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  • Photos by Yugus (Flickr)And companies are getting better at organizing and finding out about every last bit of a user’s social life, whether it’s a party picture or a preference for a certain kind of shoe
  • Photo by jonsiedman1988 (Flickr)Once a lamentable image is released into the world and stored on a social network’s server and your friends’ smartphones, it can be hard to delete. What the public has yet to realize…is that their data are not only being archived but also analyzed and scored
  • Photo by Son of Groucho (Flickr)Whenever I ask someone, do they want control over the messages and media that they send to others, the answer 100 percent is yes
  • Photo by tedeytan (Flickr)While none of us were looking, Google -- the most data-hungry of today's digital giants -- is reengineering mobile technology
  • Photo by laverrue (Flickr)According to Google co-founder Sergey Brin, quoted by tech website Mashable, "Glass will also have an automatic picture-taking mode, snapping pics at a preset intervals (such as every 5 seconds).
  • Photo by im nothing in particular (Flickr)Google Glass opens an entirely new front in the digital war against privacy. These spectacles, which have been specifically designed to record everything we see, represent a developmental leap in the history of data that is comparable to moving from the bicycle to the automobile.
  • Photo by Alan Cleaver (Flickr)It is the sort of radical transformation that may actually end up completely destroying our individual privacy in the digital 21st century.
  • Photo by doegox (Flickr)For Google, "privacy" means "what you've agreed to", and that is slightly different from the privacy we've become used to over time. So how comfortable – or uneasy – should we feel about the possibility that what we're doing in a public or semi-public place (or even somewhere private) might get slurped up and assimilated by Google?
  • Photo by Truthout.org (Flickr)By getting us to wear their all seeing digital eyeglasses, Google are metamorphosing us into human versions of those Street View vans -- now thankfully banned in Germany -- which crawl, like giant cockroaches, around our cities documenting our homes
  • Photo by stevendepolo (Flickr)The terabytes of data sucked up every five seconds by its omniscient glasses will, of course, flow to Google. That's the whole business model, the very raison d'etre of Google Glass. Those pics every 5 seconds will be used to aggregate data and then to generate billions of dollars of revenue by selling advertising around it.
  • Photo by mikebaird (Flickr)Can a child properly consent to filming or being filmed? Is an adult, who happens to be visible in a camera's peripheral vision in a bar, consenting?
  • Photo by nolaclutterbustersThe idea that you could inadvertently become part of somebody else's data collection – that could be quite alarming. And Google has become the company which knows where you are and what you're looking for. Now it's going to be able to compute what it is you're looking at
  • Photo bywaitscmSupermarkets and packaging companies spend lots of money trying to work out which packages you look at first on a shelf. Potentially, through Google Glass, they would be capturing that data as standard. That would be quite powerful – to be able to say why people buy things
  • Photo by hawk2009Google Glass, thus, may become the pivotal post PC, post iPod and post tablet device. A pooling of all our most intimate data, a mirror of ourselves -- the holy grail, of course, for advertisers.

Flipbook Flipbook Presentation Transcript

  • Google Glassand “Privacy”Photo by Mali (Flickr)By Sam Forrest
  • Any smartphone nowadays has as much raw computingpower as a top-of-the-line laptop from 10 years agoPhoto by Johan Larsson (Flickr)
  • 78 per cent of young people, ages 12 to 17, now have cellphones.Nearly half of those are smartphones, a share thats increasingsteadilyPhoto by WillieChiang (Flickr)
  • One in four young peoplesay they are "cell-mostly"Internet users, a percentagethat increases to about halfwhen the phone is asmartphone.Photo by Macy Blomely (Flickr)
  • Nomophobia describes the anxiety felt when someone has noaccess to mobile technologyPhoto By Dror Poleg (Flickr)
  • “Ive had students tell me that they bringtheir cell phones in the shower with them.They sleep with them”-Stephen Groening, George Mason UniversityPhoto by MeneerDijk (Flickr)
  • Photo by StockMonkeys.com (Flickr)The business model of today’s free social media networks andsearch engines, of course, is collecting and storing behavior andinterests of every kind……and selling that information to marketers
  • Photos by Yugus (Flickr)And companies are getting better at organizing and findingout about every last bit of a user’s social life, whether it’s aparty picture or a preference for a certain kind of shoe
  • Photo by jonsiedman1988 (Flickr)Once a lamentable image is released into the world and stored on a socialnetwork’s server and your friends’ smartphones, it can be hard to delete…What the public has yet to realize…is that their data are not onlybeing archived but also analyzed and scored.
  • Photo by Son of Groucho (Flickr)“Whenever I ask someone, do they want control over the messagesand media that they send to others, the answer 100 percent is yes.”-Nico Sell, Wickr Co-Founder
  • Photo by tedeytan (Flickr)While none of us were looking, Google -- the most data-hungry of todays digital giants -- is reengineering mobiletechnology
  • “Glass will also have an automatic picture-takingmode, snapping pics at a preset intervals (such as every5 seconds).”-Sergey Brin, Google Co-FounderPhoto by laverrue (Flickr)
  • Google Glass opens an entirely newfront in the digital war against privacy.These spectacles, which have beenspecifically designed to recordeverything we see, represent adevelopmental leap in the history ofdata that is comparable to moving fromthe bicycle to the automobile.Photo by im nothing in particular (Flickr)
  • Photo by Alan Cleaver (Flickr)It is the sort of radicaltransformation that may actuallyend up completely destroying ourindividual privacy in the digital21st century.
  • Photo by doegox (Flickr)For Google, “privacy" means "what youveagreed to”, and that is slightly different fromthe privacy weve become used to over time.So how comfortable – or uneasy – should we feelabout the possibility that what were doing in a publicor semi-public place (or even somewhere private)might get slurped up and assimilated by Google?
  • Photo by Truthout.org (Flickr)By getting us to wear their all seeing digitaleyeglasses, Google are metamorphosing usinto human versions of those Street View vans-- now thankfully banned in Germany --which crawl, like giant cockroaches, aroundour cities documenting our homes
  • Photo by stevendepolo (Flickr)The terabytes of data sucked up every five secondsby its omniscient glasses will, of course, flow toGoogle. Thats the whole business model, the veryraison detre of Google Glass. Those pics every 5seconds will be used to aggregate data and then togenerate billions of dollars of revenue by sellingadvertising around it.
  • Can a child properly consent to filming or beingfilmed? Is an adult, who happens to be visible ina cameras peripheral vision in a bar, consenting?Photo by mikebaird (Flickr)
  • The idea that you couldinadvertently become part ofsomebody elses data collection –that could be quite alarming. AndGoogle has already become thecompany which knows where youare and what youre looking for...Photo by jbachman01 (Flickr)
  • Photo by nolaclutterbustersNow its going to beable to compute what itis youre looking at
  • Photo by waitscm (Flickr)Supermarkets and packaging companies spendlots of money trying to work out whichpackages you look at first on a shelf.Potentially, through Google Glass, they wouldbe capturing that data as standard. That wouldbe quite powerful – to be able to say whypeople buy things.
  • Google Glass, thus, maybecome the pivotal postPC, post iPod and post tabletdevice. A pooling of all ourmost intimate data, a mirror ofourselves -- the holy grail, ofcourse, for advertisers.Photo by hawk2009 (Flickr)
  • CreditsAll images are licensed under theCreative Commons Non-CommercialShare-Alike 3.0 agreement andsourced from Flickr.Photo by DarrelBirkett (Flickr)
  • SourcesPhoto by Shutterhacks (Flickr)http://readwrite.com/2013/04/08/teenagers-smartphones-how-theyre-changing-the-worldhttp://www.telegraph.co.uk/technology/news/9714616/Mobile-phone-addiction-ruining-relationships.htmlhttp://www.ctvnews.ca/more-youth-use-smartphones-to-log-online-u-s-report-1.1193559#ixzz2Qnxqu5cdhttp://www.businessweek.com/articles/2013-02-07/snapchat-and-the-erasable-future-of-social-mediahttp://www.cnn.com/2013/02/25/tech/innovation/google-glass-privacy-andrew-keenhttp://www.guardian.co.uk/technology/2013/mar/06/google-glass-threat-to-our-privacy