Heritage prose revision presentation

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  • 1. A664: Literary Heritage Prose and Contemporary Poetry1 hr 30 mins 60%Answer 2 questions:• Section A – Literary Heritage Prose (Animal Farm)• Section B – Contemporary Poetry50 mins Section A 40%40 mins Section B
  • 2. Section A – Literary Heritage Prose1. Know and understand the novel, plot, themes, characters, symbolism, structure, language.2. Know and understand how to pass the exam.
  • 3. Section A – Literary Heritage ProseChoice from 2 questions:• Passage-based question• Whole-text-based question
  • 4. Section A – Literary Heritage ProsePassage-based questionIn what ways does Orwell powerfully depict therelationship between the pigs and the other animals inthis extract?How does Orwell make this such a moving moment inthe novel? Author’s purpose + the ways this is achieved
  • 5. 1. Highlight keywords from the question
  • 6. Section A – Literary Heritage ProsePassage-based questionIn what ways does Orwell powerfully depict therelationship between the pigs and the other animals inthis extract?How does Orwell make this such a moving moment inthe novel?
  • 7. Section A – Literary Heritage ProsePassage-based questionIn what ways does Orwell powerfully depict therelationship between the pigs and the other animals inthis extract?How does Orwell make this such a moving moment inthe novel?
  • 8. Section A – Literary Heritage ProsePassage-based questionIn what ways does Orwell powerfully depict therelationship between the pigs and the other animals inthis extract?How does Orwell make this such a moving moment inthe novel?
  • 9. Section A – Literary Heritage ProsePassage-based questionIn what ways does Orwell powerfully depict therelationship between the pigs and the other animals inthis extract?How does Orwell make this such a moving moment inthe novel?IMPORTANT SIGNIFICANT REVEALING POWERFUL HORRIFYINGMOVING VIVID DISTURBING SHOCKING
  • 10. Section A – Literary Heritage ProsePassage-based questionHow does Orwell make this such a movingmoment in the novel?You need to know:• What the key adjectives mean;• How they can be interpreted.MOVING• Arousing or touching the emotions. What emotions?• Making a strong or vivid impression – impressive.
  • 11. Section A – Literary Heritage ProsePassage-based questionTASK:Choose 2 of the KEY ADJECTIVES from the list.• What do the key adjectives mean?• How can they be interpreted?
  • 12. Section A – Literary Heritage ProsePassage-based questionOther key words???In what ways does Orwell powerfully depict therelationship between the pigs and the other animals inthis extract?How does Orwell make this such a moving moment inthe novel?
  • 13. Section A – Literary Heritage ProsePassage-based questionOther key words???In what ways does Orwell powerfully depict therelationship between the pigs and the other animals inthis extract?How does Orwell make this such a moving moment inthe novel?
  • 14. 1. Highlight key words from the question 2. Highlightwords/phrases in thepassage which help to answer the question
  • 15. Section A – Literary Heritage ProsePassage-based questionHow does Orwell make this such a moving moment inthe novel?Highlight words/phrases in the passage which help to answer thequestion. WHAT AM I LOOKING FOR??? THE ‘HOW LIST’.
  • 16. How does Orwell make this such a moving moment in the novel? Sorrow Horror Disgust SympathyLANGUAGE:• Movement“It was the first time that anyone had seen him (Benjamin) gallop”.Totally uncharacteristic excitement in defence of Boxer makes this moving.• How they relate to other characters/how other characters view them“Clover administered it to him twice a day... While Benjamin kept the flies off him”.Reminds us how much Boxer is loved (explain why) – makes later events moving.“Without waiting for orders from the pigs...”Animals willing to take risks to see Boxer reminds us how much he is loved.• Their thoughts“He intended to devote the rest of his life to learning the remaining twenty-two letters...”Boxer is portrayed as simple, almost pathetic – vulnerable. Makes his later treatmentmoving.
  • 17. How does Orwell make this such a moving moment in the novel? Sorrow Horror Disgust SympathyLANGUAGE:• Action/how things are said“A cry of horror burst... Crying out at the tops of their voices... Terrible voice”Desperate, horrified reactions of the animals makes this moving.“...there was a tremendous drumming of hooves inside the van...”Boxer’s sheer panic and desperation as he realises what is happening makes this moving.• Physical appearance“...a sly-looking man”.This man is untrustworthy – what he might do with Boxer who we know to be vulnerablemakes this moving.• The setting in which the character is seen“For the next few days Boxer remained in his stall”.“Benjamin and Clover could only be with Boxer after working hours”.Boxer is alone, isolated and therefore vulnerable – the pigs take advantage of this. This ismoving.
  • 18. How does Orwell make this such a moving moment in the novel? Sorrow Horror Disgust SympathyLANGUAGE:• Short sentences“And Boxer’s stall was empty”.Emphasises the drama of what has happened – the thought of the farm without Boxer ismoving.•Punctuation“!”Exclamations are used throughout this passage firstly to portray the animals naiveexcitement at Boxer’s departure, and then to communicate the shock, surprise,desperation and panic of the other animals as they realise what is happening.
  • 19. How does Orwell make this such a moving moment in the novel? Sorrow Horror Disgust SympathySTRUCTURE• How a particular atmosphere (tension) is built up across a sceneBegins with caring, positive, sympathetic activity (Boxer being cared for); then excitementof the animals at Boxer’s departure; then realisation leading to desperation, panic andtragedy. The quick transition between these stages makes this moving.• ContrastBetween the hive of activity/Benjamin shouting and the “deadly silence” as they read thesign on the van.This increases in drama and tension as the sign is read makes the moment of realisationmoving.• Dramatic ironyThe reader knows that the pigs are betraying Boxer (the pink medicine), a sympathetic anddedicated supporter of the revolution; increases the sympathy felt towards Boxer.• Plot developmentThe van comes in the middle of the day when the other animals are working and Boxer isalone; this vulnerability is moving.
  • 20. How does Orwell make this such a moving moment in the novel? Sorrow Horror Disgust SympathySTRUCTURE• The importance of the scene in relation to the rest of the storyThis passage is central in exposing the villany of the pigs in betraying such a sympatheticand dedicated supporter of the revolution.
  • 21. 1. Highlight key words from the question2. Highlight words/phrases in the passage which helpto answer the question 3. Look to group related points from (2) above – organise the paragraphs/sections of yourresponse around these groups.
  • 22. Section A – Literary Heritage ProsePassage-based questionLook to group related points from (2) above – organise theparagraphs/sections of your response around these groups.LANGUAGE:• Movement• How they relate to other characters/how other characters view them• The setting in which the character is seen• Physical appearanceSTRUCTURE:• How a particular atmosphere (tension) is built up across a scene• Contrast• Dramatic irony• The importance of the scene in relation to the rest of the story
  • 23. 1. Highlight key words from the question2. Highlight words/phrases in the passage which help toanswer the question3. Look to group related points from (2) above – organise theparagraphs/sections of your response around these groups. 4. Make reference to rest of novel.
  • 24. About 4/5 of your response needs to focus on the passage, with1/5 coming from the rest of the novel.• Can you make comparisons (or contrasts) with the points you are making andanother aspect of the story outside the passage?• What is the importance of this scene in relation to the rest of the story?LANGUAGE:• How they relate to other characters/how other charactersview them Where else in the novel is the• The setting in which the character is seen setting key?• Physical appearanceSTRUCTURE: Where else in the novel• How a particular atmosphere (tension) is built up across a has the author usedscene dramatic irony?• Contrast• Dramatic irony• The importance of the scene in relation to the rest of the Already makes links tostory rest of novel!
  • 25. WRITING
  • 26. Section A – Literary Heritage ProsePassage-based questionAim to write between 5-7 paragraphs: Introduction 5-6 developed sections Conclusion
  • 27. Section A – Literary Heritage ProsePassage-based questionINTRODUCTION:An overview which sets the passage in contextand summarises the author’s overall purpose.
  • 28. Section A – Literary Heritage ProsePassage-based questionINTRODUCTION:An overview which sets the passage in context and summarises the author’soverall purpose. How does Orwell make this such a moving moment in the novel?This particular extract occurs towards the end of Chapter 9, the penultimate chapter ofthe book. It is a very moving and dramatic moment in the novel because it effectivelyhighlights to the reader the extent of the betrayal of the working animals by the rulingpigs and implies to them that this will not necessarily improve; going against the ‘happyending’ expected of a true Fairytale. This extract does also serve to highlight to thereader that in the midst of the fear, betrayal and murder instigated by the ruling pigs,strong and caring bonds do exist between the working animals - which is also moving initself.
  • 29. Section A – Literary Heritage ProsePassage-based questionWRITING A PARAGRAPH:Mention a KEY WORD (particularly the KEY ADJECTIVE) from thequestion in every paragraph.Provide EVIDENCE FROM THE TEXT for everything you say.Focus on THE AUTHOR’S PURPOSE and the WAYS this is achieved.Focus on the KEY ADJECTIVE Refer to the HOW LIST.
  • 30. How does Orwell make this such a moving moment in the novel? LANGUAGE: • How they relate to other characters/how other characters view them • The setting in which the character is seen • Physical appearance STRUCTURE: • How a particular atmosphere (tension) is built up across a scene • Contrast • Dramatic irony • The importance of the scene in relation to the rest of the story
  • 31. How does Orwell make this such a moving moment in the novel? How they relate to other characters/how other characters view themThe way other characters view, or relate to, Boxer makes this such a movingmoment in the novel. We learn that Clover administers the pink medicine to Boxer‘twice a day’ and in the evenings ‘she lay in his stall and talked to him whileBenjamin kept the flies off him’. This suggests that the characters have realaffection for, and dedication to, Boxer. This could be for several reasons: thebravery he demonstrated during the Battle of the Cowshed; his remorse and guiltwhen he thought he had killed the stable boy or because he is the hardest-workinganimal, which led to his collapse. The fact that he is viewed so affectionately by theother animals makes later events in this extract even more tragic and moving. Thefact that the other animals break from their work ‘without waiting for orders fromthe pigs’, when they hear Boxer is leaving, therefore risking their own safety, isfurther evidence that the other animals are so dedicated towards him. Key words from the Evidence from the Links to the rest of question passage the novel Further evidence from the passage Writer’s purpose
  • 32. How does Orwell make this such a moving moment in the novel? How they relate to other characters/how other characters view themThe way other characters view, or relate to, Boxer makesthis such a moving moment in the novel. We learn thatClover administers the pink medicine to Boxer ‘twice aday’ and in the evenings ‘she lay in his stall and talked tohim while Benjamin kept the flies off him’. This suggeststhat the characters have real affection for, anddedication to, Boxer. This could be for several reasons:the bravery he demonstrated during the Battle of theCowshed; his remorse and guilt when he thought he hadkilled the stable boy or because he is the hardest-working animal, which led to his collapse. The fact thathe is viewed so affectionately by the other animalsmakes later events in this extract even more tragic andmoving. The fact that the other animals break from theirwork ‘without waiting for orders from the pigs’, whenthey hear Boxer is leaving, therefore risking their ownsafety, is further evidence that the other animals are sodedicated towards him.
  • 33. How does Orwell make this such a moving moment in the novel? How they relate to other characters/how other characters view themThe way other characters view, or relate to, Boxer makes Key words from thethis such a moving moment in the novel. We learn that questionClover administers the pink medicine to Boxer ‘twice aday’ and in the evenings ‘she lay in his stall and talked tohim while Benjamin kept the flies off him’. This suggeststhat the characters have real affection for, anddedication to, Boxer. This could be for several reasons:the bravery he demonstrated during the Battle of theCowshed; his remorse and guilt when he thought he hadkilled the stable boy or because he is the hardest-working animal, which led to his collapse. The fact thathe is viewed so affectionately by the other animalsmakes later events in this extract even more tragic andmoving. The fact that the other animals break from theirwork ‘without waiting for orders from the pigs’, whenthey hear Boxer is leaving, therefore risking their ownsafety, is further evidence that the other animals are sodedicated towards him.
  • 34. How does Orwell make this such a moving moment in the novel? How they relate to other characters/how other characters view themThe way other characters view, or relate to, Boxer makes Key words from thethis such a moving moment in the novel. We learn that questionClover administers the pink medicine to Boxer ‘twice aday’ and in the evenings ‘she lay in his stall and talkedto him while Benjamin kept the flies off him’. This Evidence from thesuggests that the characters have real affection for, and passagededication to, Boxer. This could be for several reasons:the bravery he demonstrated during the Battle of theCowshed; his remorse and guilt when he thought he hadkilled the stable boy or because he is the hardest-working animal, which led to his collapse. The fact thathe is viewed so affectionately by the other animalsmakes later events in this extract even more tragic andmoving. The fact that the other animals break from theirwork ‘without waiting for orders from the pigs’, whenthey hear Boxer is leaving, therefore risking their ownsafety, is further evidence that the other animals are sodedicated towards him.
  • 35. How does Orwell make this such a moving moment in the novel? How they relate to other characters/how other characters view themThe way other characters view, or relate to, Boxer makes Key words from thethis such a moving moment in the novel. We learn that questionClover administers the pink medicine to Boxer ‘twice aday’ and in the evenings ‘she lay in his stall and talkedto him while Benjamin kept the flies off him’. This Evidence from thesuggests that the characters have real affection for, and passagededication to, Boxer. This could be for several reasons:the bravery he demonstrated during the Battle of theCowshed; his remorse and guilt when he thought he Links to the rest of thehad killed the stable boy or because he is the hardest- novelworking animal, which led to his collapse. The fact thathe is viewed so affectionately by the other animalsmakes later events in this extract even more tragic andmoving. The fact that the other animals break from theirwork ‘without waiting for orders from the pigs’, whenthey hear Boxer is leaving, therefore risking their ownsafety, is further evidence that the other animals are sodedicated towards him.
  • 36. How does Orwell make this such a moving moment in the novel? How they relate to other characters/how other characters view themThe way other characters view, or relate to, Boxer makes Key words from thethis such a moving moment in the novel. We learn that questionClover administers the pink medicine to Boxer ‘twice aday’ and in the evenings ‘she lay in his stall and talkedto him while Benjamin kept the flies off him’. This Evidence from thesuggests that the characters have real affection for, and passagededication to, Boxer. This could be for several reasons:the bravery he demonstrated during the Battle of theCowshed; his remorse and guilt when he thought he Links to the rest of thehad killed the stable boy or because he is the hardest- novelworking animal, which led to his collapse. The fact thathe is viewed so affectionately by the other animalsmakes later events in this extract even more tragic and Writer’s purposemoving. The fact that the other animals break from theirwork ‘without waiting for orders from the pigs’, whenthey hear Boxer is leaving, therefore risking their ownsafety, is further evidence that the other animals are sodedicated towards him.
  • 37. How does Orwell make this such a moving moment in the novel? How they relate to other characters/how other characters view themThe way other characters view, or relate to, Boxer makes Key words from thethis such a moving moment in the novel. We learn that questionClover administers the pink medicine to Boxer ‘twice aday’ and in the evenings ‘she lay in his stall and talkedto him while Benjamin kept the flies off him’. This Evidence from thesuggests that the characters have real affection for, and passagededication to, Boxer. This could be for several reasons:the bravery he demonstrated during the Battle of theCowshed; his remorse and guilt when he thought he Links to the rest of thehad killed the stable boy or because he is the hardest- novelworking animal, which led to his collapse. The fact thathe is viewed so affectionately by the other animalsmakes later events in this extract even more tragic and Writer’s purposemoving. The fact that the other animals break from theirwork ‘without waiting for orders from the pigs’, whenthey hear Boxer is leaving, therefore risking their own Further evidence fromsafety, is further evidence that the other animals are so the passagededicated towards him.
  • 38. Section A – Literary Heritage ProsePassage-based questionHow does Orwell’s writing make thismoment in the novel so dramatic andsignificant?
  • 39. Section A – Literary Heritage ProsePassage-based questionHow does Orwell’s writing make this moment inthe novel so dramatic and significant?Highlight the key words from the question, including theKEY ADJECTIVE(s).Mindmap the KEY ADJECTIVE(s) to interpret it – cover itas fully as you can.
  • 40. Section A – Literary Heritage ProsePassage-based questionHow does Orwell’s writing make this moment inthe novel so dramatic and significant?Highlight any words or phrases which help to answer thequestion (referring to the KEY ADJECTIVE(s)).Use the HOW LIST to remind you what to look for.
  • 41. Section A – Literary Heritage ProsePassage-based questionHow does Orwell’s writing make this moment inthe novel so dramatic and significant?PLAN YOUR ANSWER:• Look to group related points – each will for a paragraph/section of your response. Aim for 4-6 sections.• Organise the groups into a logical structure.
  • 42. Section A – Literary Heritage ProsePassage-based questionHow does Orwell’s writing make this moment inthe novel so dramatic and significant?PLAN YOUR ANSWER:Try to make links between the points you have made andother aspects of the story outside of the passage.Indicate on your plan where you might do this.
  • 43. Section A – Literary Heritage ProsePassage-based questionHow does Orwell’s writing make this moment inthe novel so dramatic and significant?Write the introduction - an overview which sets thepassage in context and summarises the author’s overallpurpose.
  • 44. Section A – Literary Heritage ProsePassage-based questionHow does Orwell’s writing make this moment inthe novel so dramatic and significant?Write a section or your answer. Don’t forget to:• Mention a KEY WORD (particularly the ADJECTIVE(s)).• Provide EVIDENCE (a range?) from the passage.• Focus on the AUTHOR’S PURPOSE and the WAYS this isachieved.• Try to make a link with the an aspect(s) of the noveloutside the passage.
  • 45. Section A – Literary Heritage ProsePassage-based questionHow does Orwell make Napoleon appear tobe particularly powerful in this passage?
  • 46. Section A – Literary Heritage ProsePassage-based questionHow does Orwell make Napoleon appear to beparticularly powerful in this passage?Highlight the key words from the question, including theKEY ADJECTIVE.Mindmap the KEY ADJECTIVE to interpret it – cover it asfully as you can.
  • 47. Section A – Literary Heritage ProsePassage-based questionHow does Orwell make Napoleon appear to beparticularly powerful in this passage?Highlight any words or phrases which help to answer thequestion (referring to the KEY ADJECTIVE).Use the HOW LIST to remind you what to look for.
  • 48. Section A – Literary Heritage ProsePassage-based questionHow does Orwell make Napoleon appear to beparticularly powerful in this passage?PLAN YOUR ANSWER:• Look to group related points – each will for a paragraph/section of your response. Aim for 4-6 sections.• Organise the groups into a logical structure.
  • 49. Section A – Literary Heritage ProsePassage-based questionHow does Orwell make Napoleon appear to beparticularly powerful in this passage?PLAN YOUR ANSWER:Try to make links between the points you have made andother aspects of the story outside of the passage.Indicate on your plan where you might do this.
  • 50. Section A – Literary Heritage ProsePassage-based questionHow does Orwell make Napoleon appear to beparticularly powerful in this passage?Write the introduction - an overview which sets thepassage in context and summarises the author’s overallpurpose.
  • 51. Section A – Literary Heritage ProsePassage-based questionHow does Orwell make Napoleon appear to beparticularly powerful in this passage?Write a section or your answer. Don’t forget to:• Mention a KEY WORD (particularly the ADJECTIVE).• Provide EVIDENCE (a range?) from the passage.• Focus on the AUTHOR’S PURPOSE and the WAYS this isachieved.• Try to make a link with the an aspect(s) of the noveloutside the passage.