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Clean Rivers, Clean Lake 8 -- Leveraging Resources -- Robert Monnat
 

Clean Rivers, Clean Lake 8 -- Leveraging Resources -- Robert Monnat

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  • In cities that have water resources, great environments and development don’t happen by accident, they happen because developers understood and paid attention to that critical intersection of our water resources and the land resources we develop. How this intersection is reconciled can make our cities livable and desirable, and is the most critical element of sustainable urbanism.
  • The very first river-oriented development, what is known as the Beerline B neighborhood, came close but failed as sustainable urbanism. Its singular real estate product – housing - results in a less-than-complete diversity of uses. And, its reaction to the river was in some cases misunderstood, as at our own Trostel Square development pictured here, or simply brutal as evidenced by other developments in the corridor. Nature was not embraced but rather straight-jacketed.
  • Next, we’ll examine the arguments for applying sustainable urbanism practices to our future real estate and habitation needs, and identify some of the positive impacts that we can realize by doing so.
  • Next, we’ll examine the arguments for applying sustainable urbanism practices to our future real estate and habitation needs, and identify some of the positive impacts that we can realize by doing so.
  • Milwaukee is fortunate to have two significant opportunities to support Sustainable Neighborhoods. The first is the lake. Where private ownership extends to the lakeshore, such as in those areas immediately south of downtown, new neighborhoods can develop incorporating the lake as its natural resource. Similarly, the Milwaukee River and our other river corridors embody tremendous biophilic value. These natural resources have a direct impact on the success of urban development, both in terms of value creation and attraction of residents to the city.
  • The more we expose urban inhabitants to the water resources around them, the more they’ll care about its quality. This can greatly assist in fostering public support both in the form of votes as well as financial resources. Using sustainable urbanism as a model, cooperative dialogue can lead to standards and policies that will better govern the intersection of water and development in our cities. This in turn can make our water resources more readily available and integrated into our urban neighborhoods, thereby increasing the desirability of urban living alternatives and relieving the pressure of continued sprawl. Who knows, maybe we’ll even be able to walk the dog without our car some day.
  • Much of the material for this presentation was culled from a terrific book by Douglas Farr, titled “Sustainable Urbanism | Urban Design With Nature”. Farr is an architect and urban designer with a Chicago-based design practice, who notably chaired the US Green Building Council’s LEED-ND (Neighborhood Development) core committee. The book is already sold out of its first edition; I had to buy my copy used over the internet.

Clean Rivers, Clean Lake 8 -- Leveraging Resources -- Robert Monnat Clean Rivers, Clean Lake 8 -- Leveraging Resources -- Robert Monnat Presentation Transcript

  • Leveraging ourResources toCreate Cities inWhich We ActuallyWant to LiveRobert B. MonnatPartner | Chief Operating OfficerMandel Group, Inc.
  • “Water will be found in the region, around which highly sought-afterdevelopment opportunities may be realized.”
  • “No urban area willprosper unless it attractsthose who can choose tolive wherever they wish.”- Jonathon BarnettFAIA FAICPProfessor / Practitioner / Author
  • Water and open space are our most valuablereal estate resources • Create • Protect • Access • Leverage
  • We’ve lost our way….. Divergence of urban design and ecological design Lacking of the full “kit of parts” - Accessible - Proximate / Walkable - Biophilic - Sustainable Lost appreciation for nature in the city
  • So, what do we do about it?
  • 1 2345 6 7
  • Viewshed Management$$$$ Viewshed Impact Fee
  • Sustainable Urbanism• Humanity’s affinity for water – Milwaukee: lake and river resources – Stand alone | integrated into a livable city• Water’s impact on the livability of cities – Values and desirability • Value’s Highest Differentiator • View and Openness • Recreational Diversion
  • Sustainable Urbanism• Opportunities – Public attention + appreciation for our water resources = funding + resources – Cooperative vs. combative standards and policies for the intersection of water + development – Enhance the desirability of urban living + relieve the pressure to continue sprawl