Niagara Falls

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Niagara Falls

  1. 1. Niagara Falls ∼ Niagara falls are situated on the Niagara River on the US and Canadian border, formed from receding glaciers at the end of the last ice age. The falls are in a drainage basin containing the great lakes, so about 20% of the worlds fresh water resides here, of which most flows over the falls. ∼ Two waterfalls make up Niagara Falls, the Horseshoe falls in Canada and the American falls. ∼ More than six million cubic feet (168,000 m³) of water falls every minute during a fast flow of water. The height of the waterfall is 167 ft (52 m). The amount of water flowing over the falls depends on two factors the time of year, and the time of the day. ∼ The water flow peaks during the day and during the tourist seasons, June, July and August. The flow can be slowed by hydroelectric industries on the river banks. The flow of water can also be stopped by an extremely cold winter where the water can freeze completely. ∼ When the water has passed over the waterfall, the water flows along the St Lawrence River, which is situated in the northeast of Canada. ∼ During the summer 100,000 cubic feet (2,800 m3) per second of water, of this 90% goes towards the Horseshoe Falls. This water is now being used for hydroelectric purposes. The Horseshoe Falls were developed 12000 years ago. ∼ Erosion causes the water fall to retreat approximately 0.30m per year. ∼ The river flows at 35m per hour. ∼ The waterfalls have attracted a large number of touristic industries for example the Maid of the mist tour. This attraction is popular among the more than 22 million people that visit the falls each year.

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