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Class  and object_diagram
 

Class and object_diagram

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    Class  and object_diagram Class and object_diagram Presentation Transcript

    • CLASS AND OBJECT DIAGRAMS Submitted by: Sadhana Singh M.Tech(S.E.)
    • Contents  Introduction about Class Diagram  Common Uses of Class Diagram  Common Modeling Techniques for Class Diagram  Introduction about Object Diagram  Common Uses of Object Diagram  Common Modeling Techniques for Object Diagram  Difference between class and object diagram
    • Introduction about Class Diagram  Found in modeling object oriented system.  Use to model static design view of a system.  Main building block of Object Oriented Modeling.  Describes the type of objects in system.  In the diagram these classes are represented with boxes which contain three parts ◦ The upper part holds the name of the class ◦ The middle part contains the attributes of the class ◦ The bottom part gives the methods or operations the class can take or undertake
    • Example:
    • Common Uses of Class Diagram  To model the vocabulary of system.  To model simple collaborations.  To model a logical database schema.
    • Common Modeling Techniques for Class Diagram  Modeling simple collaborations.  Modeling a logical database schema.  Forward and Reverse Engineering.
    • Modeling simple collaborations  Identify the mechanism we had like to model.  For each mechanism, identify the classes, interfaces, and other collaborations that participate in this collaboration.  Use scenarios to walk through these things.  To populate these elements with their contents.
    • Modeling a logical database schema  Identify those classes in our model whose state must transcend the lifetime of their application.  Create a class diagram that contains these classes and mark them as persistent.  Expand the structural details of these classes.  Watch for common patterns that complicate physical database design.  Consider also the behavior of these classes by expanding operations.  Use tools to help we transform our logical design into a physical design.
    • Forward and Reverse Engineering Forward Engineering  Identify the rules for mapping to our implementation language or languages of choice.  Depending on the semantics of the languages we choose, we may have to constrain our use of certain UML features.  Use tagged values to specify our target language.  Use tools to forward engineer our models.
    • Forward engineering the class EventHandler yields the following code. public abstract class EventHandler { EventHandler successor; private Integer currentEventID; private String source; EventHandler() {} public void handleRequest() {} }
    • Reverse Engineering  Identify the rules for mapping from our implementation language or languages of choice.  Using a tool, point to the code we had like to reverse engineer.  Using our tool, create a class diagram by querying the model.
    • Introduction about Object Diagram  Gives snapshots of the system.  Shows a complete or partial view of structure of a modeled system at specific time.  Derived from class diagrams.  Represent an instance of class diagrams.  To model the static design view.
    • Common Uses of Object Diagram To model object structure.
    • Common Modeling techniques for Object Diagram  Modeling object structures.  Forward and Reverse Engineering.
    • Modeling object Structures  Identify the mechanism we had like to model.  For each mechanism, identify the classes, interfaces, and other elements that participate in this collaboration; identify the relationships among these things, as well.  Consider one scenario that walks through this mechanism.  Expose the state and attribute values of each such object, as necessary, to understand the scenario.  Similarly, expose the links among these objects, representing instances of associations among them.
    • Forward and Reverse Engineering Reverse Engineering  We’ll set your context inside an operation or relative to an instance of one particular class.  Using a tool or simply walking through a scenario, stop execution at a certain moment in time.  Identify the set of interesting objects that collaborate in that context and render them in an object diagram.  As necessary to understand their semantics, expose these object's states.  As necessary to understand their semantics, identify the links that exist among these objects.
    • Difference between Class and Object Diagrams  A class diagram is a graph of Classifier elements connected by their various static relationships whereas an object diagram is a graph of instances, including objects and data values.  Class diagrams can contain objects, so a class diagram with objects and no classes is an object diagram.  Class diagrams are the blueprints of your system or subsystem whereas object diagram shows a snapshot of the detailed state of a system at a point in time.
    • THANK YOU