Mozambique project plan 2013-15_final (id 1107)

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  • 1. NATIONAL UNION OF FINNISH UNIVERISTY STUDENTS IN FINLAND AND AFORTALECERIMPROVING READING AND WRITING SKILLS ON PRIMARY EDUCATION IN MAPUTO, MOZAMBIQUE Project plan for years 2013-2015
  • 2. Table of contents1 Summary ......................................................................................................................................................... 32 Background and the need for the project ...................................................................................................... 4 2.1 General .................................................................................................................................................... 4 2.2 Poverty..................................................................................................................................................... 4 2.3 Education ................................................................................................................................................. 4 2.4. HIV/AIDS ................................................................................................................................................. 5 2.5 PRSP and other strategy papers .............................................................................................................. 5 2.6. Other actors ............................................................................................................................................ 53 Beneficiaries and their roles ........................................................................................................................... 6 3.1 Direct beneficiaries .................................................................................................................................. 6 3.2 Roles of the direct beneficiaries .............................................................................................................. 8 3.3 Indirect beneficiaries and their roles....................................................................................................... 94 Objectives and Indicators ............................................................................................................................... 95 Implementation ............................................................................................................................................ 10 5.1 Activities ................................................................................................................................................ 10 5.2 Co-operation partners ........................................................................................................................... 14 5.3 Inputs (resources) .................................................................................................................................. 15 5.4 Timetable ............................................................................................................................................... 15 5.5 Reporting, monitoring and evaluation .................................................................................................. 16 5.6 Sustainability of the project .................................................................................................................. 19 5.7 Cross-cutting themes and human rights ............................................................................................... 206 Risk analyses ................................................................................................................................................. 227 Budget........................................................................................................................................................... 248 Reporting plan .............................................................................................................................................. 259 Appendeces .................................................................................................................................................. 25 2
  • 3. 1 SummaryIn Mozambique the level of writing and writing skills is low. There are many reasons for this: they do nothave enough schoolbooks, the infrastructure and teachers’ teaching skills are insufficient and parents donot understand the importance of education. Even though the state of Mozambique has paid effort todevelop the educational sector, for example by constructing school buildings and training teachers, thedevelopment does not materialize immediately.The direct objective of the project is to improve writing and reading skills of the 1st and 2nd grade pupils insix schools in Maputo area. This will be reached by following activities:1) Procuring school books and other important materials for teaching2) Training teachers and thus improving the quality of teaching3) Increasing the attendance of the pupils in the schools by increasing the knowledge of the parents on theimportance of education4) Establishing a favorable reading and writing atmosphere in schools5) Establishing advocacy work and lobbying to affect the quality of education in MozambiqueThe direct beneficiaries of the project are 1st and 2nd grade pupils of the project schools, and teachers.Cross-cutting objectives of development policy will be taken into account in project activities in thefollowing:Environmental sustainability: The materials needed in project will be bought from Mozambique and bookswill be protected by plastic covers. In teacher trainings and storytelling groups, themes related toenvironment will be discussed.Gender equality: The beneficiaries of the project are both female and male. Parents will be informed aboutthe children’s right for education, especially the girls’. Teachers will be trained how to take account bothsexes in education.Reduction of inequality: The whole project aims at the reduction of inequality by education.Human rights will also be taken account, especially the right for education. Education will affect therealization of other human rights such as the right to employment and a sufficient level of live. The projecthas been planned together with the beneficiaries and stakeholders and thus their possobility to tell theiropinions has been secured. The knowledge of children about their own rights will be strengthened forexample in storytelling groups. 3
  • 4. 2 Background and the need for the project2.1 GeneralThe Republic of Mozambique is a sovereign state located in oriental coast of Africa which share borderswith Tanzania, Zambia, Malawi, Zimbabwe and South Africa and has been independent since 1975.Mozambique had a decade long civil war which ended in 1992 when two main political parties celebrated apeace agreement after a decade of civil war. The peace agreement culminated with democratic electionscontested by many different political parties in 1994. Since then elections have been consecutively andsuccessfully held and democratic institution has been set up and fortified which in its turn also fortifies theenvironment of peace. The economic growth of Mozambique has been quite good: the growth of GrossDomestic Product has been during last years more than 6 %. In the area of the education the enrolmentrate in primary education increased from 44 % in 1997 to 77,1, % in 2008. (Millennium development report2010).In 2011 the population of Mozambique was 23.6 million of which more than half (51%) were women andabout 44 % of the population was under 14 years old. Over 99 % of the population is African origin,representing several ethnics groups and speaking many local languages. The official language ofMozambique is Portuguese.2.2 PovertyMozambique is one of the poorest countries in the world positioning itself in 172 among 182 rankedcountries. In 2009 circa 54.7 % of the population lived under poverty line. In 2002/2003 the povertyincidence rate was 54.1 % which means that the poverty has not reduced between those years. Thenumber of population living below the poverty line has increased between 2002 and 2009 due topopulation growth. In the rural areas the poverty is more severe than in cities (56.9 % rural areas / 49.6 %in urban areas). This trend can be also seen in the city of Maputo and in Maputo Province. In Maputo City,the poverty rate is one of the lowest (36.2 %) when in Maputo Province the poverty rate is one of thehighest in the country (67 %). The high poverty rate in Maputo Province can be explained by urbanization(Urban population growth rate is on average 4.0 % 2010-2015, when total population growth rate is 2.1%).Families moving to Maputo Province come from countryside in order to get a job in the city. Unfortunately,many of them do not get a job. In urban area they do not have a possibility to own food production, either.This deteriorates their living conditions.2.3 EducationAccording to Millennium Development Report of Mozambique 2010 the primary school enrolment rate is81, 3 % at national level. There are some differences between rural and urban areas and between boys andgirls. In urban areas, the enrolment rates are higher than general and the enrolment rate of boys’ is higherthan girls’. Especially in poorest families the differences are bigger between boys and girls attending toschool. The completion rate of primary education is 77 % (MDG report, according to Quick Facts of UNDPthis rate is as low as 55 %). There are differences in completion rate between children from wealthier andpoorer families. In the richest families the completion rates are 92.9 % when in the poorest ones thenumber is only 72.3 %. (Mozambique MDG report 2010). This means that there are a lot of drop outsduring first five years of primary school.Even if the situation in the educational field has been improved during last years, the challenges still exist.One central problem is that the primary education is not compulsory in Mozambique and all children do notgo to school. Other problem is that there are no enough teachers in primary schools (64 pupils / 1 teacher).Also, the quality of primary as well as teacher education is low. There are different teachers’ institutions forteacher training and each one is running its own curriculum. Some of them are run by differentorganisations such as NGO’s and others by government. Most of teacher training colleges are run by thegovernment and they supply almost all primary schools across the country. The teachers’ education for 4
  • 5. primary schools is also very short, only three years for those teachers who teach the five first years (thegrades 1-5) at primary school and five years for grades 6-7. People can apply for teachers’ training afterprimary education. There is also a huge lack of materials at the schools: in the project schools there isapproximately one book / four pupils and the quality of the books is often low and / or books are in badcondition.The constitution of Mozambique advocates equality of gender which reaffirms that men and women areequal. In 2006, a Gender National Policy and Strategy was approved by the government and in 2007, aWomen National Plan was also. Nowadays, thanks to this policy, the gender equity in education especiallyin primary school has improved significantly. However, despite the efforts and policies that aim atimproving gender equity, there still exist some inequalities caused by cultural factors that tend to privilegerather the boys than girls. For instance in secondary and high education, there are more gender drop outsthan in primary level.The Mozambique Education system recognises that all children at primary school level in each disciplineshould be supplied by one book free of charge. Still, all students do not get books, especially in the firstthree grades of primary school. Each student who passes to the next grade should hand their books tothose in previous grades. However, many children in the first three grades do not do so. The government iscommitted to improve the management system as well as finding financial solutions among his partners toovercome the problem and guarantee that students at primary level have everyone books that can helpthem learn. However, for learning the students need more books other than those supplied bygovernment.2.4. HIV/AIDSAccording to UNISEF statistic, In Mozambique 11, 5 % of the population aged between 15 and 59 years hasHIV/AIDS (year 2009) and the life expectancy has reduced because of HIV/AIDS. On average 130 thousandchildren (aged 0-14 years) live with HIV/AIDS and estimated 670 thousand children have been orphaned byAIDS. Traditionally, orphaned children have been absorbed into extended family networks but for increasednumber of orphan the safety nets are overburdened. Many household with orphans are without assistanceand the school attendance among orphaned children is considerable lower. Many times they have to stayat home to take of their siblings when mother or father has died. HIV/AIDS affects also indirectly children’srights and education, when education services lose skilled staff when teachers are succumbing to thedisease.2.5 PRSP and other strategy papersEducation has an important role in the Poverty Reduction Strategy Plan (PRSP) of Mozambique. One of themain objectives is human and social development. The specific objective is the universal access to sevenyears primary education, or sufficient quality to ensure the learning of basic skills. The aim is to constructmore classrooms, improve quality, keep children at schools, reform and improve the teachers trainingprogram and monitor better the teaching – learning process in the classroom.A new strategy of education and culture for the years 2012-2016 will be published by Ministry forEducation of Mozambique during 2012. In the new strategy the focus will be on the extension and qualityof education. This new strategy is a clear continuation for the previous strategy for education and culturein which the objectives were to expand the access and opportunities for learning and to improve quality ofteaching and the learning results.2.6. Other actorsState, province and district level education administrationIn Mozambique, education administration is divided in four levels: state (Ministry of Education), province,district and local (school) levels. The Ministry for Education has the overall responsibility for thedevelopment of education in Mozambique and teachers training. Province level school administration is in 5
  • 6. charge of implementation of general lines of the Ministry of Education in provincial level. They nominatefor example directors of the schools and are responsible for teachers (extra) training after their graduation.Administrative of district level is responsible for supervision pedagogical of the school and training of theteachers at local level. Schools are responsible for implementation of teaching process.International actorsThere are several international actors in the field of education in Mozambique. Most important ones areUNICEF and UNESCO. UNICEF concentrates on themes such as quality of education and early childhoodeducation when the main focus areas of UNESCO are the quality of education and training of primary levelteachers and development of curricula. There are also some INGOs as Save the Children and ActionAid.There are also some Finnish NGOs working in the field such as Operation Day’s Work in Finland (Taksvärkki)and UFF.Local NGOsSeveral local CSOs work in the field of education with themes such as capacity building of the teachers,programs that aim at improve the quality of education, teaching manuals for teachers and education ofalphabetization.Pedagogical University and Teacher training institutePedagogical University is responsible for the training of the teachers of the teacher training institute.Teacher training institute is responsible for training of primary and secondary school teachers. It is underthe supervision of the Ministry of Education.3 Beneficiaries and their roles3.1 Direct beneficiariesPUPILS, TEACHERS AND SCHOOLSThe direct beneficiaries of the project are in total six schools in Maputo area (two schools per year) andtheir teachers and pupils of 1st and 2nd grades. Also the teachers of 3rd grade are beneficiaries as they will beparticipate in teacher trainings (result 2). They are included in the project because the 3 rd grade is thebeginning of the second cycle of primary school (1st and 2nd grade are the first cycle). There is a learningsequence between these two cycles and that is why it is important to include the 3rd grade teachers. Inorder to guarantee the continuity in teaching between these two cycles it is important to include the 3 rdgrade teachers also in the trainings.All schools have been selected together with Maputo education administrative and according to the socio-economic background of the children of the schools. The pupils come from families with low-income level,from the city and its surrounding suburban areas. The number of boys and girls is quite equal in the firstand second grades. All project schools are public schools and are located in Maputo and its suburban areas.The schools were selected together with Afortalecer, school administrative of Maputo and SYL. During theproject planning trip the representatives of SYL visited the first year project schools.The number of pupils varies from one school to another. During first project year (2013) there will be ca.650 students and 20 teachers, in 2014 ca. 970 students and 22 teachers and in 2015 ca.585 pupils and 18teachers. In total, there will be about 2200 pupils and 60 teachers as direct beneficiaries during the wholeproject. 6
  • 7. Estimation of pupils and teachers involved per year Year Pupils Teachers 2013 645 20 2014 970 22 2015 585 18 Total 2200 60THE PROJECT SCHOOLS ARE:EPC Filipe S. Magaia (2013)Total ca. 367 pupils in 2013School is located in urban area and its pupils come from city area, some of middle-income families andother lower income families. The attendance of the parents in supporting their children’s studies is quite alow. Pupils have problems pass from one grade to another because they have difficulties to read and write.There are bookshelves in classrooms.EPC Unidade 27 (2013)Total ca. 278 pupils 2013The school is located outside of the city centre, in a suburban area. The pilot project of Afortalecer wasimplemented in this school. The majority of children come from low-income families and many of them donot have means to buy school materials, for example pens and other material needed. One big problem isthat many children from poor families do not attend regularly to classes because they have to help theirfamilies in earning living. There are no bookshelves in the classrooms.EPC A Luta (2014)Total ca. 580 pupils in 2014.The school is located in the suburban area of Maputo. Despite its localization more than 85% of studentsenrolled in this school come from the outskirt of Maputo, from the Polana Caniço district. Only 3% ofstudents are from the suburbs. The Polana Caniço district is one of the poorest communities in the city.Most of the families are involved in informal business selling small products for day-to-day life. Most of thebookshelves are in bad condition and must be repaired. The parents are involved in the school activitiesand participate in almost all school eventsSaul Filipe Tembe Primary School (2014)Total ca. 390 students in 2014This school is located at Maputo bay side in the district of Catembe. There are two kind of students at theschool; those from rural area and others from urban area of Maputo. Many families of the pupils areinvolved in agriculture and fishing activities. The parents involvement in the school activities is low or barelyinexistent. The school has 10 classrooms and all of them with bookshelves. Still, most of them need to berepaired.Inhaca Primary School (2015)Total ca. 210 students in 2015 7
  • 8. The school is located on the nearest Island of Maputo bay. The population is rural and most of them areengaged in agriculture and fishing. Although Inhaca is a touristic site the majority of population is poor. Asat most of the schools, the pupils of Inhaca primary school have not enough learning material such asbooks. The school has no bookshelf in the classrooms.16 of Junio Primary School (2015)Total ca. 375 students in 2015This school is located in the cross border between Maputo City and Maputo Province. Most of familiessurrounding the school are from suburban, almost rural, area. To sustain their living they engagethemselves in such activities as small informal business and agriculture at family level. The majority arepoor with no conditions to afford education expenses. In addition, the pupils do not have enough books forlearning at schools. The school has no bookshelves in the classrooms.3.2 Roles of the direct beneficiariesIn this and following chapters the roles of direct and indirect beneficiaries are presented. The more detailesactivities are presented in chapter 5.1.Roles of the pupils - They receive books and other school materials - They learn how to protect the books - They learn new reading and writing skills - They participate to the homework groups and storytelling groupsRoles of the teachers: - Representatives of the projects schools which participate in the first year (EPC Filipe S. Magaia and EPC Unidade 207) participated to the planning process of the project. - They participate to the baseline study and to the training of the teachers; also to the follow-up of the activities. They give feedback about the trainings - They participate to the evaluation of the results: the teachers will evaluate the improvement of the skills of the pupils in the classrooms. - They implement the new skills learned and put them to the practice in classrooms. - They inform/communicate with the parents of the children and organize meetings with them. - They are responsible for sending information letters to parents and take care of the classroom libraries - Representative teacher of every school will be a member of the monitoring team of the project activities at the schools.Roles of the schools: - They participate to the project by offering the facilities for training and meetings. - During the project planning process, they participated to the background analysis of the socio- economical situation of the pupils. - They participate actively to the implementation of the project by giving necessary information and offering facilities. - Some project schools, which do not have bookshelves for first grades yet, will get them as a part of the project implementation. - Representatives of the each school (rector and teacher) will be a member of the monitoring team of the project activities at the schools. 8
  • 9. 3.3 Indirect beneficiaries and their rolesAFORTALECERAfortalecer is the main responsible for the implementation and monitoring of the project. Itsresponsibilities include, for example, hiring facilitators, procuring books and materials to the schools,organizing trainings and follow-up of the teachers and cooperating with schools, teachers and parents.During the project, the personal of Afortalecer will also participate to the trainings of capacity buildingorganized by KEPA in Mozambique.MUNICIPALITY OF MAPUTOThe project schools have been selected in cooperation with the Maputo’s education administratives andthey have also participated to the planning process of the project for example in project planning workshopin January 2012. Afortalecer has also had several meetings with them. During the project, they will beinformed about the progress of the project. They will beneficiate of the project in a way that the quality ofteaching will improve and the number of school materials will increase in the schools of Maputo area.UNIVERSITY STUDENTSStudents from the Pedagogy University of Maputo will work as volunteers in the trainings for teachers,homework groups and storytelling groups. At the same time, they can practice the pedagogical skills theyare learning in their studies at the university.PARENTSPupils’ parents will participate in the parent meetinfs organized by schools and they will form parents’groups. The aim is to work on to increase the enthusiasm of the pupils to read and write. They can alsoparticipate to the activities (homework group, storytelling group). They will be informed about the activitiesat schools by a letter specially designed to them.4 Objectives and IndicatorsThe general objective of the project is:By improved education the Mozambicans’ quality of life and the possibilities to influence on their ownlives has increased and they can act as full members of their society.The direct objective of the project is: The writing and the reading skills of pupils in six schools on Maputoarea have been improvedIndicator 1: The writing and reading skills of the pupils have improved by 30% since the beginning of theproject.Source: Baseline study in the beginning of the project in the project schools and the test for the students atthe end of the project.Indicator 2: The children understand texts and are able to express (by speaking, writing and/or drawing) thecentral content of the texts to others.Source: A test designed for this purposeIndicator 3: The pupils are able to respond to easy questions by writing the response.Source: A test designed for this purpose 9
  • 10. The direct objective will be reached by four different results (the activities will be described more in detailin chapter 5.1):Result 1: Adequate materials have been procuredIndicator: The teachers are satisfied with materials in the classrooms and according to their opinionteaching process has improved significantly from the beginning of the project.Source: Baseline study and personal interviews of the evaluations.Result 2: The quality of teaching has been improvedIndicator: Teachers use two new teaching methods after trainings.Source: Conversations with the teachers before and after the trainings, demonstration lesson during thetrainings for other teachers.Result 3: The attendance and participation of pupils in six project schools have been increased.Indicator 1: The attendance of pupils at the schools has increased by 15 % compared to the situation in thebeginning of the project.Source: Attendance listsIndicator 2: The participation and activity of pupils has increased significantly from the beginning of theproject.Resource: Interviews of teachers and pupilsResult 4: Favorable reading and writing atmosphere has been established in six project schools.Indicator: 10 % of the pupils of each class participate in the activities of homework and story-telling groupsin the end of the year.Source: Attendance listsResult 5: Advocacy work and lobbying has been started to influence the quality of education inMozambiqueIndicator: AFORTALECER has organized one seminar per year and six meetings per year with different actorsSource: Annual evaluation and participation list5 Implementation5.1 ActivitiesProject preparation activitiesBaseline studyIn the beginning of the project process, in each project school a baseline study will be organized. In thisbaseline study, the level of reading and writing skills of the pupils and specific needs of each school will bemapped. Also the needs of teachers will be mapped. The test to map the reading and writing skills of thepupils will be done for the pupils of 2nd and 3rd grade in the beginning of the school year. In this way, theinformation about the writing and reading skills of the pupils (the level of their skills) after 1 st and 2nd gradecan be gathered.AFORTALECER will contract a consultant to plan the study. The consultant will prepare the neededquestions, a test for teachers and pupils and other relevant material for the implementation of the study.When this is done, the personnel of AFORTALECER will implement the study in each project school. 10
  • 11. Monitoring teamIn the beginning of the project, a monitoring team, which consists of representatives of AFORTALECER andrepresentatives (rector and teacher) from each project school, will be established. The monitoring team willplan and monitor the activities at schools. They have meetings regularly, every month.Result 1: Adequate materials have been procuredActivity 1.1 Procurement of schoolbooksBecause of the lack of schoolbooks in classrooms literature and writing books will be distributed for pupilsin the 1st and 2nd grades in all project schools. Government already guarantees one book free of charge forevery pupil at primary schools. Still, all students do not have books because of the low number of them.With the project the aim is to support pupils learning process by offering books from different themes suchus literature, children stories ect. The idea is to buy for each pupil one book but with varying themes. In thisway one class gets more books from different themes and for example two pupils can use same book. Thebooks will be bought from local editors and the editor will be bidden. There will be emphasis on quality ofbooks.After procurement the books will be protected by plastic contact paper and teachers, pupils and parentswill be taught how to take care of the books properly (this will be done during activities 3 and 4). Books willbe recycled from one student for another.Indicator 1.1: At the end of the project of each school 90 % of the pupils have literature and writing booksand they have been protected by plastic covers. 80 % of the books will be recycled to the next generation.Source: The register of the teachersActivity 1.2 Procurement of teaching materialsTeaching materials, such as manuals and posters, will be bought to the teachers according to their needsmapped in baseline study.Indicator 1.2: In the end of the project teachers have sufficient teaching materialsSource: Evaluation after each project year, interviews of the teachers.Activity 1.3 Procurement of notebook, pencils and other needed materialsStudying materials, such as notebooks and pencils, will be bought for pupils according to their needs. Thesematerials are not offered to all pupils. The schools are responsible for dividing materials for the pupils whodo not have money to buy them.Indicator 1.3: 90 % of the pupils has notebooks and pencils after the project.Source: Teachers’ interviewsActivity 1.4 Procurement bookshelvesBookshelves will be constructed for the classrooms which do not have them yet by AFORTALECER, schoolsand parents. Every classrooms have two different grades every day; one grade on the morning and anotherduring afternoon. Normally classes on afternoon are grades from 3rd to 7th. These bookshelves will be usedby 1st and 2nd grade pupils as well as pupils from other grades for in many subjects there are not enoughbooks for every pupil. That is why pupils do not take the books at home and the bookshelves arenecessaries to preserve the books in good condition in the classrooms.AFORTALECER will also negotiate with different actors (such us other NGOs) to get children book donations.The idea is to construct a small class library in order to offer reading materials and increase the interest inreading among pupils. 11
  • 12. Indicator 1.4: Each school has adequate bookshelves for books in the end of the project in each school.Source: Evaluation after each project year.Result 2: The quality of teaching has been improvedTo reach result 2 there will be trainings for teachers. There will be in total eight training days for eachteacher, about 16 teachers in each group during a year. Trainings will be organized by facilitators who arespecialist in the contents of the trainings. There will be also volunteers from the Pedagogy University ofMaputo assisting facilitators in teaching process.In the beginning of the project there will be study about the needs of the each school and trainings will bemodified according to the needs. The trainings will consist of following contents: - Teaching methods: how to teach write and read - How to motivate the pupils to study - Librarian methods - Practices to use new methods - How to recognize pupils who have problems to hear and see well - Demonstration lesson in the front of other teachers and feed-back - How to communicate with the parents - Security during way from home to school (The school trips can be dangerous when the distances can be quite long for the children to come to school. Also during heavy rains the school trips can be dangerous.)During and after trainings there will be personal follow-up of the teachers. Facilitators will follow fiveclasses of every teacher and give personal feedback about classes and teaching methodologies. Year afterthe trainings there will be three meetings with teachers who participated in the trainings.In the meetings they will be more training about the themes the teachers find important.Facilitators will have meetings with Afortalecer personel six times per year.Indicator: Each teacher who is participating in the project has the 80 % of attendance in the formationsSource: Participation listsIndicator: The teachers are satisfied of the content of the trainingsSource: Feedback after each training (formula)Result 3: The attendance of pupils in six schools in Maputo area have been increasedThis activity will be reach by increasing communication between the schools and families. This will consistof three parts: meetings with schools and parents, letters from the schools for the partners andparents´groups.The meetings will be organized by teachers three times per year (once / trimester). Personnel ofAFORTALECER will assist these meetings. Afortalecer will introduce conversation about the next themes: - The importance of education for children, especially reading and writing - How parents are able to help their children to learn (for example how to create conditions to do homework and learn at home) - The quality of teaching - Secure way from home to school and backThe presence of the parents will be secured by a written invitation and obligatory response. Even if allparents cannot read they have normally someone in family who can explain the content of the letter. 12
  • 13. There will be special letter for parents to inform them actual issues about schools, lessons, pupils, problemsect. These letters will be sent three times per year (once a trimester) by the schools. AFORTALECER willassist the schools in this work.Third activity is to establish a special parents group to each school. They will promote interest to read andwrite among other parents organizing events and other activities, such us storytelling meetings for thechildren. Teachers will be taught how to motivate parents to do this and are able to continue activities afterthe project year at the schools. Also during the meetings with teachers next year after the project was inthe school there will be capacity building for teachers about this theme.Indicator: the attendance of the pupils has increased by 15 % from the beginning of the projectSource: Attendance listsIndicator: 80 % of the parents participate in meetings between schools and parents.Source: Participation listIndicator: The parents group is working actively organizing meetings with other parents.Source: Numbers and contents of the meetings, the documents of parents groupsIndicator: In the end of the each year there are 20 active parents working in parents’ group in each projectschool of the yearSource: reports, participation listsResult 4: Favorable reading and writing atmosphere has been established in the project schoolsThis result will be reached by creating special homework and storytelling groups to each school.Homework groups will meet twice in a month (if there is necessity to more meetings, they will beorganized). AFORTALECER will cooperate with the University of Pedagogy in Maputo and will get studentsfrom there to work as volunteers in this homework group. They will help children in their homework and inthis way they also gain working experience on teaching.Storytelling groups are organized by parents’ groups and meet once a month in each school (if there will benecessity for more meetings, they will be organized). The idea of storytelling groups is to stimulate interestin learning and writing. During the meetings the adults and pupils read stories and pupils can for exampledraw pictures, plays and/or make theatre about the stories. Every meeting has a different theme. Themecan be for example environment, human rights and HIV/AIDS.Indicator: Totally 15 homework and storytelling meetings have been organized in each project school of theyearSource: Reports of volunteers and parentsResult 5: The process of advocacy making and lobbying has been started to affect the quality of educationin MozambiqueThis result consists of two activities: 1) Meetings with different actors in the educational sector in Mozambique, such as organizations, enterprises, governmental and municipality level administrative and also foreign actors as embassies of the countries which give direct budget support to the education. The object is to share information about basic education and its challenges from the point of view of grass root level. In the beginning of the project AFORTALECER will map possible co-operation partners and start to organize meetings. 2) Seminar on education. AFORTALECER will organize every year a one-day seminar on education in order to discuss actual themes on education with other actors in the field and in order to find new cooperation possibilities. 13
  • 14. Indicator: Afortalecer has mapped possible co-operation partners and contacted them after first projectyearSource: Reports, annual evaluationEvaluationThere will be evaluations in the end of the each project year and in the end of the project. Please see morein the chapter 5.5.5.2 Co-operation partnersDistrict and Municipal education administrativeThe district and municipal educational administrative of Maputo has been closely involved in planningprocess of the project as project schools are decided together with them. One representative of districtlevel administration also participated in the planning workshop during project planning trip. During theproject AFORTALECER will co-operate with the administrative and informing them how the project is goingand one representative of them will be part of the monitoring team of the project.Municipal libraryThere is a possibility to visit Central Library of Maputo with the pupils. They would be accompanied byuniversity students as part of their teaching practices. AFORTALECER is negotiating about this possibility.One representative of the library participated in project preparation workshop in January 2011.Pedagogical UniversityPedagogical University is a university with different faculties and departments. All students must studypedagogy, didactic and psychology. University will offer contacts with the students who will work asvolunteers in the project.UNESCO & UNICEFOffers materials for AFORTALECER and for the trainings for teachersSave the ChildrenSave the Children offers materials such as children books and information materialsActionAidOffers materials, books and informationRede da CriançaIs a network of local NGOs working with the education and Children’s right in Mozambique. The aim ofAFORTALECER is to become a member of the network. It’s possibly to get help from the network inorganizing the annual seminar or organize it together with them. (More information about the seminar inchapter 5.1.)ProgressoOffers books about educate childrenFEMMEIs an organization which promotes woman participation. It provides technical support to Afortalecer.KEPAKEPA will train personnel of AFORTALECER (Already in 2012) and connect the organization with other NGOswho are doing projects with Finnish NGOs. There have been also discussions about the possibility to send 14
  • 15. Finnish volunteers via KEPA’s ETVO-program. This possibility will be confirmed during 2013 since the KEPAis changing the rules of the ETVO-program and they have to take the decision it the Finnish NGO can orcannot send volunteers to more than one project (SYL has already a volunteer in Mongolia) The volunteerswould work in 2014-15.5.3 Inputs (resources)AFORTALECERAFORTALECER is the implementing agency of the project. They will hire facilitators for the trainings, plancurricula, organize all trainings, meetings and other activities. Beside of an internal monitoring group (thepersonnel of AFORTALECER working with the project) AFORTALECER organizes a monitoring group of theproject together with schools and teachers. Please see more about this in the chapter 5.5.The personnel of AFORTALECER have a wide knowledge about educational field from the child to adulteducation and pedagogy. All of them have a Master Degree from educational field and one of them haseven PHD –level degree. Project director is Jaime Alipio, Project coordinator Jose Flores, Financecoordinator Stélio Chang and assistant / accountant Olivia Alberto Muzuane. Detailed job description isattached. Also the general director Alice Cambula will participate in the project but she does not get paidfrom the project.In-kind contribution of AFORTALECER includes computers, printers, copy machine and a part of office rentand transportation costs for facilitators and volunteers.SYLSYL is responsible for project administration in Finland including monitoring of project activities andfinancing, evaluating, reporting to the Ministry for Foreign Affairs and information sharing for its mainstakeholders in Finland (University Students). In SYL, there is a development co-operation coordinator whois responsible for above mentioned activities. She works closely together with SYL`s developmentcooperation advisory board called KENKKU which consist of voluntary representatives from differentstudent unions. Once a year there will be organized a monitoring trip to Mozambique. SYL offers possibleoffice equipment needed in the project.5.4 TimetableThe project implementation time is from January 2013 to December 2015. The project will start with abaseline study which will be done during the three first months in 2013. In the end of the every year therewill be an annual evaluation and also a final evaluation in the end of the project.Every year there are activities in two schools which will be organized according to the school year inMozambique. In Mozambique there are three terms: from January to the end of March, from the secondweek of April to the mid-June and from August to the end of October. November is for exams andDecember is the holiday month. Teacher trainings and activities for pupils and parents are arranged duringall terms. The procurement of books and other materials will be done in the beginning of the each year andthe preparation activities for this will be started in the end of the previous year.One year after the school has participated into the trainings and other activities there will specialmonitoring meetings with the teachers.Meetings with stakeholders will be done regularly during the whole year. The annual seminar will beorganized in autumns.Please see more detailed work plan in appendix. 15
  • 16. 5.5 Reporting, monitoring and evaluationMonitoring and reporting in MozambiquePersonnel of Afortalecer in charge of this project is responsible for the Directorate of Afortalecer about theproject. The Directorate of AFORTALECER will meet every three months to discuss about held activities andnext ones. The Directorate is responsible for the General Assembly of AFORTALECER which meets once peryear.There will be a separate monitoring team consisting of personnel of Afortalecer, district department ofeducation, municipality and schools. This team will visit the schools and meat every month to discuss theimplementation of the project. The team will also verify the book registration process used by teachers tolend books for pupils.All facilitators of the trainings are responsible to provide a written report after every training activity.Teachers’ attitudes about training will be analyzed through check list forms. These reports will be discussedin the meetings of monitoring team.Facilitators and students volunteers will observe and assist teachers in the classrooms and will give awritten report about teaching activities. Volunteers will report homework and storytelling groups’ activitiesto the monitoring team. 16
  • 17. Organizational chart of Afortalecer: General Assembly Directorate council General Director Alice Cambula (Executive Directorate) Executive director Jaime Alípio (Executive Directorate) Finance Director Accountant, Assistant Stélio Chang Olívia Alberto Muzuane Coordinator of Secretary Education projects Coordinator of health Driver projects José Manuel Flores 17
  • 18. Monitoring and reporting to Finland and in FinlandSYL monitors the project both by regular e-mailing and by quarter annual and annual reports.Annual reporting cycle: 31.12 Third quarterly report (October) to 15.2.Annual Report SYL to SYL (voluntary) 30.4. Annual report 30.9 Second to MFA quarterly report (July-September) to 30.6. First quarterly SYL report (January-June) to SYLIn addition to the part-time Project Coordinator, Johanna Ursin-Escobar, also the Advisory Board forDevelopment Cooperation a.k.a KENKKU, which consists of voluntary representatives of the student unions,participates in monitoring. Within KENKKU, there is a separate Mozambique-group, which assumes mainresponsibility about monitoring together with the development coordinator. Monitoring trips will be madeevery project year. SYL will provide institutional support in the development of AFORTALECER as anorganization. The board of SYL is responsible for monitoring of activities in development cooperationcoordination and of KENKKU within SYL.SYL has developed Guidelines for conducting development co-operation projects for its developmentcooperation partners. In the guidelines there are information about the deadlines and other practicalissues conserning reporting and monitoring practices. The guidelines can be found at:http://kehitysyhteistyo.syl.fi/english/syl-kehy/guidelines-for-development-cooperation/Responsibilities within SYL: The Board Development cooperation coordinator Advisory board for development cooperation KENKKU Mozambique group of KENKKU 18
  • 19. Evaluations in MozambiqueAFORTALECER will organize an internal annual evaluation in the end of each project year. In the evaluation,annual activities, successes and challenges will be evaluated in order to develop and redirect the projectactivities for the next project year. The evaluation questions will be discussed together with AFORTALECERand SYL even if only AFORTALECER is responsible for implementation.During the last project year there will be a final evaluation implemented by KENKKU representatives duringthe annual monitoring trip. The evaluation questions will be developed together with SYL andAFORTALECER before the evaluation during the third project year. The goal of the final evaluation is to findout how well the direct objective and results of the project have been achieved. Therefore, for example thedirect objective indicators are relevant to the evaluation. The evaluation also sets out to get informationabout good and not-so-good practices and experienced during this project, which can then be utilized lateron a possible continuation project.5.6 Sustainability of the projectThis project plan has been made for the first three years (2013-2015), but there are already initial plans tocontinue the project to a second phase. We believe that a continuation phase would be very useful in orderto extend the project and spread good results successfully and, above all, to get more permanent andsustained results.The final exit-strategy would be done during the second phase of the project. During this first project thesustainability and continuity will be taken into account pre-emptively in order to build a good base for longterm sustainability and for the exit-strategy in the future.Economical sustainability and continuityIn order to sustain and maintain economical sustainability and to ensure the continuity of the project,during the project cycle, AFORTALECER will establish a network with other local actors working in the fieldof education in Mozambique. AFORTALECER also plans to look for new (local or international) partnershipson order to strengthen financial basis of the association. The organization will map the possibilities offinding partners who would like to 1) participate to the project and/or help finance of the project (e.g. bybuying or donating books and other materials for the schools) and 2) other partners who are willing tosupport the AFORTALECER’s NGO work in general. Possibilities include: - Cooperation with other organizations: AFORTALECER is looking for cooperation partners in order to get more books and other materials for the project. The association has already received donations from the Associations of Writers of Mozambique and from Brazil. - Private persons: AFORTALECER has already private donators and it is highly possible to widen this network. Private persons can participate by paying the membership fee of AFORTALECER and become supporting members of the association, and/or by donating books or other materials for the schools.Social, cultural and political sustainability and continuitySocial and cultural sustainability and continuity aspects of the project have been taken into account bybuilding the activities in such a way that can be sustained after the project. This includes bringing inimportant stakeholders in project planning processes and also analyzing how to make sustainableprocurements for the project.The aim of the project is to improve reading and writing skills of children and to train teachers in a way thatthey are able to teach the children better. Also, sensitizing the parents to the importance of education oftheir children is an essential part of the project. If the project succeeds in reaching the aims, these are also 19
  • 20. results which will last after the end of project and also across different groups of children (other classes ofteachers, siblings in same families).One significant part is the political sustainability. Involvement of local decision makers and politicians in theproject is very important. This has already been done during the project planning because the localeducation administration was involved in the process (for example in the problem analysis workshop and inthe selection of the project schools), and AFORTALECER will keep in close contact with them also during theproject cycle. Advocacy work has also been included in the project activities in order to increase the generalawareness about educational issues in Mozambique, to maintain the political support for the project and toget the politicians to take more responsibility on local educational situation of the children on one hand,and the school teachers on the other.Local markets and local labor force will be given the top priority when procuring materials for the schoolsand hiring people for the project. Besides being more environment-friendly, the aim is also to support localeconomy and give working possibilities for local experts.Also the students of Pedagogical University have the possibility to do internships in the framework of theproject, in order to gain valuable working experience and put their skills in practice.Institutional sustainability and continuityTo ensure institutional sustainability and continuity, local ownership of the project is essential. Theownership is already strongly in hands of AFORTALECER and the project activities have been designed in away that the schools, teachers, local educational officers, other local organizations and children’s parentsare strongly involved in them. They have also been an important part of the planning process. The schoolswill take the responsibility of the project and carry on with the activities after SYL’s support ends and theteachers will continue developing activities and using their new skills also after the end of the project.To support and develop the institutional and organizational sustainability of AFORTALECER, a specialcontract has been made between AFORTALECER and KEPA’s office in Mozambique about capacity buildingof the association during the year 2012. AFORTALECER will receive training on project cycle management,monitoring, evaluation and other themes that would be useful for the strengthening of the association andfor the future project management.AFORTALECER will also establish a network of actors interested in educational issues in Mozambique anddevelop its relationships in the field. The network will include for example other NGOs and associations,embassies of donor countries, municipal and children’s libraries and book shops.Environmental sustainabilityFor the environmental sustainability, please see chapter 5.7, “Cross-cutting themes”5.7 Cross-cutting themes and human rightsEnvironmental sustainabilityEnvironmental sustainability has been taken account in this project. For example, the procurement of thematerials will be done as locally as possible; books from Mozambique are favored as well as materials forbookshelves. When selecting materials for bookshelves the quality and sustainability of materials will beanalyzed. Endangered species (trees) will not be used. Recycled paper will be favored.Environmental sustainability can be seen as a crucial part of education since it is urgent that peopleunderstand the importance of environment, as well as changes and reasons for changes in environment.That is why it is important to educate pupils to be more active in protecting the environment. 20
  • 21. One part of the project is to teach pupils how to take proper care of the learning materials such as books.Learners will learn how to restore old books and how to protect new books. During the story telling eventsthemes such environment, climate change, tree-planting, forest fires, water and sanitation and floods willbe discussed in the form of stories.Gender equalityGender equality is one important part of the project because it is also one principal value of AFORTALECER.In Mozambique, gender parity between boys and girls starting primary school is quite equal but still thereare more girls who do not finish school. One reason for this is that many time families take the girls out ofschool earlier to help at home. Another is that trips to and from school are more dangerous for girls thanboys. These themes (importance of education, school travel) will be discussed with parents. Also, duringthe teacher trainings, gender issues will be one part of trainings. Teachers will be taught how to take intoaccount all pupils equally and how to encourage participation of all.The project will also emphasize gender issue using cultural means. Both girls and boys will participatetogether in the activities of storytelling and homework groups. Part of material produced in storytellinggroup can be shown in an exhibition organized by both boys and girls. These activities will also involveparents to encourage them to set up similar or equally valued tasks for boys and girls in the home.Reduction of inequalityThe whole project aims at reducing inequality by education and thus this theme has been included inproject planning process and activities.Human rightsThis project promotes especially the right for education and, as such, is in line with the objectives of theUniversal Declaration of Human Rights, the Convention on the Rights of the Child as well as the Educationfor All (EFA)-initiative and relevant Millenium Development Goals. Of course, the project affects otherrights such us right for employment, right to participation and right to development, as well.The project planning process has based partly on the human rights-based approach; the analysis of rootcauses was done together with different stakeholders during the planning process. Stakeholder roles andduties have been analyzed. Also during the project different actors will be participating in implementation,monitoring and evaluation.During the project, AFORTALECER will work with district and municipal level education administration inorder to get acceptance from them for the project and also discuss with them their duties as government’srepresentatives in realizing the state’s duties. The starting of advocacy work aims at improving the qualityof education in Mozambique and in this way improves the situation of Children and their rights.In addition, the responsibility of the parents in the development of the children is emphasized. There willbe special meetings with the parents.It is crucial that children understand their rights. To further this, the project considers that all childrenshould understand that they have a right to education. That is why the themes of human and childrenrights will be brought into classes when pupils are learning to write and learn and during story-tellinggroups. 21
  • 22. 6 Risk analysesThis chapter will present possible internal and external risks of the project and possible solutions for them. Possible risks of the project and how to prevent them: Internal risks (Afortalecer and SYL) 1. Changes in the personal of Afortalecer and lost of “quiet” knowledge To prevent: the majority of the personal of Afortalecer will be involved to the project so that all personal know what is happening with projects in relation with the objectives and activities 2. Changes in the personal of SYL and lost of “quiet” knowledge To prevent: KENKKU members must get all important information about the project. To avoid lost of information all documentation must be done in a clear and proper way. 3. Changes in facilitators or volunteers To prevent: the majority of the personnel of Afortalecer is involved to the project in such a way that, if there are important changes in facilitators during the project cycle, they can replace and train volunteers or facilitators easily. 4. Timing of the payments of the Ministry for Foreign Affairs of Finland can affect the implementation of the project To prevent: the timetable of the project is designed according to the payments of the Ministry. The members and personal of Afortalecer can take loans for the project activities if the funding of the Ministry comes too late. External risks (Participants of the project, society and environment) 1. Parents will not come to the meetings To prevent: in order to avoid that the parents won’t come to the meetings, a close communication between the school direction and the parents of the children is needed. This has been taken into consideration in the activities of the project 2. Parents will not want to participate to the project activities as actively as desired To prevent: communication with the parents about the importance of the project (reading and writing skills) and especially about the importance of their role to the future and continuity of the activities at schools. 3. Parents cannot read and are unable to understand letters from the schools and Afortalecer The other family members who can read can help parents to understand letters. 4. Procured school materials can be stolen or vandalized by other people because of other courses at schools in the evenings To prevent: The people using school facilities in the evenings will be informed about the project so that they will take responsibility and take good care of the books. 5. Teachers will not use the skills they have learned in the trainings in their classes To prevent: there will be assistance and supervision of the teachers in the classrooms so that the teachers have help in applying their new skills. 6. The content of the trainings does not meet the needs of the teachers 22
  • 23. To prevent: there will be clear definition of objectives and activities in the terms of reference when hiring consultants and facilitators and during baseline study.7. Some school directors or teachers may be against the project To prevent: involvement of the directors and teachers must be taken account from the very beginning of the project until the end. The directors and teachers have been part of the project planning since the beginning. There will be continuous communication and information sharing between Afortalecer and the schools.8. Children do not use or read the books (they are not interested) To prevent: We have to select books that are attractive and interesting to children. Children have to be motivated and stimulated (this is a part of the activities).9. Children lose or vandalize the books To prevent: the deterioration and loss of books can be prevented by teaching children the value of learning materials through activities, supported by the active participation of the parents in the project. School personnel and parents have to talk about the importance of taking good care of the books.10. Children and teachers will not return the books they have borrowed To prevent: A book-keeping system of borrowed books will be established to know who has borrowed books.11. Delays in procurement of school books. To prevent: Local editors and bookshops are prioritized and favored in the procurement of the books as opposed those ordered from abroad (e.g. Portugal).12. Teachers cannot come to the trainings because of the rains and floods To prevent: Trainings can be organized in those months when there is not much rain expected in general.13. There will be lost of funding because of currency changes between Euro and Meticals. To prevent: we are not able to prevent this risk. In this case the open co-operation between Ministry for Foreign Affairs of Finland, SYL and Afortalecer is important.14. Financial crisis in Europe and other international financial crisis To prevent: we are not able to prevent this risk. In this case the open co-operation between Ministry for Foreign Affairs of Finland, SYL and Afortalecer is important.15. Pupils cannot come to school because of the rains and floods To prevent: we are not able to prevent this risk.16. Corruption To prevent: We have to monitor the project well and for example have statistics about the books bought for every school. Involvement of different stakeholders will probably decrease the risk for corruption. For corruption of banks we have to ask receipts from every money transfer from the bank.17. Political changes in Mozambique 23
  • 24. To prevent: Afortalecer has to follow up the situation in Mozambique and if there are changes in politicians or administrative related to the project they will present the project as soon as possible for the new people. 18. Changes in Environment To prevent: The seasonal changes must be taken account when planning activities of the project.7 BudgetA detailed budget can be seen in the appendix of this project plan. PÄIVITÄBudget summary:Budget 2013 2014 2015 TOTAL1. Personnel costs (Appendix 1)Project personnel in Finland, subtotal 10100 11333 11667 33100Finnish personnel in project country, subtotal 0 0 0 0Travel and accomodation of Finnish personnel, subtotal 0 0 0 0Locally recruited personnel, subtotal 22440 22440 22440 67320Voluntary work, subtotal 5625 6030 5775 17430Other personnel costs, subtotal 0 300 300 600Personnel costs, subtotal 38165 40103 40182 1184502. Activity costs (Appendix 2)Activity 1: Procurement of materials 11070 14437,5 11632,5 37140Activity 2: Improving the quality of teaching 6615 6879 6351 19845Activity 3: Increasing the attendance of pupils in schools 32,25 48,5 29,25 110Activity 4: Establishing favorable reading and writingatmosphere in schools 200 200 200 600Activity 5: Starting advocacy and lobbying process 520 520 520 1560Activity 6: Producing materials for baseline study 315 15 15 345Activity 7: Local monitoring and evaluation 2500 3580 3679 9759Activity 8: Project monitoring trip 6264 6264 6264 18792Activity 9: Monitoring in Finland 9799 10579 10678 31056Activity 10: Information in Finland 700 700 700 2100Activity cost, subtotal 29216,25 33644 30390,75 932513. Operation and maintenance (Appendix 3)Operation costs 6000 6000 6000 18000Maintenance costs 0 0 0 0Operation and maintenance, subtotal 6000 6000 6000 18000TOTAL IMPLEMENTATION COSTS 73381,25 79747 76572,75 2297014. Administrative costsSalaries and related costs of administrative personnel 0 0 0 0Office costs 0 0 0 0Fund-raising costs 396 396 396 1188Statutory audit costs of the Finnish organization 0 0 0 0 24
  • 25. Value of Finnish voluntary work in administration 0 0 0 0Administration costs, subtotal 396 396 396 1188TOTAL PROJECT COSTS 73777,25 80143 76968,75 230889Administrative costs as a % of total costs (max. 10 %) 0,54 0,49 0,51Financing plan 2013 2014 2015 TOTAL1. Self-financing (Appendix 5)Cash contributions 5625 6030 5775 17430Voluntary work and material donations 5625 6030 5775 17430Total self-financing 11250 12060 11550 34860Self-financing as a % of total project costs 15,25 15,05 15,012. Project support from the Ministry for Foreign AffairsEarlier allocation of project supportNew/additional application 62527,25 68083 65418,75 196029TOTAL FINANCING 73777,25 80143 76968,75 2308898 Reporting planAfortalecer will inform it stakeholders about the project mainly as a part of the project. As presented inchapter 5.5. There will be a special monitoring group for the project. There will be representatives fromschool and education administrative of Maputo. They will share the information about the project for theirown communities. Afortalecer will communicate about the project also during the meetings with otheractors in the field.SYL will inform the student unions and university students about the project. The former have theirrepresentation in SYL, and SYL will also organize four meetings per year to discuss developmentcooperation and information issues with representatives of the student unions. In addition, the members ofKENKKU are generally active members of the development cooperation affairs in their respective studentunions, which provides for effective knowledge sharing between SYL and the unions. For the latter, apartfrom the students accessed by the aforementioned activities, KENKKU has also a blog where it posts newsof SYLs development cooperation projects and other relevant issues. In SYL’s website there is also otherinformation on SYL’s development cooperation projects. (kehitysyhteistyo.syl.fi)9 Appendeces - Problem analysis - Logical framework - Job description of key experts - Work plan - Detailed budget 25