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Girard Keynote InfoVision 2009 Enterprise Content and Communication: Are we ready for the future?
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Girard Keynote InfoVision 2009 Enterprise Content and Communication: Are we ready for the future?

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For the past two decades, public and private sector executives have struggled to develop effective ways of sharing what their organizations know. Driven by concerns such as downsizing, the impending ...

For the past two decades, public and private sector executives have struggled to develop effective ways of sharing what their organizations know. Driven by concerns such as downsizing, the impending retirement of baby boomers, terrorism, the troubling economy, and a host of other organizational challenges, many leaders have sought ways to share knowledge with both internal and external stakeholders. Despite the best efforts of many innovative leaders, few organizations have achieved the desired level of knowledge sharing. This is certainly not due to a lack of energy, enthusiasm, or excitement on the part of executives.

Today, ample resources exist for the executive who wishes to manage their organizational intellectual property - many proven tools and techniques exist to manage today’s knowledge assets. But what about the future? Will today’s baby-boomer based practices pass the test of time? Are our current processes the most relevant ones for the next generation of organizational leaders? This talk will focus on what we should be doing now (or soon) to ensure the next generation of organizational leaders know what we knew. In other words, are we creating organizational memories today, which will be useful to the leaders who follow us?

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Girard Keynote InfoVision 2009 Enterprise Content and Communication: Are we ready for the future? Girard Keynote InfoVision 2009 Enterprise Content and Communication: Are we ready for the future? Document Transcript

  • INFOVISION 2009 – JOHN P. GIRARD, PH.D. Enterprise Content and Communication: Are we ready for the future? John P. Girard, Ph.D. john@johngirard.net www.johngirard.net Content to Intent: My Perspective Associate Professor of Management Minot, ND InfoVision 2009 © 2009 John P. Girard, Ph.D. (john@johngirard.net) 2 1 www.johngirard.net john@johngirard.net
  • INFOVISION 2009 – JOHN P. GIRARD, PH.D. Energizing a Nation InfoVision 2009 © 2009 John P. Girard, Ph.D. (john@johngirard.net) 3 What do we know 40 years later? InfoVision 2009 © 2009 John P. Girard, Ph.D. (john@johngirard.net) 4 2 www.johngirard.net john@johngirard.net
  • INFOVISION 2009 – JOHN P. GIRARD, PH.D. What is the problem? Content to Intent – assumes we can access content + = Enterprise Organizational Information Dementia Memory Loss Anxiety Content to Intent – assumes we know what we knew InfoVision 2009 © 2009 John P. Girard, Ph.D. (john@johngirard.net) 5 Organizational Memory Organizational memory is the body of knowledge, past, present, and future, g ,p ,p , , necessary to achieve the strategic objectives of an organization. Enabled by technology, leadership, and culture, organizational memories include repositories of artifacts, communities of people, and iti f l d organizational knowledge sharing processes, which focus on achieving the organizational vision. Girard, 2009 InfoVision 2009 © 2009 John P. Girard, Ph.D. (john@johngirard.net) 6 3 www.johngirard.net john@johngirard.net
  • INFOVISION 2009 – JOHN P. GIRARD, PH.D. Figure 7. Forms of Organizational Forgetting (Adapted from de Holan et al.) Organizational Forgetting (de Holan et al.) From ge ource of Knowledg Existing Memory Decay Unlearning Stock Newly Avoiding Bad Failure to Capture Habits Innovated So Accidental Intentional Mode of Forgetting InfoVision 2009 © 2009 John P. Girard, Ph.D. (john@johngirard.net) 7 The impact of not . . . sharing According to Computer Associates . . . http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=lH39xjXaLW8 InfoVision 2009 © 2009 John P. Girard, Ph.D. (john@johngirard.net) 8 4 www.johngirard.net john@johngirard.net
  • INFOVISION 2009 – JOHN P. GIRARD, PH.D. Knowledge Sharing – Nothing New? Knowledge Management is Knowledge Management the creation, transfer, and is about using content to exchange of organizational determine intent ??? knowledge to achieve a [competitive] advantage. Girard, 2007 InfoVision 2009 © 2009 John P. Girard, Ph.D. (john@johngirard.net) 9 What is knowledge? Data Information Knowledge knowledge is quot;defined broadly Knowledge: defined to include information, data, Concepts, experience, and communication and culturequot; insight that provide a framework (p. 293) for creating, evaluating and using information (p. 373). InfoVision 2009 © 2009 John P. Girard, Ph.D. (john@johngirard.net) 10 5 www.johngirard.net john@johngirard.net
  • INFOVISION 2009 – JOHN P. GIRARD, PH.D. The Cognitive Hierarchy Wisdom Ackoff’s Apex Understanding Knowledge Knowledge Wisdom: Information The collective and individual Dataexperiences of applying knowledge to the solution of problems (p. 373). InfoVision 2009 © 2009 John P. Girard, Ph.D. (john@johngirard.net) 11 Intent from Content Wisdom Understanding Knowledge Knowledge Information Data Hurricane InfoVision 2009 © 2009 John P. Girard, Ph.D. (john@johngirard.net) 12 6 www.johngirard.net john@johngirard.net
  • INFOVISION 2009 – JOHN P. GIRARD, PH.D. Intent from Content 14 November 2004 Wisdom “With 3,600 stores in the United States and roughly 100 million customers walking Understanding throughKnowledge each week, Wal-Mart has the doors Knowledge access to information about a broad slice of America . . . The data are gathered item by Information item at the checkout aisle then recorded aisle, recorded, mapped and updated by store, by state, by region . . . By its own account Wal-Mart has Data 460 terabytes of data.” ( 750,000 CDs 1 terabyte ~ 1,000,000 MB) Hurricane InfoVision 2009 © 2009 John P. Girard, Ph.D. (john@johngirard.net) 13 CBS News: 11 September 2006 Including Ray Downey, Special Operations Command lost 95 men that day – totaling 1,600 years of experience. (emphasis added) InfoVision 2009 © 2009 John P. Girard, Ph.D. (john@johngirard.net) 14 7 www.johngirard.net john@johngirard.net
  • INFOVISION 2009 – JOHN P. GIRARD, PH.D. A New View of Knowledge Management Content Measurement Leadership Technology Process Culture c e InfoVision 2009 © 2009 John P. Girard, Ph.D. (john@johngirard.net) 15 A little TLC goes a long way! Leadership •Transparency •Vision and example Measurement •Resources (including time) Leadership Technology Culture Technology Process •Help or hinder •Need to Share Culture vs Need to Know •Security issues •Privacy •Ease of access •Content •Tending toward Creators free InfoVision 2009 © 2009 John P. Girard, Ph.D. (john@johngirard.net) 17 8 www.johngirard.net john@johngirard.net
  • INFOVISION 2009 – JOHN P. GIRARD, PH.D. Leadership “. . . there are known knowns; there are things we know that we know. There are known unknowns; that is to say there are things that we now know we don’t know. But there are also unknown unknowns — there are things that we do not know we don't know.” InfoVision 2009 © 2009 John P. Girard, Ph.D. (john@johngirard.net) 18 Knowns and Unknowns Unknown Unknown Knowns Unknowns Known K Known K Knowns Unknowns InfoVision 2009 © 2009 John P. Girard, Ph.D. (john@johngirard.net) 19 9 www.johngirard.net john@johngirard.net
  • INFOVISION 2009 – JOHN P. GIRARD, PH.D. Unknown unknowns Somewhere on the West Coast InfoVision 2009 © 2009 John P. Girard, Ph.D. (john@johngirard.net) 20 Technology “A social trend in which people use technologies to get the things they need from each other, rather than from traditional f t diti l institutions like corporations.” groundswell.forrester.com InfoVision 2009 © 2009 John P. Girard, Ph.D. (john@johngirard.net) 21 10 www.johngirard.net john@johngirard.net
  • INFOVISION 2009 – JOHN P. GIRARD, PH.D. Need to Know vs Need to Share InfoVision 2009 © 2009 John P. Girard, Ph.D. (john@johngirard.net) 22 Culture of Sharing SlideShare InfoVision 2009 © 2009 John P. Girard, Ph.D. (john@johngirard.net) 23 11 www.johngirard.net john@johngirard.net
  • INFOVISION 2009 – JOHN P. GIRARD, PH.D. Types of Knowledge Easier to document and Explicit share Contributes to C Easier to efficiency replicate 20% Leads to competency Carla O’Dell 80% Tacit Michael Polanyi Harder to articulate Harder to steal Higher competitive advantage Harder to transfer O’Dell, C. (2002, May). Knowledge Management New Generation. Presented at the APQC’s 7th Knowledge Conference, Washington, DC. InfoVision 2009 © 2009 John P. Girard, Ph.D. (john@johngirard.net) 25 What is the problem? + = Enterprise Organizational Information Dementia Memory Loss Anxiety InfoVision 2009 © 2009 John P. Girard, Ph.D. (john@johngirard.net) 26 12 www.johngirard.net john@johngirard.net
  • INFOVISION 2009 – JOHN P. GIRARD, PH.D. The Problem – Enterprise Dementia 2/3 of managers complained of 43% of the managers delayed Information overload (KPMG, 2000) decisions because of too much information. (Wilson, information (Wilson 2001) Managers “dwell on information that is entertaining but not informative, or 38% of the surveyed managers easily available but not of high waste a substantial amount of time quality” (Linden, 2001, p.2) locating information (Wilson, 2001) The number of books published annually has increased exponentially since the 16th century At present the prediction is that the number of books century. present, doubles every 33 years (Hanka & Fuka, 2000). The total accumulated codified database of the world, which includes all books and all electronic files, doubles every seven years and some predict this will double twice a day by 2010 (Bontis, 2000). InfoVision 2009 © 2009 John P. Girard, Ph.D. (john@johngirard.net) 27 Information Overload 245+ academic papers on Information Overload 1972-2000 (Bawden, 2001) Information Overload Personal Information Overload Information overload occurs A perception on the part of the individual when the amount of input to a (or observers of that person) that the flow system exceeds its of information associated with work tasks is processing capacity. greater than can be managed effectively. (Speier et al, 1999, p. 338) (Wilson, 2001, p. 113) Information Overload Organizational Information Overload Information overload is that A situation in which the extent of state in which available, and perceived information overload is potentially useful, information sufficiently widespread within an is a hindrance rather than a organization as to reduce the overall help. effectiveness of management operations. (Bawden, 2001, p. 6) (Wilson, 2001, p. 113) InfoVision 2009 © 2009 John P. Girard, Ph.D. (john@johngirard.net) 28 13 www.johngirard.net john@johngirard.net
  • INFOVISION 2009 – JOHN P. GIRARD, PH.D. Broader Challenge = Information Anxiety Gartner Research’s Information Overload Survey concluded there are four information issues affecting competition: siloed information; too much information; unindexed information; and ineffective searching procedures (Linden et al, 2002) Causes of Cognitive Overload: Components of Information Anxiety: 1. Too much information 1. Not understanding information; supply; 2. Feeling overwhelmed by the amount 2. Too much information of information to be understood; demand; 3. Not knowing if certain information 3. The need to deal with multi- exists; tasking and interruption; and 4. Not knowing where to find 4. Inadequate workplace information; and infrastructure to help reduce 5. Knowing exactly where to find the metacognition. information, but not having the key to (Kirsh, 2000) access it. (Wurman, 1989, p. 44) InfoVision 2009 © 2009 John P. Girard, Ph.D. (john@johngirard.net) 29 Information Anxiety - Girard Summary of Findings 3 • Low levels reported M = 2.12,  2.31 2.26 2.12 2.14 2.07 1.8 order and difference important order and difference important •ANOVA: F(4,490) = 7.962, p  2 =.0000  Mean •Accessing Information higher  (significantly) than Information  1 Overload, i.e. more troubling  •Understanding Information  significantly lower than others,  0 i.e. less of a problem i e less of a problem n n ad ty ts n io io io ie is rlo at at at Ex nx • Validates decisions to  rm rm rm ve A n O fo fo fo consider the wider of Anxiety  n io io In In n In at io at rm g ng instead of just overload ng rm at in fo rm di si nd fo In an es fo Fi In st cc In er A nd Inside Knowledge U February 2009 High scale reliability Cronbach's Alpha 0.852  InfoVision 2009 © 2009 John P. Girard, Ph.D. (john@johngirard.net) 30 14 www.johngirard.net john@johngirard.net
  • INFOVISION 2009 – JOHN P. GIRARD, PH.D. The Generation Game InfoVision 2009 © 2009 John P. Girard, Ph.D. (john@johngirard.net) 31 The Generation Game InfoVision 2009 © 2009 John P. Girard, Ph.D. (john@johngirard.net) 32 15 www.johngirard.net john@johngirard.net
  • INFOVISION 2009 – JOHN P. GIRARD, PH.D. Community Engagement – Generation V http://www.gartner.com/it/page.jsp?id=545108 InfoVision 2009 © 2009 John P. Girard, Ph.D. (john@johngirard.net) 33 The Social Technographics™ Ladder Technographics™ Creators make social content  Creators go. They write blogs or upload  video, music, or text. Critics respond to content from  others. They post reviews,  Critics comment on blogs, participate  in forums, and edit wiki articles. Collectors organize content for  themselves or others using RSS  Collectors feeds, tags, and voting sites like  Digg.com Joiners connect in social  Joiners networks like MySpace and  Facebook Spectators consumer social  content including blogs, user‐ Spectators generated video, podcasts,  forums, or reviews Inactives neither create nor  consumer social content of any  Inactives kind InfoVision 2009 © 2009 John P. Girard, Ph.D. (john@johngirard.net) 34 16 www.johngirard.net john@johngirard.net
  • INFOVISION 2009 – JOHN P. GIRARD, PH.D. The Social Technographics™ Ladder Technographics™ US 18-27 US Adults US 52-62 US 63+ Metro India Creators 39% 18% 8% 5% 24% Critics 41% 25% 15% 13% 24% 23% 12% 5% 4% 12% Collectors Joiners 58% 25% 8% 4% 42% Spectators 63% 48% 39% 30% 39% 25% 44% 55% Inactives 66% 31% InfoVision 2009 © 2009 John P. Girard, Ph.D. (john@johngirard.net) 35 Crowdsourcing Crowdsourcing is the act of taking a j g job traditionally performed by a designated agent (usually an employee) and outsourcing it to an undefined, generally large group of people in f the form of an open call. http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=TCM7w11Ultk InfoVision 2009 © 2009 John P. Girard, Ph.D. (john@johngirard.net) 36 17 www.johngirard.net john@johngirard.net