more recent document formats. Example: MS Word 6 (1994) CANNOT read a document produced on Word Perfect 8 (1997) nor can Word 5.1 for Mac read a Word 6 for Windows document. (The newer one should be able to read the older one - but that doesn't always work perfectly either.) But, if the WP8 author saves his document as RTF instead of WPD, THEN the Word 6 user CAN read it, and so can most other major word processors on either platform. I am in the process of compiling an RTF compatibility chart to pinpoint just which programs have trouble reading which other programs’ RTF files. For instance, MS Word97 for Win95 does not properly convert an RTF file created by WordPerfect 3.5 for Macintosh. WordPerfect 6.0 for Windows cannot read anything from an RTF file created on MS Word97. It will take some time yet to complete all the necessary tests. In a pinch you can always email a file to me and I can convert it to the desired destination format. I have access to resources to translate almost any word processor document format. For more information or for product support phone Jim Stauffer at 867-573-3251. (Help is free but the long distance phone charges are yours.) email <xjimst@ssimicro.com> For more information or product support phone Jim Stauffer at 867-573-3251 (help is free but the long distance phone charges are yours.) email <xjimst@ssimicro.com>

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