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Small Woods and small woods
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Small Woods and small woods

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Transcript

  • 1. Sustainable Woodland Management
  • 2. Woodlands in England • Total woodland area 1,119,000ha Conifers 370,000ha Broadleaved 749,000ha
  • 3. Woodland History • Woodland clearance started in the neolithic period 5000 years ago • Dropped to 15% by time of the Norman Conquest, and further to 5% by 1900 • Creation of the Forestry Commission in 1919 to develop a strategic resource stimulated a rise to 8.4%, with England’s most wooded county, Surrey, having 22% cover
  • 4. Woodland History This compares to • 11.6% across the UK • 15% target for England in IFP report 2012 • 27.9% in France • 40% average in EU countries • Sweden 60% • Japan 70%
  • 5. Key Facts • 75% of all woodlands are between 0.1 and 2ha • 93% of timber and timber products used in England are imported • Annual increment 7.1MT, Harvested at present 2.9MT, Unutilised 4.2MT (59%)
  • 6. Why value woodlands? • Economic benefits – from planting, management, harvesting, processing, manufacture, also recreation and landscape • Biodiversity • Social/psychological – sense of place, calming • Environmental – shade, screening, • Carbon Balance
  • 7. Woodlands and Climate Change • Woodfuel – carbon neutral 7
  • 8. Woodlands and Climate Change • Product substitution 8
  • 9. Woodlands and Climate Change • New woodlands – carbon sinks Health warning – Carbon offset planting must be additional and include provision for future management 9
  • 10. Woodlands and Climate Change • Shade, cooling, flood plain management
  • 11. Coppice produce/green wood crafts
  • 12. Why manage woodland? • Light is life • Benefits for biodiversity – decline in woodland birds, butterflies and dormouse linked to unmanaged woodlands since WW2 • Local jobs • Carbon balance – carbon neutral woodfuel into local markets, reduced ‘timber miles’
  • 13. • Options for management -Coppicing Cutting trees down to ground level at intervals to stimulate new growth • ‘Coupes’ of 0.250.5ha • Coppice with standards • Biodiversity value – usually high
  • 14. Options for managementClear fell • Growing a crop of trees, thinning then felling them all at once, then replacing them with another crop • Replacement by planting or natural regeneration • Even age – all trees of same age • Biodiversity value – usually low
  • 15. Options for managementContinuous cover • Individual trees or small groups selectively felled • Gaps filled by natural regeneration • Uneven age – trees of all ages present • Can convert even age woodlands into continuous cover over time • Biodiversity value- usually high
  • 16. Current issues • • • • • • • Woodlotting Cuts to FC, Natural England FC disposals Diseases – Phytophthora, Chalara Climate change – species selection, pests/diseases Public perceptions of woodland management Woodfuel
  • 17. Any questions?