• Like
  • Save

Loading…

Flash Player 9 (or above) is needed to view presentations.
We have detected that you do not have it on your computer. To install it, go here.

  • Full Name Full Name Comment goes here.
    Are you sure you want to
    Your message goes here
No Downloads

Views

Total Views
5,502
On Slideshare
0
From Embeds
0
Number of Embeds
0

Actions

Shares
Downloads
0
Comments
2
Likes
2

Embeds 0

No embeds

Report content

Flagged as inappropriate Flag as inappropriate
Flag as inappropriate

Select your reason for flagging this presentation as inappropriate.

Cancel
    No notes for slide

Transcript

  • 1. Child Labor Presented By M. Saad Habib M. Noman Baig
  • 2. Agenda
    • Who is a Child?
    • Definition Of Child labor?
    • Child Labor across the world.
    • Usage of Child Labor in industry.
    • Child Labor in Pakistan.
    • Causes of child labor.
    • Efforts against child labor in Pakistan.
  • 3. Who is a child?
    • International conventions define children as aged 18 and under.
    • Individual governments may define "child" according to different ages or other criteria.
  • 4. Define Child Labor
    • Child labor is work that harms children or keeps them from attending school.
    • Making children work against their will.
  • 5. Child labor involves at least one of the following characteristics:
    • Violates a nation’s minimum age laws
    • Threatens children’s physical, mental, or emotional well-being
    • Involves intolerable abuse, such as child slavery, child trafficking, debt bondage, forced labor, or illicit activities
    • Prevents children from going to school
    • Uses children to undermine labor standards
  • 6. Child Labor across the world
  • 7. Child labor in Industry
    • Agriculture
    • Nearly 70% of child labor occurs in agriculture, fishing, hunting, and forestry. Children have been found harvesting.
    • Manufacturing
    • About 15 million children are estimated to be directly involved in manufacturing goods for export.
    • Carpets from India, Pakistan, Egypt.
    • Soccer balls sewn in Pakistan.
    • Surgical instruments made in Pakistan.
    • Mining and Quarrying
    • Children as young as 6 or 7 years old break up rocks, and wash, sieve, and carry ore. Nine-year-olds work underground setting explosives and carrying loads.
  • 8. Child labor in Industry
    • Domestic Service
    • Many children, especially girls, work in domestic service, sometimes starting as young as 5 or 6. This type of child labor is linked to child trafficking. Domestic child laborers can be victims of physical, emotional, and sometimes sexual abuse.
    • Hotels, Restaurants, and Retail
    • Some of the work of young people in this sector is considered legitimate, but there are indications of considerable abuse. Low pay is the norm, and in some tourist areas, children’s work in hotels and restaurants is linked to prostitution.
    • Unconditional Worst Forms of Child Labor
    • 8.4 million children are involved in work that, under any circumstance, is considered unacceptable for children It includes the forced recruitment of children for armed conflict, commercial sexual exploitation, and illicit activities, such as producing and trafficking drugs.
  • 9. Child labor in Pakistan
    • There are 3.3 million child laborers in Pakistan between the ages of 5 and 14 years.
    • which includes
    • 73% boys
    • 23% percent girls
    • children's involvement in work in rural areas is about eight times greater than in urban areas
    • Majority found in small production units, few are found in the modern sector
  • 10. Statistics of child labor according to provinces
  • 11. Causes of Child labor
    • Supply Factors
      • Child Trafficking.
      • Poverty is the main push factor.
      • Lack of educational facilities or poor quality of education.
      • Disrupted family patterns.
      • Entrenched social and cultural attitudes.
      • High birth rate.
    • Demand Factors
      • Children are docile and compliant workers and in most cases cost less.
      • Children can be hired, dismissed and re-hired easily.
      • Misplaced perception of  the necessity of children in certain production tasks
      • Child prostitution, sexual harassment, molestation.
  • 12.  
  • 13.  
  • 14.
    • Young boys, many of who are Afghan refugees, clean buses and perform other services for the drivers who take them on as assistants. Some boys, as young as 8, complain of sexual harassment. Rawalpindi, Pakistan.
  • 15.
    • Fair complexioned Pathan and Afghan shoeshine boys are legion in Lahore. They flash their masquerade eyes in hopes of attracting older male clients. The swarthier Punjabi men prefer these lighter skinned boys from the Northwest Frontier. Pakistan
  • 16. Efforts against child labor in Pakistan
    • ILO (International labor organization)
    • is a specialized agency of the United Nations that deals with labors issues. Its headquarters are in Geneva, Switzerland. Founded in 1919. was initially an agency of the League of Nations.
    • The ILO has a specialist programme addressing child labor, the International Programme on the Elimination of Child Labor (IPEC).
  • 17. IPEC CLOSE LOOK
    • The International Programme on the Elimination of Child Labor (IPEC) is a programme that the International Labor Organization has run since 1992.
    • IPEC’s aim is to work towards the progressive elimination of child labor by strengthening national capacities to address child labor problems, and by creating a worldwide movement to combat it.
  • 18. IPEC’s efforts against child labor in Pakistan
    • Combating abusive child labor practices through withdrawal and rehabilitation.
    • Elimination of child labor from sports industry in Sialkot.
    • Elimination of child labor from the surgical instrument manufacturing industry, Glass bangle industry, Tannery industries etc….
  • 19. CONCLUSION
    • Increased family incomes
    • Education — that helps children learn skills that will help them earn a living
    • Social services — that help children and families survive crises, such as disease, or loss of home and shelter
    • Family control of fertility — so that families are not burdened by children
  • 20. THE END