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Implications of using Tire-derived Aggregate for Landfill Leachate Collection & Drainage Systems
Implications of using Tire-derived Aggregate for Landfill Leachate Collection & Drainage Systems
Implications of using Tire-derived Aggregate for Landfill Leachate Collection & Drainage Systems
Implications of using Tire-derived Aggregate for Landfill Leachate Collection & Drainage Systems
Implications of using Tire-derived Aggregate for Landfill Leachate Collection & Drainage Systems
Implications of using Tire-derived Aggregate for Landfill Leachate Collection & Drainage Systems
Implications of using Tire-derived Aggregate for Landfill Leachate Collection & Drainage Systems
Implications of using Tire-derived Aggregate for Landfill Leachate Collection & Drainage Systems
Implications of using Tire-derived Aggregate for Landfill Leachate Collection & Drainage Systems
Implications of using Tire-derived Aggregate for Landfill Leachate Collection & Drainage Systems
Implications of using Tire-derived Aggregate for Landfill Leachate Collection & Drainage Systems
Implications of using Tire-derived Aggregate for Landfill Leachate Collection & Drainage Systems
Implications of using Tire-derived Aggregate for Landfill Leachate Collection & Drainage Systems
Implications of using Tire-derived Aggregate for Landfill Leachate Collection & Drainage Systems
Implications of using Tire-derived Aggregate for Landfill Leachate Collection & Drainage Systems
Implications of using Tire-derived Aggregate for Landfill Leachate Collection & Drainage Systems
Implications of using Tire-derived Aggregate for Landfill Leachate Collection & Drainage Systems
Implications of using Tire-derived Aggregate for Landfill Leachate Collection & Drainage Systems
Implications of using Tire-derived Aggregate for Landfill Leachate Collection & Drainage Systems
Implications of using Tire-derived Aggregate for Landfill Leachate Collection & Drainage Systems
Implications of using Tire-derived Aggregate for Landfill Leachate Collection & Drainage Systems
Implications of using Tire-derived Aggregate for Landfill Leachate Collection & Drainage Systems
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Implications of using Tire-derived Aggregate for Landfill Leachate Collection & Drainage Systems

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Implications of using Tire-derived Aggregate for Landfill Leachate Collection & Drainage Systems - Marclus Mwai, University of Alberta, Edmonton

Implications of using Tire-derived Aggregate for Landfill Leachate Collection & Drainage Systems - Marclus Mwai, University of Alberta, Edmonton

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  • 1. Use of tire-derived aggregate (TDA) for landfill leachate collection and drainage systems Marclus Mwai, Kristine Wichuk & Dr. Daryl McCartney University of Alberta April 2010 1
  • 2. Background  Albertans discard 5 million tires per year.  Recycling of used tire carried out under Alberta’s Tire Recycling Program.  Products available currently produced: • Pour-in-place rubber surfacing for playgrounds, floor and roofing tiles, and TDA for drainage purposes.  Other uses include blending crumb with asphalt for road construction. 2
  • 3. Leachate Collection and Drainage System 3
  • 4. Types of TDA produced in Alberta Four types: • Medium truck tire shred (MTT). • Off-the-road tire shred (OTR). • Passenger and light truck tire shred (PLTT). • Also mixtures of types, e.g. PLTT and OTR. 4
  • 5. Use of TDA in LCDS  TDA used in LCDS since 1996.  Useful product in offsetting need for natural aggregate, e.g. gravel, in LCDS.  TDA has high permeability, hence the continued application in LCDS  Over 294,000 tonnes (t) used to 2008: • 213,450 t - PLTT • 62,510 t - MTT • 18,040 t - OTR 5
  • 6. TDA use in Leachate Collection & Drainage System (LCDS) of Alberta landfills Class Type of landfill No. Landfills With TDA I Hazardous Waste 2 0 Municipal Sanitary 32 22 (>10,000 t/yr) Municipal Sanitary II 100 7 (<10,000 t/y) Industrial Waste 26 2 III Dry Waste 6 1 TOTAL 180 32 6
  • 7. Design & Operating Standards for All Types of LCDS Materials  Main feature of a drainage layer: • Ensure efficient drainage and collection of leachate.  Design standards require less than 300 mm leachate mounding (Alberta Environment 2010).  Need high hydraulic conductivity: • e.g. ≥ 0.01 cm per second.  Clogging can lower hydraulic conductivity, key mechanisms are: • Sedimentation, biofilm formation, adsorption. 7
  • 8. Need for Investigation  Investigation of long-term performance of LCDS using gravel or TDA: • No record of LCDS failures in Alberta. • Few laboratory studies of LCDS anywhere. • Ontario study (Rowe & McIsaac 2005):  Suggested the potential for long-term (30 to 50 years) clogging of both gravel and TDA.  Based on their work, TDA may clog faster than gravel.  Leachate quality and quantity, and TDA properties are different than those used in Alberta. 8
  • 9. Need for Investigation  Limited investigation of long-term performance of LCDS: • Testing specific to Alberta situation needed. • It is necessary to quantify mechanisms and to identify required design specifications. • Specifications to cover TDA types available in AB. • Specifications to ensure high quality performance of TDA in LCDS. 9
  • 10. Today’s Objective Introduce you to the on-going research activities. 10
  • 11. Research Program & Status 1. Overview of research activities. 2. Some preliminary findings: a. Alberta leachate characteristics. b. TDA physical properties. 3. Future activities & expected outcome. 11
  • 12. 1. Overview of the research  Main objective of research: to test long-term hydraulic conductivity of TDA and gravel.  Main factors to consider: leachate chemistry; compressibility and type of TDA.  Lysimeter apparatus will be used to simulate LCDS 12
  • 13. Complete apparatus 13
  • 14. 2a. Alberta Leachate characteristics • Leachate chemistry very variable between and within landfills. • Chemistry depends on age of landfill, waste composition, seasons. • Results consistent with information available in the literature. 14
  • 15. 2a. Alberta Leachate Characteristics Leachate Quality Trends 0 10 20 30 15
  • 16. 2b. Tire shred properties Gravel (as reported Property TDA in literature) Specific gravity (ratio) 1.18-1.38 2.67-2.72 Dry density loose 385-469 1370 (kg/m3) Initial porosity (%) 62-72 46 Water absorption (%) 2-4 1-3 Compressibility (%) 40-50 Not compressible Hydraulic conductivity 4.9-59.3 0.78 (cm/sec), uncompacted Particle size distribution 25-300 50-80 (mm) 16
  • 17. 2b. TDA Properties Compressibility of tire shreds 1.2 1.0 PLTT OTR Depth (m) 0.8 MTT 0.6 0.4 0.2 0.0 0 50 100 150 200 250 300 350 Overburden Pressure (kPa) 17
  • 18. 3. Future activities  To complete TDA physical testing.  To investigate short and long-term permeability of LCDS.  To provide data that facilitates the use of TDA in LCDS. 18
  • 19. 3. Expected Outcome  Research expected to provide information/ data that facilitates the use of TDA in LCDS. 19
  • 20. Summary  There is a need to investigate factors affecting LCDS  Leachate chemistry variable over space and time:  Within and between landfills.  Physical properties of TDA to be determined.  Long-term tests being conducted to compare hydraulic conductivity of TDA and gravel 20
  • 21. Acknowledgements • Alberta Recycling and Management Authority for commissioning the research and providing financial and logistical support. • Edmonton Waste Management Centre of Excellence for housing the lysimeter apparatus and technical support. • City of Edmonton for technical support and supplying the leachate for the experiment. • Alberta Research Council for the design, fabrication and commissioning of lysimeters. 21
  • 22. Thank you 22

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