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Cleve State PD Workshop Feb 2012
 

Cleve State PD Workshop Feb 2012

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Culturally Responsive Pedagogy: Teaching Like our Students' Lives Matter

Culturally Responsive Pedagogy: Teaching Like our Students' Lives Matter

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  • SHERRY – Share a bit about UNIVERSITY OF COLORADO DENVER (downtown denver), close work with Denver Public Schools, Aurora Public Schools, other metro districts…working with class PARTICIPANTS TALK WITH EACH OTHER AT TABLE (while eating supper) SHERRY – Ask folks to RAISE HANDS regarding teachers of….K-2, 3-5, 6-8, 9-12, ADMINISTRATORS, CSU Faculty, other…. SHERRY – close with brief overview about my EDUC BACKGRD, TEACHING (K-12, bilinged/elemed, ESL 6-12 & adult, Mexico, IL, CO, OH)
  • SHERRY – In this professional development workshop, you will be involved in a variety of interactions & learning experiences. I’ll ask you to reflect – INDIVIDUALLY, in PAIRS, in SMALL GROUPS AND as a WHOLE GROUPWe’ll watch a short video clip, listen to a read-aloud of a teaching scenario, analyze an organizational framworkAnd at break time, I’ll ask you to RE-GROUP in to GRADE SIMILAR GROUPS…… so go ahead and “nest” for a while now, but you can roll your eyes at me later when I ask you to re-group!
  • TAKE TIME TO READ & CONTEMPLATECOMPLETE “RATING” ON YOUR OWN – INDIVIDUALLY TURN TO YOUR ELBOW PARTNER & SHARE YOUR RESPONSESSHERRY – CIRCULATE AND LISTEN IN – PICK OUT 1 OR 2 PARTICULAR FOLKS TO SHARE STATE CLEARLY – LET’S HEAR WHAT 2 FOLKS HAD TO SAY……. .ABOUT #8 AND #9 # 10 IS AN EASY WAY TO TRANSITION TO …………. “CHANGING WORLD CONTEXT” …….NEXT SLIDE
  • SHERRY – “CONSIDER THESE QUESTIONS” – AND – “TAKE A QUICK NOTE ---- INDIVIDUALLY – RELEVANT TO YOUR CONTEXT” Next slide….” WHAT DO YOU NOTICE?” …. TRENDS, OBSERVATIONS? ---- TALK WITH COLLEAGUES AT YOUR TABLE SHERRY – CIRCULATE AND LISTEN IN, IDENTIFY 2 PEOPLE BY NAME WHOSE COMMENTS I WANT TO HAVE SHARED WITH WHOLE GROUP SHERRY – THEN CALL ON THESE 2 FOLKS SPECIFICALLY (LIMIT ANY OTHER INTERACTIONS OR COMMENTS) SHERRY - SHARING ABOUT CU DENVER’S STUDENT POPULATION & FACULTY POPULATION COULD BE A WAY TO TRANSITION……
  • Beyond our state standards, the professional organizations that guide our work also provide standards & supports – including: TESOL INT’L Standards NCATE Standards IRA International Standards
  • Highlight key phrases so I don’t just read……..
  • SHERRY – TAKE A MINUTE OR 3 WITH A COLLEAGUE NEAR YOU & CONSIDER WHAT YOU ARE ALREADY DOING TO TAKE THESE COMPONENTS INTO CONSIDERATION AS YOU PLAN FOR INSTRUCTION ARE THERE AREAS WHERE YOU COULD DO MORE? WHICH AREAS ARE THESE? GIVE FOLKS 3 MINUTES
  • SHERRY – DISTRIBUTE THE “ORGANIZATIONAL FRAMEWORK” PROMPT PARTICIPANTS TO: -- HIGHLIGHT FOR YOURSELF THE COMPONENTS & ACTION YOU DO WHEN YOU ORGANIZE FOR INSTRUCTION (OR IF A COACH/ADMIN– WHN OBSRVING) -- CHECK THE COMPONENTS & ACTIONS YOU WANT TO TRY TO DO – OR – DO MORE -- ITEMS YOU WANT TO REMEMBER TO TRY – -- USE THE MARGINS FOR NEW IDEAS OR NEW THINKING
  • SHERRY – EXPLAIN THAT WE WILL BE LISTENING TO A READ-ALOUD OF THE IMPLEMENTATION OF A LESSON BY A TEACHER --- MS RENI RUIZ – WHO IS COMMITTED TO PLANNING FOR & IMPLEMENTING CULTURALLY RESPONSIVE INSTRUCTION SHE’S NOT PERFECT, BUT SHE HAS TAKEN STEPS TO PUT THIS IN PLACE IN HER CLASSROOM THE READ-ALOUD WILL BE SUPPORTED WITH VISUALS OF THE CLASSROOM & INSTRUCTIONAL MATERIALS FROM THE LESSON WHILE YOU LISTEN, TAKE TIME TO VISUALIZE – AND – USE THE NOTE-CATCHER TO IDENTIFY EXAMPLES OF CRT DURING THE READ-ALOUD, I WILL PAUSE TO GIVE YOU TIME TO REFLECT & DISCUSS
  • SHERRY – ENCOURAGE TABLE GROUPS TO SHARE AMONG THEMSELVES …. THEIR OBSERVATIONS AND NOTATIONS OF EXAMPLES OF ORGANIZATIONAL PLANNING CULTURALLY RESPONSIVE INSTRUCTION = SHERRY – CIRCULATE, LISTEN, AND ASK 3-4 SPECIFIC PEOPLE TO SHARE OUT (CONTROL THIS SHARING OUT)

Cleve State PD Workshop Feb 2012 Cleve State PD Workshop Feb 2012 Presentation Transcript

  • National Professional Development Grant Cleveland State University February 16, 2012 Sherry Taylor, Ph.D. Associate ProfessorLiteracy, Language & Culturally Responsive Teaching Program School of Education & Human Development University of Colorado Denver
  • Sharing a bit about me…. Learning a bit about youIdentify our current educational context & thebackground of the learners with whom wework.What learning experiences have we had thathave prepared us to teach learners fromlinguistically & culturally diversebackgrounds?To what extent have these experiences
  • Today‟s ObjectivesConceptual Overview Guiding assumptions, theoretical principles, & definitions of culturally responsive pedagogy; Demographics & their impact on educational contexts; Professional Standards & SupportsPractical Applications Provide practical supports for teachers to organize & plan for the implementation of a culturally responsive pedagogy. Highlight classrooms where teachers have effectively operationalized their commitment, knowledge and skills of a culturally responsive pedagogy in multilingual & multicultural classrooms; grounded in classroom-based research (Taylor & Sobel, 2011).
  • Guiding Assumptions Grounding My Work With Culturally Responsive Pedagogy1. Culture is central to learning, language, literacy and education; it is pervasive in people‟s ways of knowing and responding to life; it influences teachers‟ and students‟ decisions and mutual interactions.2. Children arrive at school having been socialized at home in how to use language to acquire the knowledge their community has judged appropriate for someone at their age level.3. Learning is socially constructed and mutually negotiated, not transmitted; learning is influenced by learners‟ background knowledge, life experiences and cultural knowledge.
  • GuidingAssumptions4. Language, literacy and culture are interrelated and intersect with the learning process.5. All children deserve the opportunity to an equitable and quality education.6. All students deserve access to a curriculum that is relevant and to instruction that accommodates for their learning interests, abilities, and needs. This includes instructional planning and practices aligned with a pedagogy that is inclusive and equitable in order to facilitate the academic
  • Take a Stance
  • Strongly Agree Dis- Strongly Take a Stance on Agree agree Disagre Assumptions 7-10 e7. Education is not politically neutral;sociopolitical and historical contextsinfluence educational policies, schools,curricular decisions, administrators,teachers and students.8. While English is becoming a common,global language, there is value in alllanguages. Multilingualism promotesmutual understanding; maintenance ofone‟s native language is a basic humanright.9. One‟s native language is a valuableresource and a useful tool. This isparticularly so when a speaker is adding anew language to his/her linguisticrepertoire.10. Individuals in today‟s world need to beprepared to function in a multicultural,inclusive society within the United States &
  • A Changing World Context School classrooms worldwide consist of students from a diversity of languages, cultures, racial/ethnic backgrounds, religions, economic resources, interest abilities and life experiences. Schools are expected to take the lead in socializing students and helping them gain the knowledge and skills needed for a successful life in a global context. Globally, a striking cultural mismatch between teachers and students exists.
  • Demographics of U.S. Educational Contexts (NCES, 2009) A large yet 1.04 million 1 in 5 children undetermined # of immigrate to US have a foreign- undocumented yearly born parent immigrants arrive annually 70% of student Currently nearly By 2025, 40% of the population consists million ELL school-ageof student of color in population will be students attendthe 20 largest school students of color school districtsSome ethnic groups are 95% of students with overrepresented in disabilities are By 2025, 1 in 4 special education students will initially programs and served in general underrepresented in education be classified as an gifted programs classrooms. ELL student
  • Pause to reflect on your educational context What are the demographics of the student population in the district where you work? How do district demographics compare with those of the school where you work? What are the demographics of faculty, administration & support staff at this school? What are similarities & differences between demographic data of students at the school & teacher demographics? Demographics of students & support staff? Students & administrators?
  • What do you notice as you reflect on estimates of thedemographic data in your context? TRENDS?OBSERVATIONS?
  • Ohio Standards fortheTeaching ProfessionStandard 1: Teachers understandstudent learning & development andrespect the diversity of the studentsthey teach.Teachers understand what students know & are able to use this knowledge to meet the needs of all students.Teachers model respect for students’ diverse cultures, language skills & experiences (ODE, 2005).
  • Definitions of culturally responsive teaching“Using the cultural knowledge, priorexperiences, frames of reference, andperformance styles of ethnically diversestudents to make learning encountersmore relevant to and effective for them”(Gay, 2010)“…a framework that recognizes the richand varied cultural wealth, knowledge, andskills that students from diverse groupsbring to schools.” (Howard, 2010)
  • Theoretical Principles: Culturally responsive pedagogy supports…A recognition of the complexity of culture including educatorsallowing students to use their personal culture to enhancetheir quest for educational excellence.An authentic and culturally informed notion of care forstudents, wherein their academic, social, emotional,psychological, and cultural well-being is abided by.A critical consciousness and sociopolitical awareness thatreflects an ongoing commitment to challenge injustice, anddisrupt inequities and oppression directed at a group ofpeople.The disruption of the idea that Eurocentric or middle-classforms of discourse, knowledge, language, culture, andhistorical interpretations are normative.The eradication of deficits-based ideologies toward culturallydiverse students. (Howard , 2010)
  • Culturally Responsive Teaching What does it look like when teachers understand what students know & can use this knowledge to meet the needs of all students? Would we know culturally responsive teaching if we saw it?
  • Characteristics of Culturally Responsive Educators1.Understand how learners construct knowledge and have theskills to assist learners to do this;2. Take time to learn about the cultures and lives of their students;3. Use their knowledge about students to design instruction thatbuilds on students‟ cultural perspectives & knowledge, thenexpand the content and learning to depths beyond the startingpoint;4. Affirm students from diverse backgrounds and recognizedifferences as resources, not as problems to overcome;5. Are socio-culturally conscious, meaning they recognize thatthere are multiple ways of perceiving reality;6. See self as responsible for & capable of bringing about changethat will make schools more responsive to all students. (Villegas & Lucas,
  • TAKE A LOOK IN THE MIRROR Reflecting on the Villegas & Lucas characteristics,consider examples of your own teachingpractice that exemplify these characteristics.
  • Take a look & ask yourself…1. What do I understand about: how learners in my classroom construct knowledge? about their cultures and life experiences?2. In what ways do I use my knowledge about the students in myclassroom to design instruction that builds on their culturalperspectives & background knowledge?3. How do I go about affirming students‟ backgrounds?4. How do I integrate multiple ways of perceiving reality orcurricular content within the curriculum?5. How do I go about prompting change at the school level to buildan environment with increased cultural responsiveness toward allstudents?
  • Building on ourexisting expertise CONSIDERATIONS
  • Building on our existing expertise: ConsiderationsLegitimize students’ cultures and life experiences, bymoving beyond understanding surface levelculture, such as foods, dances and holidays.Use the cultural legacies, traits, and orientations ofstudents as filters through which to teach studentsacademic knowledge, thereby teaching “to andthrough” students‟ frames of reference.Include more significant and comprehensiveinformation about different cultures and theircontributions in school subject content. (Gay, 2010)
  • Building on our existing expertise: Considerations (2)Make learning an active, participatory endeavor inwhich students are assisted in making meaningand giving personal meaning to new ideas.Teach the students style-shifting (code-switching)skills so that they can maneuver between homeand school languages and cultures with ease.Build the moral commitment, criticalconsciousness, and political competence thatstudents need to consider their role in promotingsocial justice and social transformation. (Gay,2010)
  • A daily “entry” activity has potentialto be culturally responsive Exempla Non- exemplar r of CRT of CRT in in K-3 Calendar is K-3 Standard wall positioned at student calendar w/ eye level, all cards pockets for day contain picture cues and date cards and multilingual presented in representations of English are days of the week. decorated with Multiple multisensory colorful balloons. manipulatives are used for counting practice. Randomly, students are Teacher appoints a student to verbally called use picture name cards to call upon to identify upon peers. Teacher gauges each student‟s calendar task today‟s weather. so it matches their learning need (e.g. counting, vs. prediction of weather).
  • The 5-minute “entry” activity has the potential to be culturally responsive Three periodic tables are displayed on the side Periodic Table Exempla walls of the classroom for positioned on the r of CRT easy viewing & access. wall in the front Each periodic table of the classroom. in 9-12 presents a different Non- perspective &exemplar Science organization of theof CRT in 9-12 elements. science Upon entering the room, students are directed to write a Students work in description of the table groupings of 4 atomic structure of to discuss three 3 selected selected elements & elements. The hypothesize why teacher calls on they are placed in a random students to different organization share description. in each of the 3 tables displayed.
  • Middle School MathPEEKING INTO ACLASSROOM
  • WHAT DO YOU SUGGEST? What would you suggest to this teacher about ways to designinstruction to support her students,especially her student, Moises, who is struggling to communicate his understandings & knowledge of the content.http://www.mediathatmattersfest.org/watch/9/immersion
  • Planning for culturally responsive pedagogy: An organizational framework 7. Scaffolding/Instructiona l adaptations1. Considering the 8. Distribution of learner teacher‟s attention2. Environment 9. Check for /Environmental understanding/Evidenc print e of student3. Curriculum understanding considerations 10. Classroom4. Language behavior/managing the objective classroom5. Social context for 11. Connecting with family, learning/grouping community, local strategies. culture. (Taylor & Sobel, 2011).6. Content materials for instruction
  • Planning for culturally responsive pedagogy What planning and information gathering need to occur when we organize for culturally responsive instruction? Using an „Organizational Framework‟ as a lens for planning & reflecting on classrooms & instruction (Taylor & Sobel, 2011)
  • Taking a “bird’s eye view” into the classroom3RD GRADE LITERACY LESSON
  • Will I know it if I see it? Taking a peek at a teacher‟s journey Literacy instruction: 3rd grade classroom As you listen to the classroom scenario,visualize you are there as the lesson evolves &takes shape. Use the note-catcher to identifyexamples of the teacher’s use of theorganizational framework in her planning forculturally responsive instruction.
  • Note-catcher Components of Identify exemplars of responsive teaching that are Responsive Teaching evident in the “Classroom Context & Tour” and “Literacy Instructional Episode”1) Considering your learner2)Environment/Environmental Print3) Curriculumconsiderations
  • Designing Culturally Responsive Instruction How did Ms. Reni Ruíz do? Analyze the teaching scenario and identifyexplicit examples of what the teacher did that illustrate aspects of “using the cultural knowledge, prior experiences, frames of reference, and performance styles of culturally diverse students to make learning encounters more relevant to and effective.” (Gay, 2010)
  • Concluding our conversations: Supports& structures for advancing our efforts toculturally responsive instruction Organizational Framework Professional Organizations Mentoring Tool: Illustrates a variety of key elements of culturally responsive pedagogy; supports discussion and conferring relevant to the organizational & planning components (Taylor & Sobel, 2011).
  • Your questions,thoughts, next steps? THANK YOU!