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RMECC 2013 Sherry Taylor & Isabelle Smith

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  • AUDIENCE INVOLVEMENT: Share with your “elbow partner” ---- and respond to these questions (not all Qs show up at once)
  • AUDIENCE INVOLVEMENT: Read each definition. Select the definition that you prefer. Take a “stab” at describing your culture using either #1 or #2 as a guideline.
  • AUDIENCE INVOLVEMENT: On your own, read & rate statement 1-8 (jot down your ratings on power point slides/handout) SHARE your response to ONE statement with an elbow partner
  • AUDIENCE INVOLVEMENT -- SELECT ONE ITEM ---- REFLECT ON HOW YOU PUT THIS IN PLACE ……
  • FUNDS OF KNOWLEDGE = The cultural resources that children and families have/use in their homes and communities. E.g., families and children may be very knowledge about gardening, auto repair, caring for crops, making & selling tortillas or tamales, …running a family business, etc.
  • Nutrition Classes, Healthy Learning Pathways, Literacy and Language Development, Use staff expertise
  • Children’s Museum, Play Dates in various places, Lowes, Public Library, Open Space
  • Transcript

    • 1. Building Culturally Responsive Family Partnerships in Early Childhood Education Rocky Mountain Early Childhood Conference Friday, March 1, 2013
    • 2. Building Culturally Responsive Family Partnerships in Early Childhood Education Sherry Taylor, Ph.D. Associate Professor & Program Chair Literacy, Language & Culturally Responsive Teaching University of Colorado, Denver Isabelle Smith, MA ECSE Pre-School Teacher, Boulder Valley School District Lead Instructor in Early Literacy Certificate Program University of Colorado, Denver
    • 3. Today‟s Focus: Supporting young learners -Teachers and students today -Culturally responsive skills & understandings -Families‟ valuable resources & experiences -Building family partnerships using: Engaging families as partners Cross-cultural supports Authentic assessments
    • 4. But first, let‟s begin with YOU • What is your position and classroom context? • Who are your students? • What interests you about building culturally responsive family partnerships? • What do you already do to build these partnerships? • How do want to expand your efforts to build culturally responsive partnerships with students? With their families?
    • 5. Culture: What is culture? 1. Everything you believe in & everything you do that identifies you as a member of a group & distinguishes you from members of other groups (Robins, Lindsey, Lindsey & Terrell,2011). 2. The ever-changing values, traditions, social & political relationships, and worldview created, shared, and transformed by a group of people who are bound together by a combination of factors (Nieto & Bode, 2011).
    • 6. Students Today:Demographic Trends in U.S. Educational Contexts 1.04 millionimmigrate to US A large yet yearly 1 in 5 children undetermined # of have a foreign- undocumented born parent immigrants arrive annually 70% of student population consistsof student of color in Currently nearlythe 20 largest school By 2025, 40% of the school-age million ELL districts population will be students attend students of color US schools Some ethnic groups are overrepresented in special education 95% of students By 2025, 1 in 4 programs and with disabilities are students will underrepresented in served in general initially be gifted programs education classified as an classrooms. ELL student
    • 7. Teachers Today • Predominantly female (75%); • Native English speaking from a White (non-Latino) background (83%); Less than • 10% are African American: • 6% are Latino; • 1% Asian American; • .8% Native American
    • 8. What is involved in being aculturally responsive teacher?
    • 9. What is involved in being a culturally responsive teacher? Rarely – Seldom – Sometimes – Often - Usually1) I am aware of my own culture & ethnicity. 4) I know the country of origin of each of my students &2) I am comfortable talking about my his/her parents. culture & ethnicity. 5) I understand the factors that3) I know the effect that my culture & affect acculturation. ethnicity may have on the people in my work setting including students & 6) I understand the ways a their families. learner‟s culture may influence learning. 7) I understand the ways my culture – as a teacher – may influence my teaching. 8) I understand the ways the culture of the school influences school norms, expectations, interaction, behaviors & communication.
    • 10. What understandings & skills are practiced by culturally responsive teachers?
    • 11. Culturally responsive skills &understandings used by teachers • Understand how learners construct knowledge & have the skills to help learners to do this; • Take time to learn about the lives & cultures of their students; • Use their knowledge of students to design instruction that builds on Ss’ foundations, strengths & cultural perspectives; • Are socio-culturally conscious, meaning they recognize there are multiple ways of perceiving reality; • Recognize students’ differences as resources not as problems to overcome. (Villegas & Lucas, 2007)
    • 12. Teachers who adhere to culturally responsive & relevant teaching • Capitalize on their students’ home & community cultures; • Empower students (intellectually, socially, emotionally) by making connections with their culture as they teach content, skills & attitudes; • Keep the class focused on instruction & use methods that suggest to students that they are capable of learning.
    • 13. Responding to the culture you bring into the classroom • Questions to consider – Am I providing materials, conditions, and experiences that allow all of my students to explore, expand, and value their cultures and the cultures of others? – What social hierarchies are present in my classroom? Who works and plays together? Who gets to be in charge? (Owocki & Goodman, p.24, 2002)
    • 14. Learning about families‟ valuable resources & experiences “To understand the home and community environment, teachers may observe and participate in community life, interview community members, and visit students’ homes.” (Diaz-Rico & Weed, 2010) What steps do you take to learn about the students‟ home & community environment?
    • 15. Learning about families‟ valuable resources: Taking Action Home Visits: Questions you might ask? – What does your child do well? What do you enjoy doing as a family? – What changes has your child experienced? (health, re-location, family members & home context) – What goals to you have for your child this year? What are your hopes and worries? – Where does your child go after school? • “Getting to know” questionnaire (Owocki & Goodman, p.97-98, 2002);
    • 16. Learning about families: Learning to listen • Sample questions to help you learn about children‟s families: – What funds of knowledge are present in the child‟s home? (Gonzalez & Moll, 2002) – What materials are available in the home? Which are regularly used? – What types of interactions and relationships does the child have with others in the home? – What is the child’s language background and experience? – What do family members recall about their own learning and school experiences? Home-based information (Owocki & Goodman, p.23, 2002)
    • 17. Learning about families at conferences • Listen & take a break from the role of „expert‟ • Use videos to explain and share what the child is doing at school • Think about the physical environment during each conference; Are you seated in a way that encourages sharing & conversation?
    • 18. Learning about families‟ valuable experiences: Inquiry -Community-based information shared by child‟s family (Owocki & Goodman, p.24, 2002); -Community tour by teacher:  Where do students in your class live?  How do they get to school? Route?  Where does the family shop?  What restaurants do they frequent?  What is the family’s entertainment? Where? -Life at home:  What responsibilities does the student have?  How does the student help the family?  What talents is the student praised for at home?
    • 19. Building family partnerships • Invite families to share their interests and talents. • Allow for flexibility in your programing to incorporate a variety of families’ skills.
    • 20. Building Family Partnerships• Ask families to share their own learning goals and provide opportunities to meet them.• Engage families in cross-cultural social experiences. Celebrate each other.
    • 21. Building family partnerships with the community• Connect families to community resources and to each other
    • 22. Questions to consider as youmove forward on your journey: • What do you already do to build partnerships with children & their families? • What steps will you take to expand your efforts to build culturally responsive partnerships with students & families? • Home visits? • Questions to prompt parents to share? • Use videos to show child‟s activity? • Listen more-Talk less with parents? • Family – community resources? • Other? Your ideas?
    • 23. On Your Own: Personal Survey & Reflection1) I understand how differences in 3) I have assessed the student cultural, linguistic, and linguistic abilities of socio-economic backgrounds my students in affect language and literacy English and in their development. home language.2) I know the country of origin of each of my students and his or 3) I understand and her parents. respect my students oral language use, even when they may differ from my own use of language.
    • 24. Thank you!Your questions?
    • 25. Beeman, K. Urow, C. (2013). Teaching for biliteracy: Strenthening bridges between languages. Philadelphia,References PA: Caslon. Gonzalez, N. & Moll, L. (2002). Cruzando el Puente: Building bridges to funds of knowledge. Educational Policy, 16 (4), 623-641. Owocki, G. & Goodman, Y. (2002). Kidwatching: Documenting children’s literacy development. Portsmouth, NH: Heinemann. Robins, K.J.N., Lindsey, R.B., Lindsey, D.B. & Terrell, R.D. (2011). Culturally Proficient Instruction: A guide for people who teach. Thousand Oaks, CA: Corwin Press. Taylor, S.V. & Sobel, D.M. (2011). Culturally responsive pedagogy: Teaching like our students’ lives matter. Boston, MA: Brill Publishing. Villegas, A.M. & Lucas, T. (2007). The culturally responsive teachers. Educational Leadership, March 2007, 28-33.

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