The Purpose and Power of
Supporting
All Children’s Oral Language
Sherry Taylor, Ph.D.
Associate Professor & Program Chair
...
❏Young children and oral language
❏A quick overview of the research
❏Language & culture go ‘hand in hand’
❏Reflecting on o...
Isabelle Smith, MA
ECSE Pre-School Teacher in BVSD
Lead Instructor in Early Literacy Certificate
Program for the Literacy,...
Let’s take a moment to find out
more about each other!
A little about YOU …
INTERNS: Anita Walker & Alea Alea Wojdyla
ECE ENHANCED GRANT PROJECT:
EARLY LITERACY AND LANGUAGE DEVELOPMENT FOR
YOUNG EN...
More about you!
❏ Who are ECE Facilitators?
❏ Who are ECE paraprofessionals?
❏ Who are Early childhood Special Education s...
Children are language learners by virtue of being born
into human society.
They construct knowledge about language as they...
❏ Language expresses meaning through sounds made in
the vocal tract (barring impairment or obstacles to the use
of sound);...
❏ Language is used primarily for communication;
❏ Languages – and dialects - have regular structures
and a predictable set...
Words added to Webster dictionary in 2014:
❏ Fracking: the injection of fluid into shale beds at high
pressure in order to...
Pennsylvania German-English in the USA
Strongly influenced by Pennsylvania Dutch, a dialect of German spoken by
people in ...
A quick review!
What do we know about
predictable stages of
language development?
❏ Pre-language stage: Voice recognition;
discrimination of phoneme sounds for L1; babbling
with consonants & vowel sounds ...
❏ Combining words: Telegraphic speech (“mommy
up!”); pivotal words (“more- _____”); an understanding
of syntax develops (s...
Stages of
English language
development
(by age ranges)
18-24 months
∗ Says 50 words
∗ Names familiar objects
∗ Understands
approximately 300 words
∗ Points to body parts
∗ Uses ...
30-36 months
∗ Understands
approximately 900 words
∗ Points to pictures of
common objects
described by their use
(Show me ...
42-48 months
∗ Understands
approximately 1,500-2,000
words
∗ Responds to three step
directions
∗ Tells how common objects
...
54-60 months
∗ Understands
approximately 2,500 -
2,800 words
∗ Knows concepts such as
heavy/ light, long/ short
∗ Says 2,0...
Acquiring an additional language
Second-language acquisition assumes that the learner
has a foundation and solid knowledge...
Learners of an additional language move through similar
developmental stages as those experienced during one’s
first langu...
Stages
of
Second Language
Acquisition
Pre-
production
STAGE 1: The silent period;" when the student takes in the
new language but does not speak it. This period...
Intermediate
Fluency STAGE 5: Communicating in the second language is
fluent, especially in social language situations; in...
What stages of 1st
language development or
2nd language
development
tend to be displayed
by the young children
you support?
The Power
of
Oral Language
❏ Language is the primary symbol system through
which children learn about the world.
❏ Children use language to facilitat...
Children’s talk provides us with
a window
into their thinking
and
their knowledge…..
What is the power of
oral language? (...
…...if…..when….
❏ We create structures to support children’s talk
in a variety of contexts;
❏ We encourage & support child...
❏ children’s knowledge of language functions & forms
across a variety of different contexts;
❏ children’s interactional co...
Children develop the
capacity
to use,
talk about, and
learn through language…..
both oral & written
language
within the va...
We have multiple discourse circles in which we interact
everyday.
Consider one day last week.
❏ Discuss the way you spoke ...
THINK ABOUT IT:
❏ Are there particular contexts where your
language use is comfortable and proficient?
❏ Are there other c...
Reflecting on our
language use
in the classroom
Most days when I am in the classroom:
❏ I speak clearly and enunciate each word carefully.
❏ I tend to speak rapidly.
❏ I ...
As you reflect on YOUR own language
use, consider the language used by
this classroom teacher
Why is our language use in t...
TRANSCRIPT: Morning Welcome
1. Teacher: Good morning friends!
2. A Few Students: Good morning!
3. Teacher: I heard some of...
9. Teacher: Great job! We counted to 5! Let’s talk about
how we’re feelin’ this morning. Today I am feeling happy
because ...
17. Teacher: Why are you happy Kendra? Are you happy
‘cuz you’re at school, too?
18. Kendra: Yeah
19. Teacher: Who else is...
What did you notice about the teacher’s
language? About the children’s language?
When in the classroom:
❏ I speak clearly ...
❏ Serve as a positive language model
❏ Give children interesting first-hand experiences to talk about
❏ Repeat & reinforce...
What might these
supports look like
in the classroom?
❏ Serve as a positive language model: Use
complete sentences; expand & build on what child says, ‘Go outside!’.... Tr:
“Wo...
❏ Observe talk, wait & ask Qs, then listen: Pay
close attention to what child says, be patient & wait for child to respond...
❏ Use open-ended questions & prompts: “Wh-
questions” require MORE than a “yes” or “no”.... Also ask, “I wonder what
would...
❏ Play language games together: Games that focus on
language, like “20 questions”....
❏ Offer models so that children can ...
TALK ABOUT IT AT YOUR TABLE!
❏ Serve as a positive language model
❏ Give children interesting first-hand experiences to ta...
Select 1 strategy you will enhance during the first few
weeks of school.
Talk it over at your table.
Write this strategy o...
Sharing your ideas!
After you have recorded ideas for using 1 of the
strategies to support children’s language use on the
...
Assessing
language:
What are we looking for?
and
Where do we find it?
Observing talk
in a variety of contexts & settings
helps us gain insight into
children’s language development
and
conceptu...
Why do we want to observe children
talk in a variety of contexts
& settings ?
We want to observe children as they:
❏ talk ...
How might we create
contexts
and settings
that are “rich” in talk?
A rich talk environment includes:
❏ A curriculum that prompts & inspires children’s interests;
❏ A variety of reasons for ...
What language
functions have you
supported in the
classroom?
For each language function
(or purpose), comes a set of
langu...
Observing and Assessing:
Knowing what you are looking for
Language
functions we
can observe
while
children use
various
lan...
Observing and Assessing: Knowing
where to look for children’s language
use
Contexts where
students will
use language
funct...
Intentional planning
And teaching children how
to interact when talking at
school
How can we make this
happen?
Don’t overlook that we need to teach children how to
interact using their language:
∗ Talking Stick
∗ Question of the Day ...
The Very Hungry Caterpillar
Turn and Talk Example: With props
The Very Hungry Caterpillar
Turn and Talk Example: Whole group
The Very Hungry Caterpillar
Turn and Talk Example: With book
The Very Hungry Caterpillar
Turn and Talk Example:
Take a chance: Turn talk over to
children!
Getting Started:
GUIDELINES
1. What language functions do
you plan to observe (...
Your turn!
- Focus on 1 language function that you chose to support
during the first few weeks of school.
- Use the guidel...
Time to learn
from each other
IN CLOSING…..Children’s talk provides us with
a window into their thinking
and
their knowledge.
WHEN WE PLAN, LISTEN & OBS...
Sherry & Isabelle
Email contacts:
sherry.taylor@ucdenver.edu
isabelle.smith@ucdenver.edu
Questions?
Thank you!
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Oral lang ece aps (july 28 2014) (final)

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ECE: Supporting Oral Language for All Children
Sherry Taylor and Isabelle Smith

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Oral lang ece aps (july 28 2014) (final)

  1. 1. The Purpose and Power of Supporting All Children’s Oral Language Sherry Taylor, Ph.D. Associate Professor & Program Chair Literacy, Language & Culturally Responsive Teaching University of Colorado, Denver Isabelle Smith, MA ECSE Pre-School Teacher, Boulder Valley School District Lead Instructor in Early Literacy Certificate Program University of Colorado, Denver ECE Conference, July 28, 2014 Aurora Public School District
  2. 2. ❏Young children and oral language ❏A quick overview of the research ❏Language & culture go ‘hand in hand’ ❏Reflecting on our language use in the classroom ❏Purposeful planning: Intentional structures to support children’s language ❏Assessing language: What are we looking for? ❏Take a chance: Turn talk over to the children! Note: See chart paper & markers for later Welcome! Our plans for today
  3. 3. Isabelle Smith, MA ECSE Pre-School Teacher in BVSD Lead Instructor in Early Literacy Certificate Program for the Literacy, Language & Culturally Responsive Teaching Program at CU Denver ECE Enhanced grant (delivered in APS 2013- 2014): Working Group Member Teaching areas (at CU Denver): Early language development, Early literacy instruction, Early literacy routines and assessment, and Linking assessment with instruction. I love to spend time with my husband and dogs, Daisy and Cole, and travel...especially to Florida… or any where that has a beach! Taking a moment to find out more about each other! A little about us... Sherry Taylor, Ph.D. Associate Professor & Program Leader Literacy, Language & Culturally Responsive Teaching Program, CU Denver Coordinator of Certificate Program delivered to K- 12 teachers in APS/COE Principal Investigator of ECE Enhanced grant (delivered in APS 2013-2014) Teaching areas: Language & literacy development & acquisition; Multicultural Education, Research areas: Teacher cognition; The impact of culturally responsive teacher preparation I love to spend time with my 15 year old daughter & my husband; garden & landscape; read; play pinball & pacman; travel; XX ski; and I’m excited to be part of a literacy enrichment team in August for kids in Michoacan Mexico!!
  4. 4. Let’s take a moment to find out more about each other! A little about YOU …
  5. 5. INTERNS: Anita Walker & Alea Alea Wojdyla ECE ENHANCED GRANT PROJECT: EARLY LITERACY AND LANGUAGE DEVELOPMENT FOR YOUNG ENGLISH LANGUAGE LEARNERS COHORT MEMBERS: Folashade Adebayo Sandra Carruthers Lisa Dally Geri Dansby Susan Garcia Lili Grove Melissa Ivy Pat LaMontagne Karen Lozano Amy Martin Ashley Neff Rebecca Ross Sylvia Velasco COHORT MEMBERS: Dulcie Velasco Martinez Holly Wettanen Alice Wong Lisa May Pam Lopez Maria Arroyo Sandy Fermo Sonia Fuentes Cruz Rhonda Mohrbacher Ashley Morgan Soledad Ramirez Tina Richards Patricia Tanner
  6. 6. More about you! ❏ Who are ECE Facilitators? ❏ Who are ECE paraprofessionals? ❏ Who are Early childhood Special Education staff? ❏ Who are Administrators? ❏ Who are Teacher Coaches? ❏ Who has not been mentioned yet? Your positions? ❏ Who is located in a Child Development Center? ECE classroom in an elementary school? Other? ❏ How many of you work with students who are acquiring English as an additional language? 2 or 3 students? Half of your students? Most of your students?
  7. 7. Children are language learners by virtue of being born into human society. They construct knowledge about language as they use it to engage with the people and objects in their environments and as they use language to make sense of their surroundings. (Halliday, 1975). Children and Oral Language
  8. 8. ❏ Language expresses meaning through sounds made in the vocal tract (barring impairment or obstacles to the use of sound); ❏ Children learn language in the speech community where they are raised with little or no direct instruction by the adults; ❏ Discourse patterns (e.g., how to ask Qs, make requests, tell stories, etc.) are learned by children at home & in their community. (Barry, 2008) Research tells us that ALL languages share linguistic universals, such as:
  9. 9. ❏ Language is used primarily for communication; ❏ Languages – and dialects - have regular structures and a predictable set of rules or a grammar); ❏ Language is dynamic (not static); ❏ Language speakers have a language competence that may not always be reflected in their spoken language. Do you AGREE or DISAGREE?
  10. 10. Words added to Webster dictionary in 2014: ❏ Fracking: the injection of fluid into shale beds at high pressure in order to free up petroleum resources. ❏ Hashtag:a word or phrase preceded by the symbol # that classifies or categorizes the accompanying text. ❏ Selfie:an image of oneself taken by oneself using a digital camera especially for posting on social networks. Language is DYNAMIC!
  11. 11. Pennsylvania German-English in the USA Strongly influenced by Pennsylvania Dutch, a dialect of German spoken by people in this area. Its grammar allows sentences like "Smear your sister with jam on a slice of bread" and "Throw your father out the window his hat." South Midland English in the USA This area is dominated by the Appalachian Mountains and the Ozark Mountains; originally settled by the Pennsylvania Dutch and the Scotch-Irish. A TH at the end of words or syllables is sometimes pronounced F, and the word ARE is often left out of sentences. An A is usually placed at the beginning of verb that ends with ING, and the G is dropped; an O at the end of a word becomes ER. For example, "They a-celebratin' his birfday by a-goin' to see 'Old Yeller' in the theatah.” Dialects do have regular structures & predictable grammar
  12. 12. A quick review! What do we know about predictable stages of language development?
  13. 13. ❏ Pre-language stage: Voice recognition; discrimination of phoneme sounds for L1; babbling with consonants & vowel sounds and intonation patterns. ❏ Early language: First words (labels from immediate environment; holophrastic meaning that 1 word carries a longer message). Typical, predictable stages of language development
  14. 14. ❏ Combining words: Telegraphic speech (“mommy up!”); pivotal words (“more- _____”); an understanding of syntax develops (subject_ verb_ object, such as, “mommy get cookie!”). ❏ Acquisition of morphemes: There is a regular sequence of morpheme acquisition that tends to occur. Children regularly acquire “- ing” before plurals; plurals & possessive before articles (“MINE!). Typical, predictable stages of language development (2)
  15. 15. Stages of English language development (by age ranges)
  16. 16. 18-24 months ∗ Says 50 words ∗ Names familiar objects ∗ Understands approximately 300 words ∗ Points to body parts ∗ Uses two-word phrases ∗ Uses commands (‘move’) ∗ Uses possessives (‘mine!’) Typical English Language Development (First Language) 24-30 months ∗ Understands approximately 500 words ∗ Says 200 words ∗ Answers ‘What’ and ‘Where’ questions ∗ Uses some regular plurals ∗ Asks simple ‘what’ and ‘where’ questions (What’s that?) Voress & Pearson (2006) Early Childhood Development Chart
  17. 17. 30-36 months ∗ Understands approximately 900 words ∗ Points to pictures of common objects described by their use (Show me what you eat with.) ∗ Knows third person pronouns (he, she) ∗ Says 500 words Voress & Pearson (2006) Early Childhood Development Chart Typical English Language Development (First Language) 36-42 Months ∗ Understands approximately 1,200 words ∗ Responds to two unrelated commands (Put your cup on the table and turn off the TV) ∗ Says 800 words ∗ Uses regular past tense forms ∗ Beginning to ask questions (What? Who?... and, of course… WHY?!?)
  18. 18. 42-48 months ∗ Understands approximately 1,500-2,000 words ∗ Responds to three step directions ∗ Tells how common objects are used ∗ Uses contractions ∗ Knows positional words (in front, behind) Typical English Language Development (First Language) 48-54 months ∗ Uses approximately 2,000-2,500 words ∗ Says 1,500 words ∗ Uses possessives (boy’s, dog’s) ∗ Identifies first, last and middle Voress & Pearson (2006) Early Childhood Development Chart
  19. 19. 54-60 months ∗ Understands approximately 2,500 - 2,800 words ∗ Knows concepts such as heavy/ light, long/ short ∗ Says 2,000 words ∗ Generates complex sentences ∗ Tells familiar stories without picture cues Typical English Language Development (First Language) 60-72 Months ∗ Understands approximately 13,000 words ∗ States similarities and differences between objects ∗ Uses pronouns consistently ∗ Tells simple “jokes” Voress & Pearson (2006) Early Childhood Development Chart
  20. 20. Acquiring an additional language Second-language acquisition assumes that the learner has a foundation and solid knowledge of her first language. Given this foundation, the learner moves through the process of learning a new language, including vocabulary, phonological components, grammatical structures, and writing systems. The process is not linear, it is more like a zig-zag process
  21. 21. Learners of an additional language move through similar developmental stages as those experienced during one’s first language development thereby making some of the same types of errors in grammatical markers and picking up chunks of language without knowing precisely what each word means. Learners of an additional language rely on language input and modifications from proficient speakers who support successful conversational exchanges and comprehension of the additional language. Acquiring an additional language (2)
  22. 22. Stages of Second Language Acquisition
  23. 23. Pre- production STAGE 1: The silent period;" when the student takes in the new language but does not speak it. This period often lasts six weeks or several months, depending on the individual. Early production STAGE 2: The individual begins to speak using short words and sentences; emphasis is still on listening and absorbing the new language; many errors in this stage that can last 3 months or longer. Speech Emergent STAGE 3: Speech becomes more frequent, words and sentences are longer; student still relies heavily on context clues and familiar topics. Vocabulary continues to increase in this stage that can last 6 months to around 2 to 3 years; errors begin to decrease in common or repeated interactions. Beginning Fluency STAGE 4: Speech is fairly fluent in social situations with minimal errors. New contexts and academic language are challenging; individual struggles to express herself due to gaps in vocabulary and appropriate phrases (2 to 3 years depending on the individual).
  24. 24. Intermediate Fluency STAGE 5: Communicating in the second language is fluent, especially in social language situations; individual is able to speak almost fluently in new situations or in academic areas, but there will be gaps in vocabulary knowledge and some unknown expressions; fewer errors, and the individual is able to demonstrate higher order thinking skills in the second language such as offering an opinion or analyzing a problem (3 to 6 years depending on the individual). Advanced Fluency STAGE 6: The individual communicates fluently in most all contexts and can maneuver successfully in new contexts and when exposed to new academic information. At this stage, the individual may still have an accent and use idiomatic expressions incorrectly, but the individual is essentially fluent and comfortable communicating in the second language (5 to 7 years or never depending on the individual).
  25. 25. What stages of 1st language development or 2nd language development tend to be displayed by the young children you support?
  26. 26. The Power of Oral Language
  27. 27. ❏ Language is the primary symbol system through which children learn about the world. ❏ Children use language to facilitate their thinking and learning in all areas. ❏ Children jointly construct meaning and knowledge with others. What is the power of oral language?
  28. 28. Children’s talk provides us with a window into their thinking and their knowledge….. What is the power of oral language? (2)
  29. 29. …...if…..when…. ❏ We create structures to support children’s talk in a variety of contexts; ❏ We encourage & support children to engage in talk with each other; ❏ We listen & observe with intention & purpose. Children’ talk provides us with a window into their thinking & their knowledge…
  30. 30. ❏ children’s knowledge of language functions & forms across a variety of different contexts; ❏ children’s interactional competencies; ❏ what children know about content areas & the world; ❏ how children’s TALK corresponds with their reading and writing development. When we listen with intention & purpose, we gain insights into...
  31. 31. Children develop the capacity to use, talk about, and learn through language….. both oral & written language within the various contexts of their lives….including the cultural contexts of their lives. Language, Culture, and Context go hand-in-hand Researchers and experts agree that children control most features of the grammar of their mother tongue by the time they come to kindergarten. WOW! (Owicki & Goodman, 2002)
  32. 32. We have multiple discourse circles in which we interact everyday. Consider one day last week. ❏ Discuss the way you spoke and used written language with your students, your colleagues, and your administrator. ❏ Discuss the ways you speak and use written language at home, at play, in social media, and with family members. Language, Culture & Context go hand-in-hand for adults too!
  33. 33. THINK ABOUT IT: ❏ Are there particular contexts where your language use is comfortable and proficient? ❏ Are there other contexts where your language use is not as easy? Your words do not ‘flow’ as comfortably? Where you may be somewhat self-conscious and become “tongue-tied”? ❏ This is true for young children too! Their language use excels in different contexts too! Language use is influenced by the different contexts we find ourselves in
  34. 34. Reflecting on our language use in the classroom
  35. 35. Most days when I am in the classroom: ❏ I speak clearly and enunciate each word carefully. ❏ I tend to speak rapidly. ❏ I state directions only once; I do not repeat them. ❏ I use slang when I am interacting with students. ❏ I try to use simple, short sentences and avoid complex, long sentences. ❏ I primarily speak in the present tense. ❏ I ask students more than 10 “Wh-” questions. ❏ After each question I ask, I wait 1-2 seconds before encouraging students to answer. Take a moment to reflect YOUR language use in theclassroom TRUE or FALSE?
  36. 36. As you reflect on YOUR own language use, consider the language used by this classroom teacher Why is our language use in the classroom important? Think about it as you analyze this transcript!
  37. 37. TRANSCRIPT: Morning Welcome 1. Teacher: Good morning friends! 2. A Few Students: Good morning! 3. Teacher: I heard some of you but I’d like to hear all of you. Can you all say ‘good morning’? 4. Class: Good morning. 5. Teacher: Thanks! That’s better! Today is Thursday. What day is it? 6. Class: Thursday. 7. Teacher: Yes, it’s Thursday. Good job! Today is the fifth day of the month of April. It is April 5th. Let’s count the days so far this month, K? Count with me, please. 8. All: 1,2,3,4,5.
  38. 38. 9. Teacher: Great job! We counted to 5! Let’s talk about how we’re feelin’ this morning. Today I am feeling happy because I ate a good breakfast. Sammy, how are you this mornin’? 10. Sammy: Ha.. 11. Teacher: Today I am feeling… 12. Sammy: Today I am feeling happy. 13. Teacher: ‘cuz… 14. Sammy: ‘Cuz I’m at school. 15. Teacher: Great! Friends, how is Sammy feeling? He is feeling happy. Why? ‘Cuz he’s at school. Nice job Sammy. Kendra are you happy today? 16. Kendra: Yes.
  39. 39. 17. Teacher: Why are you happy Kendra? Are you happy ‘cuz you’re at school, too? 18. Kendra: Yeah 19. Teacher: Who else is happy ‘cuz they’re at school? Raise your hand if you’re happy. Wow! Check out how many of you are happy today! Before we go to centers, let’s look at our day today. We are in our circle, then we’re going to centers. Who can tell me what we do after centers? Joe? What do we do after centers? 20. Joe: snack 21. Teacher: yeah… we eat snack. Today we’re going to have bananas and crackers. What color are bananas? Are bananas yellow or red? 22. Joe: yellow.
  40. 40. What did you notice about the teacher’s language? About the children’s language? When in the classroom: ❏ I speak clearly and enunciate each word carefully. ❏ I tend to speak rapidly. ❏ I state directions only once; I do not repeat them. ❏ I use slang when I am interacting with students. ❏ I try to use simple, short sentences and avoid complex, long sentences. ❏ I primarily speak in the present tense. ❏ I ask students more than 10 “Wh-” questions. ❏ After each question I ask, I wait 1-2 seconds before encouraging students to answer. ARE THESE HELPFUL PRACTICES? Why is our language use in the classroom important?
  41. 41. ❏ Serve as a positive language model ❏ Give children interesting first-hand experiences to talk about ❏ Repeat & reinforce new words ❏ Observe talk, wait & ask Qs, then listen ❏ Talk with children often & listen to what they say ❏ Encourage conversations that go beyond “here & now” ❏ Use open-ended questions & prompts ❏ Read to children daily & talk about the story before, during, & after ❏ Enjoy songs, rhymes, & fingerplays together ❏ Play language games together ❏ Offer models so that children can hear their home language in the classroom. ❏ Share informational books that relate to children’s particular interests The Creative Curriculum (Heroman & Jones, 2010) What are some ways we can support children’s language?
  42. 42. What might these supports look like in the classroom?
  43. 43. ❏ Serve as a positive language model: Use complete sentences; expand & build on what child says, ‘Go outside!’.... Tr: “Would you like to go outside today? We’ll go out right after snack!” ❏ Give children interesting first-hand experiences to talk about: Experiences that spark child’s curiosity & wonder, prompt child to use senses & thinking, etc. ❏ Repeat & reinforce new words: Use new word in different contexts during the day; The story “The Enormous Turnip” can prompt talk about an enormous appetite or an enormous tree outside. (Heroman & Jones, 2010) Ways we can support children’s language
  44. 44. ❏ Observe talk, wait & ask Qs, then listen: Pay close attention to what child says, be patient & wait for child to respond, then respond appropriately. ❏ Talk with children often & listen to what they say: Talk & listen; clarify when needed; strive for at least 5 exchanges in the conversation. ❏ Encourage conversations that go beyond “here & now”: Discuss events that happened yesterday & might happen in future; invite child to use her imagination (“If you could be any animal, what would you be? What would you do?”) (Heroman & Jones, 2010) Ways we can support children’s language (2)
  45. 45. ❏ Use open-ended questions & prompts: “Wh- questions” require MORE than a “yes” or “no”.... Also ask, “I wonder what would happen if….” ❏ Read to children daily & talk about the story before, during, & after: Talking about a story while reading it helps children with language, vocabulary, AND comprehension. Read story more than once!! ❏ Enjoy songs, rhymes, & fingerplays together: Child hears & forms language sounds, learns new words, becomes aware of patterns & rhymes. Ways we can support children’s language (3)
  46. 46. ❏ Play language games together: Games that focus on language, like “20 questions”.... ❏ Offer models so that children can hear their home language in the classroom: Invite people in who are proficient in the child’s L1; Encourage families to discuss learning topics at home in L1. ❏ Share informational books that relate to children’s particular interests: To introduce child to new ideas, new words & potential interests. (Heroman & Jones, 2010) Ways we can support children’s language (4)
  47. 47. TALK ABOUT IT AT YOUR TABLE! ❏ Serve as a positive language model ❏ Give children interesting first-hand experiences to talk about ❏ Repeat & reinforce new words ❏ Observe talk, wait & ask Qs, then listen ❏ Talk with children often & listen to what they say ❏ Encourage conversations that go beyond “here & now” ❏ Use open-ended questions & prompts ❏ Read to children daily & talk about the story before, during, & after ❏ Enjoy songs, rhymes, & fingerplays together ❏ Play language games together ❏ Offer models so that children can hear their home language in the classroom. ❏ Share informational books that relate to children’s particular interests The Creative Curriculum (Heroman & Jones, 2010) Check off the strategies you already use! Which strategies could you enhance?
  48. 48. Select 1 strategy you will enhance during the first few weeks of school. Talk it over at your table. Write this strategy on the top of the chart paper. Develop several ideas around this one strategy to support ‘turning talk over’ to the children! Record your ideas on the chart paper. OUR CHALLENGE TO YOU…
  49. 49. Sharing your ideas! After you have recorded ideas for using 1 of the strategies to support children’s language use on the chart paper….. Be ready to share your ideas!
  50. 50. Assessing language: What are we looking for? and Where do we find it?
  51. 51. Observing talk in a variety of contexts & settings helps us gain insight into children’s language development and conceptual growth.
  52. 52. Why do we want to observe children talk in a variety of contexts & settings ? We want to observe children as they: ❏ talk and listen in various situations and settings; ❏ explore different language functions and forms; ❏ demonstrate different interactional competencies; ❏ demonstrate language & conceptual knowledge about different aspects of their world.
  53. 53. How might we create contexts and settings that are “rich” in talk?
  54. 54. A rich talk environment includes: ❏ A curriculum that prompts & inspires children’s interests; ❏ A variety of reasons for children to use language and explore curricular concepts; ❏ A physical environment that promotes socialization amongst the children (e.g., whole-group, small group, pairs of chlidren). ❏ A sense of safety within the community of child learners where it is OK to use one’s talk and take a risk to share her ideas & thoughts; ❏ An understanding that each individual in the classroom IS an expert and brings important knowledge to the group. ❏ A teacher who has structured supports that turn talk over to the children! (Owicki & Goodman, 2002) Hmmm……. What makes a rich ‘talk’ environment?
  55. 55. What language functions have you supported in the classroom? For each language function (or purpose), comes a set of language forms that children will use to express meaning. Assessing language: What are we looking for? And, where do we find it? Where are the places in the classroom where talk occurs? For Example: -whole group context; -interest areas; -small group; -context for self-talk; -context for one-to-one talk; -context where child chooses partner; -context where Tr chooses group; -small instructional group; -play context; other?
  56. 56. Observing and Assessing: Knowing what you are looking for Language functions we can observe while children use various language forms LANGUAGE FUNCTIONS & (FORMS) ❏ Sharing stories (narrative forms) ❏ Retelling events (past tense verb forms) ❏ Reporting information (declarative sentence forms, conversational forms) ❏ Expressing feelings, empathy, emotional identification (descriptive forms) ❏ Responding to peers’ and teachers’ questions & request for information (declarative sentence forms)
  57. 57. Observing and Assessing: Knowing where to look for children’s language use Contexts where students will use language functions ❏ whole group ❏ interest areas ❏ contexts for small group (informal &/or selected by teacher) ❏ setting for self-talk ❏ pair-share or one-to-one talk ❏ small instructional group ❏ play context, snack, etc.
  58. 58. Intentional planning And teaching children how to interact when talking at school How can we make this happen?
  59. 59. Don’t overlook that we need to teach children how to interact using their language: ∗ Talking Stick ∗ Question of the Day (sentence starters and specific vocabulary practice) ∗ Student Interviews ∗ Snack (vocabulary! textures, colors, tastes) ∗ Read Aloud/ Your Four Day Play Supports Student Talk ∗ Partner Reading ∗ Turn and Talk (video clip) Take a chance: Turn talk over to the children!
  60. 60. The Very Hungry Caterpillar Turn and Talk Example: With props
  61. 61. The Very Hungry Caterpillar Turn and Talk Example: Whole group
  62. 62. The Very Hungry Caterpillar Turn and Talk Example: With book
  63. 63. The Very Hungry Caterpillar Turn and Talk Example:
  64. 64. Take a chance: Turn talk over to children! Getting Started: GUIDELINES 1. What language functions do you plan to observe (i.e., the functions you want children to use) & what are corresponding language forms? 2. What structures do you need to teach to support children’s talk & use of these functions? 3. Where will students use these language functions? 4. What structures will you put into place so children have the opportunity to use these language functions in multiple contexts? Ready for intentional observation & assessment!
  65. 65. Your turn! - Focus on 1 language function that you chose to support during the first few weeks of school. - Use the guidelines on the handout to begin to plan your next steps for ‘turning talk over’ to the children! -Record your ideas on the second chart paper. - Be ready to share WHAT function & form you will be observing in children’s language use and WHERE you will be able to observe them.
  66. 66. Time to learn from each other
  67. 67. IN CLOSING…..Children’s talk provides us with a window into their thinking and their knowledge. WHEN WE PLAN, LISTEN & OBSERVE, WE CAN GAIN INSIGHT INTO: ❏ children’s knowledge of language functions & forms across a variety of different contexts; ❏ children’s interactional competencies; ❏ what children know about content areas & the world; ❏ how children’s TALK corresponds with their reading and writing development.
  68. 68. Sherry & Isabelle Email contacts: sherry.taylor@ucdenver.edu isabelle.smith@ucdenver.edu Questions? Thank you!
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