Laura Porter's Presentation from the Regional Summit on Adverse Childhood Experiences on March 24-26, 2014

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Laura Porter's Presentation from the Regional Summit on Adverse Childhood Experiences on March 24-26, 2014

  1. 1. Shifting the Future of Health, Safety & Prosperity Preventing Adverse Childhood Experiences We’re All About The Magnitude of the Solution
  2. 2. Promote Virtuous Cycle of Health Moderate ACE Effects, Improve Wellbeing Among Parenting Adults 2 Prevent High ACE Scores among Children Mutually Reinforcing 8 7
  3. 3. Parenting May Be More Difficult for Some Relationships Physical Mental Health Cognition Behavior Crisis
  4. 4. Very High ACE Scores Among Parenting-Age Adults in Washington AGE 18-34 with ≥5 ACEs AGE 35-54 with ≥5 ACEs
  5. 5. Adult Adversity Compounds Effects 0 10 20 30 40 50 60 0 1 2 3 %with15-30 Disability-InterruptedDaysaMonth Number of Major Stress Categories In Adulthood Added to ACE Score of ≥3 Adults with 3 ACEs Plus Major Stress Categories: 1. Homelessness 2. Incarceration 3. Chronic illness 4. Separation/Divorce 5. Severe Depression 6. Work-related Injury/ Illness
  6. 6. 1. Employ a Dual Generation Approach 2. Engage the Citizenry to Shift Cultural Norms 3. Shift Practice in ACE-Driven Cost Centers 4. Systematically Learn: What Works for Whom, In What Conditions Policy Implications ACE Score Reduction Reliably Predicts Savings: Health, Justice, Social, Education, Workforce, Happiness, Lifespan
  7. 7. ACEs Driven Cost Centers Workforce Health Corrections Housing & Shelter Behavioral Health Disability Services Labor & Industries Child Welfare
  8. 8. First Responders Interrupting Intergenerational Transmission • ACEs in Home Visiting • Community: People We Can Count On • TANF Parent Ed “Counts” • Youth Development as “Pre- Parent Skill-Building” • Train the Trainer • Action Oriented Workshops
  9. 9. Expand Leadership Come Together – Talk about What Matters Learn Together Decisions for Results & Shared Identity Emergence: Create both Path & Destination Appreciative Action: Finds Strengths and Acts Upon Them
  10. 10. Social/Emotional Support-Resilience Factor 7.50% 10.40% 15.70% 7.00% 9.10% 8.20% 5.70% 7.20% 1.40% 0.00% 2.00% 4.00% 6.00% 8.00% 10.00% 12.00% 14.00% 16.00% 18.00% Cardiovascular Diabetes Receive Treatment for Mental Illness Rarely/Never Sometimes Always/Usually Have Support
  11. 11. Support, Positive View & Hope Improve Housing Stability 19 2.6 0 2 4 6 8 10 12 14 16 18 20 Low Resiliency High Resiliency PercentWhoMoved≥4TimesinPastYear Resiliency Score: Social-Emotional Support, Positive View/Narrative, Hope Moved ≥ 4 Times in Past Year
  12. 12. 8% 8% 7% 10% 10% 12% 17% 16% 17% 25% 23% 35% 0% 5% 10% 15% 20% 25% 30% 35% 40% 0 ACE 1 ACE 2ACE 3 ACE 4-5 ACE 6-8 ACE PercentUnemployed PEOPLE WITH SUPPORT & HOPE ARE MORE LIKELY TO BE EMPLOYED High Resilience Score Low Resilience Score SOCIAL & EMOTIONAL SUPPORT; POSITIVE VIEW; HOPE
  13. 13. Higher Community Capacity Fewer Adverse Childhood Experiences (ACEs) among Young Adults
  14. 14. Keys to Success  Take a learning systems approach  Form long-term partnership with community leaders  Structure staff for both short and long term needs  Develop an education framework that unites people across professional disciplines, class lines, sectors, etc.  Hold a fundamental respect for the wisdom of every person – their culture, experience, capabilities, and aspirations
  15. 15. Community Services Education System Other Special Services Building Self-Healing Communities © 2013 Justice System

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