Literate Environment Analysis Presentation
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Literate Environment Analysis Presentation Presentation Transcript

  • 1. How do I create a literate environment for my learners?
  • 2. Getting to Know Literacy Learners
  • 3. Getting to Know Literacy Learners • Teachers can learn about the cognitive and affective aspects of students’ learning. Cognitive Aspects: • reading level • fluency (correct words per minute) • comprehension abilities • high-frequency word knowledge • spelling and writing abilities Affective Aspects: • interests • learning styles • values • self-concept • attitudes
  • 4. Getting to Know Literacy Learners • Teachers must get to know their learners as individuals. • Teachers can assess students formally and informally to measure cognitive and affective aspects of students’ literacyrelated abilities, skills, and interests. • Some assessments: running records, reading inventories, portfolios, observations, anecdotal notes, tconferences (Tompkins, 2010).
  • 5. Getting to Know Literacy Learners Analysis of this Practice: I worked closely with a focus group of three 2nd grade transitional readers.
  • 6. Getting to Know Literacy Learners Analysis of this Practice: After analyzing my students’ miscues from a reading inventory (cognitive assessment), I found that many of them rely on visual cues when decoding. This informed me that I should teach my students strategies to encourage them to use structural and meaning-based cues as well. My students’ decoding abilities (and in turn, comprehension) have since improved.
  • 7. Getting to Know Literacy Learners Analysis of this Practice: Using the Motivation to Read Profile (Gambrell, Palmer, Codling, & Mazzoni, 1996), I assessed some affective aspects of my students’ literacy learning. Measuring how my students value reading and how they view themselves as readers (self-concept) allowed me to understand them more wholly. I have worked to increase my students’ reading motivation, which can lead to increased reading performance.
  • 8. Selecting Texts
  • 9. Selecting Texts • Texts exist on several continuums. • narrative-informational • linguistic-semiotic • difficulty level, including • readability • length of text and text size • text structure (descriptive, compare/contrast, cause/effect, poetic, etc. (Laureate Education, 2011)
  • 10. Selecting Texts • We can view these in a Literacy Matrix. hard linguistic informational narrative semiotic easy • Teachers should vary text type to provide balanced literacy experiences. Texts can be used in different ways. •  (Laureate Education, 2011a)
  • 11. Selecting Texts Analysis of this Practice: • I selected a variety of texts that varied in genre (informational and narrative), presentation of story or information (linguistic/semiotic), level of difficulty, and format (print or online).
  • 12. Selecting Texts Analysis of this Practice: • I presented the text in different settings (independent reading, guided reading, read aloud) according to students’ readiness and abilities. • Using varied texts that spanned the Literacy Matrix helped ensure students were exposed to different types of text. • Considering different aspects of text allowed my students to interact with, think critically about, and respond to a variety of texts.
  • 13. Literacy Lesson: Interactive Perspective
  • 14. Literacy Lesson: Interactive Perspective • When working with text from the interactive perspective, students focus on reading and understanding text. • Instruction is centered around what are generally referred to as the five pillars: phonemic awareness, phonics, fluency, comprehension, and vocabulary. (Laureate Education 2008).
  • 15. Literacy Lesson: Interactive Perspective • Students must be taught to think strategically. They should be taught and given guided opportunities to use strategies across the five pillars. Students should be taught to think metacognitively as they read. • Teachers should teach students to be able to choose appropriate strategies as they read; we want students to be able to decode and understand texts independently. (Laureate Education, 2011c)
  • 16. Literacy Lesson: Interactive Perspective Analysis of this Practice: • Assessments indicated that my students relied primarily on visual cues to decode text. • I wanted my students to use visual, structural, and meaning-based cues to decode unknown words. • I introduced Boushey and Moser’s (2009) cross checking strategy.
  • 17. Literacy Lesson: Interactive Perspective Analysis of this Practice: • With this strategy, students learn to think metacognitively by recognizing when they struggle to read a word and identifying when they need to use the strategy. • Students use the different cues to attempt to read the unknown word. They ask themselves “Does it look right? Does it sound right? Does it make sense?”
  • 18. Literacy Lesson: Interactive Perspective Analysis of this Practice: • This strategy has encouraged my students to use a variety of cues to decode words. • My data indicates that this has led to increased accuracy, which has led to increased comprehension. • Teaching students to think metacognitively and select appropriate strategies allows students to become strong independent readers.
  • 19. Literacy Lesson: Critical and Response Perspectives
  • 20. Literacy Lesson: Critical and Response Perspectives • When students think about text from the critical perspective, they think critically about, evaluate, and judge parts of texts and/or whole texts. (Laureate Education, 2011b). • Students often think from the response perspective as they learn from texts and connect with texts on a personal and/or emotional level. (Laureate Education, 2011d)
  • 21. Literacy Lesson: Critical and Response Perspectives Analysis of this Practice: • I guided my students to recall important events from a story and rank those events from most to least exciting (10 to 1). • The events were placed on a graph horizontally. Each event was moved vertically based on how exciting it was.
  • 22. Literacy Lesson: Critical and Response Perspectives Analysis of this Practice: • This allowed students to visually understand a narrative story arc with rising action, a climax, and falling action. • This allowed me to see which students were able to participate actively, evaluate events, and explain their thinking.
  • 23. Literacy Lesson: Critical and Response Perspectives Analysis of this Practice: • I planned later instruction and practice with critical thinking based on my observations during this lesson. • The critical thinking skills students use to evaluate text extend to critical thinking in other subject areas and in life. This helps students become productive thinkers.
  • 24. Summary To create a literate environment, consider the following: • your literacy learners • the texts you select • the perspectives from which you encourage students to think, including • interactive • critical • response
  • 25. Feedback • What insights did you gain about literacy and literacy instruction from viewing this presentation? • How might the information presented change your literacy practices and/or your literacy interactions with students? • In what ways can I support you in the literacy development of your students or children? How might you support me in my work with students or your children? • What questions do you have?
  • 26. References •  Boushey, G., & Moser, J. (2009). The CAFÉ book. Portland, ME: Stenhouse. •  Gambrell, L. B., Palmer, B. M., Codling, R. M., & Mazzoni, S. A. (1996). Assessing motivation to read. The Reading Teacher, 49(7), 518--533. Retrieved from http:// web.ebscohost.com.ezp.waldenulibrary.org/ehost/ pdfviewer/pdfviewer? sid=1195f82c-4a9f-4336-9b9d-7232909f93c7%40sessionmgr1 11&vid=2&hid=118 Laureate Education, Inc. (Executive Producer). (2008) The stages of reading development. Baltimore: Author. Retrieved from https://class.waldenu.edu/webapps/portal/ frameset.jsp?tab_tab_group_id=_2_1&url=%2Fwebapps %2Fblackboard%2Fexecute%2Flauncher%3Ftype%3DCourse %26id%3D_3467476_1%26url%3D • 
  • 27. References •  Laureate Education, Inc. (Executive Producer). (2011a) Analyzing and selecting text. Baltimore: Author. Retrieved from https://class.waldenu.edu/webapps/portal/ frameset.jsp?tab_tab_group_id=_2_1&url=%2Fwebapps %2Fblackboard%2Fexecute%2Flauncher%3Ftype%3DCourse %26id%3D_4199147_1%26url%3D •  Laureate Education, Inc. (Executive Producer). (2011b) Critical perspective. Baltimore: Author. Retrieved from https:// class.waldenu.edu/webapps/portal/frameset.jsp? tab_tab_group_id=_2_1&url=%2Fwebapps%2Fblackboard %2Fexecute%2Flauncher%3Ftype%3DCourse%26id %3D_4199147_1%26url%3D
  • 28. References •  Laureate Education, Inc. (Executive Producer). (2011c) Strategic processing. Baltimore: Author. Retrieved from https://class.waldenu.edu/webapps/portal/frameset.jsp? tab_tab_group_id=_2_1&url=%2Fwebapps%2Fblackboard %2Fexecute%2Flauncher%3Ftype%3DCourse%26id %3D_4199147_1%26url%3D •  Laureate Education, Inc. (Executive Producer). (2011d) Response perspective. Baltimore: Author. Retrieved from https://class.waldenu.edu/webapps/portal/frameset.jsp? tab_tab_group_id=_2_1&url=%2Fwebapps%2Fblackboard %2Fexecute%2Flauncher%3Ftype%3DCourse%26id %3D_4199147_1%26url%3D Tompkins, G. E. (2010). Literacy for the 21st century: A balanced approach (5th ed.). Boston: Allyn & Bacon. •