SURVEY N°1 / July 2008
Foreign direct investment
into MEDA in 2007
The switch
MED-AllianceInvestintheMediterranean
 
Foreign direct
investment into MEDA in
2007: the switch
S t u d y N ° 1
J u l y 2 0 0 8
 
A N I M A I n v e s t m e n t ...
Foreign investment into the MEDA region in 2007
3
 
References
This report was prepared by the ANIMA team within the frame...
Foreign investment into the MEDA region in 2007
4
Acronyms
ANIMA:  Euro‐Mediterranean  Network  of  Investment  Promotion ...
Foreign investment into the MEDA region in 2007
5
 
Contents
FDI in MEDA, illustrating a shift in the global economic bala...
Foreign investment into the MEDA region in 2007
6
A very variable entry ticket depending on the sector ......................
Foreign investment into the MEDA region in 2007
7
 
5. Annexes ..............................................................
 
FDI in MEDA, illustrating a shift
in the global economic balance
Data on foreign direct investment (FDI) in the MEDA reg...
Foreign investment into the MEDA region in 2007
9
 
2007,  the  first  signs  of  regional  industrial  integration).  All...
 
1. Synopsis: more FDI projects
than ever in 2007
The new attractiveness of the Mediterranean
According  to  UNCTAD  figu...
Foreign investment into the MEDA region in 2007
11
 
Consolidation in value in 2007, after 5 years of strong
increase
What...
Foreign investment into the MEDA region in 2007
12
advertised by the investors), announced FDI flows 3 regress in the same...
Foreign investment into the MEDA region in 2007
13
 
Except  in  the  case  of  an  unforeseen  shock,  this  consolidatio...
Foreign investment into the MEDA region in 2007
14
Europe and the Gulf, 2 pillars of foreign investment in the
Mediterrane...
Foreign investment into the MEDA region in 2007
15
 
The Gulf and Europe are for the moment the 2 pillars of foreign inves...
Foreign investment into the MEDA region in 2007
16
against  new  mass  immigration).  Even  if  relocations  are  less  fr...
Foreign investment into the MEDA region in 2007
17
 
In fact, the products manufactured offshore are ʺof the same complexi...
Foreign investment into the MEDA region in 2007
18
granted). The bill stipulates that certain investment projects will be ...
Foreign investment into the MEDA region in 2007
19
 
and  to  partnerships  (joint‐venture,  etc.)  with  approximately  1...
Foreign investment into the MEDA region in 2007
20
industry is also thriving, counting on significant local resources: abu...
Foreign investment into the MEDA region in 2007
21
 
Figure 8. Number of projects and FDI flows by sector in 2007 (MIPO, i...
Foreign investment into the MEDA region in 2007
22
As  for  services  to  businesses (solicitors,  facility  management,  ...
Foreign investment into the MEDA region in 2007
23
 
4. Egypt.  Damac  (United  Arab  Emirates)  to  invest  30  EGP  bill...
Foreign investment into the MEDA region in 2007
24
Conclusion: how can MEDA achieve a lasting
attractiveness?
Beyond the e...
Foreign investment into the MEDA region in 2007
25
 
2. Euro-Med integration or
Euro-Med-Gulf triangle?
Investors from the...
Foreign investment into the MEDA region in 2007
26
The Euromed integration, a necessary condition, but one
of many, of the...
Foreign investment into the MEDA region in 2007
27
 
increase,  insofar  as  Turkey  would  have  collected  alone  nearly...
Foreign investment into the MEDA region in 2007
28
Presence of the Gulf in the Mediterranean: in search of
economic rents ...
Foreign investment into the MEDA region in 2007
29
 
Figure 11. Relative contributions of the main FDI‐emitting regions in...
Foreign investment into the MEDA region in 2007
30
Another  phenomenon  ought  to  be  highlighted:  the  regular  progres...
Foreign investment into the MEDA region in 2007
31
 
destination  for  Saudi  companies.  The  latter  indeed  prefer  Tur...
Foreign investment into the MEDA region in 2007
32
our  MIPO  observatory.  Gulf  SMEs  are  consequently  seriously  unde...
Foreign investment into the MEDA region in 2007
33
 
Conclusion
About thirty private or public holdings are the source of ...
Foreign investment into the MEDA region in 2007
34
Improving  the  quality  of  FDI  is  essential,  and  MEDA  regulators...
Foreign investment into the MEDA region in 2007
35
 
10. Egypt. Emaar Properties (UAE) to launch a new project, the 1 bill...
 
3. Sectoral analysis of FDI into
MEDA
Before analyzing the projects announced in 2007, it is interesting to put in 
pers...
Foreign investment into the MEDA region in 2007
37
 
Figure 15. FDI flows per sectoral subset over 2003‐07 (€m, ANIMA‐MIPO...
Foreign investment into the MEDA region in 2007
38
Figure  16.  Ranking  per  sector  (MIPO  2007,  number  of  projects  ...
Foreign investment into the MEDA region in 2007
39
 
Top 5 in value in 2007
Whereas  the  composition  of  the  top  5  ha...
Foreign investment into the MEDA region in 2007
40
The  17  other  sectors  scrutinised  by  MIPO  also  make  25%  of  th...
Foreign investment into the MEDA region in 2007
41
 
The  correlated  boom  in  foreign  and  national  investment  in  th...
Foreign investment into the MEDA region in 2007
42
This  might  be  only  temporary,  given  the  number  of  operations  ...
Foreign investment into the MEDA region in 2007
43
 
another.  The  2003‐2007  average  entry  ticket  (113  million  EUR)...
Foreign investment into the MEDA region in 2007
44
FDI, driving force for employment
Even  if  the  data  ʺemployment  cre...
Foreign investment into the MEDA region in 2007
45
 
The aggregation of the ʺemploymentʺ data over 2003‐07 makes it possib...
Foreign direct investment into MEDA in 2007: the switch
Foreign direct investment into MEDA in 2007: the switch
Foreign direct investment into MEDA in 2007: the switch
Foreign direct investment into MEDA in 2007: the switch
Foreign direct investment into MEDA in 2007: the switch
Foreign direct investment into MEDA in 2007: the switch
Foreign direct investment into MEDA in 2007: the switch
Foreign direct investment into MEDA in 2007: the switch
Foreign direct investment into MEDA in 2007: the switch
Foreign direct investment into MEDA in 2007: the switch
Foreign direct investment into MEDA in 2007: the switch
Foreign direct investment into MEDA in 2007: the switch
Foreign direct investment into MEDA in 2007: the switch
Foreign direct investment into MEDA in 2007: the switch
Foreign direct investment into MEDA in 2007: the switch
Foreign direct investment into MEDA in 2007: the switch
Foreign direct investment into MEDA in 2007: the switch
Foreign direct investment into MEDA in 2007: the switch
Foreign direct investment into MEDA in 2007: the switch
Foreign direct investment into MEDA in 2007: the switch
Foreign direct investment into MEDA in 2007: the switch
Foreign direct investment into MEDA in 2007: the switch
Foreign direct investment into MEDA in 2007: the switch
Foreign direct investment into MEDA in 2007: the switch
Foreign direct investment into MEDA in 2007: the switch
Foreign direct investment into MEDA in 2007: the switch
Foreign direct investment into MEDA in 2007: the switch
Foreign direct investment into MEDA in 2007: the switch
Foreign direct investment into MEDA in 2007: the switch
Foreign direct investment into MEDA in 2007: the switch
Foreign direct investment into MEDA in 2007: the switch
Foreign direct investment into MEDA in 2007: the switch
Foreign direct investment into MEDA in 2007: the switch
Foreign direct investment into MEDA in 2007: the switch
Foreign direct investment into MEDA in 2007: the switch
Foreign direct investment into MEDA in 2007: the switch
Foreign direct investment into MEDA in 2007: the switch
Foreign direct investment into MEDA in 2007: the switch
Foreign direct investment into MEDA in 2007: the switch
Foreign direct investment into MEDA in 2007: the switch
Foreign direct investment into MEDA in 2007: the switch
Foreign direct investment into MEDA in 2007: the switch
Foreign direct investment into MEDA in 2007: the switch
Foreign direct investment into MEDA in 2007: the switch
Foreign direct investment into MEDA in 2007: the switch
Foreign direct investment into MEDA in 2007: the switch
Foreign direct investment into MEDA in 2007: the switch
Foreign direct investment into MEDA in 2007: the switch
Foreign direct investment into MEDA in 2007: the switch
Foreign direct investment into MEDA in 2007: the switch
Foreign direct investment into MEDA in 2007: the switch
Foreign direct investment into MEDA in 2007: the switch
Foreign direct investment into MEDA in 2007: the switch
Foreign direct investment into MEDA in 2007: the switch
Foreign direct investment into MEDA in 2007: the switch
Foreign direct investment into MEDA in 2007: the switch
Foreign direct investment into MEDA in 2007: the switch
Foreign direct investment into MEDA in 2007: the switch
Foreign direct investment into MEDA in 2007: the switch
Foreign direct investment into MEDA in 2007: the switch
Foreign direct investment into MEDA in 2007: the switch
Foreign direct investment into MEDA in 2007: the switch
Foreign direct investment into MEDA in 2007: the switch
Foreign direct investment into MEDA in 2007: the switch
Foreign direct investment into MEDA in 2007: the switch
Foreign direct investment into MEDA in 2007: the switch
Foreign direct investment into MEDA in 2007: the switch
Foreign direct investment into MEDA in 2007: the switch
Foreign direct investment into MEDA in 2007: the switch
Foreign direct investment into MEDA in 2007: the switch
Foreign direct investment into MEDA in 2007: the switch
Foreign direct investment into MEDA in 2007: the switch
Foreign direct investment into MEDA in 2007: the switch
Foreign direct investment into MEDA in 2007: the switch
Foreign direct investment into MEDA in 2007: the switch
Foreign direct investment into MEDA in 2007: the switch
Foreign direct investment into MEDA in 2007: the switch
Foreign direct investment into MEDA in 2007: the switch
Foreign direct investment into MEDA in 2007: the switch
Foreign direct investment into MEDA in 2007: the switch
Foreign direct investment into MEDA in 2007: the switch
Foreign direct investment into MEDA in 2007: the switch
Foreign direct investment into MEDA in 2007: the switch
Foreign direct investment into MEDA in 2007: the switch
Foreign direct investment into MEDA in 2007: the switch
Foreign direct investment into MEDA in 2007: the switch
Foreign direct investment into MEDA in 2007: the switch
Foreign direct investment into MEDA in 2007: the switch
Foreign direct investment into MEDA in 2007: the switch
Foreign direct investment into MEDA in 2007: the switch
Foreign direct investment into MEDA in 2007: the switch
Foreign direct investment into MEDA in 2007: the switch
Foreign direct investment into MEDA in 2007: the switch
Foreign direct investment into MEDA in 2007: the switch
Foreign direct investment into MEDA in 2007: the switch
Foreign direct investment into MEDA in 2007: the switch
Foreign direct investment into MEDA in 2007: the switch
Foreign direct investment into MEDA in 2007: the switch
Foreign direct investment into MEDA in 2007: the switch
Foreign direct investment into MEDA in 2007: the switch
Foreign direct investment into MEDA in 2007: the switch
Foreign direct investment into MEDA in 2007: the switch
Foreign direct investment into MEDA in 2007: the switch
Foreign direct investment into MEDA in 2007: the switch
Foreign direct investment into MEDA in 2007: the switch
Foreign direct investment into MEDA in 2007: the switch
Foreign direct investment into MEDA in 2007: the switch
Foreign direct investment into MEDA in 2007: the switch
Foreign direct investment into MEDA in 2007: the switch
Foreign direct investment into MEDA in 2007: the switch
Foreign direct investment into MEDA in 2007: the switch
Foreign direct investment into MEDA in 2007: the switch
Foreign direct investment into MEDA in 2007: the switch
Foreign direct investment into MEDA in 2007: the switch
Foreign direct investment into MEDA in 2007: the switch
Foreign direct investment into MEDA in 2007: the switch
Upcoming SlideShare
Loading in...5
×

Foreign direct investment into MEDA in 2007: the switch

4,031

Published on

Find out the most recent data, all the analyses of our experts, the latest trends about Mediterranean foreign direct investment in the 2007 edition of the ANIMA FDI observatory (MIPO).

Authors : Pierre Henry, Samir Abdelkrim, Bénédict de Saint Laurent / ANIMA (www.anima.coop)

Published in: Business, Economy & Finance
0 Comments
0 Likes
Statistics
Notes
  • Be the first to comment

  • Be the first to like this

No Downloads
Views
Total Views
4,031
On Slideshare
0
From Embeds
0
Number of Embeds
0
Actions
Shares
0
Downloads
0
Comments
0
Likes
0
Embeds 0
No embeds

No notes for slide

Foreign direct investment into MEDA in 2007: the switch

  1. 1.    SURVEY N°1 / July 2008 Foreign direct investment into MEDA in 2007 The switch MED-AllianceInvestintheMediterranean
  2. 2.   Foreign direct investment into MEDA in 2007: the switch S t u d y N ° 1 J u l y 2 0 0 8   A N I M A I n v e s t m e n t N e t w o r k Pierre Henry/Samir Abdelkrim/ Bénédict de Saint-Laurent
  3. 3. Foreign investment into the MEDA region in 2007 3   References This report was prepared by the ANIMA team within the framework of the  Invest  in  Med  contract.  ANIMA  Investment  Network  is  a  multi‐country  platform supporting the economic development of the Mediterranean. The  network  gathers  around  40  governmental  agencies  and  international  networks.   The objective of ANIMA is to contribute to a better investment and business  climate  and  to  the  growth  of  capital  flows  into  the  Mediterranean  region.  www.anima.coop    ISBN   2‐915719‐34‐9    EAN 9782915719345   ©  ANIMA‐Invest  in  Med  2008.  Reproduction  prohibited  without  express  authorisation. All rights reserved   Authors Pierre Henry, Samir Abdelkrim, Bénédict de Saint‐Laurent (ANIMA) for  the data‐gathering and the drafting.   The economic intelligence team of AFII assisted ANIMA and our cordial  thanks are especially due to Charlotte Danet, Dioline Dorvil, Fouad Hachani,  Yann Letessier, Nadeschda Musshafen, Emmanuelle Rausch, Julie Veaute.   The various MEDA Investment Promotion Agencies (IPA) and French  economic missions abroad for the supply of certain information.   ANIMA  and  its  partners  cannot  be  held  responsible  for  the  data  provided.  Any  error  or  inaccuracy  should  be  communicated  to  info@anima.coop.  ANIMA is interested in getting your feedback, comments,  further information and updates.        
  4. 4. Foreign investment into the MEDA region in 2007 4 Acronyms ANIMA:  Euro‐Mediterranean  Network  of  Investment  Promotion  Agencies   AFII: Invest in France Agency   CEECs: Central and Eastern European Countries   EU: European Union (EU‐25, but frequent differentiation of EU‐15 –“old”  members‐ and EU‐12 – “new” members‐)  FDI: Foreign Direct Investment   GDP: Gross Domestic Product  GNP: Gross National Product   ICT: Information and Communication Technologies  IPA: Investment Promotion Agency   MEDA‐12:  group  of  12  partner  countries  of  the  EU:  Algeria,  Cyprus,  Egypt,  Israel,  Jordan,  Lebanon,  Malta,  Morocco,  Palestinian  Authority,  Syria, Tunisia, Turkey (Malta and Cyprus are taken into account in the  study, but joined the Union in 2004)  MEDA‐10: the same without Malta and Cyprus   MENA:  Middle  East  ‐  North  Africa  =  MEDA‐10  +  Mauritania,  Libya,  Sudan, Gulf States + Yemen, Iran, Iraq, Afghanistan, Pakistan (sometimes  variable geometry)  MIPO: Mediterranean Investment Project Observatory  R&D: Research and Development  SCSC: Software and Computing Services Company   UNCTAD: United Nations Conference on Trade and Development  WIR:  World  Investment  Report  (report  by  UNCTAD  on  foreign  investment)   WTO: World Trade Organisation 
  5. 5. Foreign investment into the MEDA region in 2007 5   Contents FDI in MEDA, illustrating a shift in the global economic balance.8 1. Synopsis: more FDI projects than ever in 2007 .............................. 10 The new attractiveness of the Mediterranean................................................ 10 Consolidation in value in 2007, after 5 years of strong increase................. 11 Europe  and  the  Gulf,  2  pillars  of  foreign  investment  in  the  Mediterranean..................................................................................................... 14 Europe is back .............................................................................................................14 What explains this new Mediterranean tropism? .................................................15 Reforms start paying off ............................................................................................17 Modes of establishment: mainly acquisitions................................................ 18 Leading sectors: real estate and energy ahead .............................................. 19 Too few investments with strong spillovers ..........................................................22 The prize list of the largest FDI projects ......................................................... 22 Conclusion: how can MEDA achieve a lasting attractiveness? .................. 24 2. Euro‐Med integration or Euro‐Med‐Gulf triangle?....................... 25 Context: Dubai plays the troublemaker in the Barcelona process.............. 25 The Euromed integration, a necessary condition, but one of many, of  the takeoff of the MEDA region ....................................................................... 26 Presence of the Gulf in the Mediterranean: in search of economic rents  or healthy contribution in new blood?............................................................ 28 Gulf and Europe dominate foreign investment flows in the Mediterranean ...28 Competing or complementary investment strategies?.........................................29 Conclusion ........................................................................................................... 33 3. Sectoral analysis of FDI into MEDA................................................ 36 Boom of the equipment and processing industries ...................................... 36 2007 sectoral prize list ................................................................................................37 Reinforced concentration of FDI flows on some sectors.............................. 38 Sectoral distribution of 2003‐07 FDI projects .........................................................39 Relative constancy of the outperforming sectors .......................................... 40 Difficult digestion of the heaviest real estate investments ..................................40 Banking on the Mediterranean.................................................................................41 Tourism and telecoms await the next wave of FDI...............................................41
  6. 6. Foreign investment into the MEDA region in 2007 6 A very variable entry ticket depending on the sector .................................. 42 FDI, driving force for employment.................................................................. 44 Review by sector................................................................................................. 46 Public works, real estate, transport, delegated services.......................................46 Tourism, catering........................................................................................................49 Distribution, retail ......................................................................................................50 Energy...........................................................................................................................52 Industries of materials ...............................................................................................54 Electric, electronic and medical equipment, electronic components,  electronics ware...........................................................................................................57 Pharmaceutical industries and biotechnologies ....................................................58 Automotive, aeronautics, mechanics and machinery...........................................58 Services: Bank, insurance and other financial services.........................................62 Telecom & Internet operators ...................................................................................67 Data processing & software, Engineering & services to businesses...................68 Personal and domestic services, other services .....................................................71 4. Geography of foreign direct investments in MEDA..................... 72 The confirmed attractiveness of Machrek ...................................................... 72 Egypt and Turkey continue to fill the tank with FDI ................................... 73 Origin of the flows of FDI towards MEDA.................................................... 75 European investors back in the race................................................................ 75 Gulf investors set up camp ............................................................................... 76 Asian companies settle quietly......................................................................... 76 The intra‐MEDA integration process goes on ............................................... 78 Profile of the receiving countries for 2007...................................................... 79 Egypt: the Sphinx takes off! ......................................................................................79 Turkey, a new Euro‐Mediterranean tiger...............................................................80 Algeria eventually courted by foreign investors...................................................81 Israel: good economic records despite the decline in FDI....................................83 Jordan relies on Arab investors ................................................................................84 Syria: calling upon all people of goodwill..............................................................85 Lebanon: some projects gained in spite of the crisis.............................................87 Morocco: a determination which produces results...............................................88 Tunisia: immaterial investments and great property projects ............................90 The Libyan phoenix rises from its ashes.................................................................92 Malta, Cyprus and the Palestinian Territories.......................................................93
  7. 7. Foreign investment into the MEDA region in 2007 7   5. Annexes ................................................................................................. 94 Annex 1. List of projects detected in 2007 (MIPO)........................................ 94 Annex 2. Origin‐destination cross table 2003‐07 ........................................... 153 Annex 3. Methodology ...................................................................................... 154 Approach......................................................................................................................154 Selection criteria..........................................................................................................155 Recent methodological changes ...............................................................................156 Index of figures and graphs.............................................................................. 158
  8. 8.   FDI in MEDA, illustrating a shift in the global economic balance Data on foreign direct investment (FDI) in the MEDA region (Mediterranean  countries partners of the EU) 1 confirm the entry of the area in the economic  globalisation. In a global context of shifting dynamism between on the one  hand, developed countries, often in relative decline, following the example  of the United States or Europe, and on the other hand emerging countries,  whose  growth  seems  insatiable,  the  Mediterranean  follows  the  same  patterns:   Over the past few years, the interest of the northern shores (European)  of  the  Mediterranean  in  its  southern  neighbour  has  not  grown  significantly.  Even  though  European  investments  in  MEDA  in  2007  remain high (approximately  24 billion euros), a third of this FDI flow  comes  from  a  single  project  (the  purchase  by  Lafarge  of  the  cement  factories of Egypt’s Orascom). Europe remains a significant partner in  two  areas,  the  Maghreb  and  Turkey,  but  its  positions  are  fragile  in  Machreck. Europe chooses MEDA to locate projects that it cannot carry  out  any  more  in  an  economically  viable  way  on  its  own  territory  (automotive,  aeronautics,  delocalization  of  services).  European  champions also perceive the potential of the MEDA market: it is the case  of  banks,  tourism  companies,  or  construction  giants  (Lafarge,  Italcementi,  Spanish  public  works  companies,  etc).  Lastly,  another  recent  study  undertaken  by  ANIMA  (Med  Funds)  shows  that  the  European share of the capital investment (private equity) injected in the  region is very weak (3%, against 22% for the United States and 22% for  the Gulf);   On the contrary, the South never seemed so eager to benefit from the  many  Mediterranean  opportunities.  The  MEDA  operators  themselves  are starting to invest in the other countries of their region (55 projects in                                                                     1 Algeria, Tunisia, Morocco, Egypt, Jordan, Lebanon, Palestine, Syria, Turkey, Israel +  Libya as an observer. Cyprus and Malta are since 2004 members of the EU. 
  9. 9. Foreign investment into the MEDA region in 2007 9   2007,  the  first  signs  of  regional  industrial  integration).  All  dynamic  emerging economies (and not only China and India) are represented in  a region whose resources are better valued now. The champions of the  South  have  a  presentiment  of  the  growing  potential  of  MEDA  as  a  production platform for the future Euromed market. The Gulf, with a  third  of  the  amounts  to  be  invested,  confirms,  especially  in  the  Machreck, its role as an economic “big brother” who could become an  interesting partner of the historic godfather who is Europe.   The project of the Union for the Mediterranean comes at the right moment to  bring  new  energy  to  a  Euro‐Mediterranean  partnership  which  probably  lacked ambition and political support. Companies, the business community,  the civil society can perhaps make this integration process a success given  the difficulty of conceiving it only from a strictly political point of view. The  examination of the economic relations that this report allows confirms all the  hopes, all the stakes which one must legitimately place in a region that is a  key for the future of Europe and the world:   With  a  third  of  world  merchandise  flows  transiting  via  Suez  and  Gibraltar,  the  Mediterranean,  located  at  the  centre  of  the  new  global  logistics, has become an industrial battle field where champions of the  north and the south clash;   The  region  is  asserting  its  vocation  to  become  a  dynamic  production  platform  of  goods  and  service  at  the  doors  of  Europe  –being  able  furthermore  to  profit  from  a  privileged  access  to  the  funding  coming  from the Gulf;   Over  the  past  three  years  it  has  received  a  yearly  amount  of  foreign  investment close to that of China and higher than that of India.  
  10. 10.   1. Synopsis: more FDI projects than ever in 2007 The new attractiveness of the Mediterranean According  to  UNCTAD  figures,  in  2006  MEDA  countries  had  passed  a  symbolic threshold by attracting more than 4.5% of the world flow of foreign  direct investment (Figure 1), that is to say, more than their share of the world  population (4%).   Figure  1.  UNCTAD  data  on  FDI  inflow  by  regional  subset  of  destination  and  MEDA share of total world FDI (in million USD, UNCTAD‐WIR)   16 595 34 421 8 005 0 5 000 10 000 15 000 20 000 25 000 30 000 35 000 40 000 45 000 50 000 1995 1996 1997 1998 1999 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 2005 2006 0% 1% 2% 3% 4% 5% Machrek Turkey + Israel Maghreb MEDA share of world FDI   The Maghreb, Machrek and Turkey‐Israel have all benefited from this new  injection of capital, even if in fact the main economic and/or demographic  powers  of  the  region  (Turkey‐Israel  on  the  one  hand,  Egypt  for  Machrek)  have enjoyed the most significant increases since 2004.  
  11. 11. Foreign investment into the MEDA region in 2007 11   Consolidation in value in 2007, after 5 years of strong increase Whatever  the  source  (UNCTAD‐WIR  or  ANIMA‐MIPO  observatory),  FDI  poured into MEDA slightly decreased in value in 2007, whereas the projects  have never been so numerous (more than 800):   According  to  the  UNCTAD,  which  measures  macroeconomic  flows  in  national accounts, FDI registered in the MEDA region was multiplied by 6 in  6 years. It went from ten billion USD in 2000 to about sixty in 2006. In 2007  however, the first estimates show a decline of 8 billion dollars (see Figure 2);  Figure 2. FDI inflows 2000‐07 for each MEDA country (million US, UNCTAD‐ WIR for 2000‐2006, estimate for 2007) 2  Reg./country  2000  2001  2002  2003  2004  2005  2006  2007   Algeria  438  1 196  1 065 634 882 1 081 1 795  6 000  Egypt  1 235  510  647 237 2 157 5 376 10 043  10 000  Israel  5 128  3 605  1 668 3 896 2 040 4 792 14 301  4 000  Jordan  815  138  74 436 651 1 532 3 121  3 000  Lebanon  964  1 451  1 336 2 977 1 993 2 751 2 794  2 100  Morocco  471  2 875  534 2 429 1 070 2 946 2 898  5 200  Palestine  62  19  9 18 49 47 38  NA  Syria  270  110  115 180 275 500 600  700  Tunisia  779  486  821 584 639 782 3 312  1 000  Turkey  982  3 352  1 137 1 752 2 883 9 803 20 120  19 400  MEDA 10  11 144  13 742  7 407 13 143 12 639 29 610 59 021  51 400  Libya  141  ‐113  145 143 357 1 038 1 734  4 400   According  to  ANIMA  (MIPO  Observatory,  launched  in  2003  as  a  complement  to  a  European  observatory  by  Invest  in  France  Agency),  which considers micro‐economic data (collection of individual projects                                                                     2    UNCTAD  figures  for  2007  are  estimates  published  at  the  beginning  of  2008  for  Egypt,  Lebanon,  Morocco,  Tunisia  and  Turkey,  while  figures  for  Algeria,  Israel,  Jordan, Palestine and Syria are estimates produced by ANIMA on the basis of official  declarations, data derived from MIPO or other sources.  
  12. 12. Foreign investment into the MEDA region in 2007 12 advertised by the investors), announced FDI flows 3 regress in the same  proportion (Figure 3).   Figure 3. Total FDI inflows and number of projects for MEDA 10 (without Libya,  UNCTAD in million dollars, million euros for MIPO)   29 610 59 021 51 400 12 639 13 143 7 407 60 627 68 174 12 851 9 863 39 187 796 779 666 333 256 167 0 10 000 20 000 30 000 40 000 50 000 60 000 70 000 2002 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 0 100 200 300 400 500 600 700 800 FDI flow, UNCTAD‐ US$m FDI flow, MIPO, €m Nb. of projects   This regression in value recorded by MIPO is due to several factors: change  in  the  euro‐dollar  parity  (a  majority  of  the  non‐European  projects  being  announced  in  US  dollars,  and  registered  in  euros  in  the  MIPO  database),  deceleration  in  the  rhythm  of  announcements  of  major  real  estate  and  tourism  projects;  temporary  stringency  of  operations  of  privatisation;  finally, reduction in the amounts devoted to the American M&A operations  in Israel.                                                                      3   MIPO takes into account investments announced in year x, when the investor (or  sometimes even the National Investment Commission) publicises or confirms a project  for implementation that will lead to payments or transfers in the same or following  years (year x + 1 etc.). The data provided by ANIMA‐MIPO is therefore forecast data. 
  13. 13. Foreign investment into the MEDA region in 2007 13   Except  in  the  case  of  an  unforeseen  shock,  this  consolidation  should  not  mark a reversal of trend. The major causes of the growing passion for the  Mediterranean  observed  since  2004  are  indeed  not  ready  to  disappear:  abundance  of  petrodollars,  proximity  with  Europe,  economic  takeoff  of  Turkey, awareness of the potential of the MEDA market and new interest for  the Euromed region in general.   The Eastern part of the region receives the bigger share of these relatively  strong FDI flows. Turkey and Egypt are indeed the countries which attracted  the  most  significant  flows  of  FDI  in  2007.  Egypt  collects  80%  of  the  FDI  directed towards the Machrek, against a little less than 60% on average the  previous years. As for the Maghreb, it is Algeria which is distinguished in  absolute terms.   Taking  account  of  ʺsize  of  the  marketʺ  factors  (GDP  and  population),  the  countries where the impact of foreign investment is strongest are Jordan (455  euros  per  capita),  Egypt  (FDI  forecast  by  MIPO  accounts  for  20%  of  real  GDP), Libya, or Tunisia (Figure 4).   Figure 4. FDI performance of MEDA country in relation to population and GDP 4  Year  2005 2006  2007 Pays  Flow  %pop  %GDP  Flow  %pop %GDP Flow  %pop  %GDP Algeria  4 133  127  76,3  2 476  75  42,8  5 317  160  95,3  Egypt  6 978  90  70,6  15 914  202  150,2  22 220  277  217,1  Israel  5 899  940  57,7  13 908  2 189  129,0  3 971  618  38,7  Jordan  1 129  196  124,1  3 235  548  337,6  2 754  455  300,5  Lebanon  643  168  39,9  3 322  858  198,8  279  71  17,8  Libya  418  72  11,8  359  61  9,5  4 439  735  123,1  Morocco  1 924  59  58,6  5 292  159  152,3  2 911  86  88,5  Syria  2 938  159  170,4  5 051  268  281,6  2 165  112  128,8  Tunisia  1 089  108  56,0  3 885  382  188,3  2 856  278  144,7  Turkey  14 032  201  70,9  14 283  203  67,8  17 997  253  89,5  MEDA 10  38 765  149  70,4  67 655  256  115,7  60 550  226  108,4  MEDA 13  39 605  148  66,3  68 533  252  108,0  65 067  236  107,3                                                                     4 FDI flow in million euros (ANIMA‐MIPO), ʺ%popʺ in euros per capita, and ʺ%GDPʺ  =  FDI  flow  /  real  GDP  *  1000.  FDI  Data  come  from  MIPO;  demographic  data  are  provided by the US Department of Commerce Census Bureau;  GDP data  are  taken  from  the  World  Development  Indicators  by  the  World  Bank.    MEDA  10  excludes  Libya; MEDA 13 includes Libya, Cyprus and Malta.  
  14. 14. Foreign investment into the MEDA region in 2007 14 Europe and the Gulf, 2 pillars of foreign investment in the Mediterranean Europe is back In  a  global  context  of  macro‐economic  shift  between  developed  countries  and  emergent  countries,  the  Gulf  confirms  its  interest  in  the  region,  but  Europe  and  France  also  make  their  return  (due  in  particular  to  the  Lafarge/Orascom deal worth more than 12 billion USD).   European investments strongly increased in 2007 (+10 billion euros, 40% of  the  total,  against  24%  in  2006),  while  North‐American  investments,  as  important  in  volume  (number  of  projects)  as  over  the  past  years,  are  this  year  more  modest  projects  (144  projects  for  6.3  billion  euros,  against  20  billion in 2006). Intra‐MEDA operations experience a rather remarkable and  encouraging surge (55 projects).   Figure  5.  Evolution  of  announced  FDI  flows  to  MEDA  by  region  of  origin  (ANIMA‐MIPO 2003‐07, in million euros and % of annual total)   0 5 000 10 000 15 000 20 000 25 000 30 000 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 UE27 + EFTA Gulf & other MENA USA/Canada MEDA‐10 Asia‐Oceania 35% 24% 34,4% 40% 44,4% 56,5 45,7% 21,1%   The  presence  of  investors  from  Asia  and  other  emergent  economies,  still  discreet for the moment, will become more and more noticeable in the years  to come: in 2007 companies from China, India, and Russia multiplied press  releases  announcing  great  projects  in  energy,  infrastructures  or  heavy  industries, mainly in Turkey, Egypt, Libya and Syria.  
  15. 15. Foreign investment into the MEDA region in 2007 15   The Gulf and Europe are for the moment the 2 pillars of foreign investment  in  the  Mediterranean.  These  two  regions  weigh  together  67%  of  the  total  amounts announced over the last 5 years, and 66% of the number of projects.   The European investors’ share of the stock of projects announced since 2003  remains however dominant, with 48% of the total.   Figure 6. Total number of FDI projects per region of origin (MIPO 2003‐07)   MEDA‐10 6% Others 3% Gulf & other  MENA 17% USA/Canada 18% UE‐27 + EFTA 48% Asia‐Oceania 8%   What explains this new Mediterranean tropism? Three joint movements feed these flows of investment:   The boom of energy and raw materials, which causes a race for cheap  industrial  inputs,  and  concerns  mining  and  extraction  industries  as  much  as  the  processing  industries  (chemicals,  fertilisers,  plastics,  metallurgy, cement, etc.);   The search for new driving forces of growth or gains in competitiveness  for mature industries in developed countries, or the search for a critical  size out of skimpy domestic markets (for Gulf companies for example,  in particular in telecoms, banking, etc). European companies (or those  active in Europe), large and small, are under the pressure of a strong  Euro, and forced by rigid (labour laws and costly social protection) and  shrinking  labour  markets  (ageing  population,  political  reluctance 
  16. 16. Foreign investment into the MEDA region in 2007 16 against  new  mass  immigration).  Even  if  relocations  are  less  frequent  than  it  seems,  many  companies  will  prefer  locating  new  productive  capacities out of Europe (Renault‐Nissan in Tangier, or the aeronautics  industry (Figure 7). These investments aim at the satisfaction of external  needs  (free  trade  agreements,  free  zones,  etc.)  as  much  as  the  satisfaction  of  the  local  demand  born  of  the  increase  in  the  local  purchasing power;   The  third  movement  is  the  recycling  of  the  commercial  surpluses  (hydrocarbon incomes from the Gulf mainly) in residential, commercial  or  tertiary  real  estate,  in  tourism  infrastructures  but  also  in  industry  (metallurgy,  fertilisers)  or  services  (banks  and  telecoms).  These  investments are frequently made by State holdings. They also concern  rising stars of the private sector of the Gulf, thanks to the funds easily  raised  on  domestic  stock  exchange  places  blessed  with  abundant  liquidity (see at the end of this chapter the list of the largest operations  announced in 2007).   These  three  movements  contribute  to  the  same  effect:  a  new  competition  between established multinationals and challengers of the emerging world,  often  based  in  the  Gulf,  and  which  have  large  means  to  serve  their  ambitions.   Figure 7. Case study: European aeronautics cluster facing a weak dollar   The  French  group  Safran,  whose  aeronautics  division  includes  the  firms  Messier‐ Dowty and Messier‐Bugatti (landing gears), Aircelle and Hispano‐Suiza (engines) and  Labinal (electric wiring), invoices in dollars and produces mainly in euros, like all the  European aeronautical industry. The fall of the American currency vis‐à‐vis the Euro  thus  weighs  considerably  on  its  competitiveness,  and  forced  it  to  accelerate  the  redeployment  of  its  production  capacity  in  the  dollar  area:  the  objective  is  to  decrease by 2010 down from 55 to 45% the exposure of this branch to the dollar/Euro  exchange rate.   Whereas the personnel in Western Europe demands rises of wages and jobs creation,  the  group  has  invested  50  million  euros  every  year  since  2006  in  creating  or  extending  factories  in  Mexico,  China,  Morocco,  India  or  Poland.  ʺAlmost  all  our  factories are in the course of doubling in size, [… ] all our companies have a site in the  dollar  area  or  in  emerging  countries  and  are  able  to  transfer  to  it  some  activitiesʺ,  explains the group management ʺ[ In 2008 ] this new deployment will be operational,  and we will exploit these factories and saturate them. But if the drift of the dollar vis‐ à‐vis the Euro continues, we will transfer more activities ʺ.  
  17. 17. Foreign investment into the MEDA region in 2007 17   In fact, the products manufactured offshore are ʺof the same complexity and of the  same quality as those from the European sitesʺ, which makes these new transfers all  the more feasible and thus probable.   As an Airbus subcontractor, Safran has no choice but to pass on its own suppliers  the  pressure  transmitted  by  the  airframe  manufacturers.  Louis  Gallois,  head  of  EADS,  said  publicly:  ʺwe  will  increase  the  contents  in  dollars  of  our  planes,  in  particular by paying more and more our suppliers in dollars which gives them strong  incentives to do just like us ʺ. The equipment suppliers working in the Euro zone will  be  paid  in  dollar,  which  forces  them  to  prefer,  among  their  French  subcontractors,  ʺthose which developed out of Franceʺ.   Whereas job creations on the offshore sites amount to thousands, Safran will hire only  2000 people in France in 2008, a figure below that of the forecast retirements (around  2500‐3000).  Source: « Safran réagit à la hausse de lʹeuro en accélérant les délocalisations », Le Monde,  27/03/2008  Reforms start paying off Following  the  example  of  Egypt,  crowned  1st  reforming  country  in  the  world  for  2006‐2007  by  the  Doing  Business  Report  (World  Bank‐IFC),  the  MEDA  countries  have  engaged  in  reforms  aiming  at  opening  their  economies, at supporting private/foreign initiative through better protection  of  their  interests,  at  entering  the  international  competition  by  better  promoting their territories. Much remains to be done, but the response of the  market shows that the signal was received. Some measures taken in 2007:   Egypt is the 1st Arab and African country to have ratified (July 2007) the  OECD  Declaration  on  international  investment  and  multinational  corporations.    Syria implemented  reforms  recommended  by the IMF, concerning  the  independence of the central bank, the regulation of the financial sector  and the management of public finance.    The  government  of  Algeria  appears  determined  to  encourage  foreign  and  domestic  investment,  by  the  adoption  of  a  bill  which  includes  various measures of administrative simplification (setting up a business),  envisages a facilitated access to the tax incentives granted by the State,  redefines  the  role  of  the  National  Agency  for  the  Development  of  Investment (ANDI) and specifies its relationships to the tax and customs  authorities  (respect  of  the  customs  exemptions  and  tax  reductions 
  18. 18. Foreign investment into the MEDA region in 2007 18 granted). The bill stipulates that certain investment projects will be able  to benefit from 20 year land concessions, renewable and convertible in  legal transfers.   In Turkey, a new investment promotion agency, the Investment Support  and  Promotion  Agency  of  Turkey  (ISPAT)  otherwise  called  Invest  in  Turkey,  officially  took  over  the  foreign  investment  department  of  the  Under‐Secretariat of the Treasury on October 24, 2007. The new agency  counts  on  an  international  representation  network  in  11  countries;  namely China, Germany, France, India, Israel, Italy, Japan, Russia, U.A.E,  UK  and  the  USA.  The  government  is  meanwhile  preparing  the  liberalisation of the media and energy sector.    Libya  and  Spain  signed  a  treaty  of  mutual  protection  of  their  investments.   The  government  of  Morocco  engaged  in  a  policy  of  corporate  tax  reduction, whose rate is to be lowered from 35% to 30%.    Jordan and Syria signed bilateral trade agreements aiming at facilitating  their exchanges.   Cyprus and Malta benefited in 2007 from the prospect of the adoption of  the European single currency effective on January 1st 2008.   The government of Tunisia has decided to maintain until 2010 the tax  incentives  in  favour  of  exporting  industries.  In  2007,  Tunisia  also  prepared the completion of the free trade zone with the European Union  for industrial products.   Modes of establishment: mainly acquisitions The distribution by type of projects in 2007 shows a rather weak proportion  of projects of production (creation, extension or delocalization of activity): a  third  of  the  projects  and  amounts.  Brownfield  or  extension  projects  hardly  reach 5% of the amounts (60 projects), whereas they represent in general a  consequent source of foreign investment in other regions of the world. 35%  of all projects have a financial dimension (acquisitions, privatisations), but  that represents about half (49.5%) of the invested amounts. The remainder of  the 2007 projects portfolio relates to the setting‐up of subsidiary company or  branches (15% of the number of projects, but not very significant amounts) 
  19. 19. Foreign investment into the MEDA region in 2007 19   and  to  partnerships  (joint‐venture,  etc.)  with  approximately  16%  of  the  projects and amounts.   Leading sectors: real estate and energy ahead Whereas  banking  was  dominant  in  2006,  it  is  the  sector  of  real  estate  and  transport  which  is  the  most  attractive  in  2007,  while  the  energy  sector  benefits from the strongest progression: +80% in value!   The average budget per project (all sectors) amounts to 129 million euros in  2007, against 168 in 2006, reflecting a significant fall of the number of very  large announced projects, while at the same time the number of projects (in  particular in real estate) is in progression.   The  number  of  projects  in  the  construction  industry  and  transport  infrastructure  has  been  strongly  increasing  since  2005  (more  than  100  projects per annum for 2 years), while the announced amounts, even spread  over  the  envisaged  duration  of  realization,  passed  from  9  billion  euros  in  2006  to  more  than  14  billion  in  2007.  Material  industries  (Glass,  cement,  minerals,  wood,  and  paper)  fully  benefit  from  this  boom  (63  projects  and  almost 10 billion euros of FDI). The local offer of cement, a material which  suddenly became very expensive, has for a number of years been unable to  cope  with  this  exponential  demand:  projects  of  creations  or  extensions  of  cement factories have multiplied in all MEDA countries.   Foreign investors are solicited to increase the production of hydrocarbons in  the Mediterranean, in a global context of durable price hikes. Exploration,  extraction  and  transformation  were  the  object  in  2007  of  spectacular  FDI  projects  announcements  (86  projects),  worth  a  total  12.6  billion  euros  (around 7 billion in 2006), that is to say 20% of the total amounts invested  into MEDA in 2007.    Heavy industries (metallurgy, chemicals‐plastics‐fertilisers) enjoy this same  interest.  FDI  projects  in  these  sectors  aim  either  at  addressing  foreign  demand through exports (production of aluminium in Algeria or fertilisers  in Egypt and Jordan) or at satisfying local markets in rapid expansion (case  of Turkey for example). Metallurgy attracted about 30 projects (against 5 on  average  the  previous  years),  representing  investments  of  several  billion  euros  for  this  year  and  the  years  to  come,  mainly  in  Algeria  and  Turkey.  Chemistry  is  becoming  a  regional  strength  (approximately  30  projects  per  annum  since  2005,  FDI  flows  above  2  billion  euros  in  2007).  The  fertiliser 
  20. 20. Foreign investment into the MEDA region in 2007 20 industry is also thriving, counting on significant local resources: abundant  phosphate (Morocco, Jordan, etc.) and cheap natural gas (employed for the  production  of  nitrogen).  World  demand  is  to  remain  high,  thanks  to  the  growing needs of Asia.   Manufacturing industries with strong spill‐over effects, typically the case of  the  automotive  industry,  have  continued  to  attract  many  projects  (approximately  thirty  projects  per  annum  since  2003  for  the  automotive  industry, with FDI flows close to 800 million euros over 3 consecutive years).  The installation of assembly factories in the South in general (Renault‐Nissan  in Tangier‐Med for instance), and not only in Turkey, which will also bring  in  subcontractors,  is  a  strong  signal  for  other  industries  facing  the  same  competitive constraints (costs, dynamic supply‐chain). Subcontractors in the  aeronautics industry follow the same trend, while businesses in the sector of  electric,  electronic  &  medical  hardware,  mechanics  and  machinery  maintain  or  increase  their  investments  in  the  Mediterranean.  Projects  in  electronic  ware  (white  goods,  etc.)  remain  however  a  quasi‐monopoly  of  Turkey,  which  confirms  its  manufacturing  vocation  for  the  European  markets  in  the  eyes  of  the  large  manufacturers  of  electric  household  appliances.   Textile‐clothing suffers from a strong deceleration, with only 8 projects this  year  against  40  in  2006  and  investments  flows  below  200  million  euros.  Agro‐business  attracts  FDI  projects  worth  more  than  one  billion  euros,  a  good performance.   Regarding services, banking and insurance comes first (14% of the projects  in 2007 and 17% of the amounts), followed by telecoms (3.3 billion euros for  25 operations). Tourism marks a pause this year, needing time to digest the  mega‐projects announced the previous years.   The data processing and software sector has been attracting between 40 and  50 projects per annum for 3 years, with invested amounts in net retreat in  2007  compared  to  the  year  2006,  which  was  marked  by  large  American  acquisitions in Israel. A new trend to be taken into account: the increased  visibility of Morocco and Tunisia.  
  21. 21. Foreign investment into the MEDA region in 2007 21   Figure 8. Number of projects and FDI flows by sector in 2007 (MIPO, in €m)   127 86 115 63 29 30 49 37 28 13 29 34 10 18 11 49 15 8 47 7 1 3 25 0 5 000 10 000 15 000 PW, utilities, logistics Energy Banking & trade Glass, minerals, wood Telecom Metallurgy Chemicals Tourism, catering Distribution Agro‐business Other or not specified Automotive Electr. hardware Transport equipment Drugs Electronic components Software Mechanics & machinery Textile Consulting & services Electronic ware Biotechnologies Furnishing & houseware FDI amount in €m Nb. of 2007 projectsFDI Inflows   
  22. 22. Foreign investment into the MEDA region in 2007 22 As  for  services  to  businesses (solicitors,  facility  management,  call  centres,  etc.), they are more dynamic than ever. The multiplication of the projects in  these  sectors  reflects  as  much  the  opening  of  local  markets  and  the  new  needs  created  by  the  presence  of  more  foreign  companies  consuming  services in all kinds, than a strong demand for export (call centres, business  process  outsourcing).  MIPO  registered  50  projects  in  2007  (a  figure  in  constant progression since 2003), for amounts lower than 200 million euros  (services depend on human capital).   Too few investments with strong spillovers It is to be feared that the majority of FDI projects in energy, using mainly  imported  equipment  and  workers,  and  exporting  products  often  little  processed, bring little local added value (apart from the revenue paid by the  operator).  Idem  for  certain  forms  of  real  estate  (second  homes  for  the  diaspora).  On  the  contrary,  the  light  industries  (agro‐business,  mechanics,  house  ware,  etc.),  well  connected  to  the  other  sectors  (but  too  little  represented  in  FDI  patterns),  can  better  spread  the  benefits  of  the  foreign  investment into the rest of the economy.   The prize list of the largest FDI projects It  is  possible  to  consult  the  detailed  data  on  the  projects  detected  by  the  MIPO  observatory  on  www.anima.coop.  The  figure  below  gives  an  overview  of  the  announced  budgets  above  a  billion  euros,  which  are  not  necessarily the most interesting nor the most significant. 5  Figure 9. Seventeen projects above 1 billion EUR announced in 2007   1. Libya. ENI (Italy) is to pay half of a joint investment programme with Libyaʹs  NOC worth 28 billion USD over 10 years (€10 816  mln).  2. Tunisia. Dubai Holding / Sama Dubai (United Arab Emirates) laid foundation  stone of Century City and Mediterranean Gate mega project in Tunisʹ southern  lake area, worth 14 billion USD over 15 years (€ 10 231 mln).  3. Egypt. Lafarge (France) buys Orascom Cement for USD 12.9 billion, including a  significant stake in Lafarge worth 4.1 bn USD (€ 6 431 mln).                                                                     5   Announced FDI, divided by the number of years of implementation of the project  (often 3 to 10 years for real estate projects).  
  23. 23. Foreign investment into the MEDA region in 2007 23   4. Egypt.  Damac  (United  Arab  Emirates)  to  invest  30  EGP  billion  in  a  project  in  New Cairo, the first phase being called Hyde Park (€4 072  mln).  5. Turkey. Socar (Azerbaidjan). The State Oil Company of Azerbaijan and Turkey’s  Turcas set up a JV for a 10 billion USD oil refinery project in Ceyhan (€3 727 mln).  6. Algeria.  Emaar  Properties  (United  Arab  Emirates)  to  invest  IN  an  ambitious  tourism project in Colonel Abbes, west of Algiers, to be developed on an area of  109 hectares (€2 923 mln).  7. Algeria. Mubadala Development + Dubal (United Arab Emirates). A JV formed  by  Moubadala  Development  and  Dubal  to  own  70%  in  a  5  billion  USD  aluminium smelter project, while Sonatrach‐Sonelgaz will hold the rest (€2 558  mln).  8. Turkey. ING (Netherlands). Turkeyʹs Oyak Bank to be sold to Dutch ING Bank  for 2.673 billion USD (€1 953 mln).  9. Turkey. Indian Oil Corporation (IOC, India) has won the approval of Turkey’s  energy regulator for setting up a 4.9‐billion USD refinery in Ceyhan (€1 826 mln).  10. Egypt.  Majid  Al  Futtaim  (MAF)  (United  Arab  Emirates)  plans  to  invest  12.5  billion  LE  over  the  next  5  years  for  12  new  outlets  for  retail  and  commodity  distribution (€1 697 mln).  11. Libya. Petro‐Canada (Canada) to invest heavily in a joint investment programme  with  NOC,  worth  7  bn  USD,  in  exploration  projects  in  the  Sirte  Basin  (€1 696  mln).  12. Turkey. National Bank of Greece (Ethniki, Greece). NBG’s total participation in  the share capital of Finansbank now amounts to 89.44%. (€1 646 mln).  13. Israel.  MTS  (International).  The  consortium,  including  Chinaʹs  CCECC,  Soares  da Costa and Siemens wins a BOT contract for the construction of the Tel Avivʹs  light train red line (€1 302 mln).  14. Turkey.  Malaysia  Airports  Holdings  (Malaysia).  A  consortium  with  Malaysia  Airports and Limak to spend 3.447 billion USD to build a new terminal and run  for 20 years the Sabiha Gokcen Airport (€1 259 mln).  15. Turkey.  Fraport  (Germany)  will  operate  with  other  partners  3  terminals  at  Antalya, Turkeyʹs second‐largest airport, thanks to a successful Euro 2.37 billion  bid (€1 209 mln).  16. Algeria.  Total  (France)  to  invest  51%  of  3  billion  USD  to  build  and  manage  a  petrochemical plant in Arzew; Sonatrach investing the rest (€1 096 mln).  17. Egypt.  Abraaj  Capital  (United  Arab  Emirates).  The  Dubai‐based  investment  company  takes  control  of  Egyptian  Fertilisers  Company  for  1.4  billion  USD  (€1 023 mln).  
  24. 24. Foreign investment into the MEDA region in 2007 24 Conclusion: how can MEDA achieve a lasting attractiveness? Beyond the encouraging achievements in direct investment towards MEDA  in  2007,  what  is  at  stake  for  ANIMA  and  its  Mediterranean  partners  is  to  find out how to better ʺrootʺ European or world companies in the Euromed  market and how to turn this market into a durable and profitable one. That  would involve:   1. making transactions safer (guarantee scheme, arbitrations, protection  of intellectual property etc.);   2. financing productive SME and industry in general ‐ and not only blue  chip  companies  and  real  estate  (cf.  proposals  by  ANIMA  regarding  a  scheme suiting emerging companies);   3.  identifying  and  developing  the  principal  markets  and  certain  niches  (necessary  work  initiated  by  ANIMA  through  sectoral  studies  which  need to be refined and transformed into action plans);   4. transferring knowledge and technology towards the south,   5. fostering partnerships;   6. creating industrial groups or networks/clusters with regional vocation  (this report intends to highlight some of the existing ones);   7. defining mutually beneficial roles between the North and the South of  the  Mediterranean‐  as  opposed  to  shameful  delocalization  (approach  followed by European regions the likes of Lombardy or Catalonia, with a  mix of clusters specialising in the MEDA countries, of funds of support,  industrial policy etc.) ;   8. bringing back trust and increasing the attractiveness of the countries  and the territories.   These efforts will be continued and amplified within the framework of the  Invest  in  Med  project,  which  ANIMA  will  start  implementing  with  its  partners in 2008. Institutional changes ‐ SME agency, ʺnew neighbourhoodʺ  fund, development banks, institution providing guarantees, etc. will also be  necessary. ANIMA is convinced of the usefulness (including a symbolic one)  of these instruments, and of an approach in terms of ʺconcrete projectsʺ.  
  25. 25. Foreign investment into the MEDA region in 2007 25   2. Euro-Med integration or Euro-Med-Gulf triangle? Investors from the Gulf have made many headlines in 2007: great projects in  real  estate  or  tourism  (projects  of  Emaar  in  Algeria),  or  large  acquisitions  (privatisation  of  Al  Watany  Bank  in  Egypt  in  favour  of  National  Bank  of  Kuwait).  Gulf  investors  earned  a  reputation  as  conquerors  with  deep  pockets, ready to overpay assets in order to capture revenues, monopolising  the  best  lands,  fuelling  real  estate  speculation  and  the  inflation  affecting  building  materials.  As  in  any  caricature,  this  hardly  flattering  portrait  conceals a share of truth.   Their contribution to the development of the MEDA region is however more  positive than it appears at first sight: whereas the European Union invests  relatively little in its Mediterranean neighbours, the Gulf could bring to the  region  the  necessary  capital to  trigger  a  true  takeoff.  If  the  ongoing  Euro‐ Mediterranean economic integration process is not sufficient to ensure the  development of the South, should we not imagine a larger framework of co‐ operation which would integrate the Gulf and its investors?   Context: Dubai plays the troublemaker in the Barcelona process The Barcelona process played a positive role in the increase in FDI flows, by  reinforcing the general attractiveness of the southern shore. The integration  of  the  Euro‐Mediterranean  economic  area  is  progressing  however  rather  slowly, and the companies from the Gulf, emerging countries, from China  and India engulfed this new intermediate market, well located, at the doors  of Europe.   This renewed interest is welcome, but it is not certain that it is enough. The  contribution of these new investors might be significant quantitatively, but  the  quality  of  their  projects  is  sometimes  poor  (weak  multiplier  effect,  limited repercussions), compared to the importance of the stakes: million of  durable jobs have to be created each year to simply maintain the current rate  of unemployment of young people.  
  26. 26. Foreign investment into the MEDA region in 2007 26 The Euromed integration, a necessary condition, but one of many, of the takeoff of the MEDA region The macroeconomic data seem to indicate that Europe and its Mediterranean  neighbourhood  entered  one  period  of  (weak)  convergence  since  2000.  The  MEDA region enjoys each year a growth per capita which is higher of almost  1%  than  that  of Europe. But with  a  GNP  per  capita  of  6 209  USD  in  2007  (MEDA average, in PPP), MEDA is on the level of Western Europe in the  Fifties,  or  Romania  in  1975.  Based  on  that  difference,  a  simple  calculation  indicates  that  MEDA  countries  would  spend  157  years  to  catch  up  with  European  living  standards,  while  it  took  only  25  years  to  Greece  and  Portugal to do it (cf. ʺBarcelone, processus inachevé ʺ, ANIMA 2008).   Barcelona certainly encouraged development of trade between the EU and  the  Mediterranean  partner  countries.  These  ten  countries  represent  from  now on 9 % of total external exports of the EU‐27 ‐ against 5% a few years  ago. The importance of Europe as commercial partner is very variable from  one  MEDA  country  to  another,  in  addition  to  being  asymmetrical  (great  commercial dependence of the MEDA region which represents an outlet of  less importance for the EU). The EU is thus a paramount commercial partner  for  the  Maghreb,  while  it  weighs  for  only  3%  of  exports  of  Jordan.  Intra‐ MEDA trade remains weak (5% of total trade in MEDA).   As regards FDI, the same asymmetry may be observed: if Europeans remain  the  principal  investors  in  the  region,  the  proportion  of  European  FDI  invested  in  the  Mediterranean  neighbourhood  is  very  small  compared  to  that of the American flows in Mexico, or Japan in its Asian vicinity. The most  recent  set  of  complete  statistical  series  made  available  by  the  European  Commission  (European  Union  Foreign  Direct  Investment  Yearbook  2007)  show  for  example  that  the  investments  of  EU  Member  States  out  of  the  Union represented in 2005 less than one third of the total FDI emitted by the  Member States this year (172 billion euros on a total of 600 billion, that is  28%  only).  Among  the  receiving  regions,  Canada‐USA,  Japan  and  EFTA  (Swiss, Norway, Iceland etc), received 72 of this 172 billion euros (42%). The  MEDA region came far behind: behind Asia, behind Latin America, behind  Central and Eastern Europe, with a share which culminates in 3%.   The first figures available for 2006 however show a considerable increase in  the outward FDI invested out of the EU, which would have reached 260,2  billion euros (+11% compared to 2005). MEDA share one in this total should 
  27. 27. Foreign investment into the MEDA region in 2007 27   increase,  insofar  as  Turkey  would  have  collected  alone  nearly  4%  of  this  extra‐EU  FDI,  that  is  to  say  10.5  billion  EUR  (Eurostat,  EU  Foreign  Direct  Investment in 2006, April 2008).   Figure 10. Distribution of European FDI outside the EU, by block of destination (in  %  of  total  extra‐EU  FDI,  European  Union  Direct  Foreign  Investment  Yearbook  2007)  Region of destination  2001  2002  2003  2004  2005  Total Emerging:  34%  29%  26%  45%  36%  Incl. South‐East Asia  21%  14%  11%  19%  15%  Incl. Latin America  10%  8%  4%  14%  4%  Incl. MEDA  1%  3%  3%  3%  3%  Incl. Eastern Europe‐ Russia  2%  4%  8%  8%  13%  Others non‐EU6  66%  71%  74%  55%  64%    The development of trade and the progressive acceleration of European FDI  flows towards MEDA therefore appear insufficient to ensure the economic  takeoff  of  the  MEDA  countries.  Among  the  external  funding  available,  migrants’ remittances, traditional development aid, or funds invested in the  private sector by the development banks (EIB‐FEMIP, World Bank‐IFC, etc.)  can be effective, but it is a FDI boom which appears necessary. Foreign direct  investment  is  a  powerful  vector  of  economic  integration  and  sustainable  structural change.   Where  will  this  additional  investment  effort  come  from?  With  the  fresh  impulse brought by the French initiative of the Union for the Mediterranean,  the time of the assessment came for the Barcelona process: is it enough to  stick  to  a  deepening  of  the  economic  relations  between  Europe  and  its  Mediterranean vicinity? Is it not necessary to integrate in the equation the  increasing interest expressed by another neighbour, that of the Gulf, for the  Mediterranean?                                                                      6  Others  non‐EU:  mainly  EFTA,  USA,  Canada,  Japan.  The  European  Commission  makes a difference between these developed markets which get the most of external  EU FDI and the “emerging markets” which receive the remainder (South East Asia,  Latin America, Russia, MEDA and Eastern Europe). 
  28. 28. Foreign investment into the MEDA region in 2007 28 Presence of the Gulf in the Mediterranean: in search of economic rents or healthy contribution in new blood? A great geographical, cultural and linguistic proximity forced North Africa,  Europe and the Middle East to weave a complex fabric of relations. Pending  the completion of physical infrastructure which will further strengthen this  proximity  (power  grids,  telecommunications,  pipelines,  trans‐Maghreb  motorway,  projects  of  a  bridge  between Egypt  and  Saudi  Arabia  and  of  a  tunnel under Gibraltar), and the advent of a great EuroMena free trade area  (Euromed  free  trade  zone  envisaged  by  the  Barcelona  process  for  2010,  Agadir  Agreement  for  intra‐MEDA  trade,  EU‐GCC  Agreement  of  co‐ operation  of  1988,  Customs  Union,  Monetary  Union  and  future  Common  Market of the Gulf), foreign direct investments constitute a strong means to  bind  these  3  blocks  durably,  while  fostering  the  material  convergence  of  their economic interests.   Gulf and Europe dominate foreign investment flows in the Mediterranean Investors  from  the  Gulf  (GCC  or  the  broader  block  ʺGulf‐MENAʺ  with  Mauritania, Libya, Sudan, Yemen, Iran, Iraq, Afghanistan and Pakistan) had  surpassed Europe in 2006 as the main issuers of FDI into the MEDA region  (cf. Figure 5).   With  the  surge  of  European  investments  registered  in  2007,  and  the  net  decline in North American projects, the Gulf and Europe now seem to be the  2 pillars of foreign investment in the Mediterranean, respectively accounting  for 34 and 40% of the amounts announced in 2007 (18% of 2007 projects for  the Gulf and 47% for Europe). Over the 5 last years, the Gulf cumulates 30%  of  the  total  of  announced  amounts,  against  37%  for  Europe.  These  two  regions  weigh  thus  together  67%  of  the  total  in  announced  amounts,  and  66% of the number of projects.  
  29. 29. Foreign investment into the MEDA region in 2007 29   Figure 11. Relative contributions of the main FDI‐emitting regions in MEDA  (% of annual flows, ANIMA‐MIPO 2003‐07)   0% 10% 20% 30% 40% 50% 60% 70% 80% 90% 100% 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 Asia‐Oceania MEDA‐10 USA/Canada Gulf & other MENA UE27 + EFTA   Competing or complementary investment strategies? A certain geographical complementarity   Figure  12  shows  that  the  principal  FDI‐issuing  regions  in  MEDA  have  distinct  preferences.  These  strong  affinities  are  initially  the  product  of  geography; the most significant flows being established between the closest  blocks  (Europe‐Maghreb  or  Europe‐Turkey,  Gulf‐Machrek).  But  physical  geography can be overcome or reinforced by cultural or historical affinities:  privileged business connections of the family and patrimonial capitalism of  the Gulf with Jordan, Lebanon, Syria or  Egypt, intimate relations between  the Californian Silicon Valley and the Israeli Jordan Valley.   The complementarity of the principal investments flows is striking:   Europe invests especially in Turkey, in the Maghreb and in Egypt,   the Gulf mainly in Machrek,   the  United  States  concentrates  on  Israel,  and  Canada  on  the  Maghreb  and Egypt,   investors  from  Asia  and  other  emerging  economies  (Russia,  South  Africa,  etc.)  seize  any  opportunities  in  Machrek  (Egypt  and  Syria),  in  Turkey, and in Morocco.  
  30. 30. Foreign investment into the MEDA region in 2007 30 Another  phenomenon  ought  to  be  highlighted:  the  regular  progression  in  the  number  of  intra‐MEDA  FDI  projects,  with  cumulated  flows  which  approach 10 billion euros over 5 years (2 billion euros in 2006, 2.5 in 2006  and more than 4 in 2007), for a total of 163 projects, including 55 for 2007  alone.  The  most  significant  flows  are  by  far  those  from  Egypt  towards  Algeria  (and  also  Turkey),  from  Jordan  to  Egypt,  and  from  Lebanon  to  Jordan and Egypt.   Figure 12. Map of the main FDI flows cumulated over 5 years, by region of origin  and destination (ANIMA‐MIPO, 2003‐07)   Source: MIPO 2003 to 2007 MAGHREB € 17,8 bn OTHER MEDA* €2,4bn MACHREQ € 23,1 bn € 5,1 bn € 30 bn € 37,8 bn € 27,3bn € 10,3 bn € 5,2 bn Europe € 71 bn Asia & emerging c. € 17,9 bn Gulf & MENA € 59,4 bn € 9,6 bn € 4,2bn USA/Canada € 36,6 bn € 12 bn Other MEDA* =Turkey, Israel, Cyprus, Malta   Individual preferences of Gulf investors  The United Arab Emirates are, among the GCC members, the main investors  in MEDA: 30.6 billion euros since 2003, that is, more than half of the GCC  total, and 183 projects. Saudi Arabia and Kuwait come second with, for each  of them, flows slightly above 11 billion and more than 100 projects. Bahrain  and Qatar are a notch below (2.3 and 2.9 billion euros and about 20 projects  each), while the Sultanate of Oman does not appear in the table below for  lack of projects.   As regards amounts invested, Egypt is the preferred destination of the UAE,  Kuwait  and  Qatar‐based  investors,  and  the  second  most  important 
  31. 31. Foreign investment into the MEDA region in 2007 31   destination  for  Saudi  companies.  The  latter  indeed  prefer  Turkey,  where  Saudi  investors  announced  8  significant  projects  in  2007:  massive  investments by Oger in telecom and banking, acquisition of banks and food‐ processing industries. Investors from Bahrain are more interested in Jordan  and  Morocco  (Batelco  owns  Umniah  Telecom  in  Jordan,  real  estate  and  tourism projects by Gulf Finance House in these 2 countries).   Figure 13. FDI from the Gulf by country of origin and destination (ANIMA‐MIPO  2003‐07, ʺFlowʺ in million of euros and ʺNbʺ, number of projects)   Origin  Bahrain  Kuwait  Qatar  Saudi A.  UAE  Total  Destination  Nb.  Flow  Nb.  Flow Nb. Flow Nb. Flow Nb. Flow  Nb.  Flow  A. Palestin.      2  288      3  89  2  N.R  7  377  Algeria  1  73  6  2 081     13  425  10  1 132  31  3 711  Egypt  4  229  23  2 890 4  1 067 35  2 360 44  16 548  111  23 093 Jordan  10  1 497  18  1 359 4  710  12  1 211 35  1 588  80  6 365  Lebanon  1  N.R  13  478      10  493  19  1 040  43  2 010  Libya  1  N.R  1  55  1  N.R     5  138  8  192  Morocco  4  484  9  201  1  54  14  425  34  2 110  62  3 275  Syria  3  87  28  2 245 6  669  15  1 220 12  1 056  64  5 277  Tunisia      7  295  1  403  6  61  12  3 783  26  4 543  Turkey      7  1 116 1  N.R 12  4 983 10  3 277  30  9 375  Total  24  2 369  114  11 009 18 2 903 120 11 266 183 30 672  462  58 219   Greenfield projects often oversized  The projects by Gulf‐based investors in the Mediterranean are characterized  by  their  estimated  budgets:  the  average  budget  is  higher  than  268  million  euros, against 70 for European projects. The average direct job creation per  project is of 171, against 95 for a European project, considering that the Gulf  and Europe are the principal foreign sources of job creation in the region.  The  sustainability  of  these  jobs  is  more  difficult  to  judge,  but  it  can  be  assumed that part of the jobs created by Gulf investments might last only the  time of the realization of the facilities (real estate projects), while European  projects usually generate more sustainable jobs in services or industry.    The majority of the detected Gulf projects are launched by large private or  public holdings, but one can suppose that the rate of detection of projects is  weaker  for  the  Gulf  than  for  Europe,  insofar  as  the  Gulf  business  environment  is  less  conducive  to  transparency  and  publicity.  A  greater  number of the medium and small projects might therefore go unnoticed by 
  32. 32. Foreign investment into the MEDA region in 2007 32 our  MIPO  observatory.  Gulf  SMEs  are  consequently  seriously  under‐ represented (less than 5% of detected Gulf projects over 2003‐07).   Gulf and Europe‐based investors are rather similar in the preference given to  projects known as ʺgreenfieldʺ (creation of new facilities, 35% of the number  of European projects over 5 years, and 40% of those of the Gulf), even if the  budgets differ: greenfield make only 20% of the amounts invested by Europe  in  5  years,  and  53%  for  the  Gulf.  External  growth  (acquisition,  including  privatisation), accounts for respectively 27 and 23% of the projects of Europe  and the Gulf, but represents more than 60% of the total of European flows  against less than 30% for the Gulf. These figures mean that investors from  the  Gulf  are  not  afraid  to  launch  out  in  greenfield  projects  with  significant  budgets, whereas European investors prefer to acquire existing companies  or units, including SMEs, to develop them.   Limited positive spillovers  One  way  of  measuring  the  quality  of  an  FDI  project  is  to  consider  the  importance of direct and indirect local spillovers, in particular the multiplier  effect of the investment, i.e. the insertion of the project in the local chain of  value (customers, suppliers, subcontractors).   Concerning  Gulf  investments  into  MEDA,  one  can  regret  the  very  clear  preponderance  of  real  estate,  tourism  and  American‐style  shopping  malls  projects (53% of the total amounts, and 48% of the number of projects over  2003‐2007).  Energy,  heavy  chemistry  industry,  cement  and  metallurgy  account for 13% of the total, while telecom and bank represent respectively  15%.  This  sectoral  mix  is  the  reflection  of  the  model  of  unbalanced  development  of  the  economies  of  the  Gulf,  in  which  consumer  goods  industries and light industries are not very present.   The  impact  of  the  investments  coming  from  the  Gulf  on  the  sectoral  distribution  of  the  FDI  projects  in  the  MEDA  region  is  very  marked.  The  correspondence between the favoured sectors of investments of Gulf‐based  companies and the first 10 sectors in value in 2007 (see Figure 8) is indeed  almost perfect.  
  33. 33. Foreign investment into the MEDA region in 2007 33   Conclusion About thirty private or public holdings are the source of the bulk of Gulf FDI  in the Mediterranean.   Saudi Arabia  Kuwait  Bahrain  UAE  Qatar  Savola  Bin Laden   National  Commercial  Bank (Alahli)   Al Rajhi   Dallah al  Baraka  Nesco   Oger  KIPCO   NBK   Global  Investment  House  M.A.  Kharafi   Zain  National  Industries  Group  (Noor)  Al Aqeelah   Ahli United  Bank   Gulf  Finance  House  Batelco   Aramex  Abraaj Capital   Damac   Dubai Holding   DP World  Majid al Futtaim  Emaar  Etisalat  Dubal  Gulf Finance House  Diar  Qtel    Some already are global brands, others aspire to it.   The champions of the Gulf have changed a great deal. They have attracted  CEOs and top executives from the greatest multinational companies (half of  the top management of Dubai Ports World is Anglo‐Saxon for example) and  their personnel is trained with the most modern management sciences. Their  investment  strategies  have  been  rationalized,  and  are  now  less  related  to  prestige and more to the profitability and long term expansion strategies.   The  complementarity  of  European  and  Gulf  investment  flows  in  the  Southern  Mediterranean  area  benefits  all  MEDA  countries.  Investments  coming  from  the  Gulf  usefully  come  to  compensate  for  the  lack  of  enthusiasm  of  European  companies,  and  can  sometimes  create  beneficial  emulation.   The considerable means that the companies of the Gulf choose to invest in  sectors  of  rent  however  represent  a  risk  which  should  not  be  underestimated: the absorption capacity of the MEDA countries is limited,  and the many crowding‐out effects which affect many local operators feed  what  could  become  resentment  towards  foreign  interests.  The  rapid  urbanisation and the establishment of great polluting industrial facilities on  the Mediterranean littoral involve significant environmental risks.  
  34. 34. Foreign investment into the MEDA region in 2007 34 Improving  the  quality  of  FDI  is  essential,  and  MEDA  regulators  are  responsible  in  the  first  place  for  defining  limits  and  enforcing  them.  The  governments  can  maximize  the  local  impacts  of  FDI  by  requiring  counterparts,  in  terms  of  local  content,  of  sustainability,  in  return  for  the  preferential treatment which is often granted to Gulf champions (land at low  prices,  etc).  The  unbalanced  economic  development  which  is  taking  place  also  has  its  hidden  costs,  especially  in  those  very  fragile  human  communities.   If there were a means of combining the financial resources of the Gulf and  European  technology  and  know‐how,  it  would  seem  possible  to  meet  the  social needs of MEDA countries in a mutually beneficial, and advantageous  triangular relationship.   Figure 14. The 20 most important projects of the Gulf in the MEDA region in 2007  (ANIMA‐MIPO, total budgets in million euros).   (More consultable projects on line on www.anima.coop )  1. Tunisia. Dubai Holding / Sama Dubai (UAE) laid foundation stone of Century  City and Mediterranean Gate mega project in Tunisʹ southern lake area, worth 14  billion USD over 15 years (€10 231 mln).  2. Egypt. Damac (UAE) to invest 30 billion EGP in a project in New Cairo, the first  phase being called Hyde Park (€4 072 mln).  3. Algeria.  Emaar  Properties  (UAE)  to  invest  in  an  ambitious  tourism  project  in  Colonel  Abbes,  west  of  Algiers,  to  be  developed  on  an  area  of  109  hectares  (€2 923 mln).  4. Algeria. Mubadala Development + Dubal (UAE). A JV formed by Moubadala  Development  and  Dubal  to  own  70%  in  a  5  billion  USD  aluminium  smelter  project, while Sonatrach‐Sonelgaz will hold the rest (€2 558 mln).  5. Egypt. Majid Al Futtaim (UAE) plans to invest 12.5 billion LE over the next 5  years for 12 new outlets for retail and commodity distribution (€1 697 mln).  6. Egypt.  Abraaj  Capital  (UAE).  The  Dubai‐based  investment  company  takes  control of Egyptian Fertilisers Company for 1.4 billion USD (€1 023 mln).  7. Egypt. Barwa Real Estate (Qatar) purchased 1,980 feddans of land for 6.11 billion  EGP (€829 mln).  8. Egypt.  Dubai  Holding  /  Dubai  Financial  Group  (UAE).  The  financial  arm  of  Dubai Holding to acquire for 1.1 billion USD a 25% stake in EFG‐Hermes (€804  mln).  9. Turkey. National Commercial Bank (Alahli) (Saudi Arabia) is to pay just over  1bn USD to acquire a 60% in Türkiye Finans Katılım Bankasi, a leading Islamic‐ style bank (€731 mln). 
  35. 35. Foreign investment into the MEDA region in 2007 35   10. Egypt. Emaar Properties (UAE) to launch a new project, the 1 billion USD New  Cairo City residential community (€731 mln).  11. Egypt.  National  Bank  of  Kuwait  (NBK)  (Kuwait).  After  a  successful  bid  for  a  51% stake in Al Watany Bank, NBK eventually acquired a total 93.77% stake for  extra 2.5 bn EGP (€689 mln).  12. Egypt. Etisalat (UAE). The 66% owned Egyptian subsidiary of UAE’s Etisalat to  spend 1.4 billion USD over 3 years in developing its telecom infrastructure (€675  mln).  13. Egypt. Damac (UAE) paid 4.74 billion EGP for 1,500 feddans of land for future  real estate projects in Egypt (€643 mln).  14. Turkey. Dubai Holding / Sama Dubai (UAE). A branch of Dubai Holding buys  land In Istanbul and announces real estate projects totalling 5bn USD (€621 mln).  15. Morocco.  Al  Maabar  /  Reem  (UAE).  The  Emirati  consortium  to  launch  Reem  Morocco, a local subsidiary in charge of its 6.5 billion MAD Atlas Garden project  in Marrakech (€586 mln).  16. Turkey.  Oger  /  Turk  Telecom‐Avea  (Saudi  Arabia).  Mobile  operator  Avea,  controlled by Ogerʹs Turk Telekom, to invest heavily in its infrastructures thanks  to a 1.6 billion USD dollar syndicated loan (5€21 mln).  17. Egypt. Emaar Properties (UAE). The Emiratesʹ real estate developer to launch a  new project, a 700 million USD mix use project on the Cairo‐Alexandria Desert  Road (€512 mln).  18. Egypt. DP World (UAE) acquired a 90 % stake in Egyptian Container Handling  which owns 90% in Sokhna Port for 670 million USD (€490 mln).  19. Turkey.  Abraaj  Capital  /  Almond  Holding  (UAE).  Almond  Holding  AS,  a  subsidiary  of  Abraaj  Capital  Ltd,  to  acquire  a  39.4%  stake  in  Acibadem  Saglik  Hizmetleri and Ticaret for 600 mln USD (€438 mln).  20. Syria.  Al  Aqeelah  (Kuwait).  Building  of  a  low  income  housing  area  near  Damascus and development in Sayedah and Zeinab for 400 mln EUR (€400  mln).
  36. 36.   3. Sectoral analysis of FDI into MEDA Before analyzing the projects announced in 2007, it is interesting to put in  perspective  the  data  of  this  year  within  the  frame  of  the  2003‐07  period.  Indeed since 2003, services to companies, industries of intermediate goods  and  equipment  goods  are  the  main  motors  of  the  growing  FDI  flows  towards MEDA.   Boom of the equipment and processing industries Whereas  the  region  remains  characterised  by  a  certain  industrial  underdevelopment,  foreign  investors  are  more  and  more  interested  in  the  productive  potential  of  Mediterranean  economies  which  can  count  on  a  young and abundant workforce, and cheap sources of energy.   The remarkable boom in FDI over the 2003‐2007 period is partly explained  by  the  multiplication  of  projects  in  the  processing  industries  (energy‐ consuming  industries  such  as  hydrocarbon  products,  building  materials,  metallurgy)  and  a  qualitative  improvement  in  the  manufacturing  projects.  Many  companies,  European  in  particular,  see  the  interest  for  them  to  increase the share entrusted to their Mediterranean neighbours in their value  chain.   Intermediate goods industries are the sectoral group which has experienced  the strongest progression over the period, as much in value (FDI flows), as  in the number of projects registered. FDI in consumer goods (furnishing and  houseware, textile, agro‐business) did not truly take off.   The  attractiveness  of  services  to  businesses was confirmed  in  2007,  with a  total of 236 projects (212 in 2006) and announced amounts close to 15 billion  euros.   Personal  and  domestic  services  attract  projects  mainly  in  the  distribution  and tourism sectors (also some investments in the private health sector and  media/entertainment, in Turkey above all).  
  37. 37. Foreign investment into the MEDA region in 2007 37   Figure 15. FDI flows per sectoral subset over 2003‐07 (€m, ANIMA‐MIPO)   Services  to businesses Intermediate  goods Capital  goods Personal  servicesConsumer  goods  0 5 000 10 000 15 000 20 000 25 000 30 000 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 Services  to businesses Intermediate  goods Capital  goods Personal  services Consumer  goods    Services to businesses: telecom services, consulting and services to companies, data‐ processing‐software, bank‐insurance.   Personal and Domestic: tourism‐catering, health‐education‐others, trade‐distribution   Capital  goods:  automotive,  construction‐public  works,  electric‐electronic  hardware,  mechanics and machinery, aeronautical, naval & railway equipment  Intermediate goods: glass‐cement‐minerals‐wood‐paper, chemicals‐plastics‐fertilisers,  metallurgy, electronic components, hydrocarbon energy‐derivatives.   Consumer  goods:  agro‐business,  furnishing‐houseware,  electronic  ware,  drugs‐ cosmetics, textile‐clothing‐luxury   2007 sectoral prize list The energy sector would come first without the strong appetite of foreign  investors for real estate and infrastructures projects. Whereas banking and  insurance dominated the landscape of foreign investment in MEDA in 2006,  it is the energy sector which experienced the strongest progression in 2007:  +80% in value!  
  38. 38. Foreign investment into the MEDA region in 2007 38 Figure  16.  Ranking  per  sector  (MIPO  2007,  number  of  projects  and  amounts  in  €millions)   Sectors  Projects  2007  % Total  2007  Flow  2007  % Total  2007  1  Construction, transport, utilities  127  15,2%  14 677  22,6%  2  Energy  86  10,3%  12 605  19,4%  3  Bank, insurance, other financial services  115  13,8%  10 958  16,8%  4  Glass, cement, minerals, wood, paper  63  7,6%  9 925  15,3%  5  Telecom & internet operators  25  3,0%  3 229  5,0%  6  Metallurgy & recycling of metals  29  3,5%  2 256  3,5%  7  Chemicals, plastics, fertilizers  30  3,6%  2 206  3,4%  8  Tourism, catering  49  5,9%  1 457  2,2%  9  Distribution  37  4,4%  1 274  2,0%  10  Agro‐business  28  3,4%  1 068  1,6%  11  Other or not specified  13  1,6%  909  1,4%  12  Car manufacturers or suppliers  29  3,5%  823  1,3%  13  Electric, electronic & medical hardware  34  4,1%  672  1,0%  14  Aeronautics, naval, rail equip.  10  1,2%  667  1,0%  15  Drugs  18  2,2%  544  0,8%  16  Electronic components  11  1,3%  486  0,7%  17  Data processing & software  49  5,9%  439  0,7%  18  Mechanics and machinery  15  1,8%  356  0,5%  19  Textile, clothing, luxury  8  1,0%  194  0,3%  20  Consulting and services to companies  47  5,6%  167  0,3%  21  Electronic ware  7  0,8%  87  0,1%  22  Biotechnologies  1  0,1%  69  0,1%  23  Furnishing and houseware  3  0,4%  0  0,0%  Total 2007  834  100,0%  65 067  100,0%    Reinforced concentration of FDI flows on some sectors This  year  still,  foreign  investment  in  the  region  concentrated  on  a  small  number of sectors, in services as in industry. The sectoral analysis of the data  provided by the MIPO observatory shows that this concentration was even  accentuated:  the  first  five  sectors  in  value  (flow)  account  for  76%  of  total  announced  amounts  in  2007  for  only  53%  of  the  total  number  of  projects  (respectively 65% and 51% in 2006).  
  39. 39. Foreign investment into the MEDA region in 2007 39   Top 5 in value in 2007 Whereas  the  composition  of  the  top  5  has  been  stable  since  2005,  cement  came  to  propel  the  sector  ‘glass‐cement‐mineral‐wood‐paper’.  In  2007,  foreign  investment  in  this  sector  rose  to  historical  heights  with  as  emblematic operation, the purchase by Lafarge of Egypt’s Orascom Cement.  This sector weighed nearly 10 billion euros in FDI inflows in 2007, against 3  the previous year.   Figure 17. Strong concentration of FDI flows on few sectors (MIPO 2007)   Perimeter  (sectors)  Aggregate 2007  (mln€)  % of total  2007  Aggregate nb.  projects 2007  % of total 2007  Top 5   51 394   79%   416   50%   Top 12   61 387   94%   631   76%   Top  5  (in  the  order):  Public  works‐real  estate‐transport‐utilities,  Energy,  Bank‐insurance‐others  financial services, Glass‐cement‐mineral‐wood‐paper, Telecom & Internet Operators  Top  12:  Idem  +  Metallurgy  and  recycling,  Chemicals‐plastics‐fertilisers,  Tourism‐catering,  Distribution, Agro‐business, Others (Personal services), Car manufacturers or suppliers  Sectoral distribution of 2003-07 FDI projects The stock of announcements of FDI projects detected by ANIMA over the  2003‐07  period  is  made  up  essentially  of  4  sectors,  each  one  weighing  approximately  15%  of  the  total  amounts,  plus  2  others  weighing  approximately 8‐9%.  Figure 18. Total FDI by sector (ANIMA‐MIPO, 2003‐2007, €m)   Bank &  insurance 15%  Telcom &  internet 14% Public works‐ real estate 14% Cement,  minerals 8%  Tourism,  catering 9% Others 25% Energy 15%  
  40. 40. Foreign investment into the MEDA region in 2007 40 The  17  other  sectors  scrutinised  by  MIPO  also  make  25%  of  the  total  announced FDI inflows.   Relative constancy of the outperforming sectors The  most  attractive  sectors  experienced  spectacular  progression,  which  is  rather  welcome  in  a  context  of  upgrade  of  the  financial  and  physical  infrastructures and industrial clusters in the region.   Figure 19. Four rising stars in the Mediterranean   0 4 000 8 000 12 000 16 000 Glass, cement, minerals,  wood, paper Bank & insurance Energy Public works, real estate,  transport, utilities 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007   Difficult digestion of the heaviest real estate investments The importance of foreign investment in the construction‐public works and  real  estate  sectors  can  however  cause  interrogations  regarding  the  absorption capacity of MEDA countries.   The FDI boom in the construction‐public works sector would be healthier if  it came to renew and develop an often dilapidated and insufficient housing  stock. The promoters, often foreigners, seem to prefer increasing their offer  on the high end segment, which frequently  targets foreign buyers. Part of  the population and professionals of the sector can then find itself suffering  from  crowding  out  effects  (availability  of  land,  inflation  of  the  prices  and  restricted access to building materials and construction machinery).  
  41. 41. Foreign investment into the MEDA region in 2007 41   The  correlated  boom  in  foreign  and  national  investment  in  the  building  materials sector is therefore more than welcome.   Banking on the Mediterranean The  penetration,  still  strong  in  2007  after  an  exceptional  year  in  2006,  of  foreign  players  in  the  banking  and  insurance  sector  is  good  news  for  all  Mediterranean  economies.  The  many  barriers  which  restrain  the  access  to  funding are indeed often regarded as a major obstacle to general economic  development.  The  arrival  of  these  new  players  contributes  to  increasing  competition,  strengthening  the  branch  networks  and  accelerating  the  launching of new banking and insurance products. These FDI projects can  improve  the  conditions  of  development  of  a  denser  fabric  of  SMEs,  after  decades of monopoly of the large public companies for access to the loans  allocated by the State Banks.   Tourism and telecoms await the next wave of FDI New  tourism  projects  remain  abundant  in  the  Mediterranean.  However,  after the many mega‐projects of 2006, investors seem to have calmed down  and be launching more modest programmes.   Whereas in 2005 the estimated budget of the most significant tourism project  reached  2  billion  euros  (Dubai  International  Properties  in  Morocco),  the  UAE‐based company Damac had revealed in 2006 a project on the Red Sea  envisaging  an  investment  of  approximately  13  billion  euros  over  10  years  (Gamsha Bay). In 2007, the most significant project detected by MIPO, that of  Spanish Urbagolf in Morocco, involves a mere 700 million euros (in Souiria  Laqdima, 30 km away from Safi).   Many mega‐projects announced the previous years will only start (except in  the event of a pure and simple abandonment) in the months and years to  come.  The  ANIMA‐MIPO  observatory  only  takes  into  account,  in  its  analysis,  annualized  amounts  of  FDI,  i.e.  the  forecast  total  budget  of  the  project, divided by the number of years (envisaged) of implementation.   As for telecoms, after 2 years of strong FDI inflows (projects worth about 10  billion  euros  announced  each  year  in  2005  and  2006),  the  sector  is  going  through quieter times.  
  42. 42. Foreign investment into the MEDA region in 2007 42 This  might  be  only  temporary,  given  the  number  of  operations  of  privatisation planned for 2008 and of the new telecom licences which will be  granted this same year.   Figure 20. Greater volatility in tourism and telecom   0 2 000 4 000 6 000 8 000 10 000 12 000 Telecom & internet operators Tourism, catering 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007   A very variable entry ticket depending on the sector The invested amount is not always available7. This amount varied in 2007  from 4 million euros for a project in services to businesses to more than 300  million in energy, with 50 million for a tourism project. The average amount  (all sectors) is 129 million euros in 2007, against 168 in 2006. These figures  reflect  a  significant  fall  in  the  number  of  very  large  projects,  while  at  the  same  time  the  total number of  projects  is  in  progression from one  year  to                                                                     7  The forecast invested amount is available in a strict sense only in 56% of the cases  over the period 2003‐07. It is announced by the investors themselves, split with each  investor according to its relative participation and only for the foreign share in case of  partnership or joint‐venture. This amount must be considered as an approximation of  the  amount  actually  invested  once  the  operation  is  carried  out.  The  average  entry  ticket  as  calculated  in  figure  21  is  obtained  by  dividing  the  total  of  the  global  estimated budgets by the number of detected projects.  
  43. 43. Foreign investment into the MEDA region in 2007 43   another.  The  2003‐2007  average  entry  ticket  (113  million  EUR)  is  certainly  over‐estimated, given the difficulty of detecting the small projects.   Figure 21. Average investment per project depending on the sector (ANIMA‐MIPO  2003‐07, €mln)   Sectors  2005 2006 2007  2003‐07  Energy  108 182 334  184 Public works, real estate, transport, utilities  154 325 262  236 Metallurgy & recycling of metals  38 29 163  104 Glass, cement, minerals, wood, paper  80 90 163  112 Telecom & internet operators  588 352 162  341 Bank, insurance, other financial services  73 123 100  93 Chemicals, plastics, fertilizers  80 80 87  68 Other or not specified  14 37 79  40 Distribution  46 42 74  64 Biotechnologies  0 18 69  15 Aeronautical, naval & railway equipment  6 412 67  119 Electronic components  181 362 52  170 Tourism, catering  128 420 48  191 Car manufacturers or suppliers  28 25 42  26 Agro‐food business  16 111 41  41 Drugs  10 40 31  24 Textile, clothing, luxury  14 11 24  12 Mechanics and machinery  1 301 24  92 Electric, electronic & medical hardware  28 26 21  23 Electronic ware  35 0 15  10 Data processing & software  23 119 9  43 Consulting and services to companies  6 1 4  3 Furnishing and houseware  16 0 0  5 Total  90 168 129  113
  44. 44. Foreign investment into the MEDA region in 2007 44 FDI, driving force for employment Even  if  the  data  ʺemployment  created  by  the  operationʺ  is  not  always  available8, it is interesting to outline a ranking of the most creative sectors of  employment. Total direct job creation in 2007 is not as important as in 2006,  which was particularly rich in advertisements of construction mega‐projects  (80,000 jobs in 2007 against 130,000 in 2006).   Figure 22. Direct job creation per sector (MIPO 2007)   Sector  Nb. projects 2007  Jobs created  Public works, real estate, transport, utilities  127  25 550  Car manufacturers or suppliers  29  17 710  Tourism, catering  49  14 426  Glass, cement, minerals, wood, paper  63  4 020  Consulting and services to companies  47  3 362  Distribution  37  3 200  Metallurgy & recycling of metals  29  2 030  Electric, electronic & medical hardware  34  1 816  Chemicals, plastics, fertilizers  30  1 490  Data processing & software  49  1 410  Bank, insurance, other financial services  115  1 365  Electronic components  11  625  Drugs  18  590  Aeronautical, naval & railway equipment  10  570  Telecom & internet operators  25  500  Agro‐business  28  307  Energy  86  200  Textile, clothing, luxury  8  100  Mechanics and machinery  15  40  Total  834  79 311                                                                       8    This  data  is  only  specified  in  20%  of  the  cases  (MIPO  2003‐07).  However,  while  taking  account  of  those  projects  creating  little  employment  (subsidiary  company  or  representative  office,  acquisition  of  a  holding,  privatisation),  this  figure  goes  up  to  50%.    Four  sectors  do  not  appear  in  the  table  for  lack  of  data:  Biotechnologies,  Furnishing & houseware, Electronic ware, Other or not specified.  
  45. 45. Foreign investment into the MEDA region in 2007 45   The aggregation of the ʺemploymentʺ data over 2003‐07 makes it possible to  constitute a significant database from which to draw some conclusions: the  sectors  which  create  most  jobs  should  receive  due  attention  from  the  governments when defining targets and priority sectors.  Figure  23.  Average  number  of  jobs  created  per  project,  according  to  the  sectors  (ANIMA‐MIPO 2003‐ 07)     Sector  Average job creation  1  Tourism, catering  448  2  Car manufacturers or suppliers  259  3  Textile, clothing, luxury  161  4  Electronic components  153  5  Public works, real estate, transport, utilities  128  6  Metallurgy & recycling of metals  127  7  Glass, cement, minerals, wood, paper  100  8  Consulting and services to companies  83  9  Telecom & internet operators  80  10  Aeronautical, naval & railway equipment  76  11  Electronic ware  75  12  Distribution  73  13  Agro‐business  71  14  Furnishing and houseware  67  15  Chemicals, plastics, fertilizers  47  16  Electric, electronic & medical hardware  32  17  Data processing & software  21  18  Biotechnologies  16  19  Drugs  15  20  Energy  14  21  Mechanics and machinery  14  22  Bank, insurance, other financial services  13  23  Other or not specified  1   

×