0
200 years ofhistory in 2 minutes
A vibrant marshland becomes….
An economic powerhouss, which becomes…
A damaged and underutilized wasteland.
New Infrastructure
300 Acres ofBrownfields Redeveloped
P&HRexnord/           Palermo                                                  Derse  Falk              Villa             ...
4,700 New Jobs   to Valley
10 Million Visitors
Every $1of public sector funding…
Has already leveraged$3.75 of private investment
1,00,000 SF SustainableDevelopment
229% Increase inAssessed Value Since 2003
14 miles of theHank Aaron State Trail
415,000 people live within three miles,100,000 of which are under 18.
Nancy Aten
Circa1940s     2010      .Constructi        on
Circa1940s     2010      .Constructi        on
45 acres ofnative plants
Nancy Aten
Nancy Aten
Tactics andGuiding Principles
1. Visionary Planning Public / Private Partnership National Design Competition Design Charrettes Market Analysis Land Use ...
Grounded in Integrated Approach.         “It should be illegal to implement solutions that solve         only one problem.”
To revitalize theMenomoneeValley for thebenefit ofthe entireMilwaukeecommunity
2. Set Goals, Objectives and Standards                         200 Developable Acres                         5,000 Family-...
Development Objectives  • Development Objectives for    Job Density  • Sustainable Design    Guidelines  • Recruitment for...
Development Objectives                                           MVIC Goals        MVIC now  Manufacturing use            ...
3. Engaging Community and Offering Senseof Discovery
Demonstration projects.
4. Value Added After the Deal is Done
• Help businesses grow in place• Build business to business connections• Connect businesses to resources• Create a sense o...
Building connection to place.
Tactics and Principles     in Practice
Example: Menomonee Valley Industrial Center
A TRADITIONAL RESPONSE                                  Piped System = Higher Infrastructure Costs                  Indivi...
The Work Ahead
1. Valley 2.0
Valley 2.0 – The Physical Side
Valley 2.0 – The Human Side
2. Menomonee Valley – From the Ground Up Transforming a 24-acre brownfield…     Looking Forward                  The Next ...
Photo credit: Photographer Eddee Daniel
MILLER PARK                  35th Street27th Street                                Menomonee                              ...
MILLER PARK              35th Street                            Menomonee                              River
…into a 24-acre park with amile of public access alongthe Menomonee River
Designed to teach.Designed to improve environmental conditions on land and in water.
WisDOT as partner. Worked within systems to supportlandscape restoration and habitat creation as project goal.
University teams (MIAD and UWM) participate in   Student work inform the final design led by Uihlein Wilson         the “L...
Laura BrayMenomonee Valley Partners, Inc.414-274-4654laura@renewthevalley.orgRenewTheValley.orgTHANK YOU!
Clean Rivers, Clean Lake 8 -- Menomonee Valley 2012 -- Laura Bray
Clean Rivers, Clean Lake 8 -- Menomonee Valley 2012 -- Laura Bray
Clean Rivers, Clean Lake 8 -- Menomonee Valley 2012 -- Laura Bray
Clean Rivers, Clean Lake 8 -- Menomonee Valley 2012 -- Laura Bray
Clean Rivers, Clean Lake 8 -- Menomonee Valley 2012 -- Laura Bray
Clean Rivers, Clean Lake 8 -- Menomonee Valley 2012 -- Laura Bray
Clean Rivers, Clean Lake 8 -- Menomonee Valley 2012 -- Laura Bray
Clean Rivers, Clean Lake 8 -- Menomonee Valley 2012 -- Laura Bray
Clean Rivers, Clean Lake 8 -- Menomonee Valley 2012 -- Laura Bray
Clean Rivers, Clean Lake 8 -- Menomonee Valley 2012 -- Laura Bray
Clean Rivers, Clean Lake 8 -- Menomonee Valley 2012 -- Laura Bray
Clean Rivers, Clean Lake 8 -- Menomonee Valley 2012 -- Laura Bray
Clean Rivers, Clean Lake 8 -- Menomonee Valley 2012 -- Laura Bray
Clean Rivers, Clean Lake 8 -- Menomonee Valley 2012 -- Laura Bray
Clean Rivers, Clean Lake 8 -- Menomonee Valley 2012 -- Laura Bray
Clean Rivers, Clean Lake 8 -- Menomonee Valley 2012 -- Laura Bray
Clean Rivers, Clean Lake 8 -- Menomonee Valley 2012 -- Laura Bray
Clean Rivers, Clean Lake 8 -- Menomonee Valley 2012 -- Laura Bray
Clean Rivers, Clean Lake 8 -- Menomonee Valley 2012 -- Laura Bray
Clean Rivers, Clean Lake 8 -- Menomonee Valley 2012 -- Laura Bray
Clean Rivers, Clean Lake 8 -- Menomonee Valley 2012 -- Laura Bray
Clean Rivers, Clean Lake 8 -- Menomonee Valley 2012 -- Laura Bray
Clean Rivers, Clean Lake 8 -- Menomonee Valley 2012 -- Laura Bray
Clean Rivers, Clean Lake 8 -- Menomonee Valley 2012 -- Laura Bray
Clean Rivers, Clean Lake 8 -- Menomonee Valley 2012 -- Laura Bray
Clean Rivers, Clean Lake 8 -- Menomonee Valley 2012 -- Laura Bray
Clean Rivers, Clean Lake 8 -- Menomonee Valley 2012 -- Laura Bray
Clean Rivers, Clean Lake 8 -- Menomonee Valley 2012 -- Laura Bray
Clean Rivers, Clean Lake 8 -- Menomonee Valley 2012 -- Laura Bray
Clean Rivers, Clean Lake 8 -- Menomonee Valley 2012 -- Laura Bray
Clean Rivers, Clean Lake 8 -- Menomonee Valley 2012 -- Laura Bray
Clean Rivers, Clean Lake 8 -- Menomonee Valley 2012 -- Laura Bray
Clean Rivers, Clean Lake 8 -- Menomonee Valley 2012 -- Laura Bray
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Clean Rivers, Clean Lake 8 -- Menomonee Valley 2012 -- Laura Bray

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  • Historically, the Valley was a wild rice marsh. The Potawatomi and other Native Americans used the Valley for hunting, fishing, and the annual rice harvest. The first permanent white settlement in Wisconsin was on the bluffs of the Menomonee River, where Jacques Vieau established a trading post with the Native Americans, on the site of what is today the Mitchell Park Domes. In the 1870s, the marsh was filled, the river channelized, and canal cut to make new land available for industry.
  • When Milwaukee was “The Machine Shop of the World,” the Valley was its engine, employing tens of thousands of people in industry, including heavy manufacturing, slaughterhouses, tanneries, and railroads. The surrounding neighborhoods grew up around the Valley, and the “bucket brigades” could be seen at shift changes, pouring into and out of the Valley over pedestrian bridges. Rail, steep bluffs, and roads separated the Valley from the neighborhoods, eliminating public access to the Menomonee River for 100 years.
  • This is the Valley that most people who grew up in Milwaukee recognize. In the latter half of the 20 th century, the core industries in the Valley either moved out to suburbs or overseas or went bankrupt, leaving hundreds of acres of vacant land, abandoned buildings, and contamination. The neighborhoods surrounding the Valley suffered disproportionately from these job losses, and unemployment skyrocketed. The Valley was the racial dividing line of the city, known locally as Milwaukee’s Mason-Dixon. In the 1960s, the Valley became the symbol for this divide, with a series of symbolic marches across the Valley’s viaducts demanding an end to racially discriminating housing practices.
  • MVP envisions a redeveloped Valley economically, geographically, environmentally, and culturally.
  • Major incredible infrastructure improvements have reconnected the Valley to the surrounding city. Before the Sixth Street Bridges , there was no easy way to get into the Valley.
  • Before Canal Street, there was no way to get from the east end of the Valley to the west end. And without the 75,000 truckloads of fill from the Marquette Interchange project, which raised the west end out of the floodplain, private development here would not have been possible.
  • Former coal storage yard, now environmental consulting company and Hank Aaron State Trail segment along the Menomonee River
  • Former stockyards are now home to four growing businesses, including Helios, the first solar panel manufacturer in Wisconsin.
  • And a former railroad shops site is now the Menomonee Valley Industrial Center and Community Park, home to seven new businesses, a nationally renowned stormwater treatment system, and the Hank Aaron State Trail.
  • 4,200 jobs have been added to the Valley, which is again becoming the economic driver of the Milwaukee region.
  • Every year, 10 million visitors come to the Valley to visit entertainment destinations.
  • Potawatomi is the largest tourist destination in Wisconsin
  • Miller Park is the second largest tourist destination
  • A former salt storage yard on the Menomonee River is now the Harley-Davidson Museum.
  • To date, every $1 of public sector funding invested has leveraged $3.60 in private investment. The taxable property values throughout the Menomonee Valley have increased by $84 million due to new developments, doubling property values, and assessments to the city.
  • To date, every $1 of public sector funding invested has leveraged $3.60 in private investment. The taxable property values throughout the Menomonee Valley have increased by $84 million due to new developments, doubling property values, and assessments to the city.
  • New construction in the Valley complies with the Menomonee Valley Sustainable Design Guidelines, so over 900,000 square feet of energy-efficient buildings have been designed and constructed.
  • To date, every $1 of public sector funding invested has leveraged $3.60 in private investment. The taxable property values throughout the Menomonee Valley have increased by $84 million due to new developments, doubling property values, and assessments to the city.
  • The Hank Aaron State Trail now travels 14 miles , from Lakeshore State Park, through the Valley, to the County line.
  • The Hank Aaron State Trail provides new public access to a restored Menomonee River.
  • Thousands of people come to the Hank Aaron State Trail and Menomonee River every year, new public recreation amenities in the heart of Milwaukee.
  • New access to the Menomonee River – canoe launch
  • Bike camps for kids help urban kids learn how to bike to school and other destinations by learning biking skills along the Hank Aaron State Trail.
  • Over 45 acres of native plants can now be found as part of the Hank Aaron State Trail and new businesses.
  • Hundreds of children have helped plant along the Hank Aaron State Trail; taking an active role in turning vacant land in their neighborhood into a vibrant destination.
  • Over 45 acres of native plants can now be found as part of the Hank Aaron State Trail and new businesses.
  • In 1999 – city adopted a land use plan with several recommendations to redevelop the valley in a way that maximized job creation and the benefit for the entire Milwaukee community – economically, geographically, environmentally, and culturally. MVP was created with a broad group of partners -- working to restore the neglected river valley at the very heart of Milwaukee. We envision a redeveloped Valley that is as central to the city as it was in the past.
  • Economic Development: $700 million invested in new infrastructure & business development 13 new businesses in the Valley 4,200 family-supporting jobs created Sustainable Design: 880,000 SF of sustainably designed buildings Stormwater from 85 acres of developed area treated on-site Public Park and Trails: To date, more than 30 acres of park and 7 miles of Hank Aaron State Trail Economic Development: $700 million invested in new infrastructure & business development 13 new businesses in the Valley 4,200 family-supporting jobs created Sustainable Design: 880,000 SF of sustainably designed buildings Stormwater from 85 acres of developed area treated on-site Public Park and Trails: To date, more than 30 acres of park and 7 miles of Hank Aaron State Trail
  • Economic Development: $700 million invested in new infrastructure & business development 13 new businesses in the Valley 4,200 family-supporting jobs created Sustainable Design: 880,000 SF of sustainably designed buildings Stormwater from 85 acres of developed area treated on-site Public Park and Trails: To date, more than 30 acres of park and 7 miles of Hank Aaron State Trail Economic Development: $700 million invested in new infrastructure & business development 13 new businesses in the Valley 4,200 family-supporting jobs created Sustainable Design: 880,000 SF of sustainably designed buildings Stormwater from 85 acres of developed area treated on-site Public Park and Trails: To date, more than 30 acres of park and 7 miles of Hank Aaron State Trail
  • Economic Development: $700 million invested in new infrastructure & business development 13 new businesses in the Valley 4,200 family-supporting jobs created Sustainable Design: 880,000 SF of sustainably designed buildings Stormwater from 85 acres of developed area treated on-site Public Park and Trails: To date, more than 30 acres of park and 7 miles of Hank Aaron State Trail Economic Development: $700 million invested in new infrastructure & business development 13 new businesses in the Valley 4,200 family-supporting jobs created Sustainable Design: 880,000 SF of sustainably designed buildings Stormwater from 85 acres of developed area treated on-site Public Park and Trails: To date, more than 30 acres of park and 7 miles of Hank Aaron State Trail
  • Seven miles of the Hank Aaron State Trail is complete and the Trail now extends from Waukesha County to Lake Michigan. Bike commuting becomes a way of life here…..and people from across the region to take the Trail to visit the Zoo, State Fair Park, Potawatomi Bingo Casino, Miller Park, the Art Museum, and Discovery World.
  • Over 45 acres of native plants can now be found as part of the Hank Aaron State Trail and new businesses.
  • Over 45 acres of native plants can now be found as part of the Hank Aaron State Trail and new businesses.
  • Finally, the number of individuals and organizations who gave time, expertise, and support is astounding. More than 475 individuals have volunteered their time on the boards, committees, and working teams of Menomonee Valley Partners, Inc., Friends of Hank Aaron State Trail, and the Menomonee Valley Business Association, while thousands more have volunteered in activities in the Valley. More than 260 organizations have offered pro bono assistance, technical guidance and time. The transformations of the past 10 years would not have been possible without this unprecedented level of partnership and collaboration, and the countless hours donated to the revitalization of Milwaukee’s Menomonee Valley. This level of commitment has made the Valley a national model of economic development and environmental sustainability , demonstrating to the region, and the nation, that Milwaukee is a great place to live and work.
  • A 24 acre brownfield is transformed into a premier natural area and living laboratory. This area becomes a model for native landscape restoration and living laboratory that teaches us all about our ecosystem
  • A third Urban Ecology Center branch opens….bringing 20,000 annual Valley visitors who learn to fly fish, borrow cross country skis, or meet for a photography workshop. Here, students will come as part of their science class to count the species of fish swimming up the Menomonee River. This is what the Valley has to offer the region in the next decade. It took courageous vision to look at hundreds of acres of contaminated land and a forgotten river a decade ago and imagine it would once again be a major center of commerce for our state, let alone a lovely state trail. It took hope and will power to imagine the Menomonee Valley, which was still often thought of as the Mason-Dixon Line of Milwaukee, could become a place that unites our city. It also takes vision to see the Hank Aaron State Trail connecting communities across the county, to see a community and environmental education center preparing the next generations of young scientists and environmental thinkers where an abandoned pedestrian tunnel sits today. But that vision is just as attainable as what we have accomplished in the past 10 years.
  • Transcript of "Clean Rivers, Clean Lake 8 -- Menomonee Valley 2012 -- Laura Bray"

    1. 1. 200 years ofhistory in 2 minutes
    2. 2. A vibrant marshland becomes….
    3. 3. An economic powerhouss, which becomes…
    4. 4. A damaged and underutilized wasteland.
    5. 5. New Infrastructure
    6. 6. 300 Acres ofBrownfields Redeveloped
    7. 7. P&HRexnord/ Palermo Derse Falk Villa Ingeteam Stadium Ahern Parking Caleffi Lots Charter Badger Wire Railing Taylor Suzy’s
    8. 8. 4,700 New Jobs to Valley
    9. 9. 10 Million Visitors
    10. 10. Every $1of public sector funding…
    11. 11. Has already leveraged$3.75 of private investment
    12. 12. 1,00,000 SF SustainableDevelopment
    13. 13. 229% Increase inAssessed Value Since 2003
    14. 14. 14 miles of theHank Aaron State Trail
    15. 15. 415,000 people live within three miles,100,000 of which are under 18.
    16. 16. Nancy Aten
    17. 17. Circa1940s 2010 .Constructi on
    18. 18. Circa1940s 2010 .Constructi on
    19. 19. 45 acres ofnative plants
    20. 20. Nancy Aten
    21. 21. Nancy Aten
    22. 22. Tactics andGuiding Principles
    23. 23. 1. Visionary Planning Public / Private Partnership National Design Competition Design Charrettes Market Analysis Land Use 100 years from now…
    24. 24. Grounded in Integrated Approach. “It should be illegal to implement solutions that solve only one problem.”
    25. 25. To revitalize theMenomoneeValley for thebenefit ofthe entireMilwaukeecommunity
    26. 26. 2. Set Goals, Objectives and Standards 200 Developable Acres 5,000 Family-Supporting Jobs Quantified Potential $4 Million in Property Taxes 70 Acres of Park and Trails
    27. 27. Development Objectives • Development Objectives for Job Density • Sustainable Design Guidelines • Recruitment for High Growth Companies
    28. 28. Development Objectives MVIC Goals MVIC now Manufacturing use Preferred → All Number of fulltime equivalent jobs* 1,294 → 1,302 Number of acres 59 → 52 FTE Jobs/Acre* 22 → 24 FTE Jobs/1000 SF* 1.5 → 1.52 Annual projected wage and salary/acre* 538,193 → 1,062,564 Building/land coverage ratio 0.33 → 0.37Incremental evaluation of goals.
    29. 29. 3. Engaging Community and Offering Senseof Discovery
    30. 30. Demonstration projects.
    31. 31. 4. Value Added After the Deal is Done
    32. 32. • Help businesses grow in place• Build business to business connections• Connect businesses to resources• Create a sense of neighborhood• Create new amenities
    33. 33. Building connection to place.
    34. 34. Tactics and Principles in Practice
    35. 35. Example: Menomonee Valley Industrial Center
    36. 36. A TRADITIONAL RESPONSE Piped System = Higher Infrastructure Costs Individually Planned Sites = Unorganized and Auto-Oriented Traditional Ponds and Storm BMP’s = Lower Development Yield and “unusable spaces No park or open space amenityplan comparison STORMWATER PARK- A MULTIFUNCTIONAL APPROACH Surface System = Limited Subsurface Pipe Denser Developments= Walkable Environment No “wasted” space for Stormwater Management= Higher Development Yield for Property Owners Park creates an attractive amenity for neighborhood
    37. 37. The Work Ahead
    38. 38. 1. Valley 2.0
    39. 39. Valley 2.0 – The Physical Side
    40. 40. Valley 2.0 – The Human Side
    41. 41. 2. Menomonee Valley – From the Ground Up Transforming a 24-acre brownfield… Looking Forward The Next Decade of Transformation
    42. 42. Photo credit: Photographer Eddee Daniel
    43. 43. MILLER PARK 35th Street27th Street Menomonee River
    44. 44. MILLER PARK 35th Street Menomonee River
    45. 45. …into a 24-acre park with amile of public access alongthe Menomonee River
    46. 46. Designed to teach.Designed to improve environmental conditions on land and in water.
    47. 47. WisDOT as partner. Worked within systems to supportlandscape restoration and habitat creation as project goal.
    48. 48. University teams (MIAD and UWM) participate in Student work inform the final design led by Uihlein Wilson the “Living Building Challenge” Architects. Ground Breaking
    49. 49. Laura BrayMenomonee Valley Partners, Inc.414-274-4654laura@renewthevalley.orgRenewTheValley.orgTHANK YOU!
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