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  • 1. Feed Northampton:FIRST STEPS TOWARD A LOCAL FOOD SYSTEM Responding Innovatively to Challenges
  • 2. UNDERSTANDING FOOD AS A SYSTEM Components of a food system
  • 3. Scales of foOD SYSTEMS:1. Local2. Regional3. National4. Global
  • 4. The Global Foodshed •  A foodshed is the area between where food is produced and where food is consumed, including: -  where food is grown -  where food travels on distribution routes -  where it is processed and packaged -  where it’s sold and consumedOn average, food consumed in the United Statestravels over 1,500 miles and changes hands half a dozen times before it even reaches the table
  • 5. A D VA N TAG E S of large-scale s y s t e m s• Access to wide varieties of food fromdistant lands and warmer climates• Food is available year-round• Food is produced and sold at low costs,making it more accessible to food insecure
  • 6. WEAKNESSES of large-scale s y s t e m s• The reliance on fossil fuels makes the system vulnerable,due fuel availability and fluctuating costs• Massive waste stream pollutes the environment and fails tocapitalize on potential opportunities• Centralized processing plants are susceptible tocontamination affecting people nation-wide• Less economic trickle down to local economy
  • 7. PLANNING ALOCAL FOODSYSTEM:a proactiveresponse to thevulnerabilities oflarge-scale foodsystems forsecuring our food
  • 8. ADDITIONAL BENEFITS Stimulates local economy Reduces environmental impacts Enhances community
  • 9. UNREALIZED OPPORTUNITIES...•  A local food system planned at the municipal level has the potential to provide food security and support job growth•  Individuals, businesses, and local governments can realize that there is an opportunity to plan a local food system that can foster:   entrepreneurial endeavors   educational opportunities   community assets   food abundance
  • 10. ...However, there are constraints and limitations to local food cultivationCHALLENGESto be overcome:• Land is prohibitively expensive• Diminishing agricultural land• Voids in infrastructure• Legal barriers and zoning restrictions• Short growing season
  • 11. FEED NORTHAMPTON:First steps Towards a Local Food SystemResponding Innovatively to Challenges
  • 12. A process for developing a LOCAL FOOD SYSTEM1.  Land Assessment2.  Appropriate Strategies3.  Assembling a Whole System
  • 13. Context: Northampton lies in the fertile Pioneer Valley Some of the richest agricultural soils in the world:Winooski/Hadley Loam
  • 14. 1) LAND ASSESSMENT Legend 0‐3%
 3‐8%
 8‐15%
 15‐25%
 25+
%
Slope Analysis
  • 15. soils
  • 16. Density & grocery stores
  • 17. COMPOSITE ANALYSIS ← Slopes ← Land Use ← Impervious Surfaces ← Hydrology ← Soils ← Transportation ← Conservation Areas ← Farmland
  • 18. A A’ SUMMARY ANALYSIS TRANSECT A A’
  • 19. SUMMARY ANALYSIS TRANSECT
  • 20. DISTRICTS Agricultural Rural Suburban• Each District has unique opportunities andconstraints to food cultivation• Apply site-specific cultivation strategiesappropriate to each district’s characteristics Urban
  • 21. 2) APPROPRIATE STRATEGIES• How can we apply the best management practices and food cultivation strategies from around the world to each district?• Permaculture offers some solutions…• Coupled with case studies of regions with similar growing conditions to Western Massachusetts

  • 22. AGRICULTURAL DISTRICT Greenhouse: Four-season Farming
  • 23. AGRICULTURAL DISTRICTOrganic Farming
  • 24. RURAL DISTRICTPond Construction Water Storage Earthworks
  • 25. RURAL DISTRICTChicken/Duck “Tractors” Two-storey Grazing
  • 26. RURAL DISTRICTPerennial Polycultures
  • 27. SUBURBAN DISTRICT Edible Front Yards
  • 28. SUBURBAN DISTRICTSubdivision CSA Site Plan: East Lake Commons, GA
  • 29. URBAN DISTRICT Asphalt RemovalCommunity Gardens
  • 30. URBAN DISTRICT Roof-top Gardening
  • 31. MUNICIPAL STRATEGIES • Policy Recommendations • Municipal Programs
  • 32. Local Food System Concept: Implementing Cultivation Strategies Legend Prototype Start-up Farm
  • 33. 3) ASSEMBLING A WHOLE SYSTEM• A food system ismore than cultivation• Four other components -processing -distribution -waste management -education
  • 34. ASSEMBLING A WHOLE SYSTEM KEY QUESTIONS for tying all of the components of a food system together:•  What assets of a food system already exist?•  What are the voids in the system?•  What are appropriate types of infrastructure that fulfill case-specific functions of a local food system?•  Strategize: where should efforts be focused first for the greatest returns and community benefits?
  • 35. POST-CULTIVATION HUB FACILITIES
  • 36. Hub CASE STUDY: Healthy City Intiative @ Intervale--Burlington, VTHands-on agricultural training Youth-run farm marketsGleaning produce to share Community-building
  • 37. Local Food System Concept: Assembling a Whole System Legend Food Hub Prototype Start-up Farm Food flow Food feeding Northampton
  • 38. Change on a Town-by-Town Basis Municipal food systems in New England working in conjunction with larger-scale food systems
  • 39. LIMITATIONS & OBSTACLES•  Lack of central coordination or organizing body for a local food system•  Outside economic forces affect the local economy•  Resistance to changing the “business as usual” model
  • 40. A COMMON EFFORT•  Using innovative responses to meet the challenges posed to beginning a local food system…•  City departments, non-profit organizations, and food and farming businesses can work together in a coordinated effort to create: –  entrepreneurial endeavors –  employment opportunities –  community assets –  food abundance!
  • 41. Intro to food systems@ Greenfield Community College

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