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Nazi timeline Nazi timeline Presentation Transcript

  • Germany Timeline Samantha Lesyk Harm Philipsen
  • 1929 http://library.thinkquest.org/C005121/data/germany.htmUnder the Weimar Republic, the country was doing decent until foreigninvestors withdrew their financial support, thus sending Germany intoeconomic trouble.Unemployment grew tremendously to a extreme number of three millionwhile the Republican began to crumble. Nationalism ImpactsThe German people thought they deserved better, so in turn, they blamed thenon-Germans for their misfortune. In doing so, Germany needed a new rulerwho agreed with their views and could provide justice to the German citizens.
  • 1930http://www.antifascistencyclopedia.com/allposts/utah-former-hitler-youth-still-finds-it-hard-to-understand-his-past The Nazi party gained greatest popularity and became the second largest party with 107 seats in the Reichstag. The Nazi party reaches into the future by establishing Hitler Youth, which was for boys and girls. Hitler Youth was a way of forming a new society once the youth become the working class. Nationalism Impacts People desired for a leader who knew and understood that the German people deserved better, thus Hitler’s popularity increased. In citizens who were not yet eligible to vote, they could support him although they were not of the age limit.
  • 1931 http://www.standlikearock.net/category/economy/page/2/By March, Germany’s unemployment numbers had reached a new highof 4.9 million. That is roughly one out of every 12 German workers.Paul von Hindenburg activated Article 48 to deal with the economiccrisis. Nationalism ImpactsThey believed that their leader had the right to use Article 48 tobenefit the greater Germany. Being in an economic crisis at the time,they realized they needed a single, strong leader to lead them tosuccess.
  • 1932http://simple.wikipedia.org/wiki/Kurt_von_Schleicher The Nazi party became the largest party in parliament winning 280 seats after Reichstag elections in July. In December, Von Schleicher was appointed Chancellor. Nationalism Impacts At this point, majority of the German people came to the conclusion that Adolf Hitler was the one the needed to make Germany powerful again.
  • 1933 http://www.educationforum.co.uk/hitlerinvite.htmHitler becomes Chancellor after the previous government fails.Months later, the Nazi Party becomes the only party in Germany.The Enabling Act was passed giving Hitler undivided powerover Germany and it’s military. Nationalism ImpactsBy electing Hitler, the German people basically sign over thecontrol over their lives to the Nazi Party, which they were okaywith since they felt as though Hitler could make a change for thebetter.
  • 1934http://history.howstuffworks.com/world-war-ii/buildup-to-world-war-2.htm/printable The Night of Long Knives, which was the stage where Hitler knew he had total control. President Paul von Hindenburg passed away in August, which opened Hitler up opportunities, such as combining the offices of President and Chancellor. Nationalism Impacts The German citizens accepted ideas of change in hopes of flourishing as a country again.
  • 1935 http://rwallenberg-int.org/Programs/RW_Lesson_Secondary_2006/CHAPTER_2.htmDuring the month of March, the act of conscription wasreintroduced to Germany despite the rules and regulations ofthe Treaty of Versailles.In September, Nuremburg laws were passed against the Jews. Nationalism ImpactsWith the influence of Hitler, the German people had a desire topurify the Aryan race.
  • 1936http://www.historyonthenet.com/Nazi_Germany/rhineland.htm The German army once again entered and reoccupied the Rhineland. Germany signed a treaty with Italy and signed an Anti- Comintern Pact with Japan. Nationalism Impacts Germany got back land they felt they deserved all the while working with other countries against other political beliefs not similar to their own, like Communism.
  • 1937 http://www.2worldwar2.com/kg200.htmThe Maginot Line was extended by France to be along theborder with Germany.The Luftwaffe does it’s first major bombing attack in Spainshowing the Europe countries Germany is back. Nationalism ImpactsGermany comes together and proves to the world that they are aforce to be reckon with once again and exercises their militaryfor the first time since World War I.
  • 1938http://www.ushmm.org/outreach/en/article.php?ModuleId=10007697 Kristallnacht also known as the Night of Broken Glass occurs and Jews die. In March, Austria becomes part of the Reich. Nationalism Impacts Germany reunites with Austria, a long time ally. The German people finally feel as though they are getting what they rightfully deserved when they put a quarter of Jewish males in concentration camps.
  • 1939 http://www.toptenz.net/top-10-influential-firsts-in-history.phpOn March 15th of this year, the German Army invaded Czechoslovakia andeventually came to occupy it as well.At this time, Poland becomes worried about it’s safety, so Britain and Franceguarantee Poland’s security. However, in September, Germany invaded Poland,so as a counter, Britain and France team up and declare war on Nazi Germany. Nationalism ImpactsBeing nationalistic involves being patriotic and devoted to one’s nation andthat’s exactly what the German’s were. They were so devoted to the flourishingof their country they took charge and began trying to make a difference throughwar and occupying others land.
  • Bibliography"1929." Wikipedia, the Free Encyclopedia. 24 Jan. 2011. Web.31 Jan. 2011. <http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/1929>.Panczyk, Pamela. "HSC Online." NSW HSC Online. Web. 31Jan. 2011. <http://hsc.csu.edu.au/modern_history/national_studies/germany/2435/page97.htm#anchor1565672>.Simkin, John. "Nazi Germany Timeline." SpartacusEducational - Home Page. Web. 31 Jan. 2011. <http://www.spartacus.schoolnet.co.uk/GERchron.htm>.