Transitioning Enterprise Applications to the Cloud

930 views

Published on

Lower costs, faster time to market, and reduced infrastructure are driving an increased acceptance of cloud-based CRM solutions. But the difficulty of migrating complex business processes remains a barrier to many large organizations looking to move to a cloud model. Join us as Cognizant explores the issues in moving large enterprise applications to the cloud. We'll cover practical steps and offer a few lessons learned to help you prepare for the move.

Published in: Business
0 Comments
0 Likes
Statistics
Notes
  • Be the first to comment

  • Be the first to like this

No Downloads
Views
Total views
930
On SlideShare
0
From Embeds
0
Number of Embeds
1
Actions
Shares
0
Downloads
54
Comments
0
Likes
0
Embeds 0
No embeds

No notes for slide
  • SaaS vendors like to present an image that cloud-computing offers a cheaper, quicker and more adoptive solution than their on-prem counterparts. This is true in many cases…
  • However, the other “clouds” can appear when circumstances are specific, such as enterprise-level deployments. In order to achieve these 3 elements of cloud-computing, customers should level-set expectations of their needs, integration, deployment – aspects that are many times overlooked in cloud-computing implementations.So let’s look at it from a common perspective: “if it’s easy to use, and easy to manage – then it must be easy to deploy, right?”Well, not exactly… To understand why SaaS deployments should get the same level of attention as any other IT project/investment, let’s see where we came from, which might help us to see why.
  • There is more opportunity than ever before for a business or organization to achieve CRM success because cloud-computing’s foundation is based on advancements in process and technology that on-premise solutions couldn’t offer - on a global scale!
  • There is more opportunity than ever before for a business or organization to achieve CRM success because cloud-computing’s foundation is based on advancements in process and technology that on-premise solutions couldn’t offer - on a global scale!
  • When things look easy, we tend to cut corners… we feel comfortable that maximum consideration for risk, failure and consequence is limited to what we are used to. Because many times, we look at the ends, make a judgment and assume the means were an equal. So, if it’s easier to use, then it MUST be easier to implement. How do I integrate the new Salesforce solution back into the enterprise – this is where the risk comes in is from expectations that get set. As Salesforce gets enterprise-savvy, these expectations are getting set more realistically than before.
  • Let’s look at typical on-premise implementation factors for CRM systems and see if they how they would be key in a successful SaaS deployment:Sound Business Case: Why take on the project? What are the risks/rewards?Resource Alignment: An ounce of prevention… with experts!Correct Solution Scope: Focused vision = easier adoptionDeployment ApproachExecutive SponsorshipOrganizational ChangeCustomization/IntegrationSecuritySupport & UpgradesTraining
  • Improve sales? Better customer satisfaction? Stop wasting marketing budgets on unsuccessful promotions?These are noble efforts. But does it really stop there? These might be the types of responses we would focus on in SaaS since it’s easier, best of breed SFA to work for my brother-in-law’s firmBut would this be how we would handle a large-scale CRM implementation? Heck no! We would have in-depth discovery/interview sessions, discuss real challenges and objectives and define these needs in a way so that they are measurable indicators, such as improve sales-stage pipeline velocity, quickly measure campaign ROI in relation to closed-deals and increase first-time case resolution rates. These indicators will have a greater chance to successfully hit needs in a SaaS deployment just as much as they do in On-Premise deployments, simply b/c the functionality and ease of managing these KPIs is already proven.
  • Point A: Partners can leverage their experience in not just what works, but more importantly what doesn’t, to ensure that a Salesforce deployment is successfulPoint B: Partners have been there/done that in ways that your organization may not have. Again, companies might take the ease-of-use concept to a point where they might feel that professional-assistance is only for the on-prem world. This is where the message comes in that Salesforce is now more of an enterprise-level solution than before.
  • The correct project-scope based on the KPIs will help your project team deliver quicker ROI once the CRM solution is live. Partners can help define the scope, but your business-users must assist in defining how to hit their success-metrics. Working in tandem with business-users and leaders, esp on SaaS projects, will help to level-set and maintain what their expectations are to what can be delivered. Point B: Once the scope is defined, designing according to this will help build out a project-plan based on resources, time and requirements. Projects are stair-step approaches to deploying a solution based on processes and business-needs. One excellent way to execute according to this scope and design is by�
  • Point A: The methodology is something that is based on allocation of resources, cost-requirements and organizational culture – among other things. Whether it’s agile, waterfall or a specific methodology, taking this decision lightly might have long-term adverse impact on the project outcome, no matter how small or large the deployment is. Point B: Your implementation-partner can help assess the approach, along with the plan and what is required to make sure the project stays on track and on the radar of the management-team responsible for the CRM endeavor.
  • Point A: Dedicated executive sponsors not only sign-off on the project, but will make sure decisions are made effectively to ensure success throughout the project’s lifecycle. Managing unknowns is an art and a science. Your implementation partner will have had experience keeping risks at bay, but they can and do show up. Making sure that executive teams see your CRM SaaS deployment as a mission-critical exercise will ensure that the right resources are met with the right attention.Point B: Project sponsors will also make sure the right resources are assigned and dedicated. Need to get the right people involved and the institutional knowledge needs to be there for all stakeholders and BU’s involved.
  • Point A: Change Management practices are the shocks in your SaaS-CRM vehicle. Surprise, fear and lack of knowledge are primary drivers of non-adoption. Users who come into work one day and are told they will be doing something TOTALLY different makes them dig their heels in. “Will it take longer?”, “Will it be hard to learn?”, “Will this decrease job performance b/c I don’t know what I’m doing?”– typical questions of a user who is not aware, not informed and not empowered with knowledge.Point B: Change Management improves adoption and success. Regardless of whether you implement an on-prem or SaaS CRM model, communicating what users can expect, managing this level of expectation and making sure users stay informed will not only help them as they begin using the tool – but will also help to create champions early on. This means that Change Management should be a part of the project-plan from start-to-finish.
  • Is it secure? Does the tie in to the back end add complexity to the user experience? Making a decision on the system-of-record and ownership of business rules is key to driving a successful integration strategy.
  • Point A: By integrating the engine within the firewall, we are establishing a single-point of connection, we aren’t having to go through authentication and validation many-times overPoint B: Security is the how, where and when of what users will interact with to successfully complete their work. Users are assigned to user-profiles, roles, times and IP-ranges that will let them access data based on your organization’s requirements. Your implementation partner will help your team build out a solid and elastic security matrix for your individual users and teams, even all the way down to the field-level.
  • Center of Excellence: when you do the next release, you need to reeducate people about the project. So by having a centralized (offshore) center of excellence, there are knowledge of the project and how it was implemented. This adds support with knowledge of the project, mentors on the application and this creates a supporting team to your users – broader scope of people to solve problems or help in administration of upgrades, etc.Training and continued knowledge-transfer will build a confident, seasoned and self-sustaining workforce. Build your training-investments into the change-management program, and make it a requirement. Users will leverage admins less and realize how empowered they are. This will also help hit the success-metrics since users will want to use a solution they are familiar with and understand!
  • Transitioning Enterprise Applications to the Cloud

    1. 1. Transitioning Enterprise Applications to the Cloud <br />IT Professionals<br />Dileep Srinivasan: Cognizant Technology Solutions<br />Chris Clegg: Cognizant Technology Solutions<br />
    2. 2. Dileep Srinivasan<br />AVP – CRM<br />Customer Solutions Practice<br />
    3. 3. Safe Harbor<br />Safe harbor statement under the Private Securities Litigation Reform Act of 1995: This presentation may contain forward-looking statements that involve risks, uncertainties, and assumptions. If any such uncertainties materialize or if any of the assumptions proves incorrect, the results of salesforce.com, inc. could differ materially from the results expressed or implied by the forward-looking statements we make. All statements other than statements of historical fact could be deemed forward-looking, including any projections of subscriber growth, earnings, revenues, or other financial items and any statements regarding strategies or plans of management for future operations, statements of belief, any statements concerning new, planned, or upgraded services or technology developments and customer contracts or use of our services.<br />The risks and uncertainties referred to above include – but are not limited to – risks associated with developing and delivering new functionality for our service, our new business model, our past operating losses, possible fluctuations in our operating results and rate of growth, interruptions or delays in our Web hosting, breach of our security measures, the outcome of intellectual property and other litigation, risks associated with possible mergers and acquisitions, the immature market in which we operate, our relatively limited operating history, our ability to expand, retain, and motivate our employees and manage our growth, new releases of our service and successful customer deployment, our limited history reselling non-salesforce.com products, and utilization and selling to larger enterprise customers. Further information on potential factors that could affect the financial results of salesforce.com, inc. is included in our annual report on Form 10-K for the most recent fiscal year ended January 31, 2010. This documents and others are available on the SEC Filings section of the Investor Information section of our Web site. <br />Any unreleased services or features referenced in this or other press releases or public statements are not currently available and may not be delivered on time or at all. Customers who purchase our services should make the purchase decisions based upon features that are currently available. Salesforce.com, inc. assumes no obligation and does not intend to update these forward-looking statements.<br />
    4. 4. Agenda<br />Top CRM Trends<br />Is The Cloud a “Quick Win”?<br />Making the Move<br />Common Pitfalls<br />Wrap Up<br />
    5. 5. The 5 trends changing the CRM Landscape ….<br />The growth and easy availability of Broadband and Wireless – It is clear that they will permeate across every available living space<br />Mobile devices and Mobility are redefining the way consumers consume information<br />Cloud is increasingly seen as an option as organizations look for cost take outs, business transformations and new business models<br />Digital channels are getting increasing attention in terms of budgets and focus<br />Social Media and Communities are enabling Consumers & Customers to take increasing control over the influence of products & services<br />
    6. 6. CRM Vision to enable customer centricity<br />Interaction with Communities <br />TransactionswithEnterprises<br />Customer / Consumer<br />Social CRM <br />Customers / Consumers<br />Devices<br />Multi /Cross Channel Interaction<br />Wireless<br />email<br />Call Center<br />Internet<br />Sales<br />BPM<br />Workflow<br />Reengineering<br /> Solutions<br />CRM Systems<br />Customer Analytics<br />Master Data Mgmt<br />MDM<br />Sales<br />Operational<br />Predictive<br />Processes<br />Services<br />Marketing<br />CDI<br />PIM<br />Platforms<br />On Premise<br />Cloud / SaaS<br />CRM Vision to enable customer centricity<br />
    7. 7. Chris Clegg<br />Director – CRM<br />Cloud Solutions Group<br />
    8. 8. Cloud Computing Experience<br />Faster Time to Market<br />Better User Adoption<br />Less<br />Expensive<br />
    9. 9.
    10. 10. So What Does This Mean?<br />In the past, on-premise solutions have required multiple concurrent or serial deployments to achieve results on a global scale. <br />With the right planning, leadership, design, integration-understanding and resources, Salesforce can achieve global results in a single deployment.<br />
    11. 11. So What Does This Mean?<br />In the past, on-premise solutions have required multiple concurrent or serial deployments to achieve results on a global scale. <br />With the right planning, leadership, design, integration-understanding and resources, Salesforce can achieve global results in a single deployment.<br />All Your Eggs In One Basket….<br />
    12. 12. So Why Are CRM Deployments Still at Risk?<br />Enterprise-level Salesforce deployments are often not implemented with the same level of planning and detail as on-premise projects! <br />
    13. 13. What Kinds of Factors Should be Considered?<br /> Sound Business Case<br /> Resource Alignment<br /> Correct Solution Scope <br /> Deployment Approach<br /> Executive Sponsorship<br /> Organizational Change<br /> Customization/Integration<br /> Security<br /> Production Support<br /> Training<br />
    14. 14. 1. Build a Sound Business Case<br />Question 1: Why take on a CRM project?<br />Improve sales?<br />Better customer satisfaction?<br />Stop wasting marketing budgets on unsuccessful promotions?<br />Question 2: What are my RELEVANT indicators?<br /><ul><li>What are the QUICK wins?
    15. 15. What will serve target-users now and in long-term?
    16. 16. What derivative KPIs and KRIs can we consider?</li></li></ul><li>2. Bring On Board Experienced Resources<br />Seasoned team-members that have “been there, done that” <br />Might know not just what works, but more importantly what doesn’t<br />
    17. 17. 3. Decide the Right Scope of the Project:<br />Customer<br />Master<br />Supply Chain<br />Incentive<br />Compensation<br />Human Resources<br />Marketing<br />Activity<br />Metrics<br />Workflow<br />Contact Management<br />Document<br />Management<br />Account Profiling<br />MBO <br />Billing<br />Pipeline Management<br />Territory<br />Management<br />Sales Metrics/MBO<br />Data<br />Warehouse<br />Business Intelligence <br />Order<br />Management<br />
    18. 18. 4. Select the Correct Implementation Approach<br />The methodology is something that is based on allocation of resources, cost-requirements and organizational culture – among other things<br />Plan on what is required to make sure the project stays on track and budget<br />
    19. 19. 5. Committed Executive Sponsorship<br />Ensure “tough” decisions are made effectively to ensure success <br />Prioritize and dedicate the right resources<br />
    20. 20. 6. Organizational Change-management Program<br />Change Management practices are the shocks in your SaaS-CRM vehicle<br />Change Management improves adoption and success<br />Copyright ©2006 Rick LaFrance<br />
    21. 21. 7. Customization and Integration<br />Consolidating the view of the enterprise minimizes clicks, saves time and can improve user-adoption and confidence<br />However, integration can have the largest chance of risk<br />
    22. 22. 8. Security<br />By using integration-engine approach, we consolidate the security risk within the enterprise<br />Security is the how, where and when of what users will interact with to successfully complete their work<br />
    23. 23. 9. Support and Upgrades<br />Center of Excellence Approach: combined application administration and maintenance for upgrades by a knowledgeable team<br />
    24. 24. 10. Mistakes to Avoid:<br />Unclear goals and/or metrics of success<br />Not understanding the strengths and limitations of the tool that is under consideration<br />Not investigating corporate-culture and project-history<br />Failing to allocate budget and resource “buffers”<br />Trying to do “too much at once” <br />Lack of dedicated leadership and direction<br />
    25. 25. Treat Your Cloud Implementation Like Other IT Projects<br />
    26. 26. Questions and Answers<br />Chris Clegg<br />Director – CRM<br />Cloud Solutions Group<br />Dileep Srinivasan<br />AVP – CRM<br />Customer Solutions Practice<br />
    27. 27. How Could Dreamforce Be Better? Tell Us!<br />Log in to the Dreamforce app to submit<br />surveys for the sessions you attended<br />Use the Dreamforce Mobile app to submit surveys<br />OR<br />Every session survey you submit is a chance to win an iPod nano!<br />

    ×